Bootloader to OS with Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI)

August 22nd, 2011 No comments

Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) is a specification detailing an interface that helps hand off control of the system for the pre-boot environment (i.e.: after the system is powered on, but before the operating system starts) to an operating system, such as Windows or Linux. UEFI aims to provides a clean interface between operating systems and platform firmware at boot time, and supports an architecture-independent mechanism for initializing add-in cards. UEFI will overtime replace vendor-specific BIOS. It also allows for fast boot and support for large hard drives (> 2.2 TB). There are several documents fully defining the UEFI Specification, API and testing requirements: The UEFI Specification (version 2.3.1) describes an interface between the operating system (OS) and the platform firmware. It describes the requirements for the following components, services and protocols: Boot Manager Protocols – Compression Algorithm Specification EFI System Table Protocols – ACPI Protocols GUID Partition Table (GPT) Disk Layout EFI Byte Code Virtual Machine Services — Boot…

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Installing Ubuntu 10.04 LTS in Acer Aspire One D255E

August 21st, 2011 14 comments

Since I’d like to try Xibo Python Linux client, I’ve decided to install Ubuntu 10.04 LTS in my netbook Acer Aspire One D255. The bad news is that it did not go so smoothly, the good news is that since the wired & wireless network and SD card did not work I can blog the solution about it. Installing Ubuntu 10.04 from a USB thumb drive. First, I went to Ubuntu Download page, change the version to Ubuntu 10.04 LTS – Long Term Support and downloaded the ISO file (ubuntu-10.04.3-desktop-i386.iso). Then I downloaded the Universal USB Installer (For Windows XP) to install the ISO in my USB thumb drive. Finally, I inserted the USB thumb drive in my netbook and performed the default installation, except for partitioning, where I used the 3rd partition in my hard disk and an extra swap partition to install Ubuntu. After installation, everything seems to work fine, as Ubuntu booted and I could login without…

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Categories: Linux Tags: acer, Linux, ubuntu

Xibo Digital Signage Version 1.3.0 Released

August 20th, 2011 No comments

Xibo has just announced the release of Xibo 1.3.0 (codename: “Faye”). Bear in mind that this is a development release and is not supposed to be used in production environments. The next stable release will be version 1.4.0 and The current stable version is 1.2.2. If you would still like to evaluate Xibo 1.3.0, you may download it at https://launchpad.net/xibo/1.3/1.3.0 New features in Xibo 1.3.0: Permissions Overhaul: The most significant change in 1.3.0 is the permissions system in the server interface. This update introduces individual and group permissions for: Layouts Library Media Regions Region Media Assignment It is also now possible to assign permissions to “Everyone” on all of the above items. Media Manager Homepage: A simple user interface for managing layout/media assignments that the user has access to. This “homepage” can be assigned on a user by user basis. Customer Counter: The Python client has been enhanced to support a “customer counter” which is incremented using a “Presenter” style…

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Categories: Linux Tags: digital signage, dotnet, python, ubuntu, xibo

Install Git for Windows XP, Windows 7

August 19th, 2011 No comments

I’ve used TortoiseCVS and TortoiseSVN under Windows XP. However, nowadays many project are using Git instead. Luckily, there is also TortoiseGIT for that matter. You’ll need to install 2 components: TortoiseGit – Port of TortoiseSVN to TortoiseGIT MSysGit – Git for Windows MSysGit already has a graphical interface, so you would also be able to clone repositories, commit change, etc.. with MSysGit alone. The only reason to install TortoiseGit is if you are used to TortoiseCVS/TortoiseSVN and want to keep the same look and feel. I use the following version for installation on Windows XP: TortoiseGit 1.7.2.0 32-bit Git 1.7.4 First, I installed TortoiseGit with the default parameters (TortoisePlink SSH Client) . Finally, I installed Git by deselecting unnecessary components as shown below. We do not need Quick Launch or Desktop icons as we’ll use TortoiseGit instead. I’ve also disabled Windows Explorer Integration or you’d have two Git options in the contextual menu. In the next windows, make sure to…

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How to Write and Submit a Linux Kernel Patch

August 19th, 2011 No comments

Greg Kroah-Hartman has a very good tutorial about writing and submitting a patch to the Linux kernel. The video is over 1 year old but this is still relevant. The materials for this tutorial are available via git: git clone git://github.com/gregkh/kernel-tutorial.git Alternatively, you can also download a copy of the presentation slides. The actual presentation is divided into 6 parts: git basics (git branch, git clone…) Kernel coding style (Details can be found in Documentation/CodingStyle) Fixing a file (with scripts/checkpatch.pl scripts) Generating a patch (with git -diff) Email the patch (with scripts/get_maintainer.pl and git send-email) Q&A If you want to skip the git basics and kernel coding style parts (although I don’t recommend it), fast forward to 13:33. All patches by in the linux kernel are checked by at least 2 persons. Before submitting a patch, you’ll have to make sure of the following (Checklist): Kernel builds with patch applied Correct “From:” address Concise “Subject:” Explain the patch Signed-of- by…

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What is GENIVI ? A Software Standard for the Automotive Industry

August 19th, 2011 No comments

I’ve recently read in the news that a few operating systems had achieved GENIVI compliance. So let’s see what Wikipedia says about the GENIVI Alliance: The GENIVI Alliance was founded on March 2, 2009 by BMW Group, Delphi, GM, Intel, Magneti-Marelli, PSA Peugeot Citroen, Visteon, and Wind River Systems with the goal of establishing a globally competitive, Linux-based operating system, middleware and platform for the automotive in-vehicle infotainment industry. Since then, the alliance has expanded to more than 100 members who are working together to deliver an open and globally consistent software platform based on Linux for use by the whole car industry. So the clear goal here is to have some set of software specifications and standards (Currently GENEVI 1.0)  in the automotive industry in order to speed time to market and reduce the cost of developing Infotainment applications. GENIVI comes from a concatenation of Geneva and IVI (In-Vehicle Infotainment). GENIVI Specifications and Compliance Program As you can see…

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Energy Harvesting Development Kit by Microchip Technology

August 18th, 2011 No comments

The XLP 16-bit Energy Harvesting Development Kit is a  development platform for realizing energy harvesting applications powered by Microchip nanoWatt XLP PIC MCUs which are suited for  low power applications with sleep currents down to 20nA, active mode currents down to 50uA/MHz, code execution efficiency, and multiple wake-up sources. The power for the kit is supplied by Cymbet’s EVAL-08 Solar Energy Harvester which features a solar panel suitable for use with indoor or outdoor light. The XLP kit enables rapid prototyping of low power applications such as RF sensors, temperature/environmental sensors, utility meters, remote controls, security sensors and more. For software development and programming, the kit includes the PICkit 3 programmer/debugger for use with the Microchip’s free MPLAB™ Integrated Development Environment. Microchip also provides XLP 16-bit Energy Harvesting RF Demo Code  in C language  (The file is a Windows Executable, but it’s just an executable compressed file so it can also be browsed in Linux). The development board portion of…

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Texas Instruments TRF7970A NFC Transceiver

August 17th, 2011 No comments

Texas Instruments has introduced the TRF7970A NFC Transceiver ” speeds designs with easy-to-configure software that helps developers bring peer-to-peer, ultra-low-power capabilities to more applications”. Here’s an excerpt from the press release: Raising the standard for ultra-low-power near field communication (NFC) devices, Texas Instruments Incorporated (TI) (NYSE: TXN) today announced the industry’s lowest power contactless short-range communication transceiver. Ideal for infrastructure devices, the new TRF7970A extends battery life up to 2 times longer than competitive products, as it provides eight selectable power modes ranging from <1 uA in power-down mode to 120 mA in full-power mode. The transceiver comes with easy-to-configure software to help developers get started quickly. Royalty-free stacks are compatible across a broad range of ultra-low-power MSP microcontrollers. Additionally, developers are able to directly access all control registers, allowing for easy fine-tuning of various parameters for the highest performance in every application. You can also read the complete TRF7970A press release on TI News website. Here are some features…

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