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Posts Tagged ‘development kit’

Embedian SMART MEN and SMART BEE SBCs Feature a TI Sitara SMARC CoM

April 19th, 2014 No comments

Embedian, an embedded company specialized in computers-on-module and single board computers, has recently unveiled SMART MEN and SMART BEE single board computers powered by their SMARC-T335X computer-on-module, compliant with the SMARC (Smart Mobility Architecture) standard, and based on Texas Instruments Sitara AM335x SoCs.

SMART MEN SBC

SBC_SMART_MEN

SMART MEN single board computer specifications:

  • SoC – Texas Instrument Sitara AM335X ARM Cortex-A8 at 600MHz, 800MHz or 1GHz
  • System Memory – 512MB DDR3 (303Mhz x 2)
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC Flash (eMMC 5.0), 4MB SPI NOR Flash, AT24C32 EEPROM, and SDHC/SDIO slot
  • Connectivity – 2 x 10/100 Mbps Ethernet (vertical RJ45)
  • Display – single channel LVDS 18-bit color depth, single channel LVDS 24-bit color depth. LCD LED backlight driver onboard
  • USB – 2 x USB 2.0 Host, 1 x USB 2.0 OTG, 1 x Serial-to-USB (Client)
  • Additional Interfaces:
    • 6 x RS232s (transceiver onboard, two with handshaking and one can be configured as RS422/RS485),  2 x SPIs, 2 x I2C
    • Audio – Microphone input and Headphones output
    • 1 x CAN Bus Header (Transceiver onboard)
    • RTC (Seiko S35390-A) backup battery onboard
    • 1 x Buzzer
    • 11 x GPIOs
    • 1 x 4-wire touch connector
  • Misc – Invisible reset jumper, external watchdog reset (reset from the power source)
  • Power Supply – 5V, typical consumption: ~2 Watts
  • Dimensions – 102 mm (L) x 145 mm (W) – (3.5″ board)
  • Temperature range – Normal Temperature: 0 ~ 60 C,  Industrial Temperature: -40 ~85 C
  • Humidity – 10% ~ 90% relative humidity, non-condensed

SMART BEE SBC

SBC-SMART-BEE

SMART BEE single board computer specifications are extremely similar to SMART MEN SBC:

  • SoC – Texas Instrument Sitara AM335X ARM Cortex-A8 at 600MHz, 800MHz or 1GHz
  • System Memory – 512MB DDR3 (303Mhz x 2)
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC Flash (eMMC 5.0), 4MB SPI NOR Flash, AT24C32 EEPROM, and SDHC/SDIO slot
  • Connectivity – 2 x 10/100 Mbps Ethernet
  • Display – Parallel LCD 18-bit color depth, single channel LVDS 24-bit color depth. LCD LED backlight driver onboard
  • USB – 1 x USB 2.0 Host, 1 x USB 2.0 OTG
  • Additional Interfaces:
    • 3 x RS232s (transceiver onboard, two with handshaking and one can be configured as RS422/RS485),  2 x SPI, 2 x I2C
    • Audio – Microphone input and Headphones output
    • 1 x CAN Bus Header (Transceiver onboard)
    • RTC (Seiko S35390-A) backup battery onboard
    • 1 x Buzzer
    • 12 x GPIOs
    • 1 x 4-wire touch connector
  • Misc – Invisible reset jumper, external watchdog reset (reset from the power source)
  • Power Supply – 5V, typical consumption: ~2 Watts
  • Dimensions – 102 mm (L) x 145 mm (W) – (3.5″ board)
  • Temperature range – Normal Temperature: 0 ~ 60 C,  Industrial Temperature: -40 ~85 C
  • Humidity – 10% ~ 90% relative humidity, non-condensed

The only differences are mostly mechanicals with for instance, the presence of USB connectors on SMART BEE which are missing on the SMART MEN, and different number of USB, GPIOs, RS232 ports, etc.. between the two boards.

Both boards support Linux 3.2 (TI EZSDK 6.0.0 Arago or Ubuntu 13.04) or Linux 3.12 (Device Tree Support, Arago or Ubuntu 13.04), Android ICS, and Windows Embedded Compact 7. The company uses Yocto/OpenEmbedded to build embedded distributions for the boards.

The company provides a user’s manual, PinMux file for TI PinMux Utility, and a toolchain.

SMARC-T335X Computer on Module

Embedian_SMARC-T335X

The two SBC features above as comprised of a baseboard, and SMARC-T335X module which comes with the following specs:

  • SoC – Texas Instrument Sitara AM335X ARM Cortex-A8 at 600MHz, 800MHz or 1GHz
  • System Memory – 512MB DDR3 (303Mhz x 2)
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC Flash (eMMC 5.0), 4MB SPI NOR Flash, and AT24C32 EEPROM
  • Connectivity – 2 x 10/100 Mbps Ethernet
  • Display – Parallel LCD 18-bit color depth, single channel LVDS 24-bit color depth.
  • USB – 1 x USB 2.0 Host, 1 x USB 2.0 OTG
  • Additional Interfaces:
    • 3 x UARTS,   2 x SPI, 3 x I2C
    • 1x I2S
    • 3 x PWMs
    • 1 x CAN Bus
    • RTC (Seiko S35390-A)
    • 12 x GPIOs
    • 4x ADC for resistive touch screens
  • Dimensions – 82 mm x 50 mm with 31-pin MXM connector (SMARC Specification)
  • Temperature range – Normal Temperature: 0 ~ 60 C,  Industrial Temperature: -40 ~85 C
  • Humidity – 10% ~ 90% relative humidity, non-condensed

The CoM gets the same development resources plus a Carrier Board Design Guide, and Carrier Board Reference Schematics (pdf and OrCAD format). You can find further development resources on Embedian Developer Center, and via their public git repo.

All three products are available now. SMARC-T335X CoM starts at $69 per unit ($49 / pcs for 3k+ orders), SBC-SMART-BEE at $119 per unit ($89 / pc for 3k+ orders), and SBC-SMART-MEN at $159 ($129 / pc for 3k+ orders). You can find more information through Embedian’s products page.

Via LinuxGizmos

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$14 Digispark Pro is a Tiny Arduino Ready Board Supporting over 25 Shields (Crowdfunding)

April 15th, 2014 No comments

Digispark Pro is yet another small Arduino compatible board, but it costs only $14, and over 25 small form factor shields for Wi-Fi, BLE, mesh networking, etc.. are available for the platform.

Digispark Pro in Different Header Configurations

Digispark Pro with Different Header Configurations

Let’s get straight into the hardware specs:

  • MCU – AVR MCU @ 16 Mhz  with 16KB Flash Memory (14.5K+ after bootloader)
  • I/Os
    • 14 I/O pins (2 shared with USB)
    • I2C, true SPI, UART, LIN, and USI
    • ADC on 10 pins
    • 3 PWM Channels (which can be assigned to a selection of pins)
  • USB – Micro USB for debugging, communication and power
  • Misc – One button usable as reset, program, or user button, Power and Test/Status LEDs,  user accessible solder jumpers to disable LEDs, and other features for lower power consumption
  • Power – 5V via micro USB, or External Source – 5v or 6-16v (automatic selection). On-board 500ma 5V regulator
  • Dimensions – 26.7mm x 18.3mm

The board is compatible with Arduino IDE 1.5  for MaC OSX, Windows, and Linux, and comes with fully signed drivers and executables. The USB port supports USB programming, USB device emulation, USB-CDC virtual serial port emulation.

Digispark, Digispark Pro and Shields

Digispark, Digispark Pro and Shields

Combined with Wi-Fi, Bleutooth or BLE shields, you can use Digispark Pro as a mobile develoment platform. Example apps with source are available for Android and iPhone, and with Android devices featuring an USB OTG port supporting serial devices, you don’t even need an extra shield and can use the built-in USB serial connectivity in the board. Documentation will eventually show up in their Wiki, and support will be provided via their forum. The boards will be open source hardware released under CC-BY-SA 3.0, and the software will be released under CC-BY-SA 3.0, GPL, LGPL, and/or MIT depending on packages. You can have a quick look at the board and some possible applications from the short promo video below.

Digistrump, the company behind the project, is currently looking for fund on Kickstarter and have already reached their funding target with over $30,000 in pledges at the time of writing. Digispark is not their first crowdfunding venture, and they have managed two other previous successful project on Kickstarter, namely Digispark and DigiX. You could get the board for as low as $10 (Early bird), but these are all gone and the cheapest pledge is now $14 for one board including to the US, with $5 asked for international shipping. You can also add a few extra dollars to your pledge to get one or more of the wireless shields: WiFi Shield for $30, Bluetooth Classic for $15,  Bluetooth Low Energy for $20, and nRF24L01+ (mesh networking) for $7. Delivery is expected for July 2014, except if you select the beta version which will be sent in May.

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Texas Instruments Tiva C Series Connected LaunchPad Unboxing and Quick Start Guide

March 28th, 2014 No comments

Texas Instruments Tiva C Series TM4C1294 Connected LaunchPad is an evaluation kit for the Internet of things with a Cortex-M4 MCU (Tiva TM4C1294), an Ethernet port, and USB interfaces for power and debugging. At $19.99 including shipping via Fedex, it’s one of the cheapest ways to get devices online. I’ve purchased one via TI e-Store, and already received it. I’ll post some pictures of the kit, go through the Quick Start Guide, and provides links to resources to go further.

EK-TM4C1294XL Connected LaunchPad Unboxing

I’ve received the kit in the package below with feature a QR Code linking to http://www.ti.com/launchpad, as well basic specifications (refer to my previous post for specs), list of tools (Code composer studio, Tivaware, Keil, IAR…) and package content.

Tiva_C_Series_Connected_Launchpad_Package
In the box we’ve got the board itself, a retractable Ethernet cable, a USB to micro USB cable for power and debugging, and Connect LaunchPad Quick Start Guide.

Board, Ethernet & USB Cables, and Quick Start Guide

Board, Ethernet & USB Cables, and Quick Start Guide

The Quick Start Guide describes the boards, the different pin on header, and how to get started. You can find both sides of the document here and here.

Top of the Board (Click to Enlarge)

Top of the Board (Click to Enlarge)

A closer look at the board shows the Ethernet port, a micro USB port, two user’s buttons as well as wake & reset button on the left, the MCU is in the middle, and the debug part on the right of the board with another micro USB port. Close to the MCU, you also have several jumpers to select the power source (ICDI (In-Circuit Debug Interface), OTG, and Boosterpack), as well as some selections for CAN and UART.  At the bottom you’ve got a breadboard area, and there are also 4 Boosterpack headers (male) on the board.

Bottom of the Board (Click to Enlarge)

Bottom of the Board (Click to Enlarge)

On the back of the board we’ve got the female headers for the BoosterPacks and description, as well as the MAC Address.

TI_Connected_Launchpad_vs_Arduino_LeonardoThe first time I open the box, I felt the board to be larger than I expected. The above photo shows the Connected LaunchPad next to an Arduino Leonardo clone.

You could also watch the unboxing video.

Getting Started with Tiva C Series (EK-TM4C1294XL) Connected LaunchPad

The board is preloaded with an application that connected to a Cloud based platform called Exosite. The very first thing you need to do is to register your board via ti.exosite.com. This requires registration, and you can also use you Google+ or Yahoo account for this process. After login, go to Click here to add a new device to your portal, click “Select a supported device below”, and “EK-TM4C1429XL Connected LaunchPad”.

Click continue to enter the MAC Address (found at the back of the board), a device name, and the device location as shown on the screenshot below.

Connected_launchpad_device_setupClick Continue and confirm at the next step. The device setup is completed at this stage.

This following step is optional to get started, but if you want to access the serial console, you’ll need to install drivers. It appears many of the tools are available for Windows and Linux (CCS and TivaWare), but the Quick Start Guide mentions a Windows PC is required, so that’s what I used. You’ll need to download Stellaris ICDI Drivers and extract spmc06.zip yo your computer.

Then connect the Ethernet cable between your board and your hub/router, and the micro USB to USB cable between the board and your Windows PC, which should then detect a new hardware. Select to install your own drivers, and select the path “spmc016\stellaris_icdi_drivers”. This will install “Stellaris Virtual Serial Port“. After this is complete, Windows will still detect a new hardware again, twice, repeat the steps above to install “Stellaris ICDI DFU Device” and “Stellaris ICDI JTAG/SWD Device“. If case you have issues, you can check the full instructions (PDF).

Now you can go to the Device Manager, to check installation is complete, and the serial port number, COM7 in my case.

Stellaris_ICDI_Driver_Device_Manager
You can now start Putty or Hyperterminal, and setup a 115,200 baud 8N1 connection on your COM port to access the serial port.

Let’s go back to ti.exosite.com. Under “Device List”, click on your device to connect to it, and interact with  the dashboard.

Tiva_Connected_LaunchPad_ExositeIt will show the Junction temperature, update counters when you press the user’s buttons, and turn on and off two LEDs on your board. The response time was very slow when I tested it maybe 5 to 10 seconds. My Internet connection might be in cause, or the refresh rate of the dashboard.

The portal will also show a map with other Connected LaunchPad around the world (over 300 at the time of my connection), and a game of Tic-Tac-Toe using you board (which I haven’t tried). You can check the full website screenshot.

When you start the board for the first time, and connect to Exosite you can see the following log.

Connected_LaunchPad_SerialAnd if you type “stats”, you’ll basically get what you can see from the Exosite dashboard.
Connected_LaunchPad_Serial_StatsThat’s all for the first steps with Tiva Connected LaunchPad. Texas Instruments also has uploaded a 5-minute video showing the Quick Start Guide steps.

Going further

Texas Instruments redirect developers to www.ti.com/tool/ek-tm4c1294xl  to access the software, drivers, and documentation, to start with “Project 0″ at www.ti.com/tiva-c-launchpad which for this board is Hello Blinky. The project requires the use of Code Composer Studio (SW-EK-TM4C1294XL-CCS), TivaWare (SW-EK-TM4C1294XL), and the ICDI drivers installed previously which you can get via http://www.ti.com/tool/sw-ek-tm4c1294xl. Please note that the download will require you to go through a ridiculous “U.S. Government export approval” form, but I got accepted immediately after application. During installation of CCS you may want to select a custom install, selecting “Tiva C Series ARM MCUs” only to avoid a large download and installation. I haven’t gone further for now due to lack of time. Beside CCS, Keil, Mentor Embedded and IAR Systems IDEs can support the board, and TI Tiva C Series MCUs.

It may also be worthwhile going through “Creating IoT Solutions with the TM4C1294XL Connected LaunchPad Workshop” with provides an introduction of CCS, TivaWare, and should go through all the MCU peripherals via sample code.

There are at least two other third party software tools:

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Low Cost Development Boards Giveaway: Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone Black, MicroZed, Minnowboard, and more

March 28th, 2014 No comments

OpenSystems Media is organizing a giveaway of some development boards targeting hobbyists. They’ll have a draw for the boards at EELive in San Jose, at their booth #2009 on April 1-2, but if you can’t attend you can also get a change to win online. Debelopment_Board_Giveaway

Here’s the list of board given away

You could also double your chances to win by tweeting the text below:

I just entered to win a #DIY board from @embedded_mag from #EELive.  Click here for your chance to #win http://bit.ly/EElivecontest #embedded

I could not find any terms and conditions, so I’m not sure if the giveaway is international, or only limited to the US.

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Compulab CM-T54 Computer-on-Module Powered by Texas Instruments OMAP5432

March 26th, 2014 No comments

CompuLab has introduced CM-T54 Computer-on-Module (CoM) powered by Texas Instruments OMAP5432 SoC with dual ARM Cortex-A15 CPU @ 1.5GHz coupled with Imagination Technologies PowerVR SGX544 GPU. The module also features up to up to 4GB DDR3,  up-to 64GB eMMC, and provides Ethernet, SATA, USB 3.0 interfaces among others. Target applications include digital signage, industrial media players and IPTV.

Compulab CM-T54 CoM

Compulab CM-T54 CoM

CM-T54 specifications:

  • SoC – Texas Instruments OMAP5432 dual Cortex-A15 @ 1.5GHz with PowerVR SGX544 GPU, 2x Cortex M4 cores, IVA-HD video subsystem and TMS320DM64 32-bit DSP core
  • System Memory – 512MB – 4GB DDR3-1066, single / dual-channel 32-bit data bus
  • Storage – Up to 64GB eMMC flash, SATA II interface, 3.0 Gbps, Up to 3x MMC/SD/SDIO (3V levels) up to 32GB each.
  • Display
    • Parallel 24-bit display. Up to 1920×1080 @ 60Hz
    • HDMI 1.4. Up to 1920×1080 @ 60Hz
    • MIPI/DSI (4x lanes) @ 1Gbps
    • Optional LVDS. Up to 1920×1080 @ 60Hz
    • Support for three independent displays
    • Optional TSC2046 touchscreen controller Supports 4-wire resistive  panels.
  • Audio
    • Up to 2 I2S (McBSP)
    • HDMI audio out
    • Digital microphone interface for up to 3 stereo mics.
    • Optional audio codec with stereo in, out, and microphone
  • Connectivity
    • Optional 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi module (Marvell 88W8787)
    • Optional Bluetooth 3.0 + High Speed (HS) (also compliant with Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR)
    • Optional 100Base-T Ethernet (Microchip LAN9730)
  • USB – Optional USB 3.0 OTG port, Up to 3x USB 2.0 ports
  • Camera:
    • Parallel camera up to 16-bit wide, up to 148.5 MP/s
    • Up to 3 serial camera ports with MIPI D-PHY v1.0 / SMIA CCP2 compliant PHY receivers up to 1.5 Gbps (750 MHz) per lane.
  • Other I/Os:
    • 1x RS-232, up to 5x UARTs
    • Up to 106 multifunction signals (GPIOs and others)
    • Up to 4x I2C ( up to 3.4Mbps)
    • Up to 3x SPI (eCSPI)
    • HDQ/1-Wire, up to 5Kbps
    • JTAG
  • Misc – RTC powered by external lithium battery
  • Power – 5VDC / Li-Ion battery
  • Dimensions – 73 x 68 x 5 mm (Connector – 204-pin SODIMM)
  • Operating temperature – Commercial: 0 to 70°C, Extended: -20 to 70°C, Industrial – -40 to 85°C
  • Storage temperature – -40 to 85°C

The company provide Linux and Android Jelly Bean SW packages (no details on exact versions), as well as documentation for the module. Development resources are not available online at this time.

SB-T54 baseboard with CM-T54 CoM

SB-T54 baseboard with CM-T54 CoM

The company also offers a baseboard SB-T54 for CM-T54, which combined become SBC-T54 single board computer with the following key features:

  • CM-T54 Com with Texas Instruments OMAP5432, Up to 4GB DDR3 and up to 32GB on-board eMMC, Video Processing Unit, 1080p decoding and encoding, Integrated PowerVR SGX544 GPU with OpenGL-ES and OpenCL EP support
  • External storage – SATA, SD card slot
  • Video Output – HDMI, DVI, LVDS, parallel RGB
  • Audio – Stereo output, line-in, microphone input, 3.5mm jacks
  • Connectivity – Ethernet, WiFi, Bluetooth,
  • USB – 1xUSB 3, 3x USB2
  • Debugging – RS232
  • Various expansion headers
  • Power – 10V to 17V

CM-T54 & SB-T54 evaluation kit is composed of the module and baseboard, as well as an LCD panel, an HDMI to DVI video cable,a serial port cable, a WiFi antenna and cable, and a 12V power supply.

Compulab CM-T54 CoM and SB-T54 baseboard are available now, starting at respectively $93 and $51 per unit for 1k orders. You can find mode information, including exact pricing of different options, on Complab’s CM-T54 and SBC-T54 pages.

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$79 Atmel ATSAMA5D3 Xplained Arduino Compatible, Open Source Hardware Board Powered by SAMA5D3 ARM Cortex-A5 Processor

March 7th, 2014 1 comment

A few days ago, at Embedded World 2014, Atmel has unveiled ATSAMA5D3 Xplained evaluation board based on SAMA5D36 ARM Cortex A5 micro-processor with 256 MB DDR2, 256 MB flash and numerous ports and expansion connectors, that targets industrial automation, networks, robotics, control panels and wearable applications. Atmel is one of the rare companies that provides support for the latest long term kernel (3.10) and mainline for their embedded solutions, and their latest board is fully open source hardware.

Atmel ATSAMA5D3 Xplained Pro (Click to Enlarge)

Atmel ATSAMA5D3-XPLD Board (Click to Enlarge)

Let’s have a look at the board specifications:

  • MPU – Atmel SAMA5D36 Cortex-A5 Microprocessor @ 536 MHz
  • System Memory – 2GBit DDR2 (Micron)
  • Storage – 2GBit Flash (Micron), SD/MMCPlus 8-bit Card slot, 1x Micro SD Card 4-bit slot footprint (meaning not soldered)
  • Connectivity – 1x Ethernet 10/100/1000M, 1x Ethernet 10/100M
  • USB -  1x micro USB Device connector, 2x USB Host connectors
  • Debugging – 1x 6-lead 3V3-level serial port, 10-pin J-TAG connector
  • Expansion – Arduino R3-compatible headers (6) and LCD connector
  • Misc – 2x push buttons, reset and startup, 1x general purpose push button, 2x general purpose LEDs
  • Power
    • Active Semi PMIC
    • Power measurement straps
    • USB powered
    • Supply input footprint (not soldered)

Beside the board, the kit also includes a Micro-AB to typeA USB cable, and a welcome letter…

ATSAMA5D3_Xplained_Description

The company provides a Linux distribution (Poky) based on either Linux 3.10 or mainline built with the Yocto Project (version 1.5.1), as well as headless Android support. You an also run bare metal C code if you don’t need an operating systems. You can find links to hardware and software development tools, technical documents including a user’s guide, SAMA5D3 datasheet, some application notes, and hardware files such as schematics, gerber, BoM…. on Element14. A detailed Linux wiki is available on Linux4SAM microsite.

SAMA5D3 Xplained board will ship in mid-March 2014  and sell for $79. You can register you interest @  www.element14.com/sama5d3, shipping with be handled by Farnell element14 in Europe, Newark element14 in North America and element14 in APAC. It can also be pre-order from Atmel e-Store. Beside Element14, you can also find more details on Atmel ATSAMA5D3-XPLD page.

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Atmel Adds SAM D21, D10 and D11 MCUs to Its ARM Cortex M0+ SAM D Family

February 25th, 2014 No comments

Atmel launched SAM D20 MCU family based on ARM Cortex M0+ last year, and at Embedded World 2014, the company has launched three new MCU families featuring ARM ultra low power core with SAM D10, SAM D11, and SAM D21 families and their corresponding Xplained PRO development boards.

Atmel_SAM_D Atmel four SAM D  families target different applications and price points:

  • SAM D10 – The smallest member of the SAM D family in terms of memory, pin count, and features.
  • SAM D11 – Adds full-speed USB not available on the SAM D10.
  • SAM D20 – “Offers a rich set of peripherals, flexibility, and ease-of-use with low power consumption.”
  • SAM D21 – Adds features such as full-speed USB, DMA, high-end timers/counters to D20 design.

I’ve compared the four families in the table below:

SAM D10 SAM D11 SAM D20 SAM D21
# MCU in Family 4 4 15 12
MCU Core ARM Cortex-M0+ based MCU running up to 48MHz
Memory 8 to 16KB embedded Flash
4KB SRAM
16 to 256KB embedded Flash
2 to 32KB SRAM
Power Consumption <70µA/MHz
DMA and Event system Yes
SERCOM (Serial Communication Modules) 3x in SAM D10D
2x in SAM D10C
3x in SAM D11D
2x in SAM D11C
6x in SAM D20J and SAM D20G,
4x in SAM D20E
6x in SAM D21J and SAM D21G
4x in SAM D21E
USB N/A Full-Speed USB Device N/A Full-Speed USB Device and embedded Host
ADC/DAC 12-bit ADC (SAM D10D: up to 10 channels; SAM D10C: 5 channels) ; 10-bit DAC 12-bit ADC (SAM D11D: up to 10 channels; SAM D11C: 5 channels) ; 10-bit DAC 12-bit ADC (SAM D20J: 20 channels; SAM D20G: 14 channels; SAM D20E: 10 channels) ; 10-bit DAC 12-bit ADC (SAM D21J: 20 channels; SAM D21G: 14 channels; SAM D21E: 10 channels) ; 10-bit DAC
Hard touch support Yes
Package 14- and 20-pin SOIC and 24-pin 32-, 48- and 64-pion QFP and QFN

Development can be performed with Atmel Studio and Atmel Software Framework, and several evaluations kits, namely Xplained Pro boards, and corresponding expansions boards: QT1 for touch controller, I/O1 adding a light and temperature sensor, a micro SD card and hardware to test UART, SPI & I2C, PROTO1 adding a bread-boarding area, and OLED1 for an 128×32 OLED display with LEDs and buttons.

SAM_D21_Xplained_PRO

Atmel SAM D10 Xplained PRO Evaluation Kit

SAM D21 samples and tools are available now with volume production in May 2014, but you’ll have to wait a little longer for SAM D10 and D11 families with engineering samples and tools scheduled for Q2 2014. SAM D21 Xplained PRO evaluation kit can be purchased for $39, and appears to be in stock. You can find details for each one of the 35 Cortex M0+ MCU on Atmel’s SAM D page.

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