Home > AllWinner A3X, Android, Hardware > AllWinner A33 Quad Core Processor to Cost $5 With PMIC, Tablets Starting at $40

AllWinner A33 Quad Core Processor to Cost $5 With PMIC, Tablets Starting at $40

With their latest A33 SoC, Allwinner may have put a nail in the coffin of dual core application processor for tablets, as Eva Wu, AllWinner’s Marketing Manager,  has just released some pricing info, and AllWinner A33 with AXP223 PMIC (Power Management Integrated Circuit) reference price is only $4.99, paving the way for ultra cheap quad core Android tablets.

AllWinner A33 Tablet PCBA (Click to Enlarge)

AllWinner A33 Tablet PCBA (Click to Enlarge)

I’ve also been given some estimates for (factory) prices for different tablet’s types powered by AllWinner A33:

  • About $40 for 7″ tablets (800×480) with 1GB DDR3, and 8GB Flash.
  • About $45 for 7.85″ tablets (1024×768) with 1GB DDR3, and 8GB Flash.
  • About $50 for 8″ tablets (1280×800) with 1GB DDR3, 8GB Flash.

With four ARM Cortex A7 cores, a Mali-400MP2 GPU, and limited display resolutions, you won’t get an amazing user experience, but for a first tablet, or a kid’s tablet, it looks pretty good value. I estimate that Chinese stores may sell them for around $65 to $80 including shipping. AllWinner A33 SoC production will start in early July, so the first tablets based on this SoC should also start to become available in July.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

  1. adem
    June 23rd, 2014 at 15:29 | #1

    i dont trust allwinner they will not spport any firmware updates

  2. Someone from the other side
    June 23rd, 2014 at 15:38 | #2

    I won’t get suckered again into buying an ultra cheap tablet. *Knockonwood*

  3. June 23rd, 2014 at 17:03 | #3

    @Someone from the other side
    I bought one once (Wondermedia Cortex A9), and it was not too bad. Unfortunately the 2,000 (or so) mAh battery died after nine months to one year…

  4. June 23rd, 2014 at 17:04 | #4

    @adem
    It’s not necessarily AllWinner the problem, and it can be the guys who made the product that don’t update their firmware.

  5. Alex
    June 23rd, 2014 at 17:16 | #5

    @adem
    But now Alwinner is part of Linaro (http://www.linaro.org/members/), which gives some hope. Sooner or later all producers to be competitive will come to Linaro.

  6. Someone from the other side
    June 23rd, 2014 at 17:39 | #6

    @cnxsoft
    I have a no name RK3066 here. Atrociously bad screen, lousy performance with tons of lag and the HDMI out seemingly does not work at all (in fairness, I had fairly limited success with the Slimport on my Nexus, too). At least it has prevented me to go mess with noname MTK phones, so far.

  7. Marius
    June 24th, 2014 at 01:17 | #7

    Well I’ve just seem Intel Atom tablets using the newer SOCs that have open source graphics. Assuming you can get UEFI to boot your kernel these should be as open source as you can get.
    The price isn’t too bad either.

  8. Someone from the other side
    June 24th, 2014 at 14:33 | #8

    Marius :
    Well I’ve just seem Intel Atom tablets using the newer SOCs that have open source graphics. Assuming you can get UEFI to boot your kernel these should be as open source as you can get.
    The price isn’t too bad either.

    That’s my hope, too, but unfortunately, so far I have not seen any with real Bay Trails (instead of Merrifield crap with PowerVR) from respectable manufacturers at sane prices…

  9. adem
    June 24th, 2014 at 16:31 | #9

    @Alex
    i hope so i still keep my cs868 just incase i see a good working firmware

  10. June 24th, 2014 at 16:51 | #10

    @Alex
    @adem
    AllWinner is not a full member (I think just a “Group member”), so they won’t have a “Landing Team” that works directly on the hardware. I’m not sure what a “Group member” does / gets but I know it’s limited.

    Even if AllWinner released a new AllWinner A31 SDK, there will not be a firmware upgrade for CS868, and whichever company did this product, moved on to something else.

  11. Alex
    June 24th, 2014 at 18:14 | #11

    @cnxsoft
    If I’m not wrong, allwinner (or group of people) started to have some source code in mainline
    https://www.kernel.org/doc/readme/Documentation-arm-sunxi-README
    Slooowly, but we are going there

  12. June 24th, 2014 at 18:21 | #12

    @Alex
    Yes, correct but not related to Linaro I believe, but it’s work by linux-sunxi community
    People can follow progress @ http://linux-sunxi.org/Linux_mainlining_effort#Status
    I also try to mention the main AllWinner – and ARM in general – changes in my “LInux x.xx Released” posts such as http://www.cnx-software.com/2014/06/11/linux-3-15-released/

  13. Alex
    June 24th, 2014 at 19:27 | #13

    @cnxsoft
    After announcement from Cubie that new A80 dev board will be presented by their team, I hope that Linaro + Sunxi will help a bit with our problem.
    Actually I still do not understand what linaro was created for … They build new kernel specifically for their devices and AOSP?

  14. Jon Smirl
    June 24th, 2014 at 20:24 | #14

    @Alex My hope is that by joining Linaro Allwinner will learn the standard practices for working on the Linux kernel and stop doing things their own way. Top of the list is to get rid of FEX and use the standard Device Tree. Second on the list is to start getting their code checked into mainline where it can be reviewed. Third is fix all of their other deviations from standard Linux in their various device drivers.

    Linaro should also teach them a lot about openness and its advantages. For example, where is the latest version of their code and manuals? Who knows? there is no place to go get an official version of anything. What is the pipe line for getting security fixes out of Allwinner?

    This is the difference between a Tier 1 vendor and the rest of the pack.

  15. June 24th, 2014 at 21:38 | #15

    @Alex
    Before company A was developing the Linux kernel for their ARM SoC behind closed doors, released a vendor tree, and eventually some bits may have made it to mainline, Company B, C ,D etc… did the same thing.
    They realized kernel development, albeit critical, does not add value compared to their competitors, so Linaro allowed to bring all companies together to share more kernel work, saving on development cost, reduce time to market, and so on. So instead of having several engineering team working in their little corner, so all collaborate together. Of course, there are some differences between SoCs, so there are also team dedicated to specific SoCs and member hardware (Landing Teams).

  16. Jon Smirl
    June 24th, 2014 at 22:55 | #16

    @cnxsoft There is another reason for Linaro. Without a common group like Linaro we will never get an ARM distribution. An ARM distribution is a very valuable thing. Image a single install image that works on hundreds of devices like we have on the x86. Building a single kernel build that can boot on dozens of different ARM SOCs is a major goal of Linaro. This is why device trees are so important. When that generic ARM kernel boots it needs to know what device drivers to load. It’s the device tree that specifies this. Allwinner can never be part of an ARM distribution until they are part of the common kernel.

  1. No trackbacks yet.