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Posts Tagged ‘development kit’

Autonomous Deep Learning Robot Features Nvidia Jetson TK1 Board, a 3D Camera, and More

January 25th, 2016 No comments

Autonomous, a US company that makes smart products such as smart desks, virtual reality kits and autonomous robots, has recently introduced a deep learning robot that comes with a 3D camera, speaker and microphone, Jetson TK1 board, and a mobile base.

Autonomous_Deep_Learning_Robot

The robot appears to be mostly made of the shelves parts:

  • 3D Depth camera – Asus Xtion Pro 3D Depth Camera
  • Speaker & Microphone
  • Nvidia Jetson TK1 PM375 board – Nvidia Terra K1 quad-core Cortex A15 processor @ 2.3 GHz with a 192-core Kepler GPU, 2GB RAM, 16 GB flash
  • Kobuki Mobile Base –  Kobuki is the best mobile base designed for education and research on state of the art robotics. Kobuki provides power supplies for external computer power as well as additional sensors and actuators. Its highly accurate odometry, amended by calibrated gyroscope, enables precise navigation.

The robot is designed for research in deep learning and mobile robotics, and comes with Ubuntu, Caffe, Torch, Theano, cuDNN v2, and CUDA 7.0, as Robot Operating System (ROS) set of open source software libraries and tools.

Kobuki Base

Kobuki Base

While there’s virtually no documentation at all on the product page, I’ve been told that the robot was built on top of TurtleBot open source robot, and re-directed to tutorials available via TurtleBot Wiki, as well useful resources for deep learnings frameworks such as Caffe and Torch, and Google TensorFlow Tutorials.

Autonomous Deep Learning Robot sells for $999 with manual charging, or $1048 with a self-charging dock.

Thanks to Nanik for the tip!

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Microchip Introduces $11 RN2483 & RN2903 LoRa Modules and $70 LoRa Evaluation Kits for IoT & M2M Applications

December 15th, 2015 15 comments

LoRa is one of those long range low power WAN standards used for the machine to machine (M2M) and Internet of things (IoT) applications. I already featured a Semtech Lora module here with a line-of-sight range of up to 20 to 30km, and the company has just partnered with STMicro to deploy LoRa solutions, but today, I’m going to have a look at Microchip Lora modules and development kits that I discovered in the company’s Micro Solutions Nov/Dec 2015 publication.

LoRa_Technology_Network_Topology

The company has launched two modules for the European and North American markets with respectively RN2483 LoRa 433/868 MHz
R&TTE Directive Assessed Radio Modem and RN2903 915 MHz North American modem. Apart from the different frequencies, both modules have similar features:

  • On-board LoRaWAN Class A protocol stack
  • Tx/Rx Power
    • RN2483 – 40 mA (14dBm, 868MHz) Tx, and 14.2 mA Rx @ 3.6V
    • RN2903 – 124 mA Tx max, and 13.5 mA Rx @ (2.1 to 3.6V)
  • ASCII command interface over UART
  • Castellated SMT pads for easy and reliable PCB mounting
  • Device Firmware Upgrade (DFU) over UART
  • 14 GPIO for control, status, and ADC
  • Highly integrated module with MCU, crystal, EUI-64 Node Identity Serial EEPROM, Radio transceiver with analog front end, and matching circuitry
  • Operating Voltage – RN2483: 3.6V; RN2903: 2.1V to 3.6V
  • Dimensions – 17.8 x 26.7 x 3 mm
  • Operating Temperature Range – -40C to +85C
  • FCC and IC Certified, RoHS compliant

Demo source code, datasheets, product briefs, and user’s guides are available on the modules’ product pages linked above.

US and EU versions of Microchip LoRa Technology Motes (Click to Enlarge)

US and EU versions of Microchip LoRa Technology Motes (Click to Enlarge)

The first development tool is LoRa Technology Mote with either RN2483 @ 868 MHz or RN2903 @ 915 MHz. It is a standalone battery-powered LoRa node, used to to demonstrate the long-range capabilities of the modem, and verify inter-operability with LoRaWAN v1.0 gateways and infrastructure.  The key features listed for Lora Motes:

    • MCU – Microchip PIC18LF25K50 8-bit MCU
    • Connectivity
      • EU version (RN2483) – 868 MHz High-Frequency SMA Connector & 433 MHz Low-Frequency Antenna test Point
      • US version (RN2903) – 915 MHz High-Frequency SMA Connector
    • Display – OLED display; 128 x 64 resolution
    • USB – USB Mini-B Connector
    • Sensors – Ambient Light Sensor, Linear Active Thermistor (MCP9700T)
    • Programming / Debugging – Mote ICSP Programming
    • Misc – S1 & S2 buttons for menu navigation, 4x LEDs controlled by PIC18 (2), and module (2), battery power switch
    • Power – 2x AAA Battery Pack; LDO Regulator (MCP1825S); alternative power supply through hole connectors
    • Dimensions – N/A
Lora PICtail (Click to Enlarge)

RN2483 Lora PICtail Daughter Board (Click to Enlarge)

The second options is RN2483/RN2903 LoRa Technology PICtail/PICtail Plus daughter boards that can be connected to PIC18 Explorer or Explorer 16 development boards, with the latter supporting PIC24, dsPIC, or PIC32 MCU families.

LoRa PICTail daughter board specifications:

  • US version – Microchip RN2903 Low-Power Long Range, LoRa Technology Transceiver Module with one SMA connector for 915 MHz band
  • EU version – Microchip RN2483 LoRa Technology Transceiver Module with two SMA connectors for 433 MHz and 868 MHz bands
  • MCU – PIC18 MCU for custom functions
  • USB – 1x mini USB connector
  • Expansion interfaces
    • Solder pads around the module for GPIOs, power pins and communication signals
    • PICtail connection interface
    • PICtail Plus connection interface
  • Programming – ICSP header to program the on-board PIC18 MCU
  • Misc – UART traffic LEDs
  • Power Supply – On-board LDO; supply current measurement points
  • Dimensions – N/A

You can find user’s guides and some extra documentation for all four kits on their respective product pages: RN2483 LoRa Technology Mote, RN2903 LoRa Technology Mote, RN2483 LoRa Technology PICtail (Plus) Daughter Board, and RN2903 LoRa Technology PICtail (Plus) Daughter Board.

Both RN2483 and RN2903 modules are available now for $10.90 each in 1,000-unit quantities, while LoRa Technology Motes go for $69.99 and LoRa PICTail boards for $65 on microchipDIRECT or other distributors.

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Cypress Unveils a $49 Solar Powered IoT Development Kit with Bluetooth LE Connectivity

December 4th, 2015 3 comments

Cypress Semiconductors has recently launched a Solar powered IoT device kit, with the easy-to-remember codename S6SAE101A00SA1002, featuring the company’s CYBLE-022001-00 Bluetooth Smart module, and S6AE101A energy harvesting power management IC
(PMIC) on the main board, as well as all accessories such as a small solar panel, a BLE-USB bridge, and all necessary components and cables. Target applications include battery-less wireless sensor node (WSN), IoT device that monitors various sensors, BLE Beacon, wearable device, building energy management system (BEMS), Home EMS, Factory EMSystem, wireless lighting control,wireless HVAC sensor and security system.

Solar_powered_Iot_development_kitThe main features of the Energy harvesting motherboard include:

  • Cypress CYBLE-022001-00 Bluetooth Smart module with ARM Cortex-M0 @ 48MHz, 128 KB flash, 16KB SRAM
  • Cypress S6AE101A energy harvesting PMIC
  • Sensor – Temperature & humidity sensor
  • USB – 1x USB port for programming and debugging
  • Debugging – SWD (serial Wire Debug) connector, JTAG header for USB-BLE
  • Expansion – Sensor expansion connector with I2C/UART/SPI/GPIO signals
  • Misc – LEDs for USB power and status, DIP switch for future expansion
  • Power Supply / Energy harvesting:
    • Panasonic AM-1801 solar module to harvest light energy as low as 200 lx
    • Optional external diode bridge to harvest vibration energy (not included)
    • Optional battery for Hybrid power supply
  • Dimensions – 45 x 25 mm
Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

 

The firmware supports two modes: Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) Beacon, transmitting data at 1.5 sec intervals with ambient light as low as 200 lx; and Wireless Sensor Node (WSN), transmitting data at 6 sec intervals with ambient light as low as 200 lx. You can also monitor Bluetooth communication with the BLE-USB bridge provided with the kit, and pre-programmed with custom firmware. This works with Windows 7/8/8.1/10 only.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

 

Documentation include the reference schematic, BOM list, and layout data, as well as a user’s manual, a quick starter guide, and release notes. You can also download the complete DVD (1.1 GB) with all the tools and documentation.

You can get all this and/or buy the kit for $49 on Cypress S6SAE101A00SA1002 product page. Alternativble, Mouser also list the kit for $45.94.

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iWave Systems iW-RainboW-G20M-Q7 SoM Features Renesas RZ/G1M Cortex A15 SoC

December 3rd, 2015 No comments

iWave Systems has unveiled a new Qseven 2.0 compliant system-on-module part of their RainboW family with iW-RainboW-G20M-Q7 module powered by Renesas RZ/G1M dual core ARM Cortex A15 SoC, and targeting industrial and automotive applications with over 10 years of support.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

iW-RainboW-G20M-Q7 module specifications:

  • SoC – Renesas RZ/G1M dual core ARM Cortex A15 @ 1.5GHz with PowerVR SGX544MP2 GPU @ 520MHz
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR3(expandable)
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC Flash (expandable) + 2MB SPI NOR Flash for boot code, and optional Micro SD Slot
  • Connectivity – 1x Gigabit Ethernet  PHY
  • USB – 2 Port USB HUB
  • Renesas_som_back

    Click to Enlarge

    I/Os via 230-pin Qseven edge connector:

    • Storage – 1x SATA , 1x SDHC
    • USB – 1x USB3.0 host, 2x USB 2.0 hosts, or 1x USB 2.0 device
    • Display – 1x LVDS
    • Connectivity – 1x Gigabit Ethernet
    • Audio – 1x I2S Audio
    • 2x PWM, 2x I2C, SPI, CAN, UART, GPIOs
    • 1x PCIe (multiplexed with SATA)
    • JTAG or UART Console
  • Other expansion connectors:
    • 80-pin header 1 with
      • 24bpp RGB LCD or 16Bit Camera interface
      • 24Bit Camera or dual 8Bit Camera interface
      • 1x UART
    • 80-pin header 2 with
      • Memory bus interface (16-bit sync/async)
      • 1x CAN
      • 1x SSI/I2S for audio
      • 2x UART Port or 1x UART + 1x SPI
      • 2x PWM + GPIOs
  • Power Supply – 5V @  2A input through Qseven edge connector
  • Dimensions – 70mm x 70mm (Qseven 2.0 form factor)
  • Temperature Range – -40°C to +85°C Industrial
Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

The module supports Linux 3.10.31, the company will provide BSPs and user’s manual for the Renesas module, and an optional RZ/G1M Qseven development kit is also available, and based on the company’s generic Qseven carrier board that supports both Qseven edge connector and the two non-standard 80-pin expansion connectors.

iWave Systems' generic Qseven Carrier Board with RainboW Q7 SoM

iWave Systems’ generic Qseven Carrier Board with RainboW Q7 SoM

Pricing and availability information is not publicly available, but you can request a quote for your project on RZ/G1M Qseven Module product page.

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LattePanda is a $79 Arduino Compatible Intel Atom x5 Board Running Windows 10 (Crowdfunding)

December 2nd, 2015 25 comments

I feel like I’m living in another world after writing a title combining Arduino, Intel and Windows 10, but that’s exactly what LattePanda is promising with a development board featuring both an Intel Atom x5-Z8300 processor and an Atmel AVR MCU, and Windows 10 as the operating system.

LattePandaLattePanda board specifications:

  • SoC – Intel Atom x5-Z8300 “Cherry Trail” quad core processor @ 1.44 GHz (Burst frequency: 1.84 GHz) with Intel Gen8 HD graphics @ 500 MHz
  • System Memory –  2 to 4 GB DDR3L
  • Storage – 32 or 64 GB eMMC, micro SD slot
  • MCU – Atmel Atmega32u4 micro-controller
  • Video Output / Display – HDMI, and MIPID DSI connector
  • Audio I/O – HDMI, 3.5mm audio port
  • Connectivity – Ethernet, WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 port, 2x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB port for power
  • Serial – 1x from Intel SoC, 1x from Atmel MCU
  • Expansion
    • Intel processor header with 2 GPIOs
    • Atmel MCU “Arduino” header with 20 GPIOs
    • 7x 3-pin relimate connectors compatible with DFRobot “Gravity” sensors.
  • Misc – Wake-on-LAN support
  • Power Supply – 5V via micro USB port
  • Dimensions – 88 x 70 mm

The company also mentions the board is Android and Linux compatible, but it’s not clear if they plan to do much work on these two operating systems.

Block Diagram

Block Diagram

The claim that ” Lattepanda comes pre-installed with a full edition of Windows 10, including powerful tools such as Visual Studio, NodeJS, Java, Processing, and more!” probably means it’s only a trial version based on their aggressive pricing, and lack of details about the exact version. I assume you’ll be able to program the Arduino part, just like as if you had an Arduino board connected to a Windows 10 PC. Tutorials and documentation should eventually be posted on Lattepanda.com, but right now there are only a few pictures.

The company plan to launch a Kickstarter campaign in order to raise at least $150,000 for mass production. A 45 GBP ($67) early bird pledge would get you a LattePanda board with 2GB RAM, 32GB eMMC, and Windows 10, with the pricing going up to 53 GBP (~$79) after the first 100 units are taken. A higher version with 4GB RAM and 64GB eMMC, called LattePanda Enhanced, is also offered for $129, and starter kits with a 7″ display will also be available. Shipping is 13 GBP (~$20), and delivery is scheduled for March 2016.

Via Liliputing

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Thunderboard Wear is a $75 Smartwatch Development Board by Silicon Labs

December 2nd, 2015 3 comments

A few days ago I watched an ARMDevices.net’s video about an ARM’s smartwatch reference design running mbed OS 3.0, powered by a Silicon Labs EFM32 Giant Gecko Cortex M3 MCU, and promising up to 2 months battery life on a 160 mAh battery. While I could not find the full details about the reference design, I noticed Silicon Labs also launched a development board called Thunderboard Wear, based on the same platform, just quite bigger, and still wearable… (Sort of)

Thunderboard_WearThunderboard Wear specifications:

  • MCU – Silicon Labs EFM32GG995F1024 ARM Cortex-M3 MCU up to 48 MHz with 128 kB RAM,1 MB Flash
  • External Memory – 256 kB external SRAM
  • External Storage – micro SD card slot
  • Display – 128×128 pixel Memory LCD from Sharp
  • Connectivity – Bluetooth 4.1 smart module (Silicon Labs BGM111), upgradeable to Bluetooth 4.2
  • Sensors
    • Ambient Light Sensing (ALS) and Proximity/Gesture via Silicon Labs Si1141.
    • Optical hear-rate monitoring (HRM) via Silicon Labs Si1144
    • 9-axis accel/gyro/magnetometer Bosch
  • USB – 2x micro USB port (device and debug)
  • Debugging
    • Built in debugger with virtual COM port
    • Support for EFM32 STK debugger
  • Misc – Touch button and touch slider, user buttons, vibration motor for tactile feedback
  • Power Supply – Coin-cell battery, USB, or external power source.
  • Dimensions – N/A
Block Diagram

Block Diagram

EFM32 STK debugger (not included) allows for advanced/precise energy monitoring, and full ETM trace. The platform also support mbed Online IDE exports for Simplicity Studio available for Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux. Source code is available on mbed.org.

Thunderboard Wear evaluation board ships with an adjustable strap, ribbon cables for energy monitoring, and quick start guide.

The first 1,000 boards can be pre-ordered on Element14 for a discounted price. Price is $75 in the US, but will vary by depending on the country where the kit is purchased. More details may be available on Silicon labs’ Thunderboard Wear product page.

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Mediatek LinkIt Smart 7688 and Smart 7688 DUO Boards Run OpenWRT for IoT Applications

December 1st, 2015 1 comment

MediaTek LinkIt is a collection of development platforms designed for the prototyping of wearables and Internet of Things (IoT) devices, and last year they started with LinkIt ONE board based on Mediatek MT2501 “Aster” micro-controller and featuring WiFi, Bluetooth, GPSD and GSM/GPRS connectivity. Mediatek Labs has now launched two new LinkIt board, namely LinkIt Smart 7688 and LinkIt Smart 7688 DUO, both powered by Mediatek MT7688 MIPS processor and running OpenWRT, with the latter also adding an Atmel ATmega32U4 for Arduino compatibility.

LinkIt_Smart_7688

LinkIt Smart 7688 (Left) and Smart 7688 DUO (Right) Boards are Breadboard-Friendly Too

LinkIt Smart 7688 Board

LinkIt Smart 7688 Board (Click to Enlarge)

LinkIt Smart 7688 Board (Click to Enlarge)

LinkIt Smart 7688 is then the simpler of the two with the following specifications:

  • Processor – Mediatek MT7688AN MIPS24KEc processor @ 580 MHz with WiFi
  • System Memory – 128MB DDR2 RAM.
  • Storage – 32MB flash + micro SD slot
  • Connectivity – 1T1R Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n with chip antenna and I-PEX conector
  • USB – 1x micro USB host port, 1x micro USB port for power
  • Expansion – 2x 18-pin headers with GPIOs, I2C, I2S, SPI, UART, PWM and Ethernet Port.
  • Misc – MPU reset and WiFi reset buttons, MPU EJTAG solder pads
  • Power Supply – 5V via micro USB port, or 3.3V via header
  • Dimensions – 55.7 x 26 mm
Bottom of Smart 7688 Board (Click to Enlarge)

Bottom of Smart 7688 Board (Click to Enlarge)

CL245A on the back of the board is a switch IC to “bypass MT7688AN bootstrap behavior”.

LinkIt Smart 7688 DUO

LinkIt Smart 7688 Duo (Click to Enlarge)

LinkIt Smart 7688 Duo (Click to Enlarge)

The DUO board is pretty similar, and adds Atmel MCU and reset button, 4 more I/O pins, and is slightly longer:

  • Processor – Mediatek MT7688AN MIPS processor @ 580 MHz with 64 KB I-cache, 32 KB D-cache
  • System Memory – 128MB DDR2 RAM.
  • Storage – 32MB flash + micro SD slot
  • MCU – Atmel ATmega32U4 AVR @ 8 MHz
  • Connectivity – 1T1R Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n with chip antenna and I-PEX conector
  • USB – 1x micro USB host port, 1x micro USB port for power
  • Expansion – 2x 20-pin headers with GPIOs, I2C, I2S, SPI, UART, PWM and Ethernet Port.
  • Misc – MPU reset, MCU reset, and WiFi reset buttons, MPU EJTAG solder pads
  • Power Supply – 5V via micro USB port, or 3.3V via header
  • Dimensions – 60.8 x 26 mm
Bottom of Duo Board (Click to Enlarge)

Bottom of Duo Board (Click to Enlarge)

The I/Os pin are however connected quite differently on 7688 and 7688 DUO, as the latter has most IOs connected to the AVR MCU, with only 3 GPIOs directly connected to the MIPS processor.

7688 DUO Pintout Chart (Click to Enlarge)

LinkIt Smart 7688 DUO Pinout Chart (Click to Enlarge)

7688 Pinout Chart (Click to Enlarge)

LinkIt Smart 7688 Pinout Chart (Click to Enlarge)

Documentation for both board is pretty extensive with Getting Started Guides, a developer’s guide, tutorials, and information about the HDK (Hardware Developer Kit) , which is simply call “board”, including schematics and PCB layout (PDF only). The company also released the bootloader and firmware binary files, as well as an OpenWRT SDK. The boards support both Linux and OS X for development with C/C++, while Python, and Node.js are also supported on Windows. Arduino IDE is also available for the DUO version, and by default MT7688 MPU and Atmel MCU communicate over UART with applications code on the former, and I/Os and sensors managed by the latter. You can access all these resources on LinkIt Smart 7688 page on MediaTek Labs, with some code also found on Mediatek Labs’ Github account, and Seeed Studio’s Wiki. You could also read my own little Linkit Smart 7688 Getting Started Guide.

LinkIt Smart 7688 boards are distributed by Seeed Studio, and you can purchase Mediatek LinkIt Smart 7688 for $12.90 and LinkIt Smart 7688 DUO for $15.90.

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Graperain Introduces G8916 Qualcomm Snapdragon 410 SoM and LTE Mobile Development Board

November 27th, 2015 No comments

Qualcomm applications processors used to be found mostly in consumer devices like smartphones and tablets, but recently the company has expended their use to the embedded space, and for example, we’ve seen Snapdragon 410 64-bit ARM processor used in DragonBoard 410c board, Intrinsyc Open-Q 410 SoM, Inforce 6309 SBC, and today I’m going to have a look at Graperain G8916 system-on-module that’s also integrated into a 4G/LTE mobile development platform.

Snapdragon_410_som

G6916 CPU module specifications:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Snapdragon 410 (MSM8916) quad core Cortex A53 processor @up to 1.4GHz with Adreno 306 GPU
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR3 (2GB optional)
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC 4.5 flash (16 and 32GB optional) + micro SD support up to 128GB via I/Os
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0 LE, FM, NFC/RFID, GPS/GLONASS with 4x on-module antenna connectors.
  • Cellular Connectivity
    • TD-LTE – B38/B39/B40/B41; FDD-LTE – B1/B2/B5/B/B26
    • TD-SCDMA -B34/B39
    • GSM – 850/900/1800/1900
    • CDMA – 1x/EVDO BC0
  • Audio – Unnamed Audio codec with signals for two microphones, headset and speakers
  • Other I/O via half through holes around the module:
    • 4x I2C, 1x PWM, 2x ADC
    • 2x SIM card
    • 1x SD card
    • 1x USB OTG, 2x USB host
    • 20x GPIO
    • Camera – MIPI-CSI up to 12MP rear camera, and 5MP front-facing camera.
    • LCD interface up to 1920×1800
  • Power Supply – N/A
  • Dimensions – 56.5 x 40.5 mm
Snapdragon 410 SoM Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

Snapdragon 410 SoM Block Diagram (Best Resolution I could get from them).

The hardware specifications should be for reference only, as the company has very poor documentation about their module, and exact details, e.g. LTE frequency bands, differ from document to documents. There’s absolutely zero information about software support, so I had to ask again, and they support Android 4.4, and no other operating systems for now.

The company also has a mobile development platform (M9) using the module.Graperain_Snapdragon_410_Mobile_Development_Platform

Snapdragon_410_som_development_board No details technical could be provided in time for this article however.

G8916 module sample price is $115, and less in quantities. More details, but not that many, might be found on Graperain G8916 SoM page.

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