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Posts Tagged ‘devkit’

Design Amazon Alexa Gateways, Robots and Smart Speakers with WisCore Modular Development Kit

June 17th, 2017 3 comments

RAK Wireless has launched a new development board powered by Mediatek MT7628A processor running OpenWrt with built-in WiFi and Ethernet connectivity, and audio codec and microphone to support Amazon Alexa voice service. Bluetooth, Zigbee, and Z-wave will also be supported via UART modules.

Wiscore Specifications:

  • Processor – Mediatek MT7628A MIPS24KEc CPU @ up to  580MHz
  • System Memory –  128MB DDR2 (64 MB optional)
  • Storage – 16 MB flash + micro SD card

    Block Diagram – Click to Enlarge

  • Audio
    • MicroSemi ZL38062 for audio in and out
    • MicroSemi ZL38067 to handle “Alexa” keyword
    • single or dual digital microphone up to 5 meter range
    • Far field voice wake up
    • Support for echo cancellation
  • Connectivity
    • 802.11 b/g/n WiFi 2×2 MIMO up to 300 Mbps
    • 2x 10/100M Ethernet (LAN and WAN)
    • Optional UART modules for Bluetooth, ZigBeem Z-Wave
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 host port
  • Expansion – Arduino headers with UART, I2C, SPI and GPIOs
  • Power Supply – 5V via power barrel or mini USB port

As you can see from the photo below, the main components are on separate boards (for some reasons) with a “mother board”, MT7628 module, and an audio sub-board.

As mentioned in the introduction, the MT7628 module runs an OS based on OpenWrt with RAK iGate middleware, and the company provides an SDK allowing you to develop solutions based on Amazon Alexa thanks to one codec that will detect “Alexa” keyword and wake up to the board, and another codec handling audio capture and output. The software architecture is shown below, Wiscore app for Android and iOS is provided to pair the EVK with Alexa, and more documentation and software can be found in the Wiki on Github.

WisCore Software Architecture

The solution can be used to build voice controlled home automation gateways or appliances, smart speakers, and robots. RAK Wireless sells a development kit with the three boards, an Ethernet cable, a speaker, a USB cable, two antennas, some Dupont wires, some jumpers, and a Quick Start Guide for $49 plus shipping. Visit the product page for a few more details.

$399 Intel Euclid Robotics Devkit Runs Ubuntu & ROS on Intel Atom x7-Z8700 Processor

May 22nd, 2017 No comments

We’ve seen many mini PC based on Intel Atom x5/x7 “Cherry Trail” processor in the last year, but Intel has also integrated their low power processor into hardware aimed at robotics, such as Intel RealSense development kit based on Atom x5 UP Board and RealSense R200 depth camera. The company has now launched its one-in-all Intel Euclid development kit combining Atom X7-Z8700 processor with a RealSense camera in a single enclosure.

Click to Enlarge

Intel Euclid specifications:

  • SoC – Intel Atom x7-Z8700 Cherry Trail quad core processor @ up to 2.4GHz with Intel HD Graphics Gen 8
  • System Memory – 4GB LPDDR3-1600
  • Storage – 32GB eMMC 5.0 flash, Micro SD slot up to 128GB
  • Video Output – micro HDMI port up to 4K @ 30 Hz
  • Audio – 2x I2S interfaces, 1W mono speaker, 3x DMIC with noise cancellation
  • Camera – Intel RealSense ZR300 camera
    • RGB camera – 2MP up to [email protected], 16:9 aspect ratio, rolling shutter, fixed focus, 75° x 41.5° x 68° FOV
    • Stereo imagers – 2x [email protected], global shutter, fixed focus, 70° x 46° x 59° FOV
    • Depth output – up to 628 × 468 @ 60fps, 16-bit format; Minimal depth distance: 0.6 M (628 x 468) or 0.5 M (480 x 360); active IR stereo technology
    • Tracking module
      • Fisheye camera resolution: VGA @ 60fps,  FOV: 166° × 100° × 133° FOV,
      • IMU: 3-axis accelerometer & 3-axis gryroscope with 50 μsec time stamp accuracy
  • Connectivity – Dual band 802.11 a/b/g/n 1×1 WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0, GPS (GNS, GLONASS, Beidou, Galileo, QZSS, WAAS, EGNOS)
  • Sensors – Integrated Sensor Hub (ISH), accelerometer, digital compass, gyroscope, ambient light, proximity, thermal, environmental (barometer, altimeter, humidity, temperature)
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 port, 1x micro USB OTG port with power, 1x micro USB 2.0 port for UART / serial console
  • Misc – ¼” standard tripod mounting hole; power and charging LEDs;
  • Battery – 2000 mAh @ 3.8V
  • Power Supply – 5V/3A via battery terminals
  • Temperature Range — up to 35°C (still air)

The kit runs Ubuntu 16.04 with Robotic Operating System (ROS) Kinetic Kame, and custom software layer to allow developers to control the device using a web interface. It also supports remote desktop application, and includes evaluation versions of Intel SLAM and Person Tracking Middleware.

Euclid Camera Output: Color Stream, Depth Stream, and Fisheye Stream – Click to Enlarge

Intel RealSense SLAM Library middleware enables applications in robots and drones to understand their location and surroundings more accurately than GPS allows in GPS denied environments and inside yet unmapped spaces. You’ll find documentation about SLAM, person tracking middleware, the camera API,  RealSense SDK framework, Euclid user guide and more in Intel Euclid product page. You’ll be able to get support in RealSense forums and Euclid developer kit community, where you’ll find tutorials and example projects.

Intel Euclid Development Kit can be pre-order for $399.00 on the product page with shipping starting on May 31, 2017.

Via LinuxGizmos

Samsung ARTIK 053 WiFi IoT Module Runs Tizen RT on an ARM Cortex R4 MCU

May 17th, 2017 2 comments

Samsung has just introduced the latest member of its Artik family at IoT World 2017. ARTIK 053 is a WiFi module powered by an ARM Cortex R4 wireless micro-controller @ 320 MHz with hardware based security, GPIO, SPI, and I2C ports, and running Tizen RT real-time operating system.

Artik 053 module specifications:

  • MCU – 32-bit ARM Cortex R4 @ 320MHz with 1280 KB RAM for general use, 128 KB RAM for global IPC data (likely Samsung Exynos i T200, or a variant without an ARM Cortex M0+ core)
  • Storage – 8 MB flash
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n WiFi @ 2.4 GHz
  • Expansion – 29 dedicated GPIO ports, 2x SPI, 4x UART (2-pin), 4x ADC, 1x JTAG, 2x I2C
  • Security – AES/DES/TDES, SHA-1/SHA-2, PKA (Public Key Accelerator), PRNG/DTRNG (Random Number Generators), Secure key storage, Physical Unclonable Function (PUF)
  • Power Supply – 5 to 12VDC input voltage
  • Dimensions – 40 x 15 x 3 mm
  • Certifications – FCC (U.S), IC (Canada), CE (EU), KC (Korea), SRRC (China)

The module runs Tizen RT operating system with WiFi and network middleware, support for LWM2M (Lightweight Machine to Machine) for device management, IoTivity, and JerryScript/IoT.js.

Tizen RT Block Diagram

You can develop on ARTIK 053 using ARTIK IDE, as well as open source tools like Eclipse Classic Desktop (CDT), gcc, and OpenOCD. A “Developer Reference Mobile App” working with Samsung ARTIK Cloud is also provided, and Samsung collaborated with VMWare to support Little IoT Agent (Liota) open source software development kit (SDK) developed by VMware on ARTIK 053.

ARTIK 053 starter kit – pictured below – will help you evaluation the module, and get started as soon as possible.

Artik 053 Module on Development Board

The ARTIK starter board includes Arduino-form factor interface headers, expanded GPIO headers with exposed SPI and UARTs, on-board reset and Arduino reset buttons, 2x test buttons and 2x LEDs, a micro USB connector for power and programming, a JTAG header (1.27mm pitch), and a power barrel.

ARTIK 053 sells for as low as $6.65 for 300 unit orders on Digikey, while the starter kit goes for $35 on either Mouser or Digikey. You’ll more more details, including software and hardware documentation, on Artik.io website.

u-blox SARA-S200 RPMA Module Supports the Machine Network

May 16th, 2017 3 comments

RPMA is one of the many LPWAN IoT communication standards, but it does not get as much press coverage as SigFox or LoRa because it targets larger scale deployments, and is not really accessible to individuals. It’s still used by companies in many countries, and u-blox has just released SARA-S200 RPMA module that will also work with the Machine Network, also relying on RPMA and managed by Ingenu.

u-blox SARA-S200 module specifications:

  • Connectivity
    • Wireless Frequency –  2.4 GHz ISM
    • Radio Spectrum – 80 MHz
    • Occupied Bandwidth – 1 MHz
    • Modulation – Dynamic – Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (D-DSSS)
    • Multiple Access Scheme – Random Phase Multiple Access (RPMA)
    • Transmit Power – +22 dBm
    • Receive Sensitivity – -133 dBm
    • Data Throughput – 100 kB per day
    • Link budget – 176 dB (FCC/IC)
  • Host Interface – 7-wire SPI that includes handshaking for deep sleep modes
  • Power Supply – 3.2 V to 3.4 V (typ. 3.3 V); VCC BAT: 2.2V to 5.5 V
  • Power Consumption – Off: 0.1 μA (typ.); deep sleep mode: 19 μA (typ.); idle mode: 22 mA (typ.); RX: 107 mA (typ.); TX: 370 mA (typ.)
  • Dimensions – 26.0x 16.0 x 2.4 mm
  • Weight – 3 grams
  • Package – 96-pin LGA (Land Grid Array)
  • Operating temperature range – -40 to +85 °C
  • Certifications – FCC, ISED (formerly known as IC), RED (formerly known as R&TTE), and additional countries as deployed (pending)

The module is an update to the first RPMA module (NANO-S100), with cost and size optimization (65% smaller) that makes it suitable for application in the Smart Meter, Smart Building, Gas & Oil, Asset/Personnel Tracking and Agricultural industries. The module supports FOTA (FW updated over the air) with the ability to also update the application firmware. A development kit for SARA-S200 is also available, but I could not find any public information about it.

Pricing and availability have not been disclosed. For more information, you may visit u-blox SARA-S200 product page, or go to nternet of Things World at the Santa Clara Convention Center, CA (May 16‑18 2017), where u‑blox and Ingenu will showcase the SARA‑S200 module.

Categories: Hardware Tags: devkit, IoT, lpwan, m2m, rpma, ublox

AIY Projects Voice Kit Transforms Raspberry Pi 3 Into Google Home, Comes Free with Raspberry Pi Magazine

May 5th, 2017 11 comments

We’ve just reported about the preview release of Google Assistant SDK that works on the Raspberry Pi 3, and other boards with a microphone, speakers, and access to Internet. The Raspberry Pi foundation and Google have now made it even easier, as they launched AIY Projects Voice Kit with a Google Voice HAT, a speaker, a stereo microphone Voice HAT board, a button, a few cables, and a cardboard case.

You’ll just need to add your own Raspberry Pi 3, follow the instructions to assemble kits, load and setup the software. Once this is all done, you’ll be able to press the top button, asking anything you want to Google Voice, including the weather.

Price? Sort of free, as it comes with MagPi 57 magazine, where you’ll also find detailed instructions for the kit. Google AIY Projects got its name from a mix between (DIY) and artificial intelligence (AI), and considering it’s “Projects” and not just “Project”, we can expect more kits in the future.

Intrinsyc Introduces Open-Q 2100 SoM and Devkit Powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 2100 SoC for Wearables

April 27th, 2017 3 comments

Qualcomm unveiled Snapdragon Wear 2100 SoC for wearables early last year, and since then a few smartwatches powered by the processor – such as LG Watch Style and Watch Sport – have been launched, and Intrinsyc has now unveiled one of the first module based on the processor with Open-Q 2100 system-on-module, and a corresponding Nano-ITX baseboard.

Open-Q 2100 SoM specifications:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 2100 (APQ8009W) quad core ARM Cortex A7 processor @ up to 1.094 GHz with Adreno 304 GPU
  • System Memory – 512 MB LPDDR3
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC flash
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n WiFi (WCN2320), Bluetooth 4.1 LE, Gen 8C GNSS (GPS/GLONASS) with on-board u.FL connector (WGR7640)
  • Audio – Integrated Codec/PMIC (PM8916-1) with optional support for Fluence HD, Snapdragon Voice Activation, and Snapdragon Voice+
  • 2x 100-pin board-to-board connectors with USB 2.0, I2S, GPIO, MIPI DSI up to 720p @ 60 Hz, 2-lane MIPI CSI, SDC2/microSD signals
  • Power Supply – 3.6 to 4.2V input
  • Dimensions – 31.5 x 15 mm
  • Temperature Range – -10 to +70 °C

The module runs Android 7 Nougat by default, but it can also support Android Wear.

The company also provides Open-Q 2100 SoM development board to evaluate the platform, and get started as soon as possible while you wait for your custom baseboard. The development includes the following key features:

  • Connectors for Open-Q 210 system-on-module
  • Storage – micro SD slot
  • Display – MIPI DSI connector with optional smartphone display, HDMI output
  • Camera – MIPI CSI connector for optional 720p capable camera
  • Connectivity – Ethernet port (via LAN9514); wireless connectivity (WiFi, BLE, GPS) on module
  • USB – 4x USB 2.0 host ports
  • Expansion Headers – SPI, I2S, GPIO, etc…
  • Debugging – micro USB port for debug UART
  • Power Supply – 12V/3A via DC jack, or 6-pin battery connector
  • Dimensions – Nano-ITX form factor (120×120 mm)

The module is expected to be used in connected wearables & trackers, tethered smartwatches, as well as ultra-compact embedded designs.

Open-Q 2100 SOM and Development Kit can be pre-ordered for respectively $75 and $595, with “early adopter units available to approved customers by May 31”. More information can be found on Intrynsic Open-Q2100 SoM and Devkit pages.

Via LinuxGizmos

Aconno Bluetooth 4.0 & 5 IoT Development Board Features an nRF52832 or nRF52840 Module, an e-Paper Display, Sensors and More

March 31st, 2017 1 comment

Bluetooth 5 is the latest iteration of Bluetooth with up to four times the speed and twice the range of Bluetooth 4.0 LE, and so far apart from Puck.js and Nordic Semi nRF52840 devkit, I had not seen many Bluetooth 5 IoT modules or boards. Aconno, a German startup, has designed ACD-52832 Bluetooth 4.0 / Thread / ANT+ IoT development board based on their own nRF52832 module, and equipped with some goodies like a black & white e-Paper display, a joystick, sensors, I/Os, etc… They’ve also launched an updated module with Bluetooth 5 using nFR52840 SoC. I don’t have the full details about the new module, but the nRF52832 module and devkit is interesting to look at, especially features should be similar.

Aconno ACD-52832 board specifications:

  • Wireless Module – ACN52832 based on Nordic Semi nRF52832 ARM Cortex-M4 @ 64 MHz SoC with Bluetooth Smart, ANT+, Thread, NFC, and 2.4 GHz proprietary
  • Display – e-Paper display with 200×200 resolution, 184 dpi pixel density
  • Sensors
    • ST iNEMO 9-DoF inertial module with a accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer
    • Temperature sensor with -40°C to 125°C range and ± 4K accuracy
    • Light sensitive sensor
  • I/Os – Pin header with seven I/O ports; 2x potential free relay outputs; 2x PWM controlled servo outputs
  • Debugging – micro USB port for J-Link or drag and drop flashing
  • Misc – IR emitter; 5-way digital joystick; 2x LEDs; 2x tactile switches; potentiometer for ADC values; buzzer
  • Power Supply
    • 5V via micro USB port
    • 1,200 mAh Li-Ion battery
    • Texas Instruments USB Li-Ion battery charger with up to 0.5A charging devices.
  • Dimensions – 105 x 65 mm (module is ~ 20 x 25 mm)

The board can be programmed and debugging via Segger J-Link OB through the micro USB interface, and Nordic toolchain using Keil, IAR and GCC. It’s also supported by mbed online compiler allowing drag & drop programing. The board and module supports Nordic’s SoftDevices to enable the wireless protocols needed for your project. Potential applications include IoT sensor nodes and hubs, rapid prototyping, desktop peripherals, remote controls, sports & medical wearables, smarthome sensors, beacons, toys, and NFC <-> BT tags.

ACN52832 Module Block Diagram – Click to Enlarge

Charbax interviewed the 4-person company at Embedded World 2017, where they showcase the old and new modules, the development board, as well as some other products based on the module such as soil moisture sensor, an e-Paper picture frame, an interesting tiny SMT prototyping board with traces made with conductive ink pen, a DIN rail box with e-Paper and so on..

The nRF52832 module is sold for 12 Euros + VAT, while the development board goes for 99 Euros + VAT on Amazon Germany. It’s also possible to buy directly on their own shop, and they have a 20% discount for a few more days. For more information, including manuals for both the module and devkit, and some other hardware kits, visit Aconno products page. Pricing and info about nRF52840 do not seem to have be posted to their website yet.

Texas Instruments CC3200 WiFi SensorTag is Now Available for $40

March 15th, 2017 No comments

Texas Instruments launched SensorTag in 2013, and at the time there was just a Bluetooth 4.0 LE version with 6 different sensors. I bought one for $25 at the time, and tried it with a Raspberry Pi board and a BLE USB dongle. Since then, the company has launched a new multi standard model (CC2650STK) supporting Buetooth low energy, 6LoWPAN, and ZigBee, and has just started to take orders for CC3200 WiFi SensorTag for $39.99, which seems expensive in a world of $2 ESP8266 modules.

But let’s see what the kit has to offer:

  • Wireless MCU – Texas Instruments CC3200 SimpleLink ARM Cortex-M4 MCU @ up to 80 MHz, with up to 256KB RAM, Hardware Crypto Engine, DMA engine
  • Storage – 1 MB serial flash memory
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n WiFi with on-board inverted-F antenna with RF connector for conducted testing
  • Sensors – Gyroscope, accelerometer, compass, light sensor (OPT3001), humidity sensor (HDC1000), IR temperature sensor (TMP007), and pressure sensor (BMP280)
  • Expansion – 20-pin DevPack SKIN connector
  • Debugging – Debug and JTAG interface for flash programing
  • Misc – 2x buttons, 2x LEDs, reed relay MK24, digital microphone, and a buzzer for user interaction
  • Power – 2x AAA batteries good for up to 3 months (with 1 minute update interval)

So it has plenty of sensors to play with, and rather long battery life for a WiFi evaluation platform. The kit ships with one CC3200 WiFi SensorTag, two AAA batteries, and a getting started guide.

WiFi SensorTag Mobile App – Click to Enlarge

Resources includes hardware design files (schematics, PCB layout, BoM, etc..), iOS and Android apps and source code, IoT Device Monitor for Windows, Code Composer Studio, and cloud-based development tools. Note that there’s no embedded software for the Wi-Fi SensorTag, it is only a a demo platform, while you can modify cloud-based applications, you can’t modify the firmware. If you want an embedded development platform, you’d have to go with CC3200 LaunchPad board. You can still have some fun SensorTag using Android or iOS app, or connecting it to IBM Watson IoT Platform.

Visit SensorTag page for further information.