Archive

Posts Tagged ‘automotive’

AllWinner V10 and V15 SoCs Target Video Recording Applications

July 9th, 2014 1 comment

AllWinner A-series that can be found in tablets and media players are pretty well known, but AllWinner also has V-Series processors with V10 and V15. A first glance, AllWinner V10 is quite similar to AllWinner A31 with a quad core Cortex A7 CPU coupled with a PowerVR SGX544MP2 GPU, and AllWinner V15 has the same CPU/GPU combo as AllWinner A10 (CortexA8/Mali-400). But AllWinner V-Series are actually video encoders targeting applications such as IP cameras, car DVRs, and sports digital video cameras thanks to features such as motion detection, video scaling, and digital watermarking.

AllWinner V10 Block Diagram

AllWinner V10 Block Diagram

Let’s go through AllWinner V10 specifications, and I’ll mark differences with AllWinner A31, or features not mentioned in A31 specs, in bold:

  • CPU – Quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 with· 256KB L1 cache, 1MB L2 cache
  • GPU – PowerVR SGX544MP2 compliant with OpenCL 1.1 EP and delivering up to 20GFLOPS.
  • Memory – 32-bit DDR3/LPDDR2 SDRAM controller, supporting up to 2GB; NAND I/F
  • Video
    • Supports H.264 High Profile 1080p@60fps video encoding
    • Digital watermarking
    • Motion detection
    • CBR/VBR bit rate control mode
    • Supports UHD@24fps video decoding
    • Supports multi-format video decoding including MPEG 1/2/4, H.264, VP8, AVS,VC-1, etc.
    • Supports independent encoding and decoding
    • 1/16 ~ 16x scaling
  • Video Input/Output
    • Supports 12-bit parallel CSI and 4-lane MIPI CSI
    • Supports up to 12M CMOS sensor
    • Supports RGB LCD/LVDS/MIPI DSI/HDMI
    • Supports one video layer and two graphic layers
    • Supports scaling up to 4K x 4K
  • HawkView ISP
    • Auto exposure/focus/white balance (AE/AF/AWB)
    • Dynamic range control (DRC)
    • Color enhancement
    • Noise reduction
  • Audio Codec
    • Integrated Hi-Fi 100dB audio codec
    • Three integrated differential analog mic amplifiers for headset and phone
    • One digital mic interface with software noise cancellation
  • Peripherals
    • 3 x USB ports
    • 4 x SD card 3.0
    • RTP/CTP
    • GMAC/EMAC
  • Package – BGA609, 18mm x 18mm, 0.65 pitch

AllWinner V10 also appears to be lacking 3840×1080 3D decoding ability found in A31, and may not have a dual band RAM interface, and no support for LPDDR3 memory. I’m not sure if A31 also supports independent encoding and decoding, or that would means Skype or Google Hangout calls are partially handled by software. AllWinner provides support for Android and Linux operating systems for the V10 and V15 processor, specifically Android 4.4 for V10. AllWinner V15 has similar features as V10 but only comes with a single Cortex A8 core, a Mali-400 GPU, supports 1080p decoding, 720p encoding, and features less peripherals. It’s also smaller with a BGA336 (14mm x 14mm) package.

I could not find any development boards, nor products based on AllWinner V10 and V15. There may be some, but the processors are seldom advertised in devices like digital cameras, and digital video recorders. I’ve asked some details to AllWinner, and I’ll update this post if I get an answer.

You can may find more information in AllWinner V10 and V15 on their respective product pages.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Google Releases Android L (Lollipop?) Developer Preview

June 26th, 2014 2 comments

Google I/O is taking place right now in San Francisco, and the company made several announcements. Although they have not announced the full codename of Android 5.0, referring to the next version as “Android L” (Lollipop would be nice though), but they’ve already documented the key changes made to Android L, and a developer preview will be released later today (26 June), together with binary images for Google Nexus 5 and Nexus 7.

Android_Lollipop

Beside the smartphone and tablet developer preview, there will be 3 other SDKs for Android L:

  • Android Wear SDK – Android for wearables with sync notifications, wearable apps, data transfer APIs, and voice actions, e.g. “Ok Google, call mum”.
  • Android TV Preview SDK – Android for TVs with pre-built fragments for browsing and interacting with media catalogs, in-app search, and recommendations.
  • Android Auto SDK – Android for the car with apps featuring consistent user experience between vehicles, and minimizing distractions.

I’ll go through various software and hardware announcements for Android Wear and TV in separate blog posts, and probably skip Android Auto for now.

So what’s new in Android L Developer Preview?

Material Design

Material Design is is a new design language that will let developer create app which look similar to Google Now. Google chose the name “Material” as it is apparently inspired from real materials such as paper and ink. Android L user interface will be entirely designed with Material Design. The best is to look at an example.

Gmail Now vs Gmail "L"

Gmail Now vs Gmail “L”

On the left, we’ve got the current Gmail app, and on the right the newly designed app for Android L. Lots of it looks like cosmetic changes, but you’ll have noticed the three dot and new mail icons are gone, and all menu will be accessible via the top left icon. There are also some light and shadow effects that will make users feel like they’re touching real elements.

More details can be found in this Material Design presentation (PDF).

Improved Notifications

Notifications have also changed with a new design based on Material, and the ability to display notifications on the lock screen.

Android_L_Notifications

I understand lockscreen notifications are optional, and if you don’t like to show them in the lock screen using visibility controls. As you can see from the screenshot above it works very similar to Google Now which cards that you can discard once you’re done. Notifications will also be able to pop-up in games or other full screen apps, and you’ll be able o take action within the notification, for example by declining or accepting a video call request.

Recents

The list of recent apps will become the list of recent everything, simply called “Recents”, as it will include both apps, web pages, and documents.

Better Tools for Improving Battery Life

As devices become more powerful, they also become more power hungry despite efforts by SoC designers to reduce energy usage. Badly programmed apps are however the main culprit of short battery life, so Google has introduced Project Volta to help user and developers optimize power consumption. Developers can use “Battery Historian” tool to monitor power consumption of different processes, and which hardware block (e.g. Cellular radio) is currently being used.

Battery_HistorianUsers will also have their own app / feature dubbed “Battery Saver” to improve battery life, and Google claims their Nexus 5 should be able to last an extra 90 minutes on a charge with Battery Saver enabled. This is achieved by reducing the performance of the device once the battery has dropped below 20% charge. At that time, a notification would pop-up to let the user select he wants to enable Battery Saver mode.

Under the hood improvements

As as been widely reported, Google recently killed Dalvik in a recent commit in AOSP, and ART will become the default JAVA runtime using ahead-of-time compilation for speedier application loading time, and memory usage improvements. Google also claims it provides true cross platform support for ARM, MIPS and x86.

Android L will support 64-bit instructions including ARMv8, x86-64 and MIPS64. This will provide a larger number of registers, and increased addressable memory space. Java developers won’t needto change their apps for 64-bit support. One the first Android64 devices is likely to be the Nexus 9 tablet powered by Nvidia Tegra K1 Denver as previously reported.

On the graphics side, Android L adds support for OpenGL ES 3.1, and includes Android Extension Pack for developers with tesselation and geometry shaders and other features that should bring PC and console class graphics to Android games according to Google.

Via Anandtech and Liliputing

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

First Tizen 3.0 Common Milestone Released, Developer Program Announced

June 5th, 2014 No comments

The Tizen Steering Group has announced the first release of Tizen 3.0 Common. Tizen Common is the common subset of development / build / test platform of the Tizen profiles, used by platform developers to develop the next version of the profiles, and a Tizen 3.0 common release is planned every quarter.

This milestone release includes:

  • 64-bit support for both Intel and ARM architecturesTizen Mobile Linux Distribution with HTML5 APIs
  • Crosswalk-based web runtime
  • Multiuser support
  • Systemd
  • Security: three-domain rule system for SMACK and Cynara as authorization framework
  • Wayland display server

Pre-built binary releases for can be downloaded @ http://download.tizen.org/releases/daily/tizen/common/common-wayland-x86_64/tizen_20140602.26/ for Intel Atom 3815 NUC Kit and NEXCOM VTC1010 in-vehicle computer based on Intel Atom 3825. However, Tizen 3.0 Common will also be tested on Intel NUC Haswell (core i5),  Lenovo x230 IvyBridge (core i5) and on the ARM side, ODROID-U3 development board.

If you want to build your own, refer to the developer guide, using tizen_common_2014.Q2 tag.

More details can be found on Tizen 3.0 Wiki, and questions can be asked on the tizen developers mailing list.

Separately, but still related to Tizen, when Samsung announced the Samung Z Tizen phone, they also mention an upcoming special developer program to boost the number of apps available on the Tizen Store at launch. Tizen Experts reports that developers will keep 100% of revenues from the Tizen Store, including in-apps sales for one year, excluding taxes and carrier billing / banking fees, with no signup fees, nor app submission fees. So if you are an app developer, and already have designed Android, iOS or HTML5 apps, it may be worth the effort to port them to Tizen, and sign up to the Tizen Store.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Intel Unveils In-Vehicle Solutions and Development Kit for Assisted Driving and Autonomous Cars

May 31st, 2014 No comments

Intel has announced their In-Vehicle Solutions (IIVS) for automakers comprised of hardware based on Intel’s industrial Bay Trail Atom 3800 series SoC, and software solutions relying on a Linux based operating system but it’s not clear whether it might be Wind River Linux, Tizen IVI, or another new OS. The solutions will first provide In Vehicle Infotainment (IVI) with assisted driving features such as , and over time it will allow semi-autonomous and self-driving cards.

Intel CM1050 Module

Intel CM1050 Module

At the heart of the system, Intel will provide CM1050 computer-on-module that will be part of a development kit including a chassis with CAN, Ethernet, and USB ports, as well as audio and CVBS  multimedia I/Os, and radios and antennas for FM, AM, DAB, GPS, WiFi, Bluetooth, and cellular. A Blu-ray drive, and SSDs will be available as storage options. The complete system is designed to be upgradeable, and automakers can expected modules with faster processors in the future to allow for autonomous, but currently CM1050 CoM will be based on four different Atom E3800 SoC from single to quad core models.

IIVS Chassis Connectors Description

IIVS Chassis Connectors Description

The complete development kits includes a compute module ((Intel In-Vehicle Solution CM1050), the chassis with thermal solution and EMI suppression, six types of antennas, a 12V/10A power brick, a 11.6″ HD capacitive touchscreen, various cables, a Blu-ray drive, Intel Solid-State Drives, and a CAN Box.  The hardware complies with RoHS and REACH directives, and the kit inclides “Hardened and Optimized Automotive Middleware” (Intel In-Vehicle Solution Software Foundation), as well as the following development tools and sample code:

  • CBC Configurator Toolchain – The carrier board communication (CBC) Tool Chain tutorial describes the process for configuring Eclipse for the CBC Tool Chain and building a CBC plug-in for the compute module
  • GENIVI Diagnostic Log and Trace Viewer Plug-in – Used to trace, analyze, and debug ultrafast, inter-process communication (UF-IPC) messages between components on the target.
  • Eclipse IDE Plug-in for Audio – Audio configuration is done using a domain specific language (DSL) defined for the audio subsystem.
  • Eclipse IDE Plug-in for IDL Programming – The IDL files that describe the software foundation (i.e., middleware) subsystem APIs can be accessed via an Intel-supplied IDL Editor, distributed as an Eclipse plug-in.
  • Line Diagnosis and Analysis (LinDA) – This tool provides an independent test framework that can be used to support hardware testing, automotive platform development, production, debugging, benchmarking, and certification.
  • Sample Applications – To demonstrate technologies included in the package. The applications currently cover multimedia, CBC tutorial, client/server UF-IPC, and LinDA.
Intel IIVS Development Kit

Intel IIVS Development Kit

Intel expects the main use cases of their IIVS to be as follows:

  • Intel_In-Vehicle_Software_Foundation_PackagesEntertainment
    • Multi-zone audio and video
    • Multimedia processing
    • DVD playback
    • Distributed audio/video management
    • Distributed playback
    • Ethernet audio/video bridging (AVB)
  • User Interface Technologies
    • Speech recognition
    • Text to speech
    • Gesture recognition
    • Touch screen
  • Navigation and GPS
  • Internet and Cloud Connectivity
  • Accident Avoidance (i.e., cameras)
  • Advanced Driver Assistance
  • Graphics Display

Automakers will be able to select advanced (720p) and premium (1080p) entertainment packages, and various connectivity and multimedia options depending on the class of the cars. You can watch the animated promo video below to get an idea of how this will all fit together, and which options are available.

You can find more information on Intel IIVS page, or directly read IIVS product brief, and/or IIVS development kit product brief.

Via SemiAccurate and LinuxGizmos

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Linaro 14.05 Released with Linux Kernel 3.15, Android 4.4.2, and Ubuntu Trusty

May 30th, 2014 4 comments

Linaro 14.05 has been released with Linux Kernel 3.15-rc5 (baseline), Linux Kernel 3.10.40 (LSK), Android 4.4.2, and Ubuntu has been switched from Saucy to Trusty.

More work has been done on big.LITTLE processing and ARMv8 support with notably completing bootstrapping with Debian 64-bit. New hardware platform have started to pop-up such as TI J6-Vayu which must be an evaluation board for Texas Instruments Jacinto 6 dual core Cortex A15 SoC for automotive application, as well as IFC6410, a Snapdragon 600 development board which got a Ubuntu LEB image. This month also marks the first release of Linaro GCC 4.9 toolchain.

Here are the highlights of this release:

  • Linux Linaro 3.15-rc5-2014.05
    • new Android topic (linaro-android-3.15-experimental) uses the resent AOSP code base
    • GATOR version 5.18 (same version as in 2014.04)
    • uprobes topic removed as all patches have been accepted into mainline
    • updated big-LITTLE-pmu topic from ARM LT
    • updated basic Capri board support from Broadcom LT (SMP support enabled for bcm21664 and bcm28155, mmc updates, more bcm590xx regulators enabled)
    • cortex-strings-arm64 topic (same as in 2014.02)
    • updated Versatile Express arm64 support (FVP Base and Foundation models, Juno (ethernet, USB)) from ARM LT
    • updated Versatile Express patches from ARM LT
    • updated Arndale_Octa/Arndale/Origen patches from Samsung LT
    • more HiP0x Cortex A15 family updates from HiSilicon LT. All the CPU cores enabled
    • new ftrace_audit topic from the Kernel WG (ftrace, audit and seccomp patches)
    • Big endian topic updated for 3.15
    • updated llvm topic. The “spinlock” commit is reverted to let armv8 kernel to compile
    • config fragments changes – uprobes: CONFIG_NAMESPACES and CONFIG_USER_NS enabled (for systemtap), arndale_octa: Enable Generic Phy support, arndale: Enable IOMMU/USB3/Generic Phy, vexpress: updated for 3.15 kernel (CONFIG_ARM_BIG_LITTLE_CPUFREQ enabled), THUMB2 disabled for arndale, arndale_octa, and origen to work around arch/arm/mach-exynos/sleep.S compilation error
  • Linaro Toolchain Binaries 2014.05
    • updated to latest Linaro TCWG releases, this is the first binary release based on GCC 4.9.
      • Linaro GCC 4.9 2014.05 includes performance improvements and bug fixes
      • Linaro Binutils 2.24.0 2014.05 features aarch64 improvements
      • Linaro GDB 7.7 2014.05
  • Linaro Android 14.05
    • built with Linaro GCC 4.8-2014.05
    • TI J6-Vayu member build has been setup (Evaluation module based on Texas Instruments Jacinto 6 for automotive application)
    • Android build system is using VPS build slaves, reducing the build time by 40% compared to the current EC2 slaves
    • Multinode job submission support is added to linaro-android-build-tools
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2014.05
    • integrated Linaro GCC 4.8 and 4.9 2014.05
    • integrated Linaro EGLIBC 2.19-2014.05
    • integrated Linaro binutils 2.24-2014.05
    • improved Linaro’s meta layer layout for 3rd parties usage
    • added toolchain benchmark image
    • update GATOR recipe to latest release and fixed build issues
    • improved python module support in images
    • upstreaming:
    • fixed separate build directory issues for mariadb, openldap, libmcrypt, netperf, fwts, php, tmux, gpm and rrdtool
    • updated recipes: acpitests, acpica, fwts, libhugetlbfs, pm-qa, systemtap and GRUB
    • enabled PM and RT tests in LTP
    • fixed GRUB build issue
  • Linaro Ubuntu 14.05 is released:
    • baseline migrated from Saucy to Trusty
    • added packages:
      • alsa-lib, added HDMI UCM profile for IFC6410
      • mesa, enabled freedreno gallium driver
    • updated packages: linaro-edk2, ARM trusted firmware, linaro-meta (added git to developer rootfs), xf86-video-freedreno (Add xorg configuration file), and linux-linaro 3.15-rc5 kernels.
  • ARMv8 Debian bootstrap effort is completed
  • Linaro U-Boot is updated to 2014.04 release
  • Linaro EDK2 CI is setup
  • Linaro kernels build support is added to Linaro OpenEmbedded
  • IFC6410 member build is delivered and released this cycle

You can visit https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1405/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB and community builds, Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain (GCC / Qemu) components.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Vivante Unveils Details About GC7000 Series GPU IP Family

April 19th, 2014 9 comments

Earlier this month, Vivante Corporation has announced several silicon partner integrations (but no names given) of its GC7000 Series GPU IP into SoCs targeting wearables, mobile, automotive, and 4K TV products, and provided some more details about its GC7000 family which supports features such as OpenGL ES 3.1 API, and hardware TS/GS/CS (tessellation / geometry / compute shader) extensions for Android.

Vivante_GC7000_Architecture

According to the company, they key benefits of their GC7000 GPU IP can be summarized as follows:

  • True GPU Scalability – GC7000 Series products support limited silicon area to match form factor and market requirements. Products can snap to grid starting at 3.0 mm2 (28 nm) for the smallest single GPU GC7000 instance and grow in simple modular fashion for high end implementations to achieve what the company’s claims to be the the industry’s best PPA (power/performance/area).
  • Smallest Licensable OpenGL ES 3.1 Cores with Geometry, Tessellation, and Compute Shaders - Die area of the GC7000 is reduced by 20% over previous generation mass market cores and includes the new evolution of OpenGL ES 3.1 and DirectX 11 shader/GPU technologies and upcoming mobile platform requirements, including support for hardware TS/GS shading extensions for Android OS.
  • Faster Graphics Performance - Better real time utilization of shaders speeds up rendering performance, quality and effects to effectively scale up for 4K gaming content at 60 FPS.
  • Cooler Cores – GPU thermals and system power are reduced 30% and bandwidth is reduced by 50% through bandwidth modulation using Vivante frame buffer (vFB) and pixel compression, Khronos ASTC, geometry/tessellation shader rendering, and Android optimized intelligent composition (Regionizer).
  • Configurable Shader Core Implementations – Cores range from highly silicon optimized eight shader solutions to performance optimized multi-GPU/multi-shader solutions, all with hardware support for security (secure GPU) and OS virtualization.
  • Hardware and Software Integration Simplified – The single unified software stack supports all Vivante GPU cores and existing software platforms to create a seamless transition to the latest technologies. GC7000 hardware is even more modular to allow faster integration with easier place-and-route design and reduced wire congestion.
  • System Friendly Architecture – GC7000 is designed for hybrid and heterogeneous computing systems supporting OpenCL and HSA using AMBA ACE-Lite (CPU – GPU cache coherency) and the vStream interface. Other additions include a pixel compression fabric that allows GC7000 to create a streamlined pixel processing pipeline across the ISP, CPU, DSP, memory, and display processor.

GC7000 Series GPU cores come packaged with a single driver software stack that supports board support packages (BSP) running Android KitKat, Chrome OS, Linux, QNX, Tizen and Windows operating systems. They will also support Unreal Engine 4, Unity 4 and the upcoming Unity 5 SDKs

Vivante_GC7000_FamilyThere are currently 6 GPUS available from the GC7000 series with GC7000 UltraLite, GC7000 Lite, GC7000, GC7200, GC7400, and GC7600 with 8 to 256 Vega Shader Cores clocked up to 1GHz, and all supporting OpenGL ES 3.1, OpenGL 2.x desktop, and OpenCL 1.2. Performance will range from 32 to 1024 GFLOPS with medium precision operation, 16 to 512 GFLOPS for higher precision operations, and GC7000 GPUs will be able to deliver up to 25.6 GTextel/s and up to 16 Gvertex/s.

AndroidPC.es also reports GC7000 GPU performance, I’d assume GC7600 performance, should be 40% higher than Nvidia Tegra K1 “Kepler” GPU and 122% higher than Imagination Technologies PowerVR GPU GX6650 “Rogue 2.0″.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Arduino based Open Source ECU for Diesel Engines

March 5th, 2014 1 comment

If you buy a diesel engine without ECU (Engine Control Unit), what would you do? If you’re  a hacker like synkooppi, you might just decide to design your own ECU with an Arduino, open source the code, and provide some documentation on your site. Many people already control motors with Arduino boards, they just happen to be electric motor, and not diesel motor.

Truck, Engine and ECU (Click to Enlarge)

Truck, Engine and ECU (Click to Enlarge)

The system works with diesel engines with Bosch VP37 pumps, and it has been used successfully since 2012.

The ECU is based on an  Arduino Mega board with a  8-bit AVR MCU @ 16MHz. The latest source code is available for download (2013-10-06), and can be uploaded to the board via the Arduino IDE. Configuration is done with text-based interface using serial connection over USB port. Hardware schematics have not been released yet.

This open source ECU currently support the following features:

  • Integrated control map editor
  • Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) memory
  • Fuel Map (RPM vs. TPS)
  • Boost map (MAP vs RPM)
  • Torque limiter map (MAP vs RPM)
  • VNT / WG control map (IQ vs RPM)
  • Pump advance map (IQ vs RPM)
  • Cold start and idle map (RPM vs. Temperature)

Other functionality they will or may be implementaion are PID based idle stabilization, EGT sensor support, Fuel trim maps for compensation intake air temp or fuel temp, HDK actuator support, as well as Cruise and traction control.

You can watch the video to see the whole setup and how the motor is controlled with a potentiometer (to emulator a gaz peddle), and the virtual dashboard. This was shot about 2 years ago, and the system has already been used in the truck.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Categories: Hardware Tags: arduino, automotive