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Posts Tagged ‘development kit’

$20 MediaTek LinkIt 7687 Arduino Compatible WiFi IoT Board Runs FreeRTOS

April 22nd, 2016 No comments

MediaTek Labs has already launched several WiFi boards for IoT applications starting with LinkIt ONE, and later LinkIt Smart 7688 running OpenWrt, and the company is now about to launch LinkIt 7687 HDK (Hardware Development Kit) powered by Mediatek MT7687F Cortex-M4 SoC,  running FreeRTOS, and developed & produced by Silicon Application Corp (SAC).

LinkIt_7687LinkIt 7687 (WS3489) board specifications:

  • SoC – MediaTek MT7687F ARM Cortex-M4F MCU @ 192MHz with 352 KB SRAM, 64KB ROM, and 2 MB serial flash in package, integrated security engine, and built-in 802.11n WiFi. 8×8 mm 68-pin QFN package
  • Connectivity – 1×1 802.11 b/g/n WiFi with on-module PCB antenna and U.FL connector.
  • USB – 1x micro USB for power, debugging (Coresight Debug Access Port + Virtual COM)
  • Expansion
    • Arduino Uno Rev. 3 headers + an extra 8-pin extension connector.
    • Mass Storage Device (MSD) flash programming interface.
    • Reserved headers for power consumption (current) measurement.
  • Misc – LEDs for UART communication, power, and 6x user customizable; 3x push buttons for reset, RTC interrupt, and external interrupt; configuration jumpers for power source and boot mode (embedded flash or UART)
  • Power supply – 5V via micro USB port, or 1.8 to 3.2V using VIN pin
  • Dimensions – 108.5 x 60.5 mm
  • Weight – 25 grams
  • Temperature Range – Operating: -40 to 85°C
Mediatek MT7687F Block Diagram

Mediatek MT7687F Block Diagram

This is the first board for MediaTek LinkIt Development Platform for RTOS, which is said to provide “the convenience of a single toolset and common APIs implemented over a popular RTOS”, in this case, FreeRTOS with additional components such as TCP/IP, SSL/TLS, HTTP (client and server), SNTP, DHCP daemon, MQTT, XML and JSON. You can download MediaTek LinkIt SDK v3.0, compatible with Windows and Linux operating systems, to work on it.

LinkIt_for_RTOS

Documentation for the board, including datasheets, a user’s guide, and the hardware reference files, can be found on Hardware Development Kits for the MediaTek LinkIt Development Platform for RTOS page.

Mediatek MT7687 HDK and MT7687 WiFi module are shown to be “coming so” for respectively $19.99 and $4.99.

Via HackerBoards (previously LinuxGizmos)

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The First Devices and Routers with WiFi 802.11ad Delivering Up 7Gbit/s Transfer Rates at 60 GHz Will Be Available This Year

March 7th, 2016 7 comments

802.11ad is the latest and fastest WiFi standard working in the 60 GHz band and delivering up to 7 Gbit per second data transmission rates. The 60 GHz  frequency band offers both advantages and disadvantages because it does not penetrate through walls nor water, meaning it can only be used within a room limiting the range, but at the same time it’s more secure since it cannot be snooped from the outside, and for people who worry about health effects it does not penetrate the human body. 802.11ad routers will also be able to switch to 2.4 and 5.0 GHz frequency bands in order to go through walls.

The table above nicely summarize the key features of 802.11ad over 802.11ac and 802.11n, however the throughput row shows the theoretical maximum throughput, but in practice, using 802.11ac as example, clients are often limited to 433 or 866 Mbps, and distance and obstacles will even lower the performance further.

Wikipedia also list the following key features for WiGig MAC and PHY Specification version 1.1:

  • Supports data transmission rates up to 7 Gbit/s – more than ten times faster than the highest 802.11n rate
  • Supplements and extends the 802.11 Media Access Control (MAC) layer and is backward compatible with the IEEE 802.11 standard
  • Physical layer enables low power and high performance WiGig devices, guaranteeing interoperability and communication at Gigabit rates
  • Protocol adaptation layers are being developed to support specific system interfaces including data buses for PC peripherals and display interfaces for HDTVs, monitors and projectors
  • Support for beamforming, enabling robust communication at distances beyond 10 meters. The beams can move within the coverage area through modification of the transmission phase of individual antenna elements, which is called phase array antenna beamforming.
  • Widely used advanced security and power management for WiGig devices

Applications for the higher bandwidth include faster download speeds, 4K wireless video, in-room gaming, etc…

60 GHz Frequency Bands for 802.11ac per Regions/Countries

60 GHz Frequency Bands for 802.11ac per Regions/Countries

If you want more technical details or/and finding how to test WiFi 802.11ad device, Agilent’s Wireless LAN at 60 GHz – IEEE 802.11ad Explained application note should be a good read.

TP-Link 802.11ad Router

TP-Link 802.11ad Router

So when will 802.11ad become available? Very soon, as TPLink unveiled Talon AD7200 Multi-band 802.11ad Wi-Fi Router at CES 2016, supporting up 7200Mbps Wi-Fi speeds over 2.4GHz (800Mbps), 5GHz (1733Mbps), and 60GHZ (4600Mbps) bands, and scheduled to be available in “U.S. stores in early 2016”, while LeEcho, previously known as LeTV, has just launched Le Max Pro (X900) smartphone featuring 802.11ad WiFi in China (also found in Aliexpress), and showcased in ARMDevices.net video where Qualcomm demonstrates 802.11ad with the phone by streaming a 4K video at 50 Mbps to a 802.11ad dock connected an UltraHD TV, and downloading data up to 2.6 Gbps with the phone.

Intrinsyc’s Snapdragon 820 Tablet Mobile Development Platform (MDP) also features 802.11ad, and according to a Qualcomm’s press release, Acer and Asus are working on 802.11ad notebooks, and USB adapter  reference designs and development kits will be offered by Sibeam and Peraso.

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Variscite DART-SD410 Snapdragon 410 SoM Comes with WiFi 802.11 b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.1 & GPS

February 26th, 2016 1 comment

Qualcomm Snapdragon 410 is the 64-bit ARM processor used in DragonBoard 410c 96Boards platform, but it’s also found in several phones, some single board computers such as Inforce 6309, and we’ve also seen it in system-on-modules includes Graperain G8916 and Intrinsyc Open-Q 410. Variscite has developed their DART-SD410 system-on-module based on the processor with up to 2GB RAM, up to 16GB storage, and on-board 802.11b/g/n WiFi and Bluetooth 4.1.

Variscite_DART_SD410DART-SD410 module specifications:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Snapdragon 410 quad core Cortex A53 processor @ 1.2GHz with Adreno 306 GPU @ 400 MHz
  • System Memory – 1 to 2GB LPDDR3 @ 533 MHz
  • Storage – 8 to 16 GB eMMC 4.5 flash
  • Connectivity – WiFi 802.11 b/g/n + Bluetooth 4.1 LE (WCN3620), GPS (WGR7640), and two u.FL antenna connectors
  • Audio – PM8916 PMIC/Audio codec
  • Snapdragon_410_SoMI/Os available via 2x 90-pin board-to-board connectors:
    • Display
      • 4-lane DSI up to 720p60/1080p30, 24-bit
      • On-carrier DSI to HDMI bridge
      • On-carrier DSI to LVDS bridge
    • Camera – 2x MIPI CSI
    • Storage – SD card
    • Connectivity – 1000/100/10Mbps on-carrier
    • RTC on-carrier
    • Up to 6x I2C, 6x SPI, 2x UARTs,
    • 1x USB2.0 Host/Device
    • Audio – Digital microphone, 2x analog microphone, stereo headphone, mono speaker, 2 x I2S
    • JTAG
  • Power Supply – 3.7 to 4.5V
  • Dimensions – 25mm x 43mm x 4mm
  • Temperature Range – -25 to 85°C
DART-SD410 Block Diagram

DART-SD410 Block Diagram

The module supports Ubuntu Linaro and Android  5.1.1, and soon will also support the Yocto Project and Windows 10 IoT. You can find documentation on Variscite DART-SD410 Wiki, and it might also be an advantage that DragonBoard 410c development board is officially supported by Linaro, and has recently become Canonical’s Ubuntu Core ARM64 reference platform.

VAR-SD410CustomBoard

VAR-SD410CustomBoard

The company can also provide VAR-SD410CustomBoard carrier board to get started with development as quickly as possible. The baseboard features a Gigabit Ethernet RJ45 port, HDMI output, a micro SD card, RTC and battery slot, two USB 2.0 ports, audio jacks, an edge connector for a camera board (VAR-EXT-CB410), various headers for LVDS, RS-232, GPIOs…, as well as user LED and buttons. Two version of the development kits with the module and baseboard are available with one including a 7″ WVGA capacitive touch screen.

DART-SD410 SoM and development kits are available now with price starting from $57 per unit for 1000 pieces orders. More details can be found on Varisite DART-SD410 and VAR-SD410CustomBoard product pages.

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SiLabs Wireless Gecko SoCs Support Bluetooth 4.2, Zigbee, Thread, and 2.4GHz Proprietary Protocols

February 25th, 2016 3 comments

Silicon Labs has introduced three new Wireless SoC families with Blue Gecko for Bluetooth Smart, Mighty Gecko for Thread & Zigbee, and Flex Gecko for proprietary 2.4 GHz protocols. All three families provides up to 19.5 dBm output power & hardware cryptography, and are pin-to-pin and software compatible.

SiLabs Might Gecko SoC Block Diagram

SiLabs Might Gecko SoC Block Diagram

SiLabs Wireless Gecko SoC highlights:

  • MCU Core – ARM Cortex-M4 @ 40 MHz with FPU, up to 256 KB flash, and up to 32KB SRAM. Mighty Gecko also adds a DSP
  • Peripherals
    • AES256/128 Hardware Crypto Accelerator
    • ADC (12-bit, 1 Msps, 286 µA)
    • Current DAC (4-bit, Current Source or Sink)
    • 2x Analog Comparator
    • Low Energy UART
    • 2x USART (UART, SPI, IrDA, I2S)
    • I2C (Address recognition down to EM3)
    • Timers : RTCC, LE Timer & Pulse Counter
    • 12-channel Peripheral Reflex System
    • Up to 31 GPIO
  • EFR32BG Blue Gecko Family
    • Bluetooth Smart (Bluetooth Low Energy or “BLE”) 4.2 specification as well as proprietary wireless protocols
    • Supported by Silicon Labs’ Bluetooth Smart software stack and BGScript scripting language
    • Packages – QFN48 (7 mm x 7 mm), QFN32 (5 mm x 5 mm), WLCSP (3.3 mm x 3.2 mm)
  • EFR32MG Mighty Gecko Family
    • Multiprotocol SoC solution for low-power 802.15.4 mesh networking
    • Supports Silicon Labs’ ZigBee PRO software stack for ZigBee applications and Silicon Labs’ pre-certified Thread protocol stack for IP-based mesh networks
    • Gives developers the flexibility to select the optimal protocol (ZigBee, Thread, Bluetooth Smart or proprietary) for their IoT applications
    • Packages – QFN48 (7 mm x 7 mm), QFN32 (5 mm x 5 mm)
  • EFR32FG Flex Gecko Family
    • Supports popular proprietary protocol options for diverse applications including M2M links, building automation, security and electronic shelf labels.
    • Features Silicon Labs’ radio abstraction interface layer (RAIL) software easing the complexity of proprietary wireless development by simplifying radio configuration
    • Packages – QFN48 (7 mm x 7 mm), QFN32 (5 mm x 5 mm)

The Wireless Gecko SoC portfolio is supported by Simplicity Studio development platform including AppBuilder, to configure wireless applications, Desktop Network Analyzer for debugging, and Energy Profiler for profiling energy consumption. The IDE works on Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X.

The company also provided the table below to help customer choose the best 2.4GHz protocol for their application.

Bluetooth Smart ZigBee Thread Proprietary
Network Topology P2P, Star Mesh Mesh P2P, Star, Mesh
Network Size 2 ~ 10 150 ~ 250 150 ~ 250 Custom
Line-of-Sight Range 375 m 585 m 585 m 585 m (2.4 GHz)
Data Rate 1 Mbps 250 kbps 250 kbps Custom
IP Support Yes No Yes No
Low Energy Yes Yes Yes Yes
Application Examples Wearables
Fitness/Health
Home Automation
Lighting
Home Automation
Lighting
Smart Metering
Industrial Automation
Home Automation
Lighting
Smart Metering
Industrial Automation
Home Automation
Electronic Shelf Labels
Asset Tracking

Mighty_Gecko_DevkitThree development starter kits are available for the Blue, Mighty and Flex Gecko SoCs:

  • $99 EFR32 Blue Gecko Bluetooth Smart SoC Wireless Starter Kit (SLWSTK6020A) with mainboard, EFR32BG 2.4 GHz radio board (+10.5 dBm), 1x USB A to USB mini-B cable, 1x CR2032 battery, and a  EFR32BG Get Started Card
  • $229 Flex Gecko Starter Kit (SLWSTK6066A) with 2x Wireless starter kit mainboards, 2x EFR32FG 2.4 GHz radio boards (+19.5 dBm), 2x USB A to USB mini-B cables, 2x CR2032 batteries, 2x AA Battery holders, and a EFR32FG Get Started Card
  • $499 EFR32 Mighty Gecko Starter Kit (SLWSTK6000A) with 3x Wireless starter kit mainboards, 3 x EFR32MG 2.4 GHz 19.5 dBm radio board, 3 x EFR32MG 2.4 GHz 13 dBm radio boards, an AA Battery board (supports running +19.5 from battery), and an integrated debug and packet trace

Wireless Gecko engineering samples are available now in QFN32 and QFN48 packages, with mass production scheduled for Q2 2016. Pricing starts at $2.11 per unit for 100,000-unit quantities for Mighty Gecko SoCs, $2.06 for Flex Gecko SoCs, and $0.99 for Blue Gecko SoCs. More details can be found on SiLabs Wireless Gecko product page.

Via EETimes

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Hexiwear is an Open Source Wearable Development Kit Expandable with Add-on Boards (Crowdfunding)

February 23rd, 2016 No comments

MikroElektronika has designed Hexiwear, a wearable development kit that you can wear and hack as a smartwatch thanks to an (optionally) included wristband, or use a an IoT development kit thanks to its docking station taking up to three “Click” boards among a choice of over 180 modules. .
HexiwearHexiwear hardware specifications:

  • MCU – NXP Kinetis K64x ARM Cortex-M4 MCU @ 120 MHz with 1MB Flash and 256KB SRAM
  • Storage – 8 MB Flash memory
  • Display – 1.1” full color OLED display with capacitive touch
  • Connectivity – Bluetooth 4.0 LE and 802.15.4 via NXP Kinetis KW4x Cortex-M0+ wireless MCU
  • Sensors -3D accelerometer and magnetometer (NXP FXOS8700CQ), 3-Axis gyroscope (NXP FXAS21002), pressure sensor (NXP MPL3115A2R1), light-to-digital converter, humidity and temperature sensor, heart-rate sensor (HRM)
  • USB – micro USB cable for power and charging
  • Misc – RGB LED, haptic feedback engine, docking connector
  • Battery – 190 mAh 2C Li-Po battery; 600 mA single-cell Li-Ion/Li-Po battery charger (NXP MC34671)
  • Dimensions – N/A

The platform can be controlled by Hexiwear app – available for Android and iOS – developed by WalkAbout, and capable of gathering data from all the sensors, turning individual sensors on and off, and programming the device over the air (OTAP). The app can also store the data into Wolkabout Cloud. Hexawear firmware source code can already be found in Github,and you can modify it with Kinetis Design Studio (KDS) free IDE based on Eclipse.

Hexiwear_Docking_Station
But one cool feature of the wearables development platform is that you can take it out of its bracelet, and insert it into Hexiwear docking station with three mikroBUS sockets with SPI, UART, I2C, PMW, Analog input and power signals that can take three of MikroElektronika’s 180+ Click boards, and allows programming over a micro USB port. This looks great for development, but not so much for a final product, which is why all hardware design files for Hexiwear, and I assume its docking station, will be made available on MikroElektronika GitHub account, as well as on NXP’s Kinetis Designs website, making it an open source hardware project.

The company decided to launch the kit on Kickstarter where they aim to raise at least $20,000. Pledges start at $37 for Hexiwear, a USB cable, and a software cover, but you’ll need to spend $49 to get the wristband with the kit, and $57 for a full kit including Hexiwear docking station. You’d still need to purchase Clikc boards separately as they are not offered as part of any rewards. Shipping is not included, and adds $14 for all rewards, except distributors packs (50 to 100 pieces). Delivery is scheduled in April and May 2016.

Hexiwear is currently being showcased at Embedded World 2016 in NXP and Mouser booths.

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Autonomous Deep Learning Robot Features Nvidia Jetson TK1 Board, a 3D Camera, and More

January 25th, 2016 No comments

Autonomous, a US company that makes smart products such as smart desks, virtual reality kits and autonomous robots, has recently introduced a deep learning robot that comes with a 3D camera, speaker and microphone, Jetson TK1 board, and a mobile base.

Autonomous_Deep_Learning_Robot

The robot appears to be mostly made of the shelves parts:

  • 3D Depth camera – Asus Xtion Pro 3D Depth Camera
  • Speaker & Microphone
  • Nvidia Jetson TK1 PM375 board – Nvidia Terra K1 quad-core Cortex A15 processor @ 2.3 GHz with a 192-core Kepler GPU, 2GB RAM, 16 GB flash
  • Kobuki Mobile Base –  Kobuki is the best mobile base designed for education and research on state of the art robotics. Kobuki provides power supplies for external computer power as well as additional sensors and actuators. Its highly accurate odometry, amended by calibrated gyroscope, enables precise navigation.

The robot is designed for research in deep learning and mobile robotics, and comes with Ubuntu, Caffe, Torch, Theano, cuDNN v2, and CUDA 7.0, as Robot Operating System (ROS) set of open source software libraries and tools.

Kobuki Base

Kobuki Base

While there’s virtually no documentation at all on the product page, I’ve been told that the robot was built on top of TurtleBot open source robot, and re-directed to tutorials available via TurtleBot Wiki, as well useful resources for deep learnings frameworks such as Caffe and Torch, and Google TensorFlow Tutorials.

Autonomous Deep Learning Robot sells for $999 with manual charging, or $1048 with a self-charging dock.

Thanks to Nanik for the tip!

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Intel RealSense Devkit and Lenovo Smartphone to Feature Project Tango 3D Mapping Technology

January 13th, 2016 No comments

Project Tango is a project launched in 2014 by Google ATAP that aims at creating 3D map of your environment using 3D motion tracking with depth sensing for tracking your movements in 3D, precise and quick measurements, augmented reality and more. The first Project Tango development kit was a tablet based on Nvidia TegraK1, but Google recently announced that Lenovo planned to launch the first consumer smartphone with the technology.

Renderings only, not the actual product

Renderings only, not the actual product

Beside the announcement that there are going to make a phone, the company did not provide many other details so far, but it should feature a screen smaller than 6.5″ and cost less than $500. The main reason Google posted about this before CES 2016 was probably to reach out to developers who can submit the app idea to be features on the first Tango phone by February 16, 2015 with the following materials:

  • Project schedule including milestones for development
  • Visual mockups of your idea including concept art
  • Smartphone app screenshots and videos, such as captured app footage
  • Appropriate narrative including storyboards, etc.
  • Breakdown of your team and its members
  • One pager introducing your past app portfolio and your company profile

Selected developers will be contacted by March 15, 2016. You can submit your proposal on Project Tango’s App Incubator. Eventually, more details should become available on Lenovo’s Project Tango smartphone page.

Intel also unveiled a smartphone development kit featuring a RealSense camera with support for RealSense and Project Tango SDKs.

Intel_RealSense_Devit_Project_TangoIntel RealSense Smartphone developer kit specifications:

  • SoC – Intel Atom x7-Z8700 quad core processor with Intel HD graphics
  • System Memory – 2GB RAM
  • Storage – 64GB flash
  • Display – 6″ touschscreen QHD Display (2560×1440)
  • Cameras
    • Intel RealSense Camera ZR300 with a [email protected] depth camera and wide FOV Camera(VGA with >160o FOV) & high precision IMU for feature tracking
    • 2MP front facing and 8MP rear facing RGB cameras
  • Connectivity – Bluetooth 4.0, GPS, 802.11 WIFI, and 3G
  • Video Output – HDMI
  • USB – USB 3.0
  • Dimensions 83.9mm x 164.8mm x 8.9mm

The smartphone will run  a recent version of Android operating system.

The development kit can be reserved now with a credit card (United States only), and will be billed for $399 once the kit is ready to ship. When that is Intel does not say.

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Microchip Introduces $11 RN2483 & RN2903 LoRa Modules and $70 LoRa Evaluation Kits for IoT & M2M Applications

December 15th, 2015 15 comments

LoRa is one of those long range low power WAN standards used for the machine to machine (M2M) and Internet of things (IoT) applications. I already featured a Semtech Lora module here with a line-of-sight range of up to 20 to 30km, and the company has just partnered with STMicro to deploy LoRa solutions, but today, I’m going to have a look at Microchip Lora modules and development kits that I discovered in the company’s Micro Solutions Nov/Dec 2015 publication.

LoRa_Technology_Network_Topology

The company has launched two modules for the European and North American markets with respectively RN2483 LoRa 433/868 MHz
R&TTE Directive Assessed Radio Modem and RN2903 915 MHz North American modem. Apart from the different frequencies, both modules have similar features:

  • On-board LoRaWAN Class A protocol stack
  • Tx/Rx Power
    • RN2483 – 40 mA (14dBm, 868MHz) Tx, and 14.2 mA Rx @ 3.6V
    • RN2903 – 124 mA Tx max, and 13.5 mA Rx @ (2.1 to 3.6V)
  • ASCII command interface over UART
  • Castellated SMT pads for easy and reliable PCB mounting
  • Device Firmware Upgrade (DFU) over UART
  • 14 GPIO for control, status, and ADC
  • Highly integrated module with MCU, crystal, EUI-64 Node Identity Serial EEPROM, Radio transceiver with analog front end, and matching circuitry
  • Operating Voltage – RN2483: 3.6V; RN2903: 2.1V to 3.6V
  • Dimensions – 17.8 x 26.7 x 3 mm
  • Operating Temperature Range – -40C to +85C
  • FCC and IC Certified, RoHS compliant

Demo source code, datasheets, product briefs, and user’s guides are available on the modules’ product pages linked above.

US and EU versions of Microchip LoRa Technology Motes (Click to Enlarge)

US and EU versions of Microchip LoRa Technology Motes (Click to Enlarge)

The first development tool is LoRa Technology Mote with either RN2483 @ 868 MHz or RN2903 @ 915 MHz. It is a standalone battery-powered LoRa node, used to to demonstrate the long-range capabilities of the modem, and verify inter-operability with LoRaWAN v1.0 gateways and infrastructure.  The key features listed for Lora Motes:

    • MCU – Microchip PIC18LF25K50 8-bit MCU
    • Connectivity
      • EU version (RN2483) – 868 MHz High-Frequency SMA Connector & 433 MHz Low-Frequency Antenna test Point
      • US version (RN2903) – 915 MHz High-Frequency SMA Connector
    • Display – OLED display; 128 x 64 resolution
    • USB – USB Mini-B Connector
    • Sensors – Ambient Light Sensor, Linear Active Thermistor (MCP9700T)
    • Programming / Debugging – Mote ICSP Programming
    • Misc – S1 & S2 buttons for menu navigation, 4x LEDs controlled by PIC18 (2), and module (2), battery power switch
    • Power – 2x AAA Battery Pack; LDO Regulator (MCP1825S); alternative power supply through hole connectors
    • Dimensions – N/A
Lora PICtail (Click to Enlarge)

RN2483 Lora PICtail Daughter Board (Click to Enlarge)

The second options is RN2483/RN2903 LoRa Technology PICtail/PICtail Plus daughter boards that can be connected to PIC18 Explorer or Explorer 16 development boards, with the latter supporting PIC24, dsPIC, or PIC32 MCU families.

LoRa PICTail daughter board specifications:

  • US version – Microchip RN2903 Low-Power Long Range, LoRa Technology Transceiver Module with one SMA connector for 915 MHz band
  • EU version – Microchip RN2483 LoRa Technology Transceiver Module with two SMA connectors for 433 MHz and 868 MHz bands
  • MCU – PIC18 MCU for custom functions
  • USB – 1x mini USB connector
  • Expansion interfaces
    • Solder pads around the module for GPIOs, power pins and communication signals
    • PICtail connection interface
    • PICtail Plus connection interface
  • Programming – ICSP header to program the on-board PIC18 MCU
  • Misc – UART traffic LEDs
  • Power Supply – On-board LDO; supply current measurement points
  • Dimensions – N/A

You can find user’s guides and some extra documentation for all four kits on their respective product pages: RN2483 LoRa Technology Mote, RN2903 LoRa Technology Mote, RN2483 LoRa Technology PICtail (Plus) Daughter Board, and RN2903 LoRa Technology PICtail (Plus) Daughter Board.

Both RN2483 and RN2903 modules are available now for $10.90 each in 1,000-unit quantities, while LoRa Technology Motes go for $69.99 and LoRa PICTail boards for $65 on microchipDIRECT or other distributors.

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