Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Android’

Android 5.0 Lollipop Running on Amlogic AML8726-MX Based WeTek Play STB

December 20th, 2014 No comments

Last month as Android Lollipop was shown booting on a Rockchip RK3188 tablet, and a few days later several companies such as Allwinner and Rockchip announced Android 5.0 ports were in progress for their latest processors, a few people asked me: what about Amlogic? I had no news at the time, but I expected the company to port Android 5.0 to their recent processor such as S802, S805, or S812, so I was surprised when I saw WeTek Play might be the first Amlogic device to boot Android 5.0 (CyanogenMod version), since it features the old dual core Amlogic AML8726-MX processor.

Android 5.0 on WeTek Play (Click to Enlarge)

Android 5.0 on WeTek Play (Click to Enlarge)

The company has just released their latest Android 4.4 firmware, so this Android 5.0.1 version is most probably an early firmware, just not quite ready for prime time just yet, but hopefully they’ll release a stable version  with a few weeks, since I’ve read Android 4.4 and Android 5.0 are not that different, at least at the HAL level.

That’s the boot and About WeTek Play video showing Android Lollipop running on this Amlogic AML8726-MX box.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Unboxing of BuyForSure 4KH 2160p/H.265 Android Media Player Powered by HiSilicon Hi3798M SoC

December 19th, 2014 4 comments

BuyForSure (BFS) is a company that sells various item on Aliexpress and Ebay, and then might also be involved in some product development (TBC). A couple of weeks ago I wrote about an inexpensive HiSilicon Hi3798M based TV box (quad core Cortex A7) supporting 2160 (4K UHD) video output and decoding, HEVC/H.265 video decoding, and featuring a USB 3.0 port. The company asked me if I wanted to receive a sample, and I accepted because few companies promote HiSilicon and MStar based products for oversea markets. So they send me their BFS 4KH TV box, my first HiSilicon device, and early next year, I’m likely to receive Zidoo X9 based on Mstar MSO9180 from another company, so that’s another story… Today, I’ll start by taking pictures of the media player and its board, and in several days I’ll post a review showing what this $50+ box is capable of (or not).

BFS 4KH Unboxing Pictures

Since I’m currently quite busy with various hardware, I asked them to send it by registered mail, so I received  China Post airmail package, and amazingly it only took 10 days for delivery (to Thailand). The package itself is entirely in Chinese, with some reference to X3, X5, A6 and A8 devices, and a 499 CNY price tag. But it’s quite possible they use the same box for all their devices.
BFS_4KH_PAckage
Inside the package, we’ll find the 4K media player, an IR remote control (requiring 2x AAA batteries), an HDMI cable, a 5V/2A power supply, a BufForSure business card, and another card reminding you to give 5 stars on Ebay or Aliexpress…

BFS_4KH_Package_Content_640px

BuyForSure 4KH and Accessories (Click to Enlarge)

Let’s now have a closer look at the box itself.

BFS_4KH

BFS 4KH (Click to Enlarge)

There’s not much to see at the front, but we’ll later see a power LED, and an IR receiver. A mechanical switch on the side is used to turn on and off the device, and most ports are on the back: composite RCA connector, Left and right audio RCA connectors, a USB 3.0 port, a pinhole for recovery, a USB 2.0 host port, Fast Ethernet, HDMI output, a power jack, and the Wi-Fi antenna. Looking on the botton of the case, we’ll find a sticker mentioning the name of the company in Chinese (which read like Bai Fei “something”, hence the BFS / BuyForSure name in English), as well as the product name which is indeed BFS 4KH.

BFS 4KH Board Pictures

There are no screws holding the case together, so you have to use a thin or hard object (I used some scalpel-like tool), between the front panel and the bottom part of the enclosure to start separating both parts, and work from there.

HI3798M-1C_Board

Hi3798M-1C Board (Click to Enlarge)

One of the first thing, I noticed was that the green and black solder point are quite close to each other. It’s not really dangerous (5V), but potentially that means both wires may short-circuit so the box would always be on, and the switch inactive. Anyway, I was not careful enough, and the black wire detached from the switch, so I have a small soldering job to do tomorrow. Otherwise there’s a small heatsink firmly attached to Hi3798M SoC, the eMMC is the commonly used FORESEE NCEFES78-08G (8GB, which has decent performance on M-195 box), and two Kingston N04268-01 chips are used to get the 1GB RAM used in the device. The Wi-Fi module is Realtek RTL8188ETV, which normally delivers very good performance (better than AP6xxx modules), but it’s only 2.4 GHz, so it’s not for people with a busy Wi-Fi environment that may require 5GHz to “escape the crowd”. The board name is HI3798M-1C-VER.C, and the unpopulated J18 connector on the bottom right side of the heatsink, is probably the UART pin for the serial console.

BFS_4KH_Board_Bottom

Bottom of BFS 4KH Board (Click to Enlarge)

In order to take out the board from the case, you need to remove the two QC covering two screws, untighten these, and take out the board. There’s not much interesting to see on the bottom of the board.

BFS 4KH is currently selling for $52.99 on Aliexpress including shipping, as well as Ebay for $61.99 from the same seller. a BFS 4KH Tiny version is always offered with 512MB RAM and 4GB flash, for just $1 less on Aliexpress, so most people will probably prefer its big brother.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Linaro 14.12 Release with Linux 3.18 and Android 5.0

December 19th, 2014 No comments

Linaro usually releases images and source code on the last Thursday of the month, but since most people will have long holidays for Chritsmas and New Year, the last working Thrusday of this month was yesterday (18th). Linaro 14.12 release includes Linux kernel 3.18 (baseline), Linux 3.10.62 & 3.14.26 (LSK, same versions as last month), and Android 5.0.1 Lollipop.

Here are the highlights of this release:

  • Linux Linaro 3.18-2014.12
    • Based on v3.18 release
    • GATOR topic: version 5.20
    • updated topic from Qualcomm LT (includes IFC6410 board support)
    • updated integration-linaro-vexpress64 topic by ARM LT (FVP Base and Foundation models, and Juno support)
    • updated LLVM topic (uses the community llvmlinux-latest branch)
    • included ILP32 patch set v3  rebased on 3.18. Boot tested with aarch64 userland. Work is in progress to test with aarch64-ilp32 userland.
    • config fragments updated – SELinux related config options enabled in linaro-base.conf, device tree runtime self tests enabled in distribution.conf
  • Linaro builds of AOSP 14.12
    • built with AOSP toolchain
    • All the Android builds have been updated to 5.0.1
    • Audio on Versatile Express TC2 is fixed (Android 5.0.1)
    • DNS issue fixed on Juno, FVP models and Versatile Express TC2 (Android 5.0.1)
    • daily CI updated to include benchmarks for Versatile Express TC2 and Juno
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2014.12
    • integrated Linaro GCC 4.9-2014.11 and Linaro binutils 2.24-2014.11
    • switched from eglibc to Linaro glibc 2.20-2014.11
    • improved external toolchain support
    • improved ACPI tooling
    • added python-numpy to images for LAVA tests
    • upstreaming:
  • Linaro Ubuntu 14.12 – updated packages: juno-pre-boot, LSK 3.10.62/3.14.26 and linux-linaro 3.18 kernels
  • CI loop for testing the pre-built Linaro toolchain using the OpenEmbedded external toolchain support has been reactivated
  • ARMv8 Ubuntu engineering build for Enterprise is available
  • CI bring up: HiSilicon Hi3716cv200
  • CI bring up: EAS (Energy Aware Scheduling) development – integration branch testing
  • Publish OpenSDK images on snapshots.linaro.org
  • Ship board recovery image into hwpack for Juno

You can visit https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1412/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB, LMB (Linaro Member Builds), and community builds, as well as Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain components.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Jesurun Maxone Allwinner A80 mini PC with 4GB RAM Sells for $184 (Promo)

December 18th, 2014 10 comments

Yesterday, I discovered DealExtreme listed four versions of new Allwinner A80 mini PC called Jesurun Maxone, with a combination of 2GB RAM/16GB Flash, or 4GB RAM/32GB flash, and US or EU power adapters, for respectively $167.40 and $207. But after a closer look, I found out those boxes are probably based on the same hardware used for Tronsmart Draco AW80 Meta and Telos, minus the external Wi-Fi antenna, and the price was a little higher so I did not feature this device in a new article. But today, GearBest provided a coupon code (JM4GCN) allowing to get Maxone 4GB RAM for $183.99, or about $15 discount compared to Draco AW80 Telos. They’ve also provided JM2GCN coupon for the 2GB RAM version, but the price ($149.99) is almost exactly the same as Draw AW80 Meta. Remember that when shopping online from oversea websites, you may be hit by custom duties back home, so try to estimate the duty (if any) in advance, as a $150 device may end up costing $300 in some countries once you include all potential fees (VAT, import duty, courier customs service charge, etc..)

Jesurun_MaxoneJesurun Maxone specifications are indeed exactly the same as the Tronsmart Draco AW80 boxes:

  • SoC – AllWinner Ultra Core A80 4x Cortex 15 @ 1.8 GHz, 4x Cortex A7 @ 1.3 GHz big.LITTLE processor with Imagination Technologies PowerVR GC6230 GPU with support for OpenGL ES 1.1/2.0/3.0, Directx 9.3
  • System Memory – 2GB or 4GB DDR3 depending on model
  • Storage – 16 GB or 32GB eMMC  (depending on model), SD card slot up to 32GB, and SATA port (via a USB 2.0/3.0 bridge)
  • Video  Output – HDMI 1.4b + AV port
  • Audio – HDMI, AV, and optical S/PDIF
  • (Main) Video Codecs – H.265/VP9 up to 1080p @ 30 fps (software decode?), H.264/VP8 up to 4K2K @ 30fps, 1080p120, or 720p240
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet, Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac with external antenna, Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 OTG port (full size), 2x USB 2.0 host ports
  • Misc – IR receiver
  • Power Supply – 12V/2A
  • Dimensions – 14.8 x 14.8.4 x 2.3 cm
  • Weight – 301 grams

The only difference is that it’s apparently lighter (301 grams vs 442 grams), and the dimensions are also different with Jesurun Maxone being a smaller product (14.8 cm vs 16.4 cm). This is possible even if Maxone and Draco AW80 are based on the same hardware, because as you can check in my unboxing post, the PCBA is smaller than the enclosure for Draco AW80.

Including accessories are also almost the same with a 12V/2A power adapter, a SATA cable, an HDMI cable, the same IR remote control, and a quick start guide in English. The only thing “missing” is a USB to USB cable which can be useful if you want to upgrade the firmware with LiveSuite or PhoenixCard tools, or use the ADB connection.
Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Unboxing of Amlogic S812 based Sunchip CX-S806 Android Media Player

December 18th, 2014 9 comments

Sunchip CX-S806 is my third Android media player based on Amlogic S812 processor, after Eny Technology EM8S (which I haven’t received yet, because the firmware is not really ready yet), and MINIX NEO X8-H Plus with a stable firmware, but some disappointment with regards to peripherals performance (eMMC, Ethernet,…), and poor support for H.265 / 4K videos in XBMC/Kodi, at least for now, since I’m sure they’ll work out the video issue with subsequent firmware / Kodi releases. CX-S806 has lower specs compared to NEO X8-H Plus, and does not come with an air mouse, but it costs about half of the MINIX box, so we’ll have to see how it performs. For now, I simply post pictures of the device and the internal board, since I’ve already posted CX-S806 specifications previously.

CX-S806 Unboxing

Sunchip sent me the box via DHL, and I received it in the black and gold package below.
Sunchip_CX-S806_Package
The box comes with a 5V/3A power supply, an IR remote control (2x AAA batteries required), an HDMI cable, and user’s manual in English.

CX-S806 and Accessories (Click to Enlarge)

CX-S806 and Accessories (Click to Enlarge)

The box looks pretty nice, and all ports are at the back with a reset pin holes, three USB 2.0 ports including one OTG port, optical S/PDIF, AV and HDMI output, a Fast Ethernet RJ45 port, and the power jack.

Sunchip CX-S806 TV Box (Click to Enlarge)

Sunchip CX-S806 TV Box (Click to Enlarge)

We can’t see anything at the front, but it’s a semi transparent plastic hiding the IR receiver and a power LED.

Unboxing video:

CX-S806 Board Pictures

There’s large rounded sticky rubber band the bottom of the case, but there’s nothing under, so everything is held together with clips. At first I tried to open the box by popping the clip from the back of the case, and I could start to open it, but it would not come off completely, the gap between the black plastic case and the semi-transparent plastic at the front was basically inexistent, so I got stuck thiking glue may be involved, and I asked Sunchip who kindly provided some pictures explaining how to open the box, including the one just below.

CX-S806_Disassembly_by_Sunchip
Once I knew how to get started, I managed to open it with my disassembly toolkit. The tiny triangular green tool was not tiny and strong enough, so I used the scalpel like tool to take out the front panel, and separated the rest of the enclosure with the other green tool.

CX-S806_Dissassembly
There’s a bit less cooling elements than in other Amlogic S8x1 boxes with just a heatsink on top of Amlogic S812, so I’ll have to keep an eye on the temperature.

CX-S806 Board (Click to Enlarge)

CX-S806 Board (Click to Enlarge)

The board is named CX_S806_V1.2_140825. The wireless module (for Wi-Fi and Bluetooth) is AP6210. Four Samsung K4B4G1646D-BCK0 DDR3-1600chips are used for the 2GB RAM, and a FORESEE NCEFES78 eMMC flash for the 8GB internal storage. You’ll also notice four pins on the right of the IR sensor which should be for serial console access.

Bottom of CX-S806 Board (Click to Enlarge)

Bottom of CX-S806 Board (Click to Enlarge)

I had to remove four screws to have a look at the back, but there’s not much to see here, except a sticker with the board key specifications, and QC status, located just on top of solder pads for another flash chip.

Sunchip is the company that designs and manufacture all CX-??? media players and TV sticks, and their board is also found in some other brands, so if you want to purchase in large quantities, you could contact them via CX-S806 product page (Contact link is on top).  Individuals can purchase the box for $80 on Amazon US, Ebay, GeekBuying, as well as Aliexpress.

Disclaimer: Although this post is not sponsored, Sunchip has recently become a sponsor for CNX Software.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Giayee Atom PC is a Rockchip RK3288 Mini PC with a VGA Port, Multiple Placement Options (Crowdfunding)

December 17th, 2014 7 comments

You may know that Rockchip and Intel have a partnership to design Atom Sofia processors, but Giayee Atom PC has nothing to do with this initiative at all, and it’s just a pretty standard Rocchip RK3288 based mini PC, except it includes a VGA port, and various “placement” options namely horizontal position, vertical position, and TV/monitor mount.

Giayee_Atom_PCAtom PC specifications:

  • SoC – Rockchip RK3288 Quad Core Cortex A17 up to 1.8GHz with ARM Mali-T764 GPU supporting OpenGL ES1.1/2.0/3.0, Open VG1.1, OpenCL, DirectX11
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3
  • Storage – 8 GB NAND flash (16 to 32 GB optional)
  • Video Output- HDMI up to 1080p (no 4K?), and VGA up to 1920×1080 @  60 Hz
  • Audio Output / Input – HDMI, 3.5 mm jacks for Audio In and Out
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet, 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi. Options: Dual band Wi-Fi, GPS, NFC, and Bluetooth
  • USB – 4x USB Host ports, 1x micro USB host port
  • Other Optional Functions – Camera, LCD, 3G, UART, LVDS, MIPI…
  • Misc – Power button
  • Power Supply – 5V/2A
  • Power Consumption – > 7 Watts

Atom_PC_BoardThe specifications are rather underwhelming, and it’s probably only interesting if you need VGA output, and/or microphone input, and TV / monitor mount (is that VESA mount?, not sure…) combined with the power for RK3288 processors. Optional features such as GPS, NFC, MIPI could make it interesting, and it looks like an RTC battery slot might even be available, but none of these are available in perks listed in the crowdfunding campaign. Some of the specifications are probably wrong, as I hope they us an eMMC flash, instead of a slower NAND flash in their system, and HDMI should support up to 4K30. Android 4.2.2 and Ubuntu 12.04.5 operating are said to be supported. I can’t even remember ever seeing Android 4.2 running in any RK3288 device, so most probably they’ll provide Android 4.4 (and maybe Android 5.0) together with Ubuntu 14.04 or greater.

Atom_PC_Mounting_OptionsThe company has launched the project on Indiegogo, and expects to raised a lowly $10,000, but if they’ve spent as many efforts and attention to detail on product development as they’ve spent on their campaign page, it does not inspire confidence. Pricing is not exactly aggressive either, as the early bird pledge starts at $119 with a 5V/3A power adapter, a base for vertical orientation, and including shipping by DHL to anywhere in the world, with delivery scheduled for March 2015.

You can check the Android and Ubuntu demo below.

Thanks to Nanik for the tip.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Andromium Transforms Your Smartphone into a mini Desktop PC (Crowdfunding)

December 17th, 2014 3 comments

Mobile desktop convergence has been a buzz word for several years now, and people have tried to use their smarphone as a desktop PC for a while thanks to technologies like MHL, which allows an easy connection between a phone and TV. However, mobile operating systems such as Android are not really suited for desktop use, and it can be a frustrating experience, so there needs to be different user interface in desktop and mobile modes for an optimal user experience. Canonical is working on this, and Ubuntu Edge, an ambitious, but ultimately failed crowdfunding campaign, was part of the strategy for convergence. But a team of developers lead by an ex-Google employee has been designed a solution with a desktop OS (Andromium OS) and a docking station that let you use your smartphone as a phone on the go, and as a desktop computer while docked, with Andromium user interface taking over, and allowing multiple windows for Andromium apps, although Android apps would still run in full screen.

Andromium_OS

Andromium Browser (MS Outlook Website) and Taskbar

Andromium user interface is heavily inspired from Windows 7 or OSX desktop, with famous taskbar and start menu, as you can see in the picture above. While the phone is docked (in desktop mode), you’ll still receive calls, text messages and push notifications. It’s not clear how many Andromium apps are currently available, but there’s a least a File Manager, and a full feature browser which you use in windowed mode. The Andromium docking station includes an HDMI output, 3 USB ports, and a power connector to power and charge your phone.

The best way to get a better idea of the system capabilities and features is to watch the demo video below.

The company has now launched a Kickstarter campaign for the project aiming to raise $100,000. You won’t have to break the bank to support this project, as if you already have a dock for your smartphone, you can pledge $10 for Andromium OS that will be downloadable via Google Play Store, although there’s no guarantee about compatibility. So they also provide docks for Samsung Galaxy Note, S, S3 (2GB RAM), S4, Note 2/3/4. Galaxy S5 is not yet supported. Following popular request, they’ll also support HTC One (M7/M8), LG N4/N5, Motorola Nexus 6, as well some large screen tablets. You can pledge between $29 to $35 to get a docking station and access to Andromium OS. Shipping to the US is included, but you’ll have to add $10 to the rest of the world. People residing in the US can expect their dock as early as February 2015, while others will have to wait at least until June 2015.

The official website Andromiumos.com does not have much more information for now.

Via Liliputing

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

U-Boot and Linux Source Code for ODROID-C1 Board Has Been Released

December 16th, 2014 7 comments

Hardkernel ODROID-C1 board, a more powerful $35 alternative to the Raspberry Pi, garnered a lot of attention when it was announced last week. At the time source code was not available, but as scheduled, U-boot and Linux source code is now available, and the full Android SDL should be released on February 2015. Instructions to get the code, and build both Linux and U-boot are available on ODROID-C1 Wiki, and I’ve just given a try to Linux instructions myself to see if I would encounter any issues in Ubuntu 14.04.

ODROID-C1-Linux

  1. Download Linaro GCC 4.7 toolchain from Linaro or Odroid website.
  2. Install the toolchain. They install it on /opt/toolchain, but instead I’ve installed in ~/opt/toochain, so I don’t need superuser permissions:

    mkdir -p ~/opt/toolchains
    tar xvf gcc-linaro-arm-linux-gnueabihf-4.7-2013.04-20130415_linux.tar.bz2 -C ~/opt/toolchains/

  3. Add the following lines to ~/.bashrc

    export ARCH=arm
    export CROSS_COMPILE=arm-linux-gnueabihf-
    export PATH=~/opt/toolchains/gcc-linaro-arm-linux-gnueabihf-4.7-2013.04-20130415_linux/bin:$PATH

  4. To apply change, log out and log in, or run:
    source ~/.bashrc
  5. Double check Linaro GCC 4.7 is installed properly:

    arm-linux-gnueabihf-gcc -v
    Using built-in specs.
    COLLECT_GCC=arm-linux-gnueabihf-gcc
    COLLECT_LTO_WRAPPER=/home/jaufranc/opt/toolchains/gcc-linaro-arm-linux-gnueabihf-4.7-2013.04-20130415_linux/bin/../libexec/gcc/arm-linux-gnueabihf/4.7.3/lto-wrapper
    Target: arm-linux-gnueabihf
    Configured with: /cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/.build/src/gcc-linaro-4.7-2013.04/configure --build=i686-build_pc-linux-gnu --host=i686-build_pc-linux-gnu --target=arm-linux-gnueabihf --prefix=/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/install --with-sysroot=/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/install/arm-linux-gnueabihf/libc --enable-languages=c,c++,fortran --enable-multilib --with-arch=armv7-a --with-tune=cortex-a9 --with-fpu=vfpv3-d16 --with-float=hard --with-pkgversion='crosstool-NG linaro-1.13.1-4.7-2013.04-20130415 - Linaro GCC 2013.04' --with-bugurl=https://bugs.launchpad.net/gcc-linaro --enable-__cxa_atexit --enable-libmudflap --enable-libgomp --enable-libssp --with-gmp=/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/.build/arm-linux-gnueabihf/build/static --with-mpfr=/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/.build/arm-linux-gnueabihf/build/static --with-mpc=/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/.build/arm-linux-gnueabihf/build/static --with-ppl=/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/.build/arm-linux-gnueabihf/build/static --with-cloog=/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/.build/arm-linux-gnueabihf/build/static --with-libelf=/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/.build/arm-linux-gnueabihf/build/static --with-host-libstdcxx='-L/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/.build/arm-linux-gnueabihf/build/static/lib -lpwl' --enable-threads=posix --disable-libstdcxx-pch --enable-linker-build-id --enable-gold --with-local-prefix=/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/install/arm-linux-gnueabihf/libc --enable-c99 --enable-long-long --with-mode=thumb
    Thread model: posix
    gcc version 4.7.3 20130328 (prerelease) (crosstool-NG linaro-1.13.1-4.7-2013.04-20130415 - Linaro GCC 2013.04)

  6. Both Linux and Android Linux are available, and depending on which kernel should want to get checkout the code from the right branch:
    git clone https://github.com/hardkernel/linux.git -b odroidc-3.10.y-android

    or

    git clone https://github.com/hardkernel/linux.git -b odroidc-3.10.y
  7. I selected the Linux branch. Time to configure the build for ODROID-C1:
    cd linux
    make odroidc_defconfig
  8. Install u-boot-tools for mkimage, and build the kernel image
    sudo apt-get install u-boot-tools
    make uImage -j8
  9. And the device tree file for ODROID-C1:
    make meson8b_odroidc.dtd
    make meson8b_odroidc.dtb
  10. I’ve stopped there, but if you have a board you’ll want to copy / flash the files arch/arm/boot/uImage and arch/arm/boot/dts/amlogic/meson8b_odroidc.dtb to a bootable eMMC or SD card
    • For Linux – Copy uImage and meson8b_odroidc.dtb to the FAT32 partition of your boot device, replacing the existing files
    • For Android – Use fast boot as follows:
      sudo apt-get install android-tools-fastboot 
      sudo fastboot flash boot <path/of/your/uImage>
      sudo fastboot flash dtb <path/of/your/meson8b_odroidc.dtb>
  11. Have fun :)

This source code release for ODROID-C1 should also open the way for Linux Kernel ports, and Ubuntu / Debian or other Linux distributions for other Amlogic S805 devices such as MK808B Plus, MXQ S85, or MINIX NEO X6.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter