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Posts Tagged ‘devkit’

Atmel Introduces SAMA5D4 Embedded MPUs With 720p Video Decoder And TrustZone Support

October 2nd, 2014 No comments

Atmel has expanded its SAMA5 Cortex A5 embedded processor family with SAMA5D4 series adding an optional video processing unit capable of decoding H264, VP8 and MPEG4 at 720p / 30fps, as well as support for ARM NEON and TrustZone technology. There are also some other changes with regards to connectivity: no Gigabit Ethernet, more UART interfaces, less SPI interfaces, etc…

Atmel SAMA5D4 Block Diagram

Atmel SAMA5D4 Block Diagram

Key features listed of Atmel SAMA5D4 series::

  • ARM Cortex-A5 core up to 528MHz (840DMIPS) with NEON & TrustZone support, 2x 32KB L1 cache, and 128KB L2 cache.
  • Optional 720p hardware video decoder supporting H264/263, VP8, JPEG, and MPEG4.
  • Graphic LCD TFT controller with overlays for image composition, resistive touchscreen controller.
  • CMOS image sensor interface.
  • Three high-speed USB ports (configurable as three hosts or two hosts and one device port).
  • Dual EMAC 10/100 with IEEE1588 support (Precision Time Protocol).
  • Other I/Os – 8x UART,  8x SPI, 4x TWI, 2 HS SDIO/SD/MMC, 2x I2S
  • Advanced security features to prevent counterfeiting, secure external communication, and authenticate the system:
    • On-the-fly encryption/decryption of code from external DDR.
    • Encryption engines supporting AES/3DES, RSA, ECC – TRNG, SHA.
    • Tamper detection pins.
    • Memory content protection (secure key storage).
  • Temperature Range – -40/+85°C
  • BGA289 and BGA361 in 0.8mm pitch.

There are currently 4 MPUs available in SAMA5D4 series:

  • SAMA5D41 – ARM Cortex -A5 MPU, 528Mhz, Neon, L2 cache, Trust Zone, Security, 16-bit DDR, BGA289
  • SAMA5D42 – ARM Cortex -A5 MPU, 528Mhz, Neon, L2 cache, Trust Zone, Security, 16/32-bit DDR, BGA361
  • SAMA5D43 – ARM Cortex -A5 MPU, 528Mhz, Neon, L2 cache, Trust Zone, Security, Hardware video decoder, 16-bit DDR, BGA289
  • SAMA5D44 – ARM Cortex -A5 MPU, 528Mhz, Neon, L2 cache, Trust Zone, Security, Hardware video decoder,16/32-bit DDR, BGA361

The company has developed a Linux distribution based on Yocto Poky for SAMA5D4 MPUs available on linux4sam.com, and the platform also is supported in mainline kernel. An Android 4.4 KitKat port will be available in December 2014 on http://www.AT91.com/android4sam. If your application does not require an operating systems, Atmel also provides over 40 drivers written in C language. Finally for graphics interface development, an SDK based on Qt5 including demos, widgets, background images, icons, and useful graphical elements will be provided.

Atmel ATSAMA5D4-EK Development Kit

Atmel ATSAMA5D4-EK Development Kit

There aren’t any low cost development kits such as SAMA5D3 Xplained board for now, but ATSAMA5D4-EK development kit including a 7″ capacitive display is available now, and comes with a Linux distribution running a Qt5 demo capable of playing 720p videos. The demo image and a getting started guide are available on Linux4SAM Wiki.

SAMA5D4 samples are available now. SAMA5D43 which include a 720p video decoder will sell for $8.95 in 1k order. Atmel ATSAMA5D4-EK is also said to be available for purchase for $695, but I could not find the SKU on Atmel e-Store yet. You may find more information about the new SAMA5D4 eMPU family on Atmel SAMA5 page.

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HydraBus is an Open Source Hardware STM32 Devkit with Support for NFC via HydraNFC Shield

October 1st, 2014 No comments

Recently, I wrote about public availability of Micro Python board based on STMicro STM32F4 Cortex M4 support that can easily be programmed with Python. It turns out there’s another STM32 board called HydraBus, also supporting Micro Python firmware, or another embedded firmware based on ChibiOS, together with an optional HydraNFC shield capable of sniffing, reading/writing or emulating any 13.56MHz NFC tags.

 

Hydrabus_Board

HydraBus Specifications:

  • MCU – STMicro TM32F405RG micro-controller @ 168 MHz with 1MB flash, 192KB SRAM, and an FPU.
  • External Storage – Micro SD card slot up to 48MHz (~24MB/s)
  • Expansion Headers – 4 headers with access to 44 I/Os (some already used by micro SD and USB 1 & 2).
  • USB – 2x micro USB connector including 1x OTG port, and 1x device/host port, both with ESD protection.
  • Misc – Reset and user button, user LED,
  • Power – 5V via micro USB port.
  • Dimensions – 60mm x 37mm (compliant with a Dangerous Prototype DP6037 PCB size)

As mentioned in the introduction, there are two available firmware for the board, both with source code available on github: Micro Python and a HydraFW based on ChibiOS. The board is also open source hardware with CadSoft Eagle 6.x schematics & PCB layout, BoM, and Gerber files available on Github too, and licensed under Creative Commons BY NC.

 

HydraNFC

If you’d like to “play” with NFC, Benjamin Vernoux, HydraBus’ developer, has also designed HydraNFC shield for HydraBus board with the following hardware specs:

  • Autonomous mode with 4 User buttons and 4 User LEDs.
  • Use HydraBus microSD card to save or load data – Support of microSD (FAT16/FAT32) card up to 32GB (tested with SanDisk Extreme 32GB).
  • Use Texas Instrument TRF7970A NFC chipset with full access to all pins and all modes of TRF7970A through connectors J1/J2/J3.
  • HydraBus Antenna (external) with U.FL connector(cable included) or SMA (optional) and can read Mifare card at up to 8cm (with 20cm cable).

Firmware support is achieved via HydraFW running on STM32 MCU. HydraNFC is also open source hardware, and you’ll find the hardware design files in hydranfc repository.

More details are available on Hydrabus.com. You can purchase the boards directly on the website, or via Seeed Studio for $49 and $79 for respectively HydraBus and HydraNFC boards.

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Getting Started with LinkIt ONE Development Kit for Wearables & IoT

September 21st, 2014 1 comment

After going through WRTnode Quick Start Guide, it’s now time to play with LinkIt ONE, the IoT development board from Mediatek designed by Seeed Studio. LinkIt ONE is the first Hardware Development Kit (HDK) for Mediatek LinkIt, so there may be a LinkIt TWO, and/or other hardware platforms in the future.

LinkIt ONE specifications

Let’s quickly go through the specifications first:

  • Processor – Mediatek MT2502A (Aster) ARM7 EJ-STM processor @ 260 MHz
  • System Memory – 4 MB
  • Storage – 16MB Flash for firmware + micro SD slot shared with SIM slot for up to 32GB additional storage
  • Connectivity:
    • Wi-Fi – 802.11 b/g/n (MT5931) with external antenna
    • Bluetooth – BR/EDR/BLE(Dual Mode)
    • GPS – Mediatek MT3332 with external antenna
    • GSM/GPRS – 850/900/1800/1900 MHz band, Class 12 GPS with external antenna
  • Audio – 3.5mm headphone jack (including mic support) – Support for MP3, AAC, and AMR codecs.
  • Serial – Software Serial (Serial), and Hardware Serial (Serial1, D0 & D1)
  • Expansion Headers
    • Arduino UNO headers including digital I/Os, 3x analog input, PWM, I2C, SPI, UART3 etc..
    • UART and I2C Seeed Studio Grove interfaces
  • Power
    • 5V via micro USB
    • I/O – DC Current Per I/O pin: 1mA
    • Li-Po Battery Support
  • Dimensions – 8.4 x 5.3 cm

LinkIt ONE Unboxing

I’ve received the kit in a package reading “LinkIt ONE – The Ultimate Development Board for Wearables and Internet of Things”.

LinkIt_ONE_PackageThe back of the package has some explanation about various features and capabilities of the board and two links:

LinkIt ONE, Antennas, and Battery (Click to Enlarge)

LinkIt ONE, Antennas, and Battery (Click to Enlarge)

Beside LinkIt ONE board, the package comes with three antennas (Wi-Fi, GPS, and GPRS), as well as a 1000mASh Li-Po battery.

LinkIt ONE (Click to Enlarge)

LinkIt ONE (Click to Enlarge)

The Grove interface are the two headers just above LinkIt ONE marking with UART and I2C connectivity use to add modules made by Seeed Studio, but you can also connect Arduino shields using the Arduino UNO compatible headers. The board can be powered by the micro USB port on the left, or a battery connected to the connector on the bottom left. Power source is selected by a switch (USB / BAT). The headphone jack (stereo + mic) is located on the top right.

Back of LinkIt ONE Board (Click to Enlarge)

Back of LinkIt ONE Board (Click to Enlarge)

On the back of the board, there’s a SIM/ micro SD card slot combo, and a metallic shield (for EMI) covering the main components, mostly MT2502A, since the SoC integrates memory, MCU, Bluetooth, and the PMU into a single chip. You’ll find the three antenna connectors on the right of the picture.

LinkIt ONE Quick Start Guide

At first I went to http://labs.mediatek.com/linkit to download LinkIt SDK, after registering with Mediatek Labs. You can also optionally download the Hardware Reference Guide with the datasheets for Aster (MT2502A), Wi-Fi (MT5931), and GPS (MT3332) chips, as well as schematics and PCB layout in Eagle format, and high resolution pinout diagram which I reproduced below.

LinkIt ONE Pinout Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

LinkIt ONE Pinout Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

The SDK file is named Mediatek_Linkit_SDK_for_Arduino_1_0_34.zip that contains a file called Mediatek_Linkit_SDK_for_Arduino_1_0_34.exe. Alright, time to start a Windows 7 VM… The Wiki however states that “Arduino IDE for LinkIt ONE supports Windows only. Mac and Linux will be supported in the near future.

At first I failed to install the SDK, but I found I’ve found better resources in LinkIt ONE Wiki, which also links to LinkIt Developer’s Guide, explaining you need to get the Arduino IDE.

So first, you need to retrieve the LinkIt ONE IDE (modified version of Arduino IDE?) from github. There are several methods, but let’s just download the ZIP file (145MB), and extract it. Go to LinkIt-ONE-IDE-Master/drivers/mtk directory, and click on InstallDriver to install the drivers. Now connect the board to your PC with a micro USB to USB cable. If you use VirtualBox, you’ll also need the VirtualBox Extension Pack to access USB devices. In VirtualBox, LinkIt ONE is referred to as “Mediatek Inc Product [0100]” in Devices->USB Devices menu. The installation should complete as follows with two new COM ports.

LinkIt-ONE_Drivers

So now, you can install the the LinkIt SDK, pointing the installation directory to LinkIt IDE directory (LinkIt-ONE-IDE-Master).

LinkIt_SDK_For_Arduino_1.0Click Next a few times to complete the installation,. We don’t really need to install Mediatek USB drivers (last step), as we’ve done that already.

Now start the Arduino IDE by clicking on Arduino(.exe) in LinkIt-ONE-IDE-Master folder, and configure it to use the board by selecting Tools->Board->LinkIt ONE.

Arduino_IDE_LinkIt_ONEYou’ll also need to select the COM port corresponding to MTK USB Debug Port (COM6 in my case) with Tools->Port. Port was grayed out at first, but resetting the board fixed the issue.

The first project you usually try is Blink, that simply blinks an LED on the board. So let’s do it. The procedure is exactly the same as the one followed for an Arduino board. To load the project, click on File->Examples->01. Basics->Blink. Make sure the switch on the left of LinkIt ONE marking on the board is set to SPI, and upload the program by selecting File->Upload or clicking directly on the Upload icon (->). The transfer should complete within a few seconds, and a green LED blink on the board shortly after.

Seeed Studio also sells “Sidekick Basic Kit for LinkIt ONE” with a breadboard, passive components (resistor, capacitor,…), sensors (thermistor Photo resistor ..), a servo, and a buzzer to interface with LinkIt ONE board, and provide a tutorial with 10 examples showing how to use the kit. I haven’t received it, but their “Hello World” tutorial just blinks an external LED, so I’ve tried it out as well with some off-the-shelf components.

LinkIt ONE Hello World (Click to Enlarge)

LinkIt ONE Hello World (Click to Enlarge)

The wiki mentions you can load the program with File->Examples->Starter Kit for LinkIt->Basic->L2_Control_LED, but there’s no Starter Kit for LinkIt entry. Maybe I need to install something else, but I could not find any download links. Nevertheless, the code is included in the wiki, so I just created a new project with the code:

const int pinLED = 3;                      // LED connect to D13
 
void setup()
{
  pinMode(pinLED, OUTPUT);                // set direction of D13-OUTPUT
}
 
void loop()
{
  digitalWrite(pinLED, HIGH);             // LED on
  delay(3000);
  digitalWrite(pinLED, LOW);              // LED off
  delay(100);
}

With I then uploaded to the board, and the LED is lit for 3 seconds, and off for a short time (100ms) as expected.

That’s all for the quick start guide. To go further, you can check the wiki, and developer’s guide mentioned above, and read the LinkIt API Reference for full details of the APIs for MediaTek LinkIt development platform.

LinkIt ONE is available now for $79 on Seeed Studio, and you may also consider pre-ordering “Sidekick Basic kit for LinkIt ONE” for $29.90 (Shipping on October 22) to have some fun interfacing LEDs, sensors, a servo, etc.. to the board, by following the related tutorials.

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Infineon XMC 2Go Cortex M0 Development Kit Sells for 5 Euros

September 15th, 2014 4 comments

Infineon brought another tiny, portable, and cheap ARM Cortex M0 board to market with XMC 2Go development kit featuring XMC1100 ARM Cortex M0 micro-controller with 16KB RAM, 64KB Flash, and tow breadboard friendly headers to access various serial interfaces and ADC pins.

 

Infineon_XMC_2GoKey features listed on Infineon website:

  • MCU – Infineon XMC1100 ARM Cortex-M0 MCU @ 32 MHz with 64KB flash, 16KB RAM.
  • Debugger – On-board J-Link Lite Debugger using an XMC4200 Microcontroller.
  • Headers – 2×8 pin headers suitable for Breadbord with access to 2x USIC (Universal Serial Interface Channel: UART, SPI, I2C, I2S, LIN), 6x 12-bit ADC, external interrupts (via ERU), 4x 16-bit timers
  • Misc – 2 x user LED, RTC
  • Power – 5V Micro via USB, or 3.3V external power. ESD and reverse current protection
  • Dimensions – 14.0 x 38.5 mm

XMC1100_Development_BoardThe board is programmed via USB using the same Dave IDE I tried with XMC4500 Relax Lite Kit. Documentation includes PCB design data, the board’s user manual, and various documents to get started. The board has been released in March, so some people have already played with it (Link in Polish), and another ran some Arduino code on the board (in English!).

You can find more information and purchase the board on Infineon’s XMC 2Go page. The board is sold for 5 Euros + shipping, but you can also find it on Mouser and Digikey for about $6 to $12.

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Intrinsyc OPEN-Q 8084 Development Kit Powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 Processor

September 12th, 2014 4 comments

Inforce Computing IFC6540 was the first low cost development board powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 processor I discovered a few months ago, but is currently “for pre-approved customers only and have not yet been released to public”. Intrinsyc has now launched their own Snapdragon 805 development kit called OPEN-Q 8084 based on a mini-ITX carrier board, and a SoM with 3GB RAM, and 16GB eMMC. The board target applications include ruggedized tablets, digital signage, government/public safety, medical, robotics, wearable displays, video streaming/conferencing, gaming systems, and in-flight entertainment.

OPEN-Q 8084 Snapdragon 805 Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

OPEN-Q 8084 Snapdragon 805 Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

Specifications of APQ8084 Open-Q System-on-Module:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 (APQ8084) quad core Krait 450 @ 2.5GHz, with Adreno 420 GPU @ 500MHz, Hexagon QDSP6 V5A (600MHz), and two ISPs for up to 55-megapixel stereoscopic 3D
  • System Memory – 3GB PoP LPDDR3 RAM
  • Storage – 16GB eMMC 5.0 flash, expandable to 64GB, micro SD signals, and SATA signals (via MXM connector)
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet (via MXM connector), 802.11a/b/g/n/ac WiFi (2.4GHz/5GHz) for 600Mbps throughput, Bluetooth 4.1
  • Other I/Os accessible via 314-pin MXM 3.0 edge connector:
    • PCIe
    • HDMI
    • SPI, I2C. I2S, GPIO
    • 3x MIPI CSI, 2x MIPI DSI
    • NFC, UIM
    • Slim bus
    • USB – 2x USB 2.0 (host and client),  2x USB 3.0 (host and client), USB HSIC
    • JTAG
    • Serial ports
  • Power +3.3V DC; PMIC supporting processor and peripheral LDOs, boost regulators as well as clock management and auxiliary signals.
  • Dimensions – 82 x 35mm
  • Temperature Range – 0 to 70°C

One of the advantages of Snapdragon 805 is its 4K/UHD capabilities including 4K capture with H.264/AVC format, 4K playback with H.264/AVC and H.265/HEVC formats, and 4K UHD on-device display concurrent with 4K UHD output to HDTV.

Open-Q 8084 devkit mini-ITX + SoM has the following specs:

  • Processor, Memory, Storage and Connectivity – As listed forAPQ8084 Open-Q SoM with Snapdragon 805, 3GB RAM, 16 GB Flash, Wi-Fi…
  • External Storage – microSD slot, SATA 3.0 I/F
  • Connectivity – Apart from Wi-Fi and Bluetooth on the module, the carrier board adds a Gigabit Ethernet port, GPS with GLONASS and COMPASS support
  • Video Output
    • HDMI 1.4
    • 2x MIPI-DSI I/F with support for optional qHD LCD capacitive touchscreen
  • Camera I/F – 3x MIPI-CSI I/F with support for optional cameras
  • Audio – 5.1 channel, 3.5mm headphone output and microphone input jacks, 6 digital mics
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 host port, 1x micro USB 3.0 port, 2x USB 2.0 host ports.
  • Sensors – Optional compass, gyro, accelerometer
  • Debugging – JTAG and UART (DB9)
  • Headers – Sensor/IoT header, NFC/UIM header
  • Expansion Slot – mini-PCIe slot
  • Misc – 3x user buttons, 3x user LEDS and power indicator
  • Power – 12V power supply with external battery connector; optional PMIC with battery support
  • Dimensions – 170×170 mm (Mini-ITX form-factor)
OPEN-Q 8084 Block Diagram

OPEN-Q 8084 Block Diagram

The company will provide an Android 4.4 BSP, but “embedded Linux customization” is also available. The full development kit includes Open-Q 805 8084) SoM in MXM 3.0 custom form factor, the Mini-ITX Carrier board for IO and expansion, a power supply, an HDMI cable, a Quick Start Guide, a licence agreement, and access to documentation and platform BSP. Cameras, LCD touchscreen displays, and extra sensors are available as options.

Intrinsyc’s OPEN-Q 8084 module is selling for $219, whereas the development kit goes for $449, with shipments scheduled for October. You may want to visit  Open-Q 8084 SOM and Open-Q 8084 Development Kit product pages for further details.

Via LinuxGizmos

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Broadcom Introduces WICED Sense Bluetooth Low Energy Development Kit

September 1st, 2014 No comments

Broadcom has recently announced a new development board for IoT applications using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) called WICED Sense. The kit consists of a “sense tag” powered by the company’s BCM20737S Bluetooth SIP Module with five micro-electromechanical sensors (MEMS), and Bluetooth 4.1 compatible WICED SMART software stack.
WICED_Sense_Development_KitThe key features of WICED Sense devkit are as follows:

  • Broadcom BCM20737 Bluetooth Smart system in package (SiP) module
  • Five low-power MEMS sensors by ST Micro (part of the module):
    • Gyroscope (L3GD20)
    • Accelerometer (LIS3DSH)
    • eCompass (LSM303D)
    • Pressure sensor (LPS25H)
    • Humidity Temperature sensor (HTS221)
  • Bluetooth Smart connection covers distance of roughly 30 meters.
  • USB – 1x micro USB connector to update applications
  • Encryption, decryption, certificate signing, verification and various algorithms for increased privacy
  • Secure Over-the-air (OTA) download capability to enable firmware updates from central device including smartphone, tablet and computers
  • Misc – iBeacon, NFC, Wireless charging (Rezence A4WP) support.
  • Power – Coin-cell battery

The tag can communicate with mobile devices running iOS and Android OS (App coming to Google Play in October), and supports up to 8 simultaneous master/slave connections. You can get started within 5 minutes, by install the demo app on your iPhone or iPad, and pressing the Wake button on the tag to get sensor data, But If you want to go further, you’ll want to download WICED Smart SDK (Registration required) that integrates with Eclipse IDE, and comes with sample applications. You can get a little more info about the SDK on WICED Smart community.

Possible applications includes text alerts based on sensor data, car keys finder, security device for pets, tennis coach by attaching WICED sense to a tennis racket and using accelerometer and e-compass data, indoor humidity and temperature monitor, and more.

Broadcom WICED Sense is a direct competitor to TI SensorTag, and sells in the same price range at $19.99 via Mouser, Avnet, or other distributors. You can find more information on Broadcom WICED Sense page, including a quick start guide and a product brief, and in case you wonder, WICED stands for Wireless Internet Connectivity for Embedded Devices.

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MYIR ARM9 Linux Development Boards & Computer-on-Modules Powered by Freescale i.MX28 Processor

August 14th, 2014 No comments

MYIR MYD-IMX28X development boards and MYC-IMX28X CPU modules had been announced in May 2014, but I’ve just found out about them via the company’s newsletter. The CoMs are powered by Freescale i.MX28 ARM9 processors (i.MX283 or i.MX287), feature 128 MB RAM, 256 MB Flash, and connect to a baseboard to make the development boards. Target applications include smart gateways, human-machine interfaces (HMIs), handheld devices, scanners, portable medical, experimental education as well as other industrial applications.

MYC-IMX28X CoMs

MYIR_MYC-iMX28X_ARM9_CoMMYC-IMX28X computer-on-module specifications:

  • Processor – Freescale i.MX283 or i.MX287 ARM926EJ-STM processor up to 454MHz with 128KB SRAM, 128KB ROM, 1280 bits of OCOTP ROM, 16KB/32KB I and D Cache
  • System Memory – 128MB DDR2 SDRAM
  • Storage – 256MB NAND flash, 128KB SPI flash
  • Connectivity – On-board Ethernet PHY
  • Connectors – 2x 1.27mm pitch 2 x 40-pin SMT male expansion connectors with access to
    • Ethernet – Up to 2 Ethernet (two for i.MX287, one for i.MX283)
    • USB – 2x USB2.0 High-speed ports
    • Serial – Up to 6x Serial ports (including one Debug port)
    • 1x I2C, 2x SPI
    • Up to 8x ADC (one high-speed ADC, seven low-resolution ADC)
    • Up to 5x PWM
    • 1x SDIO
    • 2x CAN (i.MX287 only)
  • Misc – Power and user LEDs
  • Power Supply – 5V
  • Dimensions – 62mm x 38mm
  • Operating Temperature Range – Commercial: -20~70 Celsius; Industrial: -40 to +85 Celsius

The main differences between i.MX283 and i.MX287, are support for only 1 Ethernet port against 2 for i.MX287, and the latter features 2 CAN buses. The company provides an SDK with u-boot, Linux 2.6.35, and relevant drivers for the module.

MYD-IMX28X Boards

Click To Enlarge

MYD-IMX28X Development Board (Click To Enlarge)

The development boards have the following hardware specifications:

  • SoC/Memory/Storage – Based on MYC-IMX283 or MYC-IMX287 modules as described above: Freescale i.MX28 @ 454 MHz, 128 MB DDR2, 256 NAND flash, and 128KB SPI flash
  • External Storage – micro SD card slot
  • Display I/F – 1x LCD interface (16-bit true color, supports optional 4.3-inch and 7-inch TFT LCD), 1x 4-wire resistive touch screen interface
  • Audio – 3.5mm jacks for Audio IN and OUT, and headphone output, digital audio out (RCA), MIC IN interface, Buzzer
  • Serial ports – 1x 3-wire RS232 Debug serial port (DB9), 1x 5-wire RS232 serial port (UART0), 1x RS485
  • USB – 1x USB2.0 Host port, 1x USB2.0 OTG
  • Connectivity – 10/100Mbps Ethernet (two for i.MX287, one for i.MX283)
  • CAN – 2 x CAN interfaces (only for i.MX287)
  • Expansion connector – 2x 20-pin headers with access to 3x ADC (one high-speed ADC, two low-resolution ADC), 1x SPI, 2x I2C, 3x UART, 3x PWM
  • Debugging – 20-pin JTAG interface
  • Misc – 4 x Buttons (1 x Reset button, 3 x User buttons), 2 x User LEDs (Blue)
  • Power Supply – 5V barrel connector
  • Dimensions – 140mm x 90mm

MYD-IMX28X_Block_DiagramPublicly available documentation is limited with only Freescale i.MX28 datasheet, and MYD-IMX28X board and MYC-IMX28X module simplified datasheets with overview of the boards, header pinout, and a list of document and software packages available for the board. U-boot, Linux 2.6.35, and drivers will be provided with source code, as well as some code samples to control various peripherals (SPI. I2C, touchscreen, LCD…) and a Qt demo. MYIR also provides 4.3″ and 7″ resistive or capacitive touchscreen as option for $60 to $99.

The modules and development kits appears to be available now, MYC-IMX28X module starts at $39 for the commercial version, $59 for the industrial version, and the development board, probably excluding the CPU module, sells for $99 and $119, respectively for the commercial and industrial versions. You can find more details on MYIR’s MYC-IMX28X module page.

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