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Posts Tagged ‘automotive’

Navdy is an Android Head Up Display for your Car Controlled by Voice and Gestures

August 9th, 2014 2 comments

Following up on yesterday’s Android rear view mirrors (ARVM), where I and others mentioned safety of such devices in comments, it has been brought to my attention that there’s a possibly safer alternative with Navdy, a 5.1″ Head-Up Display (HUD) running Android 4.4, that’s placed right in front of your eyes on the top of the dashboard, and coming with both common and different features compared to ARVM.
Navdy_Android_Automotive_HUD

Navdy’s preliminary specifications:

  • Processor – Unnamed dual core processor
  • System Memory – N/A
  • Storage – N/A
  • Display – 5.1″ wide transparent Head-Up Display (HUD) with high quality projector
  • Camera – IR camera for touchless gesture control
  • Connectivity – WiFi (802.11 b/g/n), Bluetooth 4.0/LE
  • Sensors – Accelerometer, e-compass, ambient light sensor
  • Audio – Via Bluetooth or 3.5mm minijack mini-USB port, Internal speaker and microphone with noise canceling DSP
  • Data / Power interface – OBD-II power and data connection to car computer, with optional 12 volt power adapter
  • Mount – Portable, bendable, non-marking, powered friction mount, with magnetic connection to the device
  • Dimensions – 130x140x95 mm (excluding mount, and including display)
Navdy GPS Application

Navdy GPS Application

Navdy can also be paired with your smartphone (Android or iOS) to access your apps and data. It is fully controlled by gestures and voice input, and I could not see any buttons on the device, which allows to answer/give calls, read/write SMS, control your music, and drive with GPS instructions right in front of your eyes. To better understand what Navdy does, watch the promo/demo video below.

The apps are not displayed as-is on the HUD, but a simplified version is shown to make it more HUD friendly. Compared to Android rear view mirrors, it has the advantage of sitting right in front of your eyes, it does not hide anything on the rear view mirror, supports gesture control, and has built-in support for ODBII, but does not come with cameras for DVR functions or parking assitance, and it looks like you may only be able to run a subset of Android apps.

Navdy is available for pre­-order for 30 days at the introductory price of $299, at 40% discount from the expected $499 retail price, and will ship “early 2015″.

Thanks to Connolly for the tip.

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Android Rear View Mirrors Feature Dual Cameras for DVR Function, GPS, Bluetooth, and More

August 8th, 2014 9 comments

I first heard about Android rear view mirrors back in 2012 with a solution designed by Huawei running Android 2.3. But this morning, DealExtreme listed three Android rear view mirrors, with model names like EL-H100, EL-H200, and EL-H800 selling between $120 to $216 depending on the features. The mirrors feature 4.3″ to 5″ displays, and all come with dual camera support, run Android 4.0, and seem powered by AllWinner A10 or A13 ARM Cortex A8 processor, with the most expensive (EL-H800) also supporting Bluetooth and GPS. One model also support IR night vision (EL-H100).

Elebest EL-H800 Rear View Mirror

Elebest EL-H800 Rear View Mirror

Features and specifications for EL-H800 model are listed as follows:

  • SoC – AllWinner A13 ARM Cortex A8 @ 1.2GHz with Mali-400 GPU
  • System Memory – 512MB DDR3
  • Storage – 8GB flash and micro SD slot up to 32GB
  • Display – 5″ TFT Touch Screen, 800×480 resolution
  • Connectivity – Wi-Fi and Bluetooth earphone support, FM radio
  • Video In – AV-IN support
  • Audio – Earphone jack, mono speakers, microphone
  • Camera
    • 2x 5.0MP camera lenses, with 140 deg wide angle, and 5x optical zoom.
    • DVR function supported @ 1080p30
    • Motion detection, timestamp, anti-shake, auto-white balance. IR night vision NOT supported.
  • USB – 1x mini USB 2.0 port for data interface
  • Power
    • 5V/1A DC via cable connected to car charger
    • 800 mAh battery
  • Dimensions – 17 cm x 12 cm x 11 cm
  • Weight – 750 grams

The kit is sold with the “Car DVR” rear view mirror, a rear camera, a DC 5V/1A car charger + cable (3 meters), a USB cable, as well as a user’s manual in English and Chinese. The pictures also show a Bluetooth audio headset, but it’s not listed in the product page… Having a rear view mirror running Android on half the screen seems like a distraction, and I’m not even sure how this can be legal… Nevertheless, I’ve searched for video to better understand what could be done with these models, but there weren’t any, and instead I’ve seen an interesting video for Germind JM-043LA Android rear view mirror which shows the different use cases including voice input, GPS, etc… Some of the features supported by the Germind model may not be supported by the EL-Hxx models.

Beside the products listed on DX, I could also find a model called B6000 on GeekBuying with GPS ($127) with a few positive users’ feedback, and Maxxiss on Amazon ($250), both also based on AllWinner A10. All these car DVR systems based on AllWinner may partially explain why the company is now working on V10 and V15 SoCs specifically for car and sports DVRs.

Shenzhen Elebest Technology (HK) appears to be the manufacturer of the EL-Hxx models, but only EL-H800 is listed on their website.

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ARM TechCon 2014 Schedule – 64-Bit, IoT, Optimization & Debugging, Security and More

July 23rd, 2014 No comments

ARM Technology Conference (TechCon) 2014 will take place on October 1 – 3, 2014, in Santa Clara, and as every year, there will be a conference with various sessions for suitable engineers and managers, as well as an exposition where companies showcase their latest ARM based products and solutions. The detailed schedule for the conference has just been made available. Last year,  there were 90 sessions organized into 15 tracks, but this year, despite received 300 applications,  the organizers decided to scale it down a bit, and there will be 75 session in the following 11 tracks:ARM_TechCon_2014

  • Chip Implementation
  • Debugging
  • Graphics
  • Heterogeneous Compute
  • New Frontiers
  • Power Efficiency
  • Safety and Security
  • Software Development and Optimization
  • Software Optimization for Infrastructure and Cloud
  • System Design
  • Verification

There are also some paid workshops that take all day with topics such as “Android (NDK) and ARM overview”, “ARM and the Internet of Things”, or “ARM Accredited Engineer Programs”.

As usual, I’ve gone through the schedule builder, and come up with some interesting sessions with my virtual schedule during the 3-day event:

Wednesday – 1st of October

In this session, Dr. Saied Tehrani will discuss how Spansion’s approach to utilize the ARM Cortex-R line of processors to deliver energy efficient solutions for the automotive MCU market has led the company to become a vital part of the movement toward connectivity in cars. Beginning with an overview of the auto industry’s innovation and growth in connected car features, he will explain how these systems require high performance processing to give drivers the fluid experience they expect. Highlights in security and reliability with ARM Cortex-R, including Spansion’s Traveo Family of MCU’s will also be presented.

HEVC and VP9 are the latest video compression standards that significantly improves compression ratio compared to its widely used predecessors H.264 and VP8 standard. In this session the following will be discussed:

  • The market need for GPU accelerated HEVC and VP9 decoders
  • Challenges involved in offloading video decoding algorithms to a GPU, and how Mali GPU is well suited to tackle them
  • Improvement in power consumption and performance of Mali GPU accelerated decoder
  • big.LITTLE architecture and CCI/CCN’s complementing roles in improving the GPU accelerated video decoder’s power consumption

ARM’s Cortex-M family of embedded processors are delivering energy-efficient, highly responsive solutions in a wide variety of application areas right from the lowest-power, general-purpose microcontrollers to specialised devices in advanced SoC designs. This talk will examine how ARM plans to grow the ARM Cortex-M processor family to provide high performance together with flexible memory systems, whilst still maintaining the low-power, low-latency characteristics of ARM’s architecture v7M.

IoT devices as embedded systems cover a large range of devices from low-power, low-performance sensors to high-end gateways. This presentation will highlight the elements an embedded engineer needs to analyse before selecting the MCU for his design. Software is fundamental in IoT: from networking to power management, from vertical market protocols to IoT Cloud protocols and services, from programming languages to remote firmware update, these are all design criteria influencing an IoT device design. Several challenges specific to IoT design will be addressed:

  • Code size and RAM requirements for the major networking stacks
  • Optimizing TCP/IP resources versus performance
  • Using Java from Oracle or from other vendors versus C
  • WiFi (radio only or integrated module)
  • Bluetooth (Classis versus LE) IoT protocols

Thursday – 2nd of October

Amongst ARM’s IP portfolio we have CPUs, GPUs, video engines and display processors, together with fabric interconnect and POP IP, all co-designed, co-verified and co-optimized to produce energy-efficient implementations. In this talk, we will present some of the innovations ARM has introduced to reduce memory bandwidth and system power, both in the IP blocks themselves and the interactions between them, and how this strategy now extends to the new ARM Mali display processors.

Designing a system that has to run on coin cells? There’s little accurate information available about how these batteries behave in systems that spend most of their time sleeping. This class will give design guidance on the batteries, plus examine the many other places power leakages occur, and offer some mitigation strategies.

64-bit is the “new black” across the electronics industry, from server to mobile devices. So if you are building or considering building an ARMv8-A SoC, you shall attend this talk to either check that you know everything or find out what you shall know! Using the ARMv8 Juno ARM Development Platform (ADP) as reference, this session will cover:

  • The ARMv8-A hardware compute subsystem architecture for Cortex-A57, Cortex-A53 & Mali based SoC
  • The associated ARMv8-A software stack
  • The resources available to 64-bit software developers
  • Demonstration of the Android Open Source Project for ARMv8 running on Juno.

Rapid prototyping platforms have become a standard path to develop initial design concepts. They provide an easy-to-use interface with a minimal learning curve and allow ideas to flourish and quickly become reality. Transitioning from a simple, easy-to-use rapid prototyping system can be daunting, but shouldn’t be. This session presents options for starting with mbed as a prototyping environment and moving to full production with the use of development hardware, the open-source mbed SDK and HDK, and the rich ARM ecosystem of hardware and software tools.Attendees will learn how to move from the mbed online prototyping environment to full production software, including:

  • Exporting from mbed to a professional IDE
  • Full run-time control with debugging capabilities
  • Leveraging an expanded SDK with a wider range of integration points
  • Portability of applications from an mbed-enabled HDK to your custom hardware

Statistics is often perceived as scary and dull… but not when you apply it to optimizing your code! You can learn so much about your system and your application by using relatively simple techniques that there’s no excuse not to know them.This presentation will use no slides but will step through a fun and engaging demo of progressively optimizing OpenCL applications on a ARM-powered Chromebook using IPython. Highlights will include analyzing performance counters using radar diagrams, reducing performance variability by optimizing for caches and predicting which program transformations will make a real difference before actually implementing them.

Friday – 3rd of October

The proliferation of mobile devices has led to the need of squeezing every last micro-amp-hour out of batteries. Minimizing the energy profile of a micro-controller is not always straight forward. A combination of sleep modes, peripheral control and other techniques can be used to maximize battery life. In this session, strategies for optimizing micro-controller energy profiles will be examined which will extend battery life while maintaining the integrity of the system. The techniques will be demonstrated on an ARM Cortex-M processor, and include a combination of power modes, software architecture design techniques and various tips and tricks that reduce the energy profile.

One of the obstacles to IoT market growth is guaranteeing interoperability between devices and services . Today, most solutions address applications requirements for specific verticals in isolation from others. Overcoming this shortcoming requires adoption of open standards for data communication, security and device management. Economics, scalability and usability demand a platform that can be used across multiple applications and verticals. This talk covers some of the key standards like constrained application protocol (CoAP), OMA Lightweight M2M and 6LoWPAN. The key features of these standards like Caching Proxy, Eventing, Grouping, Security and Web Resource Model for creating efficient, secure, and open standards based IoT systems will also be discussed.

Virtual Prototypes are gaining widespread acceptance as a strategy for developing and debugging software removing the dependence on the availability of hardware. In this session we will explore how a virtual prototype can be used productively for software debug. We will explain the interfaces that exist for debugging and tracing activity in the virtual prototype, how these are used to attach debug and analysis tools and how these differ from (and improve upon) equivalent hardware capabilities. We will look in depth at strategies for debug and trace and how to leverage the advantages that the virtual environment offers. The presentation will further explore how the virtual prototype connects to hardware simulators to provide cross-domain (hardware and software) debug. The techniques will be illustrated through case studies garnered from experiences working with partners on projects over the last few years.

Attendees will learn:

  • How to set up a Virtual Prototype for debug and trace
  • Connecting debuggers and other analysis tools.
  • Strategies for productive debug of software in a virtual prototype.
  • How to setup trace on a virtual platform, and analysing the results.
  • Hardware in the loop: cross domain debug.
  • Use of Python to control the simulation and trace interfaces for a virtual platform.
  • 14:30 – 15:20 – GPGPU on ARM Systems by Michael Anderson, Chief Scientist, The PTR Group, Inc.

ARM platforms are increasingly coupled with high-performance Graphics Processor Units (GPUs). However the GPU can do more than just render graphics, Today’s GPUs are highly-integrated multi-core processors in their own right and are capable of much more than updating the display. In this session, we will discuss the rationale for harnessing GPUs as compute engines and their implementations. We’ll examine Nvidia’s CUDA, OpenCL and RenderScript as a means to incorporate high-performance computing into low power draw platforms. This session will include some demonstrations of various applications that can leverage the general-purpose GPU compute approach.

Abstract currently not available.

That’s 14 sessions out of the 75 available, and you can make your own schedule depending on your interests with the schedule builder.

In order to attend ARM TechCon 2014, you can register online, although you could always show up and pay the regular on-site, but it will cost you, or your company, extra.

Super Early Bird Rare
Ended June 27
Early Bird Rate
Ends August 8
Advanced Rate
Ends September 19
Regular Rate
VIP $999 $1,299 $1,499 $1,699
All-Access $799 $999 $1,199 $1,399
General Admission $699 $899 $1,099 $1,299
AAE Training $249 $299 $349 $399
Software Developers Workshop $99 $149 $199 $249
Expo FREE FREE $29 $59

There are more types of pass this year, but the 2-day and 1-day pass have gone out of the window. The expo pass used to be free at any time, but this year, you need to register before August 8. VIP and All-access provides access to all events, General Admission excludes AAE workshops and software developer workshops, AAE Training and Software Developers Workshop passes give access to the expo plus specific workshops. Further discounts are available for groups, up to 30% discount.

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AllWinner V10 and V15 SoCs Target Video Recording Applications

July 9th, 2014 1 comment

AllWinner A-series that can be found in tablets and media players are pretty well known, but AllWinner also has V-Series processors with V10 and V15. A first glance, AllWinner V10 is quite similar to AllWinner A31 with a quad core Cortex A7 CPU coupled with a PowerVR SGX544MP2 GPU, and AllWinner V15 has the same CPU/GPU combo as AllWinner A10 (CortexA8/Mali-400). But AllWinner V-Series are actually video encoders targeting applications such as IP cameras, car DVRs, and sports digital video cameras thanks to features such as motion detection, video scaling, and digital watermarking.

AllWinner V10 Block Diagram

AllWinner V10 Block Diagram

Let’s go through AllWinner V10 specifications, and I’ll mark differences with AllWinner A31, or features not mentioned in A31 specs, in bold:

  • CPU – Quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 with· 256KB L1 cache, 1MB L2 cache
  • GPU – PowerVR SGX544MP2 compliant with OpenCL 1.1 EP and delivering up to 20GFLOPS.
  • Memory – 32-bit DDR3/LPDDR2 SDRAM controller, supporting up to 2GB; NAND I/F
  • Video
    • Supports H.264 High Profile 1080p@60fps video encoding
    • Digital watermarking
    • Motion detection
    • CBR/VBR bit rate control mode
    • Supports UHD@24fps video decoding
    • Supports multi-format video decoding including MPEG 1/2/4, H.264, VP8, AVS,VC-1, etc.
    • Supports independent encoding and decoding
    • 1/16 ~ 16x scaling
  • Video Input/Output
    • Supports 12-bit parallel CSI and 4-lane MIPI CSI
    • Supports up to 12M CMOS sensor
    • Supports RGB LCD/LVDS/MIPI DSI/HDMI
    • Supports one video layer and two graphic layers
    • Supports scaling up to 4K x 4K
  • HawkView ISP
    • Auto exposure/focus/white balance (AE/AF/AWB)
    • Dynamic range control (DRC)
    • Color enhancement
    • Noise reduction
  • Audio Codec
    • Integrated Hi-Fi 100dB audio codec
    • Three integrated differential analog mic amplifiers for headset and phone
    • One digital mic interface with software noise cancellation
  • Peripherals
    • 3 x USB ports
    • 4 x SD card 3.0
    • RTP/CTP
    • GMAC/EMAC
  • Package – BGA609, 18mm x 18mm, 0.65 pitch

AllWinner V10 also appears to be lacking 3840×1080 3D decoding ability found in A31, and may not have a dual band RAM interface, and no support for LPDDR3 memory. I’m not sure if A31 also supports independent encoding and decoding, or that would means Skype or Google Hangout calls are partially handled by software. AllWinner provides support for Android and Linux operating systems for the V10 and V15 processor, specifically Android 4.4 for V10. AllWinner V15 has similar features as V10 but only comes with a single Cortex A8 core, a Mali-400 GPU, supports 1080p decoding, 720p encoding, and features less peripherals. It’s also smaller with a BGA336 (14mm x 14mm) package.

I could not find any development boards, nor products based on AllWinner V10 and V15. There may be some, but the processors are seldom advertised in devices like digital cameras, and digital video recorders. I’ve asked some details to AllWinner, and I’ll update this post if I get an answer.

You can may find more information in AllWinner V10 and V15 on their respective product pages.

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Google Releases Android L (Lollipop?) Developer Preview

June 26th, 2014 2 comments

Google I/O is taking place right now in San Francisco, and the company made several announcements. Although they have not announced the full codename of Android 5.0, referring to the next version as “Android L” (Lollipop would be nice though), but they’ve already documented the key changes made to Android L, and a developer preview will be released later today (26 June), together with binary images for Google Nexus 5 and Nexus 7.

Android_Lollipop

Beside the smartphone and tablet developer preview, there will be 3 other SDKs for Android L:

  • Android Wear SDK – Android for wearables with sync notifications, wearable apps, data transfer APIs, and voice actions, e.g. “Ok Google, call mum”.
  • Android TV Preview SDK – Android for TVs with pre-built fragments for browsing and interacting with media catalogs, in-app search, and recommendations.
  • Android Auto SDK – Android for the car with apps featuring consistent user experience between vehicles, and minimizing distractions.

I’ll go through various software and hardware announcements for Android Wear and TV in separate blog posts, and probably skip Android Auto for now.

So what’s new in Android L Developer Preview?

Material Design

Material Design is is a new design language that will let developer create app which look similar to Google Now. Google chose the name “Material” as it is apparently inspired from real materials such as paper and ink. Android L user interface will be entirely designed with Material Design. The best is to look at an example.

Gmail Now vs Gmail "L"

Gmail Now vs Gmail “L”

On the left, we’ve got the current Gmail app, and on the right the newly designed app for Android L. Lots of it looks like cosmetic changes, but you’ll have noticed the three dot and new mail icons are gone, and all menu will be accessible via the top left icon. There are also some light and shadow effects that will make users feel like they’re touching real elements.

More details can be found in this Material Design presentation (PDF).

Improved Notifications

Notifications have also changed with a new design based on Material, and the ability to display notifications on the lock screen.

Android_L_Notifications

I understand lockscreen notifications are optional, and if you don’t like to show them in the lock screen using visibility controls. As you can see from the screenshot above it works very similar to Google Now which cards that you can discard once you’re done. Notifications will also be able to pop-up in games or other full screen apps, and you’ll be able o take action within the notification, for example by declining or accepting a video call request.

Recents

The list of recent apps will become the list of recent everything, simply called “Recents”, as it will include both apps, web pages, and documents.

Better Tools for Improving Battery Life

As devices become more powerful, they also become more power hungry despite efforts by SoC designers to reduce energy usage. Badly programmed apps are however the main culprit of short battery life, so Google has introduced Project Volta to help user and developers optimize power consumption. Developers can use “Battery Historian” tool to monitor power consumption of different processes, and which hardware block (e.g. Cellular radio) is currently being used.

Battery_HistorianUsers will also have their own app / feature dubbed “Battery Saver” to improve battery life, and Google claims their Nexus 5 should be able to last an extra 90 minutes on a charge with Battery Saver enabled. This is achieved by reducing the performance of the device once the battery has dropped below 20% charge. At that time, a notification would pop-up to let the user select he wants to enable Battery Saver mode.

Under the hood improvements

As as been widely reported, Google recently killed Dalvik in a recent commit in AOSP, and ART will become the default JAVA runtime using ahead-of-time compilation for speedier application loading time, and memory usage improvements. Google also claims it provides true cross platform support for ARM, MIPS and x86.

Android L will support 64-bit instructions including ARMv8, x86-64 and MIPS64. This will provide a larger number of registers, and increased addressable memory space. Java developers won’t needto change their apps for 64-bit support. One the first Android64 devices is likely to be the Nexus 9 tablet powered by Nvidia Tegra K1 Denver as previously reported.

On the graphics side, Android L adds support for OpenGL ES 3.1, and includes Android Extension Pack for developers with tesselation and geometry shaders and other features that should bring PC and console class graphics to Android games according to Google.

Via Anandtech and Liliputing

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First Tizen 3.0 Common Milestone Released, Developer Program Announced

June 5th, 2014 No comments

The Tizen Steering Group has announced the first release of Tizen 3.0 Common. Tizen Common is the common subset of development / build / test platform of the Tizen profiles, used by platform developers to develop the next version of the profiles, and a Tizen 3.0 common release is planned every quarter.

This milestone release includes:

  • 64-bit support for both Intel and ARM architecturesTizen Mobile Linux Distribution with HTML5 APIs
  • Crosswalk-based web runtime
  • Multiuser support
  • Systemd
  • Security: three-domain rule system for SMACK and Cynara as authorization framework
  • Wayland display server

Pre-built binary releases for can be downloaded @ http://download.tizen.org/releases/daily/tizen/common/common-wayland-x86_64/tizen_20140602.26/ for Intel Atom 3815 NUC Kit and NEXCOM VTC1010 in-vehicle computer based on Intel Atom 3825. However, Tizen 3.0 Common will also be tested on Intel NUC Haswell (core i5),  Lenovo x230 IvyBridge (core i5) and on the ARM side, ODROID-U3 development board.

If you want to build your own, refer to the developer guide, using tizen_common_2014.Q2 tag.

More details can be found on Tizen 3.0 Wiki, and questions can be asked on the tizen developers mailing list.

Separately, but still related to Tizen, when Samsung announced the Samung Z Tizen phone, they also mention an upcoming special developer program to boost the number of apps available on the Tizen Store at launch. Tizen Experts reports that developers will keep 100% of revenues from the Tizen Store, including in-apps sales for one year, excluding taxes and carrier billing / banking fees, with no signup fees, nor app submission fees. So if you are an app developer, and already have designed Android, iOS or HTML5 apps, it may be worth the effort to port them to Tizen, and sign up to the Tizen Store.

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Intel Unveils In-Vehicle Solutions and Development Kit for Assisted Driving and Autonomous Cars

May 31st, 2014 No comments

Intel has announced their In-Vehicle Solutions (IIVS) for automakers comprised of hardware based on Intel’s industrial Bay Trail Atom 3800 series SoC, and software solutions relying on a Linux based operating system but it’s not clear whether it might be Wind River Linux, Tizen IVI, or another new OS. The solutions will first provide In Vehicle Infotainment (IVI) with assisted driving features such as , and over time it will allow semi-autonomous and self-driving cards.

Intel CM1050 Module

Intel CM1050 Module

At the heart of the system, Intel will provide CM1050 computer-on-module that will be part of a development kit including a chassis with CAN, Ethernet, and USB ports, as well as audio and CVBS  multimedia I/Os, and radios and antennas for FM, AM, DAB, GPS, WiFi, Bluetooth, and cellular. A Blu-ray drive, and SSDs will be available as storage options. The complete system is designed to be upgradeable, and automakers can expected modules with faster processors in the future to allow for autonomous, but currently CM1050 CoM will be based on four different Atom E3800 SoC from single to quad core models.

IIVS Chassis Connectors Description

IIVS Chassis Connectors Description

The complete development kits includes a compute module ((Intel In-Vehicle Solution CM1050), the chassis with thermal solution and EMI suppression, six types of antennas, a 12V/10A power brick, a 11.6″ HD capacitive touchscreen, various cables, a Blu-ray drive, Intel Solid-State Drives, and a CAN Box.  The hardware complies with RoHS and REACH directives, and the kit inclides “Hardened and Optimized Automotive Middleware” (Intel In-Vehicle Solution Software Foundation), as well as the following development tools and sample code:

  • CBC Configurator Toolchain – The carrier board communication (CBC) Tool Chain tutorial describes the process for configuring Eclipse for the CBC Tool Chain and building a CBC plug-in for the compute module
  • GENIVI Diagnostic Log and Trace Viewer Plug-in – Used to trace, analyze, and debug ultrafast, inter-process communication (UF-IPC) messages between components on the target.
  • Eclipse IDE Plug-in for Audio – Audio configuration is done using a domain specific language (DSL) defined for the audio subsystem.
  • Eclipse IDE Plug-in for IDL Programming – The IDL files that describe the software foundation (i.e., middleware) subsystem APIs can be accessed via an Intel-supplied IDL Editor, distributed as an Eclipse plug-in.
  • Line Diagnosis and Analysis (LinDA) – This tool provides an independent test framework that can be used to support hardware testing, automotive platform development, production, debugging, benchmarking, and certification.
  • Sample Applications – To demonstrate technologies included in the package. The applications currently cover multimedia, CBC tutorial, client/server UF-IPC, and LinDA.
Intel IIVS Development Kit

Intel IIVS Development Kit

Intel expects the main use cases of their IIVS to be as follows:

  • Intel_In-Vehicle_Software_Foundation_PackagesEntertainment
    • Multi-zone audio and video
    • Multimedia processing
    • DVD playback
    • Distributed audio/video management
    • Distributed playback
    • Ethernet audio/video bridging (AVB)
  • User Interface Technologies
    • Speech recognition
    • Text to speech
    • Gesture recognition
    • Touch screen
  • Navigation and GPS
  • Internet and Cloud Connectivity
  • Accident Avoidance (i.e., cameras)
  • Advanced Driver Assistance
  • Graphics Display

Automakers will be able to select advanced (720p) and premium (1080p) entertainment packages, and various connectivity and multimedia options depending on the class of the cars. You can watch the animated promo video below to get an idea of how this will all fit together, and which options are available.

You can find more information on Intel IIVS page, or directly read IIVS product brief, and/or IIVS development kit product brief.

Via SemiAccurate and LinuxGizmos

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