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Posts Tagged ‘bsp’

Freescale Unveils QorIQ LS1043A Quad core ARM Cortex A53 Communication Processor for Fanless Networking Equipment

October 22nd, 2014 5 comments

Freescale has introduced the QorIQ LS1043A communications processor, powered by four 64-bit ARM Cortex A53 cores, and destined to be integrated into “intelligent-edge networking equipment including security appliances, SDN (Software Designed Networks) / NFV (Network Functions Virtualization) edge platforms and other fanless, power-efficient applications.” A dual core version named LS1023A is also available.

QorIQ_LS1043A_Block_DiagramKey features of LS1043A and LS1023A SoCs:

  • CPU – Quad (LS1043A) or Dual (LS1023A) ARM Cortex-A53 64-bit cores @ 1 GHz to 1.5 GHz with 32/32 I/D Cache KB L1 and 1 MB L2 cache. 16,000+ CoreMarks.
  • Networking & High Speed Interfaces:
    • Up to six 1x GbE or 1x 10GbE and five x GbE
    • Four lane SerDes up to 10 GHz multiplexed across controllers supporting:
      • Three PCI Express Gen 2 interfaces
      • SATA 3.0 Interface
      • uQUICC Engine
  • Accelerators and Memory Control
  • Other peripherals
    • 3x USB 3.0 interfaces with PHY
    • QuadSPI
    • Integrated Flash Controller (IFC)
    • Quad I²C
  • Misc – QorIQ Platform’s Trust Architecture, ARM SMMU for hardware enhanced virtualization
  • Power Consumption – As low as 6W for a complete fanless system

The company provides a Linux 3.12 BSP, VortiQa  software stacks for the enterprise, SMB networking applications, security appliances, cloud equipment, etc…, and a 6-month evaluation license for CodeWarrior development tools for the company’s LS1 development platforms (no details provided). Freescale also claims third party tools and development kits are available, but did not list them, except for OpenDataPlane program developed in collaboration with Linaro LNG.

QorIQ LS1043A communications processor should start sampling in Q1 2015. More information is available on Freescale LS1043A and LS1023A product page, and QorIQ solutions are currently showcased at Linley Processor Conference, at the Hyatt Regency in Santa Clara, California, until October 23.

Via Embedded.com

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Emtrion SBC-SAMA5D36 ARM Cortex A5 Linux Development Board Comes with Dual Ethernet, HDMI Output

September 10th, 2014 2 comments

A few months ago, I reviewed Atmel Xplained SAMA5D3 development board powered by SAMA5D36 Cortex A5 processor. The kit is supported by the Yocto Project, so I could build and run Poky distribution with a recent Linux kernel (it support mainline), it features Arduino compatible headers, and I found the board to be a nice platform for headless applications, or applications that require an LCD display. However, if you wanted to connect an HDMI display you’d be out of luck, unless you design your own LCD to HDMI add-on board. Emtrion SBC-SAMA5D36 could be an interesting alternative, as it features very similar specifications, but adds an HDMI output port.

SBC-SAMA5D36 Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

SBC-SAMA5D36 Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

Emtrion SBC-SAMA5D36 specifications:

  • MPU – Atmel SAMA5D36 single core Cortex-A5 @  536 MHz
  • System Memory – 256 MB RAM
  • Storage – 512 MB NAND Flash, up to 16 MB NOR Flash, and micro SD Card socket
  • Connectivity – 100Base-TX Ethernet,  10/100/1000Base-TX Ethernet (Gigabit Ethernet)
  • Video Output – HDMI, LCD connector and 4-wire touch
  • USB –  2xUSB Host,  1x USB Device
  • Other I/Os:
    • I2S Audio Interface
    • 5x serial ports (LVTTL)
    • up to 52 GPIOs
    • 2x CAN buses
  • Misc – 2x user buttons, 4x user LEDs, RTC (battery buffered)
  • Power Supply – 5V.
  • Power Consumption –  Typ. 1 W
  • Dimensions – 135mm x 74mm
Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

The board is said to support Debian 8.0 (Jessie), as well as build frameworks such as the Yocto Project and Buildroot. Just like Atmel SAMA5D3 Xplained, SBC-SAMA5D36 is supported in Linux mainline, except the LCD driver which is work in progress. The SDK includes a pre-configured rootFS based on Debian 8, Qt 5.2 support, GNU toolchain, build scripts, a VMware virtual machine for development and various software and hardware documents.

The board is available now for around 100 Euros for a single unit, and around 80 Euros for 1k order. You can find more information, including the hardware manual, on the company’s blog, and SBC-SAMA5D36 product page.

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$50 Intel Edison Board for Wearables Features an SoC with a Dual Core Atom Processor, and a Quark MCU

September 10th, 2014 7 comments

Intel announced the Edison board for wearables applications last January at CES 2014. When it first came out, it looked like an SD card, but the board look has now drastically changed. Nevertheless, the important point is that Intel Edison is now available, together with various development kits, and runs Linux (Yocto built), as well as an RTOS.

Intel_Edison_ModuleWith the official release, we’ve also got the full specifications:

  • SoC – Dual-core, dual-threaded Intel Atom (Silvermont) processor (22nm) processor @ 500 MHz and a 32-bit Intel Quark micro-controller @ 100 MHz. Includes 1GB LPDDR3 PoP memory
  • System Memory – 1 GB LPDDR3 (PoP memory) – 2 channel 32bits @ 800MT/sec
  • Storage – 4 GB eMMC (v4.51 spec) + micro SD card connector
  • Connectivity –  Dual band 802.11 a/b/g/n Wi-Fi (Broadcom 43340) with either an on-board antenna or external antenna, and Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB – 1x micro USB connector
  • I/Os:
    • 2x UART  (1 full flow control, 1 Rx/Tx)
    • 2x I2C, 1x SPI with 2 chip selects
    • 1x I2S
    • 12x GPIO including 4 capable of PWM output
  • Module connector – 70-pin connector (Hirose DF40 series – 1.5, 2.0, or 3.0 mm stack height)
  • Power Supply – Input: 3.3 to 4.5 V; Output: 100mA @ 3.3V and 100 mA @ 1.8V
  • Power consumption – Standby (No radio): 13 mW;  Standby (Bluetooth 4.0): 21.5 mW (BLE in Q4 2014);  Standby (Wi-Fi): 35 mW.
  • Dimensions – 35.5 × 25.0 × 3.9 mm
  • Temperature Range – 0 to 40°C

The company will provide Yocto 1.6 Linux for the two cores of the Atom processor, and the Quark MCU will run an unnamed RTOS. Development tools for the Atom cores includes the Arduino IDE, Eclipse with support for C, C++ and Python programming languages, and Intel XDK for Node.JS and HTML5 development. An SDK and IDE will be available for the Quark MCU. Intel IoT Analytics Platform is the cloud solution adopted for the board, and will be free for limited and non-commercial use.

Intel Edison Arduino (Click to Enlarge)

Intel Edison Board for Arduino (Click to Enlarge)

Edison is basically a module, so it might be useful to have a baseboard, and Intel has come up with two:

  • Intel Edison Board for Arduino – Board with Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, and headers compatible with Arduino UNO expect it only supports 4 PWM instead of 6.
  • Intel Edison Breakout Board – Minimal board with the following key features:
    • Exposes native 1.8 V I/O of the Edison module.
    • 0.1″ grid I/O array of through-hole solder points.
    • USB OTG with USB Micro Type-AB connector
    • USB OTG power switch.
    • Battery charger.
    • USB to device UART bridge with USB micro Type-B connector.
    • DC power supply jack (7 to 15 VDC input).

Documentation including a product brief, hardware guides for Edison board for Arduino and the Breakout board, the Arduino IDE, and the instructions to get the Yocto BSP can be downloaded on Intel’s Edison Board page.

Intel Edison is available for backorder on Sparkfun for $49.95, and Edison for Arduino and Edison Breakout Board kits are listed Maker Shed for respectively $107 and $75, but currently out of stock. There’s also a Starter Pack on Sparkun for $114.95. Shipping is expected in 6 to 8 weeks.

Thanks to David and Freire.

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PicoZed System-on-Modules are Powered by Xilinx Zynq-7000 ARM + FPGA SoC

September 10th, 2014 1 comment

After the Zedboard, and the Microzed, here comes PicoZed, a family of system-on-modules (SoM) based on Xilinx Zynq-7000 SoCs featuring a dual core Cortex A9 processor and FPGA fabric. The module also comes with 1GB RAM, 4GB eMMC, Gigabit Ethernet PHY, various user I/O, and more. Target applications include embedded vision, test & measurement, motor control, software-defined radio, and industrial automation.

PicoZed 7303 SoM (Click to Enlarge)

PicoZed 7030 SoM (Click to Enlarge)

Four modules are available with support for commercial or industrial temperature ranges, all sharing the following specifications:

  • SoC (depending on module)
    • Xilinx Zynq-7010 with two Cortex-A9 cores @  866MHz, FPGA with 28K Logic Cells
    • Xilinx Zynq-7015 with two Cortex-A9 cores @  866MHz, FPGA with 74K Logic Cells, 4 transceivers @ 6.25 Gb/s
    • Xilinx Zynq-7020 with two Cortex-A9 cores @  866MHz, FPGA with 85K Logic Cells
    • Xilinx Zynq-7030 with two Cortex-A9 cores @  1GHz, FPGA with 125K Logic Cells, up to 4 transceivers @ 12.5 Gb/s
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR3 SDRAM
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC flash, 128Mb QSPI flash
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet PHY
  • PicoZed Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

    PicoZed Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

  • USB – USB 2.0 PHY
  • User I/O via three board-to-board connectors (JX3):
    • 7Z010 Version:
      • 113 User I/O (100 PL, 13 PS MIO)
      • PL I/O configurable as up to 48 LVDS pairs or 100 single-ended I/O
    • 7Z015 Version:
      • 148 User I/O (135 PL, 13 PS MIO)
      • PL I/O configurable as up to 65 LVDS pairs or 135 single-ended I/O
      • 4 GTP transceivers
    • 7Z020 Version:
      • 138 User I/O (125 PL, 13 PS MIO)
      • PL I/O configurable as up to 60 LVDS pairs or 125 single-ended I/O
    • 7Z030 Version:
      • 148 User I/O (135 PL, 13 PS MIO)
      • PL I/O configurable as up to 65 LVDS pairs or 135 single-ended I/O
      • 4 GTX transceivers
  • Debugging – JTAG configuration port accessible via I/O connectors, PS JTAG pins accessible via I/O connectors
  • Misc – Oscillator @ 33.33 MHz
PicoZed 7030 Back (Click to Enlarge)

PicoZed 7030 Back (Click to Enlarge)

The module comes with a getting started card, and the company provides a Linux BSP, as well as reference design files.

To ease development, PicoZed Carrier Board is also available with the following specifications:

  • SoC/Memory/Storage – Via PicoZed modules listed above
  • External Storage — MicroSD slot
  • Connectivity – 2x Gigabit Ethernet ports, SFP+ cage
  • Video Output – HDMI
  • USB – USB 2.0 port, USB UART
  • Other I/O
    • SMA port for GTX/GTP
    • JTAG port
    • Programmable clock mux
    • SMA reference clock input
    • User I/O:
      • FMC (Low Pin Count)
      • PS Pmod (Shared with eMMC)
      • PL Pmod (7015/20/30 only)
      • PL Pmod (7015/30 only)
  • Expansion – 1x PCIe Gen 2
  • Misc – User push buttons and LEDs
  • Power – 12V
PicoZed Carrier Board (Click to Enlarge)

PicoZed Carrier Board (Click to Enlarge)

This baseboard comes with a 12V AC/DC power support, and a quick start card.

PicoZed SoMs and Carrier Board are available now on Avnet with lead times between 8 to 10 weeks. The SoM prices vary between $179 and $399 depending on chosen Zynq SoC and temperature range, and PicoZed Carrier Board can be purchased for $425. You can find more details on PicoZed SoM and PicoZed Carrier Board pages. The board will be demonstrated at X-Fest seminars in Europe, Asia, and North America.

Via LinuxGizmos

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Texas Instruments Announces Sitara AM437x Cortex A9 SoCs and Evaluation Modules

July 2nd, 2014 5 comments

Texas_Instruments_Sitara_AM437xThe first time I heard about Texas Instruments Sitara AM437x was via a TechNexion EDM-CT-AM437x system-on-module back in 2012, but Texas Instruments Sitara Cortex A9 processors development seems to have dragged a little longer than expected. Nevertheless, the company has now formally announced their Sitara AM437x ARM Cortex A9 SoC targeting automation, IoT gateways, and other industrial applications, and featuring four PRUs (Programmable Real-time Units), and support for dual camera for terminals with bar code scanning.

At launch there will be four AM437xprocessors: AM4376, AM4377, AM4378, and AM4379. The processors will all be based on a single Cortex A9 core  @ 800 to 1000 MHz with 64KB SRAM shared with 32KB data cache and 32KB programmable cache, 256 KB L2 and L3 caches, a 32-bit memory interface supporting LPDDR2, DDR3, and DDR3L, a 2-port Gigabit Ethernet switch , two USB 2.0 OTG + PHY and the following other interfaces:

  • Serial Ports – 6x UART, 5x SPI, 3x I2C, 2x McASP, 2x CAN, HDQ, QSPI
  • System – EDMA, Debug, Counter (SyncTimer32K), WDT, RTC, 3x eQEP, 3x eCAP, JTAG, 12x Timers, 6x PWM
  • Parallel – 3x MMC/SD/SDIO, GPIO, 2x Camera, 2×12-bit ADCs, NAND/NOR (16bit ECC)

Some interfaces (HDQ, McASP, eQEP..) seem specific to Texas Instruments, and if you’d like to get a short explanation of these, I’ve updated my technical glossary.

The main differences between the four SoCs are related to the presence of a PowerVR GPU and EtherCat support as shown in the table below.

AM4376 AM4377 AM4378 AM4379
Graphics N/A PowerVR SGX530
PRU-ICSS 4x 32-bit Programmable Real Time Unit (PRU) 4x 32-bit Programmable Real Time Unit (PRU) + EtherCAT slave support 4x 32-bit Programmable Real Time Unit (PRU) 4x 32-bit Programmable Real Time Unit (PRU) + EtherCAT slave support

Total power consumption will be less than one watt in active mode, about 5mW in deep sleep, and less than 0.03mW in RTC-only mode. AM437x processors are available in 17x17mm, 0.65mm VCA packages.
AM437x_Block_Diagram
Texas Instruments already have a software development kit based on Linux 3.x mainline and with a GUI launcher, as well as graphics and other demos. Adeneo Embedded also announced a Windows Embedded Compact 7 (WEC7) BSP for AM437x processors, SYS/BIOS RTOS with support for real-time industrial protocols will be available in Q3 2014, Android 4.3 or greater support will be released by a third-party in the fall of 2014. Other various RTOS solutions by Mentor Graphicsm, QNX, Wind River, Green Hills Software and Ittiam are also planned, but no timeline has been provided.

Texas Instrument AM437x Evaluation and Development Kits

The company has already readied an evaluation module based on AM4378 with a 7″ touch screen.

AM437x Evaluation Module (TMDXEVM437X)

AM437x Evaluation Module (TMDXEVM437X)

TMDXEVM437X Kit has the following key features:

  • Sitara AM4378 ARM Cortex-A9 Processor
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3
  • Storage – On board 4GB NAND and 4GB eMMC memory, 1x Micro SD/MMC
  • Vido Output / Display – 7″ capacitive touch screen LCD, HDMI output
  • Audio – Audio in/out
  • Camera – 2 camera modules
  • Connectivity – 1x Gigabit Ethernet
  • USB – 1x USB2.0 OTG, 1x USB 2.0 host
  • Other I/O – 1x UART, 2x CAN, 1x JTAG
  • Misc – Connector for Wilink8 (Wi+Fi + Bluetooth module)
  • Power – TPS65218 Power management IC

The development kit currently supports the Linux SDK, and sells for $599. You can find more information on AM437x evaluation modules page. Two other evaluation modules are schedule for later this year: TMDXIDK437X Industrial Development Kit based on AM4379 with 1 GB RAM, and no display but with industrial protocols support thanks to SYS/BIOS RTOS (Q3 2014 – $329), and TMDXSK437X based on AM4378 with 1GB RAM, a 4.3″ capacitive touchscreen (Q4 2014 for less than $300). Eventually, I suspect there may also be a low cost platform for hobbyists… Beaglebone Green anyone?

You can watch the introduction video below for an overview about TI Sitara AM437x SoCs, evaluation modules, and software solutions.

LinuxGizmos reports Sitara AM437x processors will start sampling later this month, mass production is expected to begin Q4 2014, and pricing will be around $15 per unit for 1k orders. You can find more information on Texas Instruments’ Sitara AM437x page, as well as TI Wiki.

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Emtrion DIMM-AM335x SoM Supports Mainline Linux Kernel

June 30th, 2014 1 comment

When I cover system-on-modules (SoM), companies will usually provide some BSP (Board Support Packages) for older kernels, and did not submit their changes to mailine kernel, so I was interested in a news from Emtrion entitled “DIMM-AM335x: Linux mainline support ready“, which actually means they’ve done the work to support a recent Linux kernel (3.14) and provides instructions and code (device tree files), but did not submit patches to the linux-arm-kernel mailing list to get their changes added to kernel.org.

Emtrion_DIMM-AM335xLet’s look at the hardware specs first:

  • SoC – Texas Instruments Sitara AM335x ARM Cortex A8 processor @ 720Mhz to 1GHz (AM3354 or AM3359)
  • System Memory – onboard 512 MB SDRAM/optional 256 MB
  • Storage – 512 MB NAND Flash (managed) + 2 SD card interfaces
  • Display – LCDs I/F with resolution up to SVGA, with 4-wire touch interface
  • Audio – Analog Audio with SSI I/F
  • USB – USB 2.0 Host and Device
  • Connectivity – 100BaseTX Ethernet
  • Other I/Os:
    • 2x CAN
    • 4x serial interfaces
    • 4x analog inputs
    • 1x SPI, 1x I²C
    • 10x GPIOs
  • Misc – RTC (Battery buffered)
  • Temperature range – 0°C to 70°C (optional from – 40°C to 85°C)
  • Dimensions – 67,6 x 45 mm

The company provide four different baseboard for development. You can find more details about the hardware on Emtrion DIMM-AM335x page.

The company provides BSP and development kit for Linux 3.2.0 (via Yocto 1.5.1), and QNX 6.5, but you can also get BSPs for Windows Embedded Compact 7, Windows 2013, and Android 4.0 on request. To make there SoM “Linux mainline ready” they’ve provided a tarball file with documentation and files namely:

  • DIMM-AM335x-Mainline-Support-v001en.pdf – Documentation for Linux mainline support for DIMM-AM335x
  • am335x-dimm.dts – Device tree file with the SoM
  • am335x_mainline_defconfig – Kernel config
  • uboot_script – Uboot script

And apparently that’s all what’s needed to support a Sitara AM335x SoM in mainline kernel. They have tested it against Linux 3.14.y from kernel.org, but it should also work with the latest version. They also have added this to Yocto in the FTP (see PDF). I’m not sure why they’ve have gone the extra steps and submitted a patch to add their module to mainline.

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Compulab Introduces $75 CM-QS600 Computer-on-Module Powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 SoC

May 13th, 2014 No comments

CompuLab has just announced their CM-QS600 Computer-on-Module (CoM) powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon APQ8064 quad-core SoC with up to 2GB DDR3 RAM, up 32GB of on-board eMMC, dual-band WiFi 802.11, Bluetooth 4.0, and Gigabit Ethernet network connectivity, as well as PCIe, USB, SATA, HDMI, LVDS, serial ports and I/O lines. CM-QS600 targets multimedia applications such as digital signage, IPTV and media players requiring low power, and a small form factor.

Compulab CM-QS600 CoM (Click to Enlarge)

Compulab CM-QS600 CoM (Click to Enlarge)

Compulab CM-QS600 specifications:

CM-QS600 Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

CM-QS600 Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

  • SoC – Qualcomm Snapdragon APQ8064 quad core Krait 300 processor @ 1.7GHz with Adreno 320 GPU and Hexagon QDSP6 DSP
  • System Memory – Up to 2GB DDR3
  • Storage – Up to 32GB on-board eMMC, SATA interface (via connector)
  • Display
    • HDMI 1.4a, up-to 1920 x 1080
    • LVDS, up-to 2048 x 1536
  • Audio – Audio codec with stereo line-out, line-in, mic
  • Camera – MIPI-CSI, up-to 20MP
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet, Dual-band WiFi 802.11a/b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.0 low-energy
  • Other I/Os
    • PCI Express Gen 2.0 interface
    • Up to 3 USB2.0 high-speed ports
    • Up to 5 UART ports, up to 5 I2C interfaces, up to 5 SPI interfaces
    • Up to 3 MMC/SD/SDIO interfaces
    • GPIO Up to 61 multifunction signals
  • Power – 5VDC / Li-Ion battery
  • Connector – 204-pin SO-DIMM edge connector
  • Dimensions – 65 x 68 x 5 mm
  • Temperature range – Commercial: 0° to 70° C; Extended: -20° to 70° C and Industrial: -40° to 85° C.

The company will provide Android and Linux BSPs for the module, and an SB-QS600 evaluation kit with CM-QS600-C1700-D2-N8-E-A-WB-H Module (2GB DRAM, 8GB eMMC, Ethernet, Audio Codec, WiFi+BT), SB-QS600 baseboard, an HDMI to DVI adapter, a serial port cable, a WiFi antenna and cable, and a 12V power supply will also be available for development/evaluation.

CM-QS600 will be available in June 2014 through CompuLab or their distributors, starting at $75 for 1k order for a minimal configuration CM-QS600 CoM with 512MB RAM and no eMMC, nor other options. You can find more information, and pricing details of the different options on Compulab’s CM-QS600 product page.

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