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Posts Tagged ‘devkit’

Grid-EYE Breakout Board is a $49 Low Resolution Thermal Camera Module

November 29th, 2016 8 comments

Thermal cameras can be really expensive pieces of equipment, and even the cheap 60×60 thermal cameras available on Aliexpress costs a little over $200. However, PURE Engineering has made an breakout board with Panasonic Grid-EYE infrared 8×8 array sensor that allows you to experiment with the technology, or integrate into your own projects for just $49.

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Grid-EYE breakout board features:

  • Panasonic Grid-EYE AMG8834 64 pixel infrared / thermal camera sensor with 60 degree viewing angle using MEMS thermopile technology
  • Pinout compatible with Arduino Zero,  ST-NUCLEO board, and other 3.3V boards with I2C, VDD, GND, INT, and AD pins
  • PUREModules PCB edge connectors with UART, GPIO, to interface with the company’s IoT board
  • Power Supply – On-board regulator handles 3 to 5V input

The Panasonic sensor transfers thermal presence, direction, and temperature values over I2C. The company wrote a demo for the module with an Arduino sketech and a Processing sketch both available on github, and you can see it in action in the video below using an ice pack and a hot coffee mug.

Applications listed by Panasonic for this sensor include digital signage, security, lighting control, kiosk/ATM, medical imaging, automatic doors, thermal mapping, people counting, robotics, and others.

The board is now listed on GroupGets for $49, and 100 boards need to be sold for the group buying campaign to be successful. More details may be available on the product’s page on Pure Engineering website. Alternatively, you could also get AMG8834EK Grid-EYE evaluation kit with the IR camera, an Atmel SAMD21G18A MCU, and Bluetooth Smart connectivity for about $95 on Newark or 48.99 GPB (~$61) on Farnell UK.

[Update: PUREmodules modular system has been launched a kickstarter campaign, but it does not seem to include the thermal camera]

Theobroma Announces Rockchip RK3368 and RK3399 Qseven System-on-Modules

November 29th, 2016 2 comments

Theobroma Systems, an embedded system company based in Austria, has designed several Allwinner systems-on-module compliant with μQseven & Qseven standards in the past. The company has now started to work with Rockchip and reached “an advanced design stage” for the development of μQseven and QSeven systems-on-module powered by RK3368 and RK3399 processors.

rockchip-rk3399

RK3368-uQ7 module specifications:

  • SoC – Rockchip RK3368 octa-Core ARM Cortex-A53 processor up to 1.2GHz with Imagination Technologies PowerVR G6110 GPU
  • System Memory – up to 4GB DDR3-1600 SDRAM on-module (512MB, 1GB, 2GB (default) and 4GB configuration available)
  • Storage – Up to 128GB eMMC flash on-module (8GB default), 16 Mbit to 128 Mbit SPI NOR flash on-module
  • Video Capabilities –  H.264 decoding up to 2160p30, H.265 decoding up to 2160p60, video encoding up to 1080p30
  • Connectivity – GbE PHY on-module
  • CAN – On-module communication offload controller for CAN
  • 230-pin MXM edge connector with:
    • 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet
    • USB – 1x USB 2.0 dual-role port, 3x USB 2.0 host port
    • Display – HDMI 2.0 up to 4K (60fps), LVDS (single-channel), MIPI-DSI, Embedded DisplayPort (eDP) up to 4 lanes (2.7Gb/s each)
    • Camera – MIPI-CSI, each with 4 lanes (up to 1Gb/s per lane)
    • Additional Interfaces – UART, 8x GPIO, I2S, I2C, SMBus, SPI, FAN, CAN
  • Security Module – Global Platform 2.2.1 compliant JavaCard environment, on-module EAL4-certified smartcard controller
  • Power Supply – 5V supply
  • Power Consumption – < 9W
  • Dimensions – 70 x 40mm (μQseven 2.1 form factor)
  • Temperature Range – Commercial: 0°C to 60°C; Industrial: -20°C to 85°C
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Theobroma “Hainan” carrier board for Q7 and μQ7 modules – Click to Enlarge

RK3399-Q7 module specifications:

  • SoC – Rockchip RK3399 hexa-Core processor with 2x Cortex-A72 up to 2.0 GHz (48KB+32KB L1 cache and 1024KB L2 cache), 4x Cortex-A53 (32KB+32KB L1 cache and 512KB L2 cache), and an ARM Mali-T864MP4 GPU
  • System Memory – up to 4GB DDR3-1600 SDRAM on-module (512MB, 1GB, 2GB (default) and 4GB configuration available)
  • Storage – Up to 128GB eMMC flash on-module (8GB default), 16 Mbit to 128 Mbit SPI NOR flash on-module
  • Video Capabilities –  Decoding up to 2160p60, encoding up to 1080p30
  • Connectivity – GbE PHY on-module
  • CAN – On-module communication offload controller for CAN
  • 230-pin MXM edge connector with:
    • 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet
    • USB – 1x USB 3.0 superspeed dual-role port, 2x USB 3.0 superspeed host ports, 1x USB 2.0 host port
    • Display – HDMI 2.0 up to 4K (60 Hz), 2x MIPI-DSI up to 250×1600 @ 60 Hz, Embedded DisplayPort (eDP) up to 4 lanes (2.7Gb/s each)
    • Camera – 2x MIPI CSI, each with 4 lanes (up to 1.5 Gb/s per lane)
    • 4-lane PCIe 2.1
    • Additional Interfaces – UART, 8x GPIO, I2S, I2C, SMBus, SPI, FAN, CAN
  • Security Module – Global Platform 2.2.1 compliant JavaCard environment, on-module EAL4-certified smartcard controller (optional)
  • Power Supply – 5V supply
  • Power Consumption – < 15W
  • Dimensions – 70 x 70 mm (Qseven form factor)
  • Temperature Range – Commercial: 0°C to 60°C; Industrial: -20°C to 85°C

Both modules support Linux and Android 6.0 operating systems, and the company can provide Hainan development kit with a carrier board to get started with development.

RK3399-Q7 SOM will ship to early-access customers in Q1 2017, I could not find availability information for RK3368 module. You’ll find some more details in the announcement, and RK3399-Q7 product page.

A Closer Look at Ingenu RPMA Alternative to LoRa or Sigfox LPWAN Standards & RPMA Development Kit

November 20th, 2016 6 comments

I’ve recently started to write a bit more about long range LPWAN standards for IoT applications, especially LoRa and Sigfox, as commercial networks are being launched, and relatively low cost hardware platforms are being introduced to the market. There are also other highly expected standards such as Weightless and LTE Cat M that will bring more competition to the market. Ingenu RPMA (Random Phase Multiple Access) is another available standard that’s been in deployment for a while, and based on an earlier comparison of  long range LPWAN standards, it comes with long range, supports up to 384,000 nodes per “sector”, operates in the unlicensed 2.4 GHz ISM band, and offers high combined uplink and downlink bandwidth than competitors. Ingenu recently contacted me and provided some more details and information about their technology and development kit.

One of the documents includes an “independent analysis completed by ABI Research, Inc.” comparing features of Sigfox, LoRa, EC-GSM-IoT, MB-IoT, LTE Cat-M1,  and RPMA.

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All standards can have node powered by a battery for over 10 years, but based on that table RPMA does seems to have some advantages in terms of coverage, capacity, throughput, security level, scalability, and mobility support.

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Those charts are extracted from the Ingenu’s marketing documents, so they’ll obviously show RPMA in a positive light. However it does seems that if you have lots of nodes, and bandwidth requirements higher than what can be delivered by LoRa or Sigfox, RPMA appears to be a potentially better solution. The 2.4 GHz band is normally quite busy, so I wonder if there could be some limitations here, and some countries may also have restrictions on the emitted power. RPMA deployments started in 2011, so they already have an installed base on several continents for industrial, agricultural, and security applications, which includes 38 Private Networks as well as the “Machine Network” in North & South America, EMEA, and APAC regions.

ingenu-rpma-networksSupport in the Asia Pacific regions is certainly a plus, as this week a French company wanted to send me their Sigfox & LoRa sensors kits for evaluation, but they had nothing working in South East Asia, so it will be for a little later.

The company can provide RPMA devkit to their customers in order to get started and evaluate the technology.

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Ingenu RPMA development kit key features and specifications:

  • MCU – NXP Kinetis K20 ARM Cortex-M4 MCU @ 50 MHz
  • Connectivity
    • nanoNode RPMA radio module (NODE103)
      • Wireless Frequency – 2.4 GHZ ISM
      • Bandwidth – 1 MHz
      • Modulation – Dynamic Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (D-DSSS)
      • Access Point Capacity – Up to 64,000 nodes in star topology
      • Typical Power – Tx: 800 mW; Rx: 250 mW
    • u-Blox GPS module
  • Expansion – Header with analog & digital GPIOs and UART
  • Debugging – JTAG header, UART for serial debugging
  • Battery Life – Up to 20+ years
  • Power Supply – 5V/1A power supply to DC jack (J204), 2.2 to 3.6V DC batteries to J201 header
  • Dimensions – 107 x 68 x 13 mm
  • Temperature Range – 0°C to 85°C
  • Certifications – FCC, IC, ETSI, and others (pending) for some specific countries

The rACM (reference Application Communication Module) tools are used to control the kit, and since they are written in Python it will work on Windows, Mac OS X or Linux. Communication occurs over a REST API or Advanced Message Queuing Protocol (AMQP) open standard messaging protocol, and devices can be managed through a platform called Intellect. Quick Start Guides are also provided to customers to show how to set up pulse meters, UART, GPIO, and more…

rpma-intellect

You’d use the devkit with RPMA networks such as the Machine Network. You can check network coverage on Ingenu to find out if it is available in your location. If there’s no network in your location, but a network is expected soon, you can still evaluate RPMA technology by getting an Exploration Kit with two RPMA devkits and a rental RPMA access point. The latter gives some clue about about the use cases for RPMA, as while you can get one or two ~50 Euros LoRa nodes connected it to a LoRaWAN network or setup P2P communication, RPMA apparently requires an access point that expensive enough that it has to be rented. So RPMA is likely most suitable and cost effective for larger scale IoT deployments, and not for smaller or hobbyist’s projects.

You’ll get some more details about the hardware and software, as well as interesting case studies about existing implementations, on the Get Started page, or by directly downloading the Starter Pack with hardware design files, software tools, REST & AMQP source code examples, and documentation.

V-Bridge Muses DTV Modulator and Video Encoder Review – Part 2: Muses-β Turnkey Solution Demo

November 12th, 2016 No comments

V-Bridge Muses-α and Muses-β boards can be used to respectively broadcast video to DTV standard from your PC, and as a turnkey solution taking any HDMI, CVBS, or USB inputs. The VATek SoC used in those  board support various DTV standards including DVB-T, DVB-C, ATSC/QAM, DTMB, ISDB-T/TB up to full HD resolution. I’ve received an early prototype for each, and I’ve already taken pictures and show how to assemble both Muses-α and Muses-β kits in the first part of the review. Today, I’ll show a demo with Muses-β turnkey solution taking HDMI input from an Android TV box (R-Box Pro), encoding and modulating the video to DVB-T, before broadcast it to an Android STB with a DVB-T/T2 tuner (U4 Quad Hybrid). This tool could be useful to test STB featuring ATSC or ISDB-T too, as those two standards are not supported in my country, and I could instead generate signals within my office.

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U4 Quad Hybrid (Left), Muses-Beta Kit (Center) and R-Box Pro TV box (left)

You could also connect it directly to your TV, but for this review it was easier to show with an external device, and my TV is using a coaxial input instead of a female F-connector, so that made it easier. If you connect it to your TV, you could still combine your local TV station signal with Muses-Beta signal by using a 2-way splitter as shown below.

2-way-splitter-antenna

The company provided a cable to connect the RF board to tuner directly, but you could also use the type of antenna shown above instead. The power level is -12dBm, which means it won’t affect others, and should not break any laws in your country. If you need longer range you’d need to use an amplifier, and check with your local authorities if you need any specific licenses.dtv-antenna

Now that the connection is done, let’s have a look at the LCD display, since it;s used to configure the DTV standard, frequency, and many more options. I did not have to change much for this demo. First I select DVB-T and QPSK modulation.

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Then set the frequency to 628 MHz as it’s one of the listed frequencies in U4 Quad Hybrid.
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And kept HDMI to 720i-60, as the prototype can only handle HD resolution (720p) smoothly, and while Full HD (1080p) is possible it won’t be that smooth yet, but should be in the final hardware.
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There are many options as shown in the UI chart below.

User Interface State Machine (Click to Enlarge)

LCD User Interface Options (Click to Enlarge)

If HDMI input is detected, the LCD should then soon show three full squares on the top left indicating video is being broadcast with whatever standard you’ve chosen. In order to get the signal I had to configure U4 Quad Hybrid set-top box with the frequency, bandwidth, and delivery system  I selected for the modulator.

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And it worked pretty much out of the box, as you can see from the photo below showing U4 Quad Hybrid menu overlaid over the DVB-T signal showing R-Box Pro user interface. Please ignore the vertical lines, as it’s just a problem with LG 4K TV.

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I’ve also shot a video showing the setup, and how well it works. Sadly, the video I selected does not play optimally in R-Box Pro (the video source), but I found it only after the review, and other videos are being broadcast normally without smoothness issues nor audio cuts. But the important in the video is to show how easy it is to configure the system and that it works reasonably well. Quality will obviously suffer a bit compare to the source since its re-encoded and HDMI output is set to 720p.

Latency & video quality can be adjusted using three profiles: High Quality (500ms), Average (300ms) and Low latency (200ms). You’ll find some more details in the preliminary? Muses Turnkey Product user’s manual.

The kickstarter campaign is still on-going with 21 days to go. Muses-β kit with the LCD control board – as reviewed in this post – requires a $559 pledge, but if you prefer to replace the STM32 Board and LCD display by your own control board (API will be provided), you can get Muses-β board with AV input board and RF board for $399. I’ll test the cheaper $200 Muses-α board connected to a computer in the next few days in part 3 of the review.

Microchip Atmel ATtiny417/814/816/817 tinyAVR MCUs Include Core Independent Peripherals (CIPs)

November 11th, 2016 8 comments

Microchip’s latest Atmel tinyAVR MCUs combine Atmel 8-bit AVR core with CIPS (Core Independent Peripherals) normally found in the company’s PIC MCUs. Since Atmel’s purchase by Microchip, I believe this is the first time the company leverages features from both MCU families.

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The four new ATtiny MCUs come with 4 to 8 KB flash, and up to 24 pins:

  • ATtiny4178-bit Atmel AVR MCU with 4KB Flash, 256 bytes SRAM, 128 bytes EEPROM, 20MHz/20 MIPS, two 16-bit timer/counters, one 12-bit timer/counter, RTC, USART, SPI, Two-wire Interface (I2C), 10-bit ADC, 8-bit DAC, analog comparator, accurate internal oscillators and multiple calibrated voltage references, Custom Logic, 10-bytes unique ID, and 24 pins
  • ATtiny814 – Same as above but with 8KB flash, 512 bytes SRAM, Peripheral Touch Controll (PTC), and 14 pins
  • ATtiny816 – Same key features as ATtiny814 but with a 20-pin package with more I/Os
  • ATtiny817 – Same key features as ATtiny814 but with a 24-pin package with more I/Os
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“Core Independent Peripheral” is pretty much self-explanatory, but Microchip description can be useful nonetheless:

CIPs allow the peripherals to operate independently of the core, including serial communication and analog peripherals. Together with the Event System, that allows peripherals to communicate without using the CPU, applications can be optimized at a system level. This lowers power consumption and increases throughput and system reliability.

The new MCUs will be supported by Atmel START, an “online tool for intuitive, graphical configuration of embedded software projects”, as well as Atmel Studio 7 software development tools. You’ll be able to experiment pretty quickly thanks to ATtiny817 Xplained Mini Kit with a micro USB port for power and programming, a button, and access to all I/Os from the MCU. The board is also said to be compatible with Arduino ecosystem.

attiny817-xplained-boardThe new 8-bit tinyAVR MCUs are available now in QFN and SOIC packages with pricing starting at $0.43 for 10K units. Xplained Mini Kit can be purchased for $8.89 on Digikey. Visit Atmel tinyAVR product page for full technical details about the new MCUs.

Thanks to Nanik for the tip.

8Devices Rambutan Qualcomm Atheros QCA9557 / QCA9550 GbE & WiFi Modules and Development Kit Run OpenWrt

November 10th, 2016 2 comments

8Devices, a Lithuanian company specialized in the development and manufacturing of electronic equipment, is known for their Carambola and Carambola2 WiFi modules powered by Ralink and Qualcomm Atheros WiSoCs. The company has now introduced a new dual band WiFi module called Rambutan that comes in commercial and industrial temperature range through respectively Qualcomm Atheros QCA9557 & QCA9550 SoCs.

8devices-rambutan

Rambutan and Rambutan-I modules specifications:

  • SoC
    • Rambutan – Qualcomm Atheros QCA9557 MIPS processor @ 720 MHz
    • Rambutan-I – Qualcomm Atheros QCA9550 MIPS processor @ 720 MHz
  • System Memory – 128 MB DDR2
  • Storage – 128 MB Flash
  • Connectivity
    • WiFi – 802.11 a/b/g/n, 2.4 or 5 GHz, 2×2 MIMO, 300 Mbps data rate, 21 dB per chain output power; 2x u.FL connectors
    • Ethernet – Atheros AR8032 10/100M Ethernet PHY
  • 68x half holes with
    • 2 x USB 2.0 host port
    • 2 x serial port
    • 1x 100 Base-T Ethernet port;  1000 Base-T Ethernet port  (SGMII interface)
    • I2S, SPI, I2C, GPIO, PCIe, MDIO
  • Power Supply – +3.3V DC; max power consumption: 3.7 W
  • Dimensions – 46.9 x 31.8 mm
  • Temperature Range – Rambutan: 0 – 65° C; Rambutan-I: -40 – 85° C

Beside the wider temperature range, Rambutan-I features QCA9550 SoC with the following advantages over QCA9557:

  • 5 and 10 MHz channelization supported in a 4.9 GHz frequency band only
  • Loopback mode to assist FIPS AES certification
  • High Tx power accuracy at lower power level
  • Small packet size (96 Bytes) in AES encryption at full packet rate
  • 8 bits spectral analysis resolution
Rambutan Pinout Diagram

Rambutan Pinout Diagram

The modules run OpenWrt with the source code to be provided on 8devices’ github account, while support is handled through their forums. The company also offers Rambutan development kit with a baseboard for the module with some interesting features and expansion for this kind of board:

  • Ethernet – 1x 1000 Base-T Ethernet port, 1×100 Base-T Ethernet port
  • USB – 1x USB Type-A socket, 1x Mini USB Type-A socket for serial console and power
  • Expansion:
    • 2x 20-pin 2.54 mm pitch through holes for I/Os such as GPIOs, USB, UART, SPI, JTAG, …
    • Mini PCIe socket
  • Misc –  reset and user buttons, DIP switch for bootstrap options, 2x integrated antennas
  • Power Supply – 5V via mini USB port
  • Dimensions – 125 x 77 mm (estimated)
Rambutan DVK (Click to Enlarge)

Rambutan DVK (Click to Enlarge)

Rambuta can be purchased now for $35, Rambutan-I for $49, and Rambutan development kit for $79. You’ll find more information, include a product brief, a datasheet, and the development board’s schematics on 8devices Rambutan’s product page.

MUSES-α & MUSES-β DVB-T/C, ISDB-T, DTMB & ATSC Modulator Boards Review – Part 1: The Hardware

October 19th, 2016 4 comments

V-Bridge Muses digital TV modulator boards launched on Kickstarter earlier this month, with the cheaper $200 MUSES-α board modulating video from a PC, and $600 MUSES-β turnkey solution capable of broadcasting HDMI or AV + stereo input to various digital TV standards including DVB-T/C, ATSC/QAM, DTMB, and ISDB-T/TB without the help of a computer. The company sent me the two hardware kits for evaluation and review on CNX Software, and today I’ll start by showing off the hardware I received.

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I got 3 packages and a F-female to F-female cable, which means you can connect the board directly to your TV tuner without having to rely on actual RF signals, and potential legal issues that goes with it.pc-modulator-kit

The first package I open if for the PC modulator kit that include MUSES-α board, an “RF” board, as a USB cable to connect to your computer.

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MUSES-α board features Vatek A1 chip, a USB port, an Ethernet port, a power jack, and  headers for UART, I2C, TS, JTAG, RF board and GPIOs.

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The back of the board just has a Winbond flash.

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The RF board is based on Texas Instruments TRF372017 IQ modulator PLL/VCO chip, and includes an F-male connector.

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To get started you’d have to connect the USB cable, the coax cable to your TV’s tuner, as well as a 5V power supply.

The next package is the STM32 + LCD control board allowing to use MUSES-β board without PC.

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It’s made of off-the-shelf parts including DF Robots LCD keypad shield for Arduino, connected to an STM32 based board via jumper cables + some glue.

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The “STM32F4xx” board is also an off-the-shelf STM32F407ZET6 ARM Cortex-M4 board found on Aliexpress for $15.50. So what you are paying for here, is not really hardware, but all the development work required for a niche product.

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The third package includes the rest of the turnkey solution with an RF board, MUSES-β board based on Vatek B2 modulator and video encoding chip, and a video & audio input board with HDMI input, and 3 RCA connector for video composite and stereo audio input. All boards are already attached to an acrylic base, and the kit adds the top acrylic cover, some spacers and screws, and a 5V/2A power supply.

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The RF board is exactly the same as the one used with MUSES-α board, and the AV input board features Explore Microelectronics EP9555E  for HDMI input and Intersil TW9912 for CVBS input.

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MUSES-β board comes with a USB port, a power jack, headers for the RF and AV input boards, I2C, MCU connect, and a TS port. I must have a received a prototype board, so there’s also some rework that should be gone once the kit ships to backers.

MUSES-β Kit Fully Assembled - Click to Enlarge

MUSES-β Kit Fully Assembled – Click to Enlarge

Assembly is quite straightforward:

  1. Connect the STM32 board to the “MCU connect” header
  2. Optionally add the top acrylic cover
  3. Connect the 5V/2A power supply
  4. Connect the coax cable to your TV, and add video and audio input(s) to the HDMI port or CVBS + stereo audio RCA jacks
  5. Scan the channel on your TV, and enjoy

That’s exactly what I’ll try in the second part of the review, once I receive some documentation from the company.

CHIP Pro is a $16 WiFi and Bluetooth 4.2 System-on-Module Powered by a $6 GR8 ARM Cortex A8 SIP

October 12th, 2016 24 comments

Next Thing CHIP board and corresponding PocketCHIP portable Linux computer have been relatively popular due to their inexpensive price for the feature set, as for $9, you’d get an Allwinner R8 ARM Cortex A8 processor, 512MB flash, 4GB NAND flash, WiFi & Bluetooth connectivity, and plenty of I/Os, which made it very attractive for IoT applications compared to other cheap boards such as Raspberry Pi Zero and Orange Pi One. The first board was mostly designed for hobbyists, but  company has now designed a new lower profile system-on-module called CHIP Pro based on Next Thing GR8 SIP combining Allwinner R8 SoC with 256MB DDR3 RAM that can be used for easy integration into your own hardware project.

chip-proWhile the original CHIP board exposed full USB ports and interface for video signal, the new CHIP Pro is specifically designed for IoT with the following specs:

  • SIP – Allwinner R8 ARM Cortex A8 processor @ up to 1.0 GHz with Mali-400 GPU + 256MB DDR3 RAM (14×14 mm package)
  • Storage – 512MB SLC NAND flash, 1x micro SD port
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n WiFi + Bluetooth 4.2 with chip antenna and u.FL antenna connector
  • USB – 1x micro USB port for power and serial console access
  • Expansion – 2x 16-pin with 2x UART, parallel camera interface, I2C, SPI, 2x PWM, USB 2.0 OTG, USB 2.0 host, 2x microphone, 1x headphone
  • Power Supply – AXP209 PMU supporting USB power, Charge in, and 2.9 to 4.2V LiPo battery
  • Dimensions – 45 x 30 mm
  • Certifications – CE and FCC part 15
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The module is pre-loaded with the company’s Linux based GadgetOS operating system, but custom firmware flashing is available for orders of 1,000 modules or more. Potential applications include physical computing, voice recognition, smart consumer devices, portable audio devices and so on. Software support should be identical to what you already get in CHIP board, and you can already find some hardware design files specific to CHIP Pro on Github including datasheets for the system-on-module and Allwinner GR8 SIP.

chip-pro-devkitIn order to help you getting started as fast as possible, a development kit is also available with a baseboard and two CHIP Pro modules. The baseboard include a 5V-23V power jack, a 3.5mm audio jack, a micro USB port, a USB host port, some LEDs, a power button, and female headers for easy access to all I/Os.

CHIP Pro SoM will start selling for $16 in December of this year without minimum order quantity, and no volume discount, e.g. if you buy 1 million SoMs, you’d have to pay 16 million dollars. One issue with CHIP board is that if you asked Allwinner for a quote for module used in the board, it would cost more or about the same as the board itself. Allwinner/Next Thing GR8 is completely different, as you can actually buy it for $6 (including AXP-209 PMIC) to integrate into your own project. The development kit is available now for $49. More technical details and purchase links can be found on the product page.

Thanks to Nanik for the tip.