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Posts Tagged ‘devkit’

Infineon XMC 2Go Cortex M0 Development Kit Sells for 5 Euros

September 15th, 2014 4 comments

Infineon brought another tiny, portable, and cheap ARM Cortex M0 board to market with XMC 2Go development kit featuring XMC1100 ARM Cortex M0 micro-controller with 16KB RAM, 64KB Flash, and tow breadboard friendly headers to access various serial interfaces and ADC pins.

 

Infineon_XMC_2GoKey features listed on Infineon website:

  • MCU – Infineon XMC1100 ARM Cortex-M0 MCU @ 32 MHz with 64KB flash, 16KB RAM.
  • Debugger – On-board J-Link Lite Debugger using an XMC4200 Microcontroller.
  • Headers – 2×8 pin headers suitable for Breadbord with access to 2x USIC (Universal Serial Interface Channel: UART, SPI, I2C, I2S, LIN), 6x 12-bit ADC, external interrupts (via ERU), 4x 16-bit timers
  • Misc – 2 x user LED, RTC
  • Power – 5V Micro via USB, or 3.3V external power. ESD and reverse current protection
  • Dimensions – 14.0 x 38.5 mm

XMC1100_Development_BoardThe board is programmed via USB using the same Dave IDE I tried with XMC4500 Relax Lite Kit. Documentation includes PCB design data, the board’s user manual, and various documents to get started. The board has been released in March, so some people have already played with it (Link in Polish), and another ran some Arduino code on the board (in English!).

You can find more information and purchase the board on Infineon’s XMC 2Go page. The board is sold for 5 Euros + shipping, but you can also find it on Mouser and Digikey for about $6 to $12.

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Intrinsyc OPEN-Q 8084 Development Kit Powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 Processor

September 12th, 2014 4 comments

Inforce Computing IFC6540 was the first low cost development board powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 processor I discovered a few months ago, but is currently “for pre-approved customers only and have not yet been released to public”. Intrinsyc has now launched their own Snapdragon 805 development kit called OPEN-Q 8084 based on a mini-ITX carrier board, and a SoM with 3GB RAM, and 16GB eMMC. The board target applications include ruggedized tablets, digital signage, government/public safety, medical, robotics, wearable displays, video streaming/conferencing, gaming systems, and in-flight entertainment.

OPEN-Q 8084 Snapdragon 805 Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

OPEN-Q 8084 Snapdragon 805 Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

Specifications of APQ8084 Open-Q System-on-Module:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 (APQ8084) quad core Krait 450 @ 2.5GHz, with Adreno 420 GPU @ 500MHz, Hexagon QDSP6 V5A (600MHz), and two ISPs for up to 55-megapixel stereoscopic 3D
  • System Memory – 3GB PoP LPDDR3 RAM
  • Storage – 16GB eMMC 5.0 flash, expandable to 64GB, micro SD signals, and SATA signals (via MXM connector)
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet (via MXM connector), 802.11a/b/g/n/ac WiFi (2.4GHz/5GHz) for 600Mbps throughput, Bluetooth 4.1
  • Other I/Os accessible via 314-pin MXM 3.0 edge connector:
    • PCIe
    • HDMI
    • SPI, I2C. I2S, GPIO
    • 3x MIPI CSI, 2x MIPI DSI
    • NFC, UIM
    • Slim bus
    • USB – 2x USB 2.0 (host and client),  2x USB 3.0 (host and client), USB HSIC
    • JTAG
    • Serial ports
  • Power +3.3V DC; PMIC supporting processor and peripheral LDOs, boost regulators as well as clock management and auxiliary signals.
  • Dimensions – 82 x 35mm
  • Temperature Range – 0 to 70°C

One of the advantages of Snapdragon 805 is its 4K/UHD capabilities including 4K capture with H.264/AVC format, 4K playback with H.264/AVC and H.265/HEVC formats, and 4K UHD on-device display concurrent with 4K UHD output to HDTV.

Open-Q 8084 devkit mini-ITX + SoM has the following specs:

  • Processor, Memory, Storage and Connectivity – As listed forAPQ8084 Open-Q SoM with Snapdragon 805, 3GB RAM, 16 GB Flash, Wi-Fi…
  • External Storage – microSD slot, SATA 3.0 I/F
  • Connectivity – Apart from Wi-Fi and Bluetooth on the module, the carrier board adds a Gigabit Ethernet port, GPS with GLONASS and COMPASS support
  • Video Output
    • HDMI 1.4
    • 2x MIPI-DSI I/F with support for optional qHD LCD capacitive touchscreen
  • Camera I/F – 3x MIPI-CSI I/F with support for optional cameras
  • Audio – 5.1 channel, 3.5mm headphone output and microphone input jacks, 6 digital mics
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 host port, 1x micro USB 3.0 port, 2x USB 2.0 host ports.
  • Sensors – Optional compass, gyro, accelerometer
  • Debugging – JTAG and UART (DB9)
  • Headers – Sensor/IoT header, NFC/UIM header
  • Expansion Slot – mini-PCIe slot
  • Misc – 3x user buttons, 3x user LEDS and power indicator
  • Power – 12V power supply with external battery connector; optional PMIC with battery support
  • Dimensions – 170×170 mm (Mini-ITX form-factor)
OPEN-Q 8084 Block Diagram

OPEN-Q 8084 Block Diagram

The company will provide an Android 4.4 BSP, but “embedded Linux customization” is also available. The full development kit includes Open-Q 805 8084) SoM in MXM 3.0 custom form factor, the Mini-ITX Carrier board for IO and expansion, a power supply, an HDMI cable, a Quick Start Guide, a licence agreement, and access to documentation and platform BSP. Cameras, LCD touchscreen displays, and extra sensors are available as options.

Intrinsyc’s OPEN-Q 8084 module is selling for $219, whereas the development kit goes for $449, with shipments scheduled for October. You may want to visit  Open-Q 8084 SOM and Open-Q 8084 Development Kit product pages for further details.

Via LinuxGizmos

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Broadcom Introduces WICED Sense Bluetooth Low Energy Development Kit

September 1st, 2014 No comments

Broadcom has recently announced a new development board for IoT applications using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) called WICED Sense. The kit consists of a “sense tag” powered by the company’s BCM20737S Bluetooth SIP Module with five micro-electromechanical sensors (MEMS), and Bluetooth 4.1 compatible WICED SMART software stack.
WICED_Sense_Development_KitThe key features of WICED Sense devkit are as follows:

  • Broadcom BCM20737 Bluetooth Smart system in package (SiP) module
  • Five low-power MEMS sensors by ST Micro (part of the module):
    • Gyroscope (L3GD20)
    • Accelerometer (LIS3DSH)
    • eCompass (LSM303D)
    • Pressure sensor (LPS25H)
    • Humidity Temperature sensor (HTS221)
  • Bluetooth Smart connection covers distance of roughly 30 meters.
  • USB – 1x micro USB connector to update applications
  • Encryption, decryption, certificate signing, verification and various algorithms for increased privacy
  • Secure Over-the-air (OTA) download capability to enable firmware updates from central device including smartphone, tablet and computers
  • Misc – iBeacon, NFC, Wireless charging (Rezence A4WP) support.
  • Power – Coin-cell battery

The tag can communicate with mobile devices running iOS and Android OS (App coming to Google Play in October), and supports up to 8 simultaneous master/slave connections. You can get started within 5 minutes, by install the demo app on your iPhone or iPad, and pressing the Wake button on the tag to get sensor data, But If you want to go further, you’ll want to download WICED Smart SDK (Registration required) that integrates with Eclipse IDE, and comes with sample applications. You can get a little more info about the SDK on WICED Smart community.

Possible applications includes text alerts based on sensor data, car keys finder, security device for pets, tennis coach by attaching WICED sense to a tennis racket and using accelerometer and e-compass data, indoor humidity and temperature monitor, and more.

Broadcom WICED Sense is a direct competitor to TI SensorTag, and sells in the same price range at $19.99 via Mouser, Avnet, or other distributors. You can find more information on Broadcom WICED Sense page, including a quick start guide and a product brief, and in case you wonder, WICED stands for Wireless Internet Connectivity for Embedded Devices.

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MYIR ARM9 Linux Development Boards & Computer-on-Modules Powered by Freescale i.MX28 Processor

August 14th, 2014 No comments

MYIR MYD-IMX28X development boards and MYC-IMX28X CPU modules had been announced in May 2014, but I’ve just found out about them via the company’s newsletter. The CoMs are powered by Freescale i.MX28 ARM9 processors (i.MX283 or i.MX287), feature 128 MB RAM, 256 MB Flash, and connect to a baseboard to make the development boards. Target applications include smart gateways, human-machine interfaces (HMIs), handheld devices, scanners, portable medical, experimental education as well as other industrial applications.

MYC-IMX28X CoMs

MYIR_MYC-iMX28X_ARM9_CoMMYC-IMX28X computer-on-module specifications:

  • Processor – Freescale i.MX283 or i.MX287 ARM926EJ-STM processor up to 454MHz with 128KB SRAM, 128KB ROM, 1280 bits of OCOTP ROM, 16KB/32KB I and D Cache
  • System Memory – 128MB DDR2 SDRAM
  • Storage – 256MB NAND flash, 128KB SPI flash
  • Connectivity – On-board Ethernet PHY
  • Connectors – 2x 1.27mm pitch 2 x 40-pin SMT male expansion connectors with access to
    • Ethernet – Up to 2 Ethernet (two for i.MX287, one for i.MX283)
    • USB – 2x USB2.0 High-speed ports
    • Serial – Up to 6x Serial ports (including one Debug port)
    • 1x I2C, 2x SPI
    • Up to 8x ADC (one high-speed ADC, seven low-resolution ADC)
    • Up to 5x PWM
    • 1x SDIO
    • 2x CAN (i.MX287 only)
  • Misc – Power and user LEDs
  • Power Supply – 5V
  • Dimensions – 62mm x 38mm
  • Operating Temperature Range – Commercial: -20~70 Celsius; Industrial: -40 to +85 Celsius

The main differences between i.MX283 and i.MX287, are support for only 1 Ethernet port against 2 for i.MX287, and the latter features 2 CAN buses. The company provides an SDK with u-boot, Linux 2.6.35, and relevant drivers for the module.

MYD-IMX28X Boards

Click To Enlarge

MYD-IMX28X Development Board (Click To Enlarge)

The development boards have the following hardware specifications:

  • SoC/Memory/Storage – Based on MYC-IMX283 or MYC-IMX287 modules as described above: Freescale i.MX28 @ 454 MHz, 128 MB DDR2, 256 NAND flash, and 128KB SPI flash
  • External Storage – micro SD card slot
  • Display I/F – 1x LCD interface (16-bit true color, supports optional 4.3-inch and 7-inch TFT LCD), 1x 4-wire resistive touch screen interface
  • Audio – 3.5mm jacks for Audio IN and OUT, and headphone output, digital audio out (RCA), MIC IN interface, Buzzer
  • Serial ports – 1x 3-wire RS232 Debug serial port (DB9), 1x 5-wire RS232 serial port (UART0), 1x RS485
  • USB – 1x USB2.0 Host port, 1x USB2.0 OTG
  • Connectivity – 10/100Mbps Ethernet (two for i.MX287, one for i.MX283)
  • CAN – 2 x CAN interfaces (only for i.MX287)
  • Expansion connector – 2x 20-pin headers with access to 3x ADC (one high-speed ADC, two low-resolution ADC), 1x SPI, 2x I2C, 3x UART, 3x PWM
  • Debugging – 20-pin JTAG interface
  • Misc – 4 x Buttons (1 x Reset button, 3 x User buttons), 2 x User LEDs (Blue)
  • Power Supply – 5V barrel connector
  • Dimensions – 140mm x 90mm

MYD-IMX28X_Block_DiagramPublicly available documentation is limited with only Freescale i.MX28 datasheet, and MYD-IMX28X board and MYC-IMX28X module simplified datasheets with overview of the boards, header pinout, and a list of document and software packages available for the board. U-boot, Linux 2.6.35, and drivers will be provided with source code, as well as some code samples to control various peripherals (SPI. I2C, touchscreen, LCD…) and a Qt demo. MYIR also provides 4.3″ and 7″ resistive or capacitive touchscreen as option for $60 to $99.

The modules and development kits appears to be available now, MYC-IMX28X module starts at $39 for the commercial version, $59 for the industrial version, and the development board, probably excluding the CPU module, sells for $99 and $119, respectively for the commercial and industrial versions. You can find more details on MYIR’s MYC-IMX28X module page.

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Atomwear is a Modularized, Open source, Wearable BLE Development Kit (Crowdfunding)

August 11th, 2014 No comments

Giayee is a company mainly manufacturing Android tablets, thin clients, and mini PCs, but their latest product, called Atomwear, is a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) development kit based on Nordic nRF51822 chipset that comes with various modules such as battery charger, accelerometer, gyroscope, OLED display, heart rate monitor, etc… which connect together via 24-pin connector on a standard rigid baseboard or a flexible printed circuit (FPC).

Atomwer_FPC

Various Atomwear Modules Connected to FPC

All modules are connected via the same 24-pin connector with power, I2C, SPI, UART, ADC, and GPIOs signals. The baseboard and FPC both contain 6 such connectors connected in parallel for up to 6 modules, and two baseboard can be connected together via a bridge circuit to accept more modules. The minimum configuration is with a BLE MCU module, and a power module.

The different boards and modules are listed as follows:

  • Atomwear-BASE – Baseboard – Dimensions: 10x70mm
  • Atomwear-MCU – BLE MCU board – Dimensions: 10x21mm. The brain of the system. It consists of Nordic nRF51822 BLE MCU, a button and two LEDs. The button is designed to switch working mode and two LEDs indicate working status. They can be defined by users.
  • Atomwear-BAT – Battery module.  Dimensions: 10x20mm.  This module provides power supply for Atomwear via a 40 mAh battery, and indicated the battery level to the MCU. If you need more capacity severral Atomwear-BAT modules can be used.
  • Atomwear-CHG – USB battery charge control module -  Dimensions – 10x13mm. Charge Atomwear via a Micro USB receptacle. There are two LEDs on this board (Green and Red) to indicate charging status.
  • Atomwear-BAC – 3-axis digital accelerometer and barometric pressure sensor -  Dimensions – 10x10mm. The two sensors are connected on the same I2C bus with different device addresses, and they provide acceleration, barometric pressure, temperature and altitude data.
  • Atomwear-MAG – Versatile 9DoF sensor module -  Dimensions – 10x10mm. This board contains a 3-axis gyro & 3-axis accelerometer (BMI055) and a 3-axis magnetometer (AK8963).
  • Atomwear-OLED -  OLED display module -  Dimensions: 14x14mm.  Low power OLED module with 64×32 resolution.
  • Atomwear-DBG – Debug port module.  Dimensions: 10X12mm. This module connects the SWD port and UART port from the 24-pin socket to 2.54mm pitch header.

Atomwear_Modules
The project will be fully open source, the first version of the firmware and software, top be used with Keil uVison4, is already available on github, and there should also be an Android (no iOS mentioned) demo app in Java to show how to use their API, but it’s not in github or I missed it. The company also promised to send all their hardware design files (schematic, board design) to their backers by email, and they encourage people to come up with their own modules.

Giayee has launched Atomwear Kickstarter campaign to raise $12,000 CAD or more to launch production. Pledges start at $45 CAD for the basic Atomwear kit with the MCU, debug, battery, MAG module, and baseboard. If you want a kit with the PFC and a rubber wristband, that is something you could actually wear, you’ll need to pledge $75 CAD which also includes the basic kit plus the OLED module. Shipping is free to Canada, and $15 CAD to anywhere else, with delivery scheduled for November 2014.

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Emtrion DIMM-AM335x SoM Supports Mainline Linux Kernel

June 30th, 2014 1 comment

When I cover system-on-modules (SoM), companies will usually provide some BSP (Board Support Packages) for older kernels, and did not submit their changes to mailine kernel, so I was interested in a news from Emtrion entitled “DIMM-AM335x: Linux mainline support ready“, which actually means they’ve done the work to support a recent Linux kernel (3.14) and provides instructions and code (device tree files), but did not submit patches to the linux-arm-kernel mailing list to get their changes added to kernel.org.

Emtrion_DIMM-AM335xLet’s look at the hardware specs first:

  • SoC – Texas Instruments Sitara AM335x ARM Cortex A8 processor @ 720Mhz to 1GHz (AM3354 or AM3359)
  • System Memory – onboard 512 MB SDRAM/optional 256 MB
  • Storage – 512 MB NAND Flash (managed) + 2 SD card interfaces
  • Display – LCDs I/F with resolution up to SVGA, with 4-wire touch interface
  • Audio – Analog Audio with SSI I/F
  • USB – USB 2.0 Host and Device
  • Connectivity – 100BaseTX Ethernet
  • Other I/Os:
    • 2x CAN
    • 4x serial interfaces
    • 4x analog inputs
    • 1x SPI, 1x I²C
    • 10x GPIOs
  • Misc – RTC (Battery buffered)
  • Temperature range – 0°C to 70°C (optional from – 40°C to 85°C)
  • Dimensions – 67,6 x 45 mm

The company provide four different baseboard for development. You can find more details about the hardware on Emtrion DIMM-AM335x page.

The company provides BSP and development kit for Linux 3.2.0 (via Yocto 1.5.1), and QNX 6.5, but you can also get BSPs for Windows Embedded Compact 7, Windows 2013, and Android 4.0 on request. To make there SoM “Linux mainline ready” they’ve provided a tarball file with documentation and files namely:

  • DIMM-AM335x-Mainline-Support-v001en.pdf – Documentation for Linux mainline support for DIMM-AM335x
  • am335x-dimm.dts – Device tree file with the SoM
  • am335x_mainline_defconfig – Kernel config
  • uboot_script – Uboot script

And apparently that’s all what’s needed to support a Sitara AM335x SoM in mainline kernel. They have tested it against Linux 3.14.y from kernel.org, but it should also work with the latest version. They also have added this to Yocto in the FTP (see PDF). I’m not sure why they’ve have gone the extra steps and submitted a patch to add their module to mainline.

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ADT-1 Google’s Android TV Developer’s Kit Details

June 30th, 2014 6 comments

Google announced Android TV a few days ago, and distributed ADT-1 hardware development kit to application developers during Google I/O. I could not find much details at the time, except it was powered by Nvidia Tegra processors. I’ve now noticed some developers have posted a few pictures and the device, Phandroid has posted the specifications, and I’ve found some interesting hardware limitations for Android TV decided by Google that kill some potential applications for the TV.

ADT-1_ANdroid_TV_Reference_DesignHere are known hardware specifications for ADT-1 devkit:

  • SoC – Nvidia Tegra 4
  • System Memory – 2GB RAM
  • Storage – 16GB flash
  • Video Output – HDMI
  • Connectivity – Ethernet, 2×2 MIMO dual-channel WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB – 1x USB host port, 1x micro (custom?) USB port for power and ADB (via an Y cable provided with the kit)
  • Dimensions – Small :)

Google_Android_TV_Accesories

This Android L Android TV box looks tiny and comes with G1 Gamepad as demonstrated during Google I/O, that is powered by 2x AA rechargeable batteries, and well as a power adapter, and cables.

More pictures and short videos can be found on Zach Pfeffer G+ account, as well as on Reddit where you may want to go through the comments section for specifics. If you were not at Google I/O, and are an application developer, you can still apply for ADT-1 devkit online. There’s also an “ADT-1 FAQ” that’s mostly interesting / useful for people who already own the kit.

As I look for more details, I also went to Android TV developer’s page, especially the hardware features section, where the following features are said to be disabled in Android TV:

Hardware Android feature descriptor
Camera android.hardware.camera
GPS android.hardware.location.gps
Microphone android.hardware.microphone
Near Field Communications (NFC) android.hardware.nfc
Telephony android.hardware.telephony
Touchscreen android.hardware.touchscreen

If you planned to use your Android TV Box and connect a USB webcam to use Skype or Google Hangout, or expected some Android L TV boxes with a built-in camera that can be placed on top of the TV, sorry, this won’t be possible because camera and microphone support are not available. The other features make sense, although for digital signage applications GPS, telephony, touchscreen, and NFC may also be useful, but I understand that’s not what Android TV is all about, and it’s focusing on the consumer market.

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