Home > Android, Debian, Hardware, Linux, Texas Instruments Sitara, Ubuntu > $44.90 BeagleBone Green Wireless Board Adds 802.11n WiFi & Bluetooth 4.1 LE and More USB Ports

$44.90 BeagleBone Green Wireless Board Adds 802.11n WiFi & Bluetooth 4.1 LE and More USB Ports

After BeagleBone Air, there’s now another BeagleBone Black derived board with WiFi and Bluetooth, as BeagleBone Green gets a wireless version with WiFi 802.11n, Bluetooth 4.1 LE, and four USB ports.

BeagleBone Green Wireless Specifications

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Click to Enlarge

The Ethernet port is also gone, but most of the other specifications remain the same as seen from the comparison table below.

BeagleBone Black BeagleBone Green BeagleBone Green Wireless
SoC Texas Instruments Sitara AM3358 ARM Cortex-A8 processor @ 1GHz with NEON, PowerVR SGX530 GPU, PRU…
System Memory 512MB DDR3 RAM
Storage 4GB eMMC flash + micro SD slot
USB 1x USB client, 1x USB 2.0 host 1 USB client, 4x USB 2.0 host ports
Network Connectivity 10/100M Ethernet Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n & Bluetooth 4.1 LE
Video Output HDMI N/A
Expansion Headers 2×46 pin headers 2×46-pin headers and 2x Grove connectors
Debugging 6-pin serial header and unpopulated 20-pin JTAG header
Dimensions 86.3 x 53.4 cm
Price $55.00 $39.00 $44.90

BeagleBone Green Wireless (BBGW) and Grove Base Cape for Beaglebone v2.0

The board is designed and manufactured by Seeed Studio, and the company send me an early sample for evaluation together with Grove Base Cape for Beaglebone v2.0 that supports up to 12 extra Grove modules. I’ve not had time to review both yet, so I’ll show what I’ve received first.

BeagleBone_Green_Wireless_PackageI got two unbranded packages for each board, but I understand BBGW board will be send in a retail package with two WiFi antennas, and a micro USB to USB cable for power.

BeagleBone Green Wireless with Antennas (Click to Enlarge)

BeagleBone Green Wireless with Antennas (Click to Enlarge)

I got the two antennas, but not the USB cable. There are two u.FL connectors where you can insert the antennas. The wireless module is Texas Instruments WiLink8 (model WG78V0) that supports WiFI 802.11 b/g/n @ 2.4 GHz 2×2 MIMO and Bluetooth 4.1 LE. The four USB ports are on the left, and two Grove connectors (I2C & UART) on the right.

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Click to Enlarge

The bottom of the board has the micro SD slot, micro USB port for power, and unpopulated 20-pin JTAG solder pads. The board can run Debian, Android, Ubuntu, Cloud9 IDE on Node, and all other operating systems supported by BeagleBone Black. The wireless module support AP+STA mode, as well as A2DP & MRAA Libraries. The board is shipped with a Debian based firmware, and you can easily access it by accessing http://192.168.8.1 from your computer web browser to get some documentation. Resources for the board can be found on the BeagleBone Green Wireless Wiki.

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Click to Enlarge

Grove Base Cape for Beaglebone v2.0 has 4x digital I/O headers, 2x analog input headers, 4x I2C headers, and 2x UART headers, as well as a I/O voltage selector (3.3V or 5V), a Cape address switch, and a user button. More details about the grove base cape can be found in the Wiki.

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Click to Enlarge

I plan to write test the board, and the cape with some of the Grove module I got in Wio Link Starter Kit in the next few days.

BeagleBone Green Wireless pre-sells for $44.90 on Seeed Studio with shipping scheduled for May 21, 2016, while Grove Base Cape for Beaglebone v2.0 goes for $9.90.

  1. ben
    May 16th, 2016 at 23:42 | #1

    So if the versions of the beaglebone are green and black, what does it mean that the grove cape supports beagle bone “version 2”?

  2. May 17th, 2016 at 10:31 | #2

    @ben
    “Version 2.0” refers to the cape version. They have “version 1” of the cape @ http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/Grove-Cape-for-BeagleBone-Series-p-1718.html

  3. rifat
    June 21st, 2016 at 12:20 | #3

    really nice board,

    would have been perfect if Ethernet remained though. How can we add ethernet connectivity to this board? Would usb to ethernet converters be stable?
    If yes, maybe one can design a cape
    any thoughts?

  4. June 21st, 2016 at 14:34 | #4

    @rifat
    You can access the user interface through a USB Ethernet gadget driver, but it’s probably not what you’d like to do here. You could always use a USB to Ethernet dongle, or design a CAPE.

  5. rifat
    June 22nd, 2016 at 16:16 | #5

    @cnxsoft
    about the cape, can you please suggest alternatives?
    I mean since there is no USB connection on the headers, all I can think is to use a short USB cable and connect eth/usb converter IC to the uP. However, I don’t really think that this is different than using USB/ETH dongle :/

    I am really wondering why they have dumbed the ethernet in the first place :/
    Hopefully an elegant solution can be found for this.

  6. June 22nd, 2016 at 16:46 | #6

    @rifat
    If performance is not an issue, you could use SPI Ethernet (ENC28J60) too.
    For details about performance: http://www.chip-community.org/index.php/Add_a_enc28j60_Ethernet_interface

  7. rifat
    June 22nd, 2016 at 17:56 | #7

    oh great! I didn’t know that ENC28J60 can be mapped to eth0 under ifconfig 🙂
    This would surely be an elegant way to solve the lack of ethernet for IoT applications.

    one last question would be, to your knowledge, does the driver for ENC28J60 work robustly? It would also be bad if we have frequent loss of connections

    thanks a lot again 🙂

  8. June 22nd, 2016 at 20:26 | #8

    @rifat
    It worked well for me, but I have not used ENC28J60 very much, so I cannot really comment on its stability.

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