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Posts Tagged ‘bsp’

Emcraft Systems STM32F7 ARM Cortex M7 SoM and Development Kit Run uClinux

March 11th, 2015 No comments

STMicro announced their STM32F7 MCU family the same as ARM announced their latest ARM Cortex M7 core for high-end micro-controllers last September. Emcraft Systems have now launched a STM32F7 system-on-module with 32MB SDRAM and 16MB NOR flash, and ported uClinux to the platform. The company has also launched a STM32F7 starter kit for evaluation and development. Both target industrial automation, system and power management, wireless networking / sensors and other embedded applications.

STM32F7-SOM-1A Module

STM32F7-SOMSTM32F7 system-on-module specifications:

  • MCU – STMicro STM32F746 Cortex M7 MCU up to 200 MHz with 320KB RAM, 1MB flash in TFBGA-216 package
  • System Memory – 32MB SDRAM
  • Storage – 16MB NOR flash
  • Connectivity – 802.3 Ethernet PHY
  • SoM connectors – 2x 80-pin (0.4mm pitch)
  • Debugging – ARM SWJ-DP combined JTAG and serial wire debug port
  • Misc – Watchdog, RTC, USB and other I/Os via SoM connectors
  • Power – 3.3V DC; Low-power mode with short startup times; Deep-sleep power mode with ultra- low power consumption profiles;
  • Dimensions – 30 mm x 46mm
  • Compliant with the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) directive
STM32F7 Module Block Diagram

STM32F7 Module Block Diagram

The company provides U-boot and uClinux 2.6.33 source code, binary images, and documentation for the module, as well as hardware documentation.

STM32F7 Starter Kit

STM32F7_Starter_KitIn order to quickly get started with the SoM, a starter kit (KIT-STM32F7-EXT) composed of STM32F7 SoM and SOM-BSB-EXT baseboard is also available with the following key features:

The baseboard is 100×70 mm in size and has the following main interfaces:

  • SoM Connectors – For STM32F7 SoM
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet (RJ-45 connector)
  • USB – 1x mini USB interface using a USB-UART bridge, 1x  mini USB OTG Interface
  • Debugging – mini USB (UART), 20-pin ARM JTAG interface
  • Expansion – Breadboard area with unused STM32F7 signals
  • Misc – User LEDs and push-buttons (reset, user)
  • Power Supply – 5V via mini USB (UART) interface or VCC3 on SoM
  • Dimensions – 100×70 mm

You can watch the demo showcasing fast boot to Qt (4s) and the performance of the system on a Qt based user interface, which is said to have greatly improved over STM32F4 thanks to ART accelerator and L1 cache in STM32F7.

The starter kit can be pre-ordered for $159, and the STM32F7 SoM sells for $27 per unit in 10K+ orders. Software and hardware documentation, and pre-order links are available on Emcraft’s STM32F7 SoM product page.

The company is also getting rid of stock of their older starter kits based on Microsemi SmartFusion (Cortex-M3 + FPGA) and NXP LPC1788 for $49.

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Mixtile LOFT-Q Allwinner A31 Board with SATA Can Now be Purchased for $90

March 4th, 2015 8 comments

Mixtile LOFT-Q and LOFT Kit were unveiled nearly a year ago, the first being a development board based on Allwinner A31 processor with 2GB RAM, 16GB RAM,  SATA connector, Gigabit Ethernet, etc.., while the second is a kit with an enclosure and power supply. The kit does not appear to be available yet, but the board has recently been listed on SeeedStudio for $90.

Mixtile_LOFT-Q

Mixtile LOFT-Q specifications:

  • SoC – Allwinner A31 quad core ARM Cortex-A7 processor with PowerVR SGX544 MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC, SATA III connector for 2.5″ drives, and SD card Slot
  • Video Output – HDMI 1.4 up to 1080p60
  • Video Decoding – H.264 4Kx2K video decoding, multi-format FHD video decoding, including Mpeg1/2, Mpeg4 SP/ASP GMC, H.263, H.264,etc
  • Audio I/O – HDMI, 1 S/PDIF, high definition microphone
  • Camera I/F
    • Integrated Parallel & MIPI I/F sensor
    • Integrated powerful ISP, supporting Raw Data CMOS sensor
    • Supports 5M/8M/12M CMOS sensor
    • Supports 8/10/12-bit YUV/Bayer sensor
  • Connectivity – 10/100/1000M Ethernet, dual band WiFi 802.11 a/g/n + Bluetooth 4.0 (AP6234), and Zigbee (NXP JNS168)
  • USB – 4x USB 2.0 host post
  • Debugging – UART debug connector, JTAG connector
  • Expansion header – 180-pin header with access to I2C, SPI, LCD, MIPI DSI, RGB/LVDS, CSI, MIPI CSI, ADC, CTP, RTP, SPDIF-OUT, SPDIF-IN, GPIO, etc…
  • Sensor – Acceleration sensor, IR receiver
  • Misc- Battery slot for RTC
  • Power – 12V/4A (48W)
  • Dimensions – N/A
Mixtile_LOFT-Q_SATA_USB_Dongles

SATA Connector and Wireless Dongles? are on the Back of Mixtile Board

You won’t find many details on Mixtile Hardare page, but there’s some recently updated documentation and software on Mixtile github account, with various repositories for documentation with a getting started guide, linux and u-boot source code, development tools, and BSPs for Android 4.4.2, Ubuntu Touch, and OpenWRT. What I failed to find however is a clear graphical description of the board and connectors.

Thanks to Embedded_Geek for the tip.
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Gateworks GW5520 Single Board Computer Features Dual Gigabit Ethernet Ports, Two mini PCIe Slots

February 4th, 2015 6 comments

If you need industrial grade ARM Linux boards with lots of Ethernet ports and several mini PCIe slots, you may want to check out Gateworks Ventana boards. The company has now released a smaller member of Ventana family with GW5520 SBC powered by Freescale i.MX6 dual, with two Gigabit Ethernet port, two mini PCIe slots, and support for PoE.

Ventana_GW5520_BoardGateworks Ventana GW5520 SBC specifications:

  • SoC- Freescale i.MX6 Dual Cortex A9 processor @ 800MHz with Vivante Vivante GC2000 / GC355 / GC320 GPUs. Option: i.MX6 Quad
  • System Memory – 512 MB DDR3-800 SDRAM (Up to 2GB RAM as option)
  • Storage – 256 MB Flash (Up to 2GB as option), serial configuration EEPROM
  • Video and Audio Output – HDMI 1.4
  • Connectivity – 2x Gigabit Ethernet ports.
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports
  • Expansion
    • 2x Mini-PCIe sockets
    • Optional mini-PCIe socket to supports a mSATA disk drive (i.MX6 Quad only)
    •  I/Os
      • Serial – CAN Bus 2.0B up to 1Mbps, 3x TTL serial ports
      • 4x GPIOs
  • Misc – RTC with battery backup,  voltage & temperature monitor, watchdog timer
  • Power Supply – 8 to 60V DC input voltage; Power via barrel or passive PoE Ethernet; reverse voltage and transient protection
  • Power consumption –  3W @ 25 C (Typical); 16W shared between mini PCIe slots
  • Dimensions – 100 x 70 x 21 mm
  • Operating Temperature – -40 to +85C

The company claims a 81.9 years MTBF at 55°C, but I’m not quite sure how this is computed… OpenWRT, OpenEmbedded Yocto, and Android BSPs are available for the board.. It’s also supported in mainline kernel since Linux 3.18 release. Documentation is available on Ventana boards Wiki.

Based on the block diagram below, they don’t use the GMAC inside i.MX6, and instead connected an external Gigabit Ethernet via PCIe, so they should not be subject to the 470 Mbps known limitation for Gigabit Ethernet on i.MX6 processor. [Update: The company confirmed that, and they measured 940 Mbps on their Ethernet ports]

Ventana GW5520 Block Diagram

Ventana GW5520 Block Diagram

Gateworks also offers  GW5520 Development Kit which includes GW5520 network computer, U-Boot bootloader, OpenWRT Linux Board Support Package, Ethernet, serial, USB, audio and video cables, as well as a passive PoE power injector and a 24V power supply, and a JTAG Programmer.The network board appears to be available now selling for about $400 on Avnet, while the development kit goes for around $500. You can visit Gateworks GW5520 product page for details, including download links to the datasheet and user’s manual.

[Update: I’ve also been informed about GW5510 based on i.MX6 Solo, but smaller (35x70mm), without Ethernet port (a mini PCIe card can be used to add Wi-Fi), and both HDMI in and out.[

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Free Electrons Publishes Yocto & OpenEmbedded Training Materials

November 2nd, 2014 1 comment

Free Electrons is a small (9 people) engineering company focusing on embedded Linux / Android, and open source software, which also happens to have ported several ARM SoC to the mainline kernel. From time to time, they also offer training sessions, and release course materials publicly. Their latest training is a 3-day course dealing with the Yocto Project and OpenEmbedded, using BeagbleBone Black development board for lab sessions, and all materials have been released under a Creative Commons license.

Yocto_Project_Training_MaterialsThe training consists in:

  • Understanding the Yocto Project
  • Using it to build a root filesystem and run it on your target
  • Writing and extending recipes
  • Creating layers
  • Integrating your board in a BSP
  • Creating custom images
  • Application development with an Eclipse SDK

Three files are released:

  • yocto-slides.pdf – Yocto Project and OpenEmbedded Training presentation slides (245 pages) give an overview of various build systems, before getting more details about the Yocto Project, and Poky distributions.
  • yocto-labs.pdf – Practical sessions with BeagleBone Black board and a Nunchuk (Wii Remote).
  • yocto-labs.tar.xz – Lab data consisting of a script, and a few patches

If you are interested in attending an actual training session, the company organizes a course in Toulouse, France on November 18-20, which costs 1690 Euros per attendee.

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Freescale Unveils QorIQ LS1043A Quad core ARM Cortex A53 Communication Processor for Fanless Networking Equipment

October 22nd, 2014 5 comments

Freescale has introduced the QorIQ LS1043A communications processor, powered by four 64-bit ARM Cortex A53 cores, and destined to be integrated into “intelligent-edge networking equipment including security appliances, SDN (Software Designed Networks) / NFV (Network Functions Virtualization) edge platforms and other fanless, power-efficient applications.” A dual core version named LS1023A is also available.

QorIQ_LS1043A_Block_DiagramKey features of LS1043A and LS1023A SoCs:

  • CPU – Quad (LS1043A) or Dual (LS1023A) ARM Cortex-A53 64-bit cores @ 1 GHz to 1.5 GHz with 32/32 I/D Cache KB L1 and 1 MB L2 cache. 16,000+ CoreMarks.
  • Networking & High Speed Interfaces:
    • Up to six 1x GbE or 1x 10GbE and five x GbE
    • Four lane SerDes up to 10 GHz multiplexed across controllers supporting:
      • Three PCI Express Gen 2 interfaces
      • SATA 3.0 Interface
      • uQUICC Engine
  • Accelerators and Memory Control
  • Other peripherals
    • 3x USB 3.0 interfaces with PHY
    • QuadSPI
    • Integrated Flash Controller (IFC)
    • Quad I²C
  • Misc – QorIQ Platform’s Trust Architecture, ARM SMMU for hardware enhanced virtualization
  • Power Consumption – As low as 6W for a complete fanless system

The company provides a Linux 3.12 BSP, VortiQa  software stacks for the enterprise, SMB networking applications, security appliances, cloud equipment, etc…, and a 6-month evaluation license for CodeWarrior development tools for the company’s LS1 development platforms (no details provided). Freescale also claims third party tools and development kits are available, but did not list them, except for OpenDataPlane program developed in collaboration with Linaro LNG.

QorIQ LS1043A communications processor should start sampling in Q1 2015. More information is available on Freescale LS1043A and LS1023A product page, and QorIQ solutions are currently showcased at Linley Processor Conference, at the Hyatt Regency in Santa Clara, California, until October 23.

Via Embedded.com

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Emtrion SBC-SAMA5D36 ARM Cortex A5 Linux Development Board Comes with Dual Ethernet, HDMI Output

September 10th, 2014 4 comments

A few months ago, I reviewed Atmel Xplained SAMA5D3 development board powered by SAMA5D36 Cortex A5 processor. The kit is supported by the Yocto Project, so I could build and run Poky distribution with a recent Linux kernel (it support mainline), it features Arduino compatible headers, and I found the board to be a nice platform for headless applications, or applications that require an LCD display. However, if you wanted to connect an HDMI display you’d be out of luck, unless you design your own LCD to HDMI add-on board. Emtrion SBC-SAMA5D36 could be an interesting alternative, as it features very similar specifications, but adds an HDMI output port.

SBC-SAMA5D36 Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

SBC-SAMA5D36 Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

Emtrion SBC-SAMA5D36 specifications:

  • MPU – Atmel SAMA5D36 single core Cortex-A5 @  536 MHz
  • System Memory – 256 MB RAM
  • Storage – 512 MB NAND Flash, up to 16 MB NOR Flash, and micro SD Card socket
  • Connectivity – 100Base-TX Ethernet,  10/100/1000Base-TX Ethernet (Gigabit Ethernet)
  • Video Output – HDMI, LCD connector and 4-wire touch
  • USB –  2xUSB Host,  1x USB Device
  • Other I/Os:
    • I2S Audio Interface
    • 5x serial ports (LVTTL)
    • up to 52 GPIOs
    • 2x CAN buses
  • Misc – 2x user buttons, 4x user LEDs, RTC (battery buffered)
  • Power Supply – 5V.
  • Power Consumption –  Typ. 1 W
  • Dimensions – 135mm x 74mm
Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

The board is said to support Debian 8.0 (Jessie), as well as build frameworks such as the Yocto Project and Buildroot. Just like Atmel SAMA5D3 Xplained, SBC-SAMA5D36 is supported in Linux mainline, except the LCD driver which is work in progress. The SDK includes a pre-configured rootFS based on Debian 8, Qt 5.2 support, GNU toolchain, build scripts, a VMware virtual machine for development and various software and hardware documents.

The board is available now for around 100 Euros for a single unit, and around 80 Euros for 1k order. You can find more information, including the hardware manual, on the company’s blog, and SBC-SAMA5D36 product page.

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$50 Intel Edison Board for Wearables Features an SoC with a Dual Core Atom Processor, and a Quark MCU

September 10th, 2014 7 comments

Intel announced the Edison board for wearables applications last January at CES 2014. When it first came out, it looked like an SD card, but the board look has now drastically changed. Nevertheless, the important point is that Intel Edison is now available, together with various development kits, and runs Linux (Yocto built), as well as an RTOS.

Intel_Edison_ModuleWith the official release, we’ve also got the full specifications:

  • SoC – Dual-core, dual-threaded Intel Atom (Silvermont) processor (22nm) processor @ 500 MHz and a 32-bit Intel Quark micro-controller @ 100 MHz. Includes 1GB LPDDR3 PoP memory
  • System Memory – 1 GB LPDDR3 (PoP memory) – 2 channel 32bits @ 800MT/sec
  • Storage – 4 GB eMMC (v4.51 spec) + micro SD card connector
  • Connectivity –  Dual band 802.11 a/b/g/n Wi-Fi (Broadcom 43340) with either an on-board antenna or external antenna, and Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB – 1x micro USB connector
  • I/Os:
    • 2x UART  (1 full flow control, 1 Rx/Tx)
    • 2x I2C, 1x SPI with 2 chip selects
    • 1x I2S
    • 12x GPIO including 4 capable of PWM output
  • Module connector – 70-pin connector (Hirose DF40 series – 1.5, 2.0, or 3.0 mm stack height)
  • Power Supply – Input: 3.3 to 4.5 V; Output: 100mA @ 3.3V and 100 mA @ 1.8V
  • Power consumption – Standby (No radio): 13 mW;  Standby (Bluetooth 4.0): 21.5 mW (BLE in Q4 2014);  Standby (Wi-Fi): 35 mW.
  • Dimensions – 35.5 × 25.0 × 3.9 mm
  • Temperature Range – 0 to 40°C

The company will provide Yocto 1.6 Linux for the two cores of the Atom processor, and the Quark MCU will run an unnamed RTOS. Development tools for the Atom cores includes the Arduino IDE, Eclipse with support for C, C++ and Python programming languages, and Intel XDK for Node.JS and HTML5 development. An SDK and IDE will be available for the Quark MCU. Intel IoT Analytics Platform is the cloud solution adopted for the board, and will be free for limited and non-commercial use.

Intel Edison Arduino (Click to Enlarge)

Intel Edison Board for Arduino (Click to Enlarge)

Edison is basically a module, so it might be useful to have a baseboard, and Intel has come up with two:

  • Intel Edison Board for Arduino – Board with Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, and headers compatible with Arduino UNO expect it only supports 4 PWM instead of 6.
  • Intel Edison Breakout Board – Minimal board with the following key features:
    • Exposes native 1.8 V I/O of the Edison module.
    • 0.1″ grid I/O array of through-hole solder points.
    • USB OTG with USB Micro Type-AB connector
    • USB OTG power switch.
    • Battery charger.
    • USB to device UART bridge with USB micro Type-B connector.
    • DC power supply jack (7 to 15 VDC input).

Documentation including a product brief, hardware guides for Edison board for Arduino and the Breakout board, the Arduino IDE, and the instructions to get the Yocto BSP can be downloaded on Intel’s Edison Board page.

Intel Edison is available for backorder on Sparkfun for $49.95, and Edison for Arduino and Edison Breakout Board kits are listed Maker Shed for respectively $107 and $75, but currently out of stock. There’s also a Starter Pack on Sparkun for $114.95. Shipping is expected in 6 to 8 weeks.

Thanks to David and Freire.

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PicoZed System-on-Modules are Powered by Xilinx Zynq-7000 ARM + FPGA SoC

September 10th, 2014 1 comment

After the Zedboard, and the Microzed, here comes PicoZed, a family of system-on-modules (SoM) based on Xilinx Zynq-7000 SoCs featuring a dual core Cortex A9 processor and FPGA fabric. The module also comes with 1GB RAM, 4GB eMMC, Gigabit Ethernet PHY, various user I/O, and more. Target applications include embedded vision, test & measurement, motor control, software-defined radio, and industrial automation.

PicoZed 7303 SoM (Click to Enlarge)

PicoZed 7030 SoM (Click to Enlarge)

Four modules are available with support for commercial or industrial temperature ranges, all sharing the following specifications:

  • SoC (depending on module)
    • Xilinx Zynq-7010 with two Cortex-A9 cores @  866MHz, FPGA with 28K Logic Cells
    • Xilinx Zynq-7015 with two Cortex-A9 cores @  866MHz, FPGA with 74K Logic Cells, 4 transceivers @ 6.25 Gb/s
    • Xilinx Zynq-7020 with two Cortex-A9 cores @  866MHz, FPGA with 85K Logic Cells
    • Xilinx Zynq-7030 with two Cortex-A9 cores @  1GHz, FPGA with 125K Logic Cells, up to 4 transceivers @ 12.5 Gb/s
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR3 SDRAM
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC flash, 128Mb QSPI flash
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet PHY
  • PicoZed Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

    PicoZed Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

  • USB – USB 2.0 PHY
  • User I/O via three board-to-board connectors (JX3):
    • 7Z010 Version:
      • 113 User I/O (100 PL, 13 PS MIO)
      • PL I/O configurable as up to 48 LVDS pairs or 100 single-ended I/O
    • 7Z015 Version:
      • 148 User I/O (135 PL, 13 PS MIO)
      • PL I/O configurable as up to 65 LVDS pairs or 135 single-ended I/O
      • 4 GTP transceivers
    • 7Z020 Version:
      • 138 User I/O (125 PL, 13 PS MIO)
      • PL I/O configurable as up to 60 LVDS pairs or 125 single-ended I/O
    • 7Z030 Version:
      • 148 User I/O (135 PL, 13 PS MIO)
      • PL I/O configurable as up to 65 LVDS pairs or 135 single-ended I/O
      • 4 GTX transceivers
  • Debugging – JTAG configuration port accessible via I/O connectors, PS JTAG pins accessible via I/O connectors
  • Misc – Oscillator @ 33.33 MHz
PicoZed 7030 Back (Click to Enlarge)

PicoZed 7030 Back (Click to Enlarge)

The module comes with a getting started card, and the company provides a Linux BSP, as well as reference design files.

To ease development, PicoZed Carrier Board is also available with the following specifications:

  • SoC/Memory/Storage – Via PicoZed modules listed above
  • External Storage — MicroSD slot
  • Connectivity – 2x Gigabit Ethernet ports, SFP+ cage
  • Video Output – HDMI
  • USB – USB 2.0 port, USB UART
  • Other I/O
    • SMA port for GTX/GTP
    • JTAG port
    • Programmable clock mux
    • SMA reference clock input
    • User I/O:
      • FMC (Low Pin Count)
      • PS Pmod (Shared with eMMC)
      • PL Pmod (7015/20/30 only)
      • PL Pmod (7015/30 only)
  • Expansion – 1x PCIe Gen 2
  • Misc – User push buttons and LEDs
  • Power – 12V
PicoZed Carrier Board (Click to Enlarge)

PicoZed Carrier Board (Click to Enlarge)

This baseboard comes with a 12V AC/DC power support, and a quick start card.

PicoZed SoMs and Carrier Board are available now on Avnet with lead times between 8 to 10 weeks. The SoM prices vary between $179 and $399 depending on chosen Zynq SoC and temperature range, and PicoZed Carrier Board can be purchased for $425. You can find more details on PicoZed SoM and PicoZed Carrier Board pages. The board will be demonstrated at X-Fest seminars in Europe, Asia, and North America.

Via LinuxGizmos

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