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Posts Tagged ‘gateway’

Amazon AWS Greengrass Brings Local Compute, Messaging, Data Caching & Sync to ARM & x86 Devices

June 8th, 2017 No comments

Amazon Web Services (AWS) provides cloud computing services to manage & store data from IoT Nodes over the Internet, but in some cases latency may be an issue, and Internet connectivity may not be reliable in all locations. AWS Greengrass provides a solution to those issues by running some of the IoT tasks within the local network in ARM or x86 edge gateways running Linux.

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You can still manage your devices from AWS cloud, but a Linux gateway running Greengrass Core runtime will be able to run AWS Lambda functions to perform tasks locally, keep device data in sync, and communicate with devices running AWS IoT Device SDK.

Greengrass benefits include:

  • Response to Local Events in Near Real-time
  • Offline operation – Connected devices can operate with intermittent connectivity to the cloud, and synchronizes with AWS IoT once it is restored
  • Secure Communication  – AWS Greengrass authenticates and encrypts device data at all points of connection.
  • Simplified Device Programming with AWS Lambda – Greengrass execute Lambda functions locally, reducing the complexity of developing embedded software.
  • Reduce the Cost of Running IoT Applications – You can program filter device data locally, and only transmit the data you need to the cloud. This reduces the amount of raw data transmitted to the cloud and lowers cost

Greengrass Core’s minimum requirements are a 1GHz Processor with at least 128 MB, so it will run on most x86 products, as well as some ARM boards and devices, with Amazon recommending the following to get started quickly:

Greengrass Core works with Linux distributions with Linux 4.4.11+ or greater including Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, Debian Jessie, etc.. Canonical will also provide snap to easily install it on Ubuntu operating systems. Dependencies include SQLite 3 or greater, Python 2.7 or greater, Glibc 2.14, boto3 (latest), botocore (latest), OpenSSL 1.0.2 or greater, libseccomp and bash. You’ll find more detailed requirements in the FAQ.

Amazon’s announcement today was about AWG GreeenGrass availability to all customers, but it has already been used successfully in the industry by customers such as Enel, the largest utility in Europe, Konecranes now having 15,000 connected cranes, Pentair plc for their aquaculture customers, and Rio Tinto mining group to improve management and safety of their truck fleet.

Greengrass is free to try for one year with up to 3 devices, and costs $0.16 per month or $1.49 per year per device for up to 10,000 devices. If you are going to manage more than 10,000 devices you’d have to contact Amazon for pricing options. You can find more info and get started on Amazon Greengrass page.

 

MediaTek MT7622 SoC with WiFi Network Accelerator Supports 4×4 802.11n WiFi & Bluetooth 5

June 1st, 2017 5 comments

MediaTek has launched a new ARM SoC for routers, home automation gateways, wireless audio and storage, with MT7622 equipped with a dual core ARM Cortex A53 processor, a dedicated network accelerator, 4×4 802.11n and Bluetooth 5 connectivity. Two models with be available: MT7622A with all features, and MT7622B with router features only, which probably mean no Bluetooth, and possibly less I/Os.

MediaTek MT7622 specifications:

  • Processor – Dual core ARM Cortex A53 @ up to 1.36 GHz
  • Storage – eMMC and SDXC interfaces; storage accelerator (SATA 3.0/eSATA Gen2)
  • Connectivity
    • 802.11b/g/n WiFi @ 2.4GHz, 4T4R antenna; 802.11ac can be added through MT7615 SoC
    • Bluetooth 5
    • Fast Ethernet Switch, RGMII and SGMII
  • Network Accelerator – APT+HQoS,  MediaTek Wi-Fi Warp Accelerator
  • Audio – Audio Amplifier, I2S, TDM, S/PDIF
  • USB – USB 2.0 host/device, USB 3.0 host
  • Other Peripheral Interfaces – PCIe Gen 2.0, ADC, GPIO, I2C, IR, PMIC I/F, PWM, SPI, UART
  • Misc – RTC

The specs on the product page are currently all over the place, with “Zigbee” also dropped somewhere in the text, but not in the specifications list, nor is Bluetooth 5. They also wrote Bluetooth 5.0 instead of Bluetooth 5, but it’s a minor issue. They however provide some more details about the WiFi Warp accelerator:

Firstly it connects the Gigabit+ class 802.11ac networking through to the Gigabit switch/WAN connection via multi-Gigabit internal pathways, ensuring no bottleneck. Secondly, its specialized design not only offloads the CPU from many-user throughput and QoS calculations, it does so at lower power. The result is the MediaTek Wi-Fi Warp Accelerator maintains a sustained high-performance when even supporting multiple, simultaneous heavy users.

Another good news is that MediaTek engineers have started to contribute MT7622 related code to mainline Linux.

Qualcomm Unveils Mesh Networking WiFi Router / Gateway Reference Design Powered by IPQ40x8/9 NSoC

May 30th, 2017 2 comments

Qualcomm has just announced the Qualcomm Mesh Networking Platform for OEM and broadband providers to design home WiFi routers/gateways capable of providing “robust and consistent connectivity”, and feature voice control capabilities, centralized management and security, and a range of mesh system features.

In order to speed up adoption the the platform, the company introduced the Qualcomm Mesh Networking Reference Design with the following key features & benefits:

  • Network System-on-Chip (NSoC) – Qualcomm IPQ40x8/9 network system-on-chip with four Cortex A7 cores, 802.11ac WiFi 2×2+2×2, network and crypto accelerators
  • Qualcomm Wi-Fi Self-Organizing (SON) feature suite will ensure corner-to-corner Wi-Fi coverage, easy set-up, automatic management and traffic optimization, as well as additional security safeguards.
  • Carrier-Grade features with Wi-Fi SON APIs, cloud-based diagnostics
  • Integrated voice capabilities thanks to built-in microphone array and speaker, voice recognition software, and APIs support for popular cloud-based assistant applications.
  • Variety of backhaul options to be used to maximize the performance of mesh networks (802.11ac, 802.11ad, 802.11ax, or Powerline technologies)
  • Qualcomm IoT Connectivity Feature Suite will ensure simultaneous use of Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, CSRmesh, and 802.15.4 connectivity

Qualcomm is – as usual – light on details, but at least that means your future WiFi routers will work better by using mesh technology for better coverage in your home, and may also be used as your IoT gateway, and Google Home/Amazon Echo replacement.

Via AnandTech

This $8 USB Transceiver Can Add 433 MHz Device Support to your Home Automation Gateway

May 23rd, 2017 5 comments

With the advent of WiFi and Bluetooth IoT, 433 MHz devices are becoming less popular but are still used for doorbells, motions sensors, windows/door sensors, etc… If you have such devices at home, one way to integrate those into your home automation system is to use an ESP8266 WiFi to 433 Mhz bridge between your gateway and 433 MHz capable products. However, you don’t even need the middleman if you use a USB 433 MHz transceiver connected directly to the gateway. Nathan Chantrell found such USB dongle on Banggood for about $8, and managed to make it work with his Debian Gateway using Node-RED.

433 MHz USB dongle and features:

  • Connectivity
    • 433 MHz transceiver
    • Range – up to 30 to 100 meters (Line of Sight)
    • Tx and Rx for PT2262, PT2260, PT2264, PT2240, EV1527, HS2303-PT codes
    • Can transmit multiple signals independently
  • Control interface – Serial over USB @ 9600 bps
  • Power Supply – 5V via USB port
  • Power Consumption – 15 mA @ 5V in standby mode; 35 mA @ 5V during Tx
  • Dimensions – 8.1 x 2.5cm (excluding antenna); antenna length: 3cm

There’s very little information about the stick on the web, and most information below is from Nathan who focused his work on PT2262 “very basic, low security encoding chip for RF or IR transmission” and found in ultra cheap Chinese security devices, older alarms, and garage door controllers. He found out the dongle has an 8-bit limitations instead of 12-bit for the original PT2262 chip, which limits the total number of codes to 6,561.

He also opened it up to find a CH340 USB-TTL chip, an internal black wire coil. The PCB label is YS-UTR2 for reference. A search for the latter does not bring anything interesting, except a 315 MHz version is also sold on Taobao.

You can send and receiver hex code over serial using a 9600 8N1 connection. Nathan described the receive and transmit bitstream in this blog post, and tested with various devices including Energenie ENER002 plug in sockets  / ENER010 power strip, VStarcam AF117 magnetic door/window contacts with a button, some PIR movement sensors, Semic CS5211DGO smoke alarm, and more. Most device based on the PT chips mentioned in the specifications should work.

He added support in Node-RED with a serial in and out as follows:

The input node will then give me a payload of [ 253, 81, 53, 213, 112, 223 ] which is a decimal representation of our orginal hex fd 51 35 d5 70 df (confused yet?). I just use a function node to concatenate the two parts of the address with the data (all in decimal) eg. 8153213 and use that as the unique code to identify the device.

For transmission just create a buffer with the hex required and send it to the serial out node.

Top Programming Languages & Operating Systems for the Internet of Things

May 19th, 2017 3 comments

The Eclipse foundation has recently done its IoT Developer Survey answered by 713 developers, where they asked  IoT programming languages, cloud platforms, IoT operating systems, messaging protocols (MQTT, HTTP), IoT hardware architectures and more.  The results have now been published. So let’s have a look at some of the slides, especially with regards to programming languages and operating systems bearing in mind that IoT is a general terms that may apply to sensors, gateways and the cloud, so the survey correctly separated languages for different segments of the IoT ecosystem.

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C and C++ are still the preferred languages for constrained devices, and developers are normally using more than one language as the total is well over 100%.

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IoT gateways are more powerful and resourceful (memory/storage) hardware, so it’s no surprise higher level languages like Java and Python join C and C++, with Java being the most used language with 40.8% of respondents.

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When it comes to the cloud with virtually unlimited resources, and no need to interface with hardware in most cases, higher level languages like Java, JavaScript, Node.js, and Python take the lead.

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When it comes to operating systems in constrained IoT devices, Linux takes the lead with 44.1%, in front of bare metal (27.6%) and FreeRTOS (15.0 %). Windows is also there in fourth place probably with a mix of Windows IoT core, Windows Embedded, and WinCE.

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Linux is the king of IoT gateways with 66.9% of respondent using it far ahead of Windows in second place with 20.5%. They have no chart for the cloud, probably because users just don’t run their own Cloud servers, but relies on providers. They did ask specifically about the Linux distributions used for IoT projects, and the results are a bit surprising with Raspbian taking the lead with 45.5%, with Ubuntu Core following closely at 44.4%.

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Maybe Raspbian has been used during the prototyping phase or for evaluation, as most developers (84%) have been using cheap development boards like Arduino, BeagleBone or Raspberry Pi. 20% also claim to have deployed such boards in IoT solutions.

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That’s only a few slides of the survey results, and you’ll find more details about Intel/ARM hardware share, messaging & industrial protocols, cloud solutions, wireless connectivity, and more in the slides below.

Via Ubuntu Insights

MatchX LoRaWAN Solution Supports up to 65,535 Sensor Nodes per Gateway

April 14th, 2017 4 comments

MatchX is a startup with offices in Chicago, Shenzhen, and Berlin, that provides a complete LoRaWAN solution with their MatchBox gateway based on SX1301 concentrator and Mediatek MT7628N processor, as well as MatchStick, MatchModule, and MatchCore sensors with up to 65,535 of those connecting to a single  gateway.

MatchBox LoRaWAN/WiFi/GPRS/GPS Gateway

Outdoor and Indoor Enclosures for MatchBox – Click to Enlarge

MatchBox specifications:

  • Processor – Mediatek MT7628AN MIPS WiSoC @ up to 580 MHz
  • System Memory – 128MB DDR2 RAM
  • Storage – 16MB FLASH
  • Connectivity
    • LoRa – Semtech SX1301 + 2x SX1257@+27dbm  Output Power; 470/868/915Mhz frequency range, -146dBm sensitivity
    • 10/100M Ethernet
    • 802.11n 2×2 WiFi @ 300 MHz
    • Optional GPRS via SIM800H, 85.6 kbps (downlink/uplink) + micro SIM card slot
    • GPS via UBlox Max 7C
    • Antennas – 2x u.FL antennas for WiFi, u.FL or chip antenna for LoRa, GPS and GPRS modules
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 port, 1x USB type C exposing 4 or 6 GPIOs and UART
  • Misc – RGB LED, 8x GPIO, on/off switch, reset button
  • Power Supply – Passive 24V POE, or  5V/2A via USB-C port
  • Power Consumption – 5W on average, 10W max.
  • Dimensions – 140 x 78 x 30mm
  • Temperature Range – -20°C to 85°C
  • Certification: CE, FCC, LoraWAN

The gateway runs OpenWrt or LEDE operating system. The company can receive packets from nodes up to 20km away in ideal conditions (line of sight, good weather…), and the company claims 4 gateways can cover Berlin’s RingBahn, and 17 gateways cover Silicon Valley Area, of course provided there’s not a very large number of nodes, exceeding the capacity of the gateways.

MatchStick & MatchCore LoRa Sensor Nodes

MatchStick

The company has two main products to connect sensors to the gateway with MatchStick and MatchCore sharing most of the same specifications, except the MatchStick is larger, supports many more sensors, and offers longer battery life:

  • MCU – Dialog SmartBond DA14680 ARM Cortex M0 micro-controller with 18 Mbit flash, 64 kB OTP memory, 128 kB Data SRAM, 128 kB ROM, and BLE 4.2 support
  • Connectivity
    • LoRa – Semtech SX1276 @+20dbm output power; 470/868/915Mhz; -146dBm Sensitivity; LoraWAN V1.0.2, Class A/B/C; on-board antenna
    • Bluetooth 4.2 LE @ +3dBm with on-board antenna
    • SIMCOM SM28L GPS module (MatchStick only)
  • Sensors
    • Inertial Sensor – Accelerometer, Magnetometer and Gyroscope
    • MatchStick only, selection of:
      • Air Sensor – CO, CO2, Methane
      • Fire Sensor – Smoke, and IR fire detection
      • Flood Sensor – Water leak detection
      • Movement Sensor – Human movement detection
      • Light Sensor – Gesture, color and ambient light detection
      • Agricultural Sensor – Soil moisture detection
      • Electricity Sensor – Relay control or power consumption
  • USB – 1x USB interface with 6 flexible GPIOs, SWD, Reset and power
  • Misc – RGB LED, reset & user buttons
  • Power Supply – 5V/1A via USB-C connector for charging the battery
  • Battery
    • MatchStick – Panasonic 18650 @ 3000mAh good for up to 10 years on a charge
    • MatchBox – CR2032 battery (300 mAh) good for up to 3 years on a charge
  • Power Consumption
    • Sleep Power – 30-50 uA
    • BLE Power – TX: 3.4 mA, RX: 3.7mA
    • LoRa Power – TX: 120mA @ 20dBm, RX: 9.9mA
  • Dimensions
    • MatchStick – 147 x 32 x 32 mm
    • MatchCore – 52 x 34 x 18 mm
  • Temperature Range – -20°C to 85°C
  • Certification: CE, FCC, LoraWAN

MatchCore

Both models can be programmed using Dialog DA1468X SDK, a community has been setup, as well as a developer’s blog, but so far I’ve been pretty quite, as the company works on completing development. There’s very little info about MatchModule , which will be a 25x25mm LoRa module that can be integrated into your own project. The only info I’ve got about is in the table below.

The MatchBox gateway should sell for around $299, while MatchStick and MatchCore should go for $28 and $16 respectively, I assume in their minimal configuration, as final price will depend on the choice of sensors.

You may be able to find some more details on Matchx.io website.

FalconGate Open Source Anti-Hackers Smart Gateway Runs on Raspberry Pi, Banana Pi, and other ARM Debian Boards

March 29th, 2017 8 comments

Everyday we can read stories about password database hacking, malware, ransomware, and so on, and companies can try to protect themselves by paying professionals that do a more or less good jobs, but individuals can’t afford professional service, so it is harder to protect oneself. One solution is to educate yourself as much as possible, but everybody has the time and/or skills to do it, so developers have worked on  FalconGate open source smart gateway that’s supposed to protect home devices against hackers, and alerts the user in case of intrusions on your home network, or devices misbehaving.

FalconGate is said to be able to:

  • Block several types of Malware based on open source blacklists
  • Block Malware using the Tor network
  • Detect and report potential Malware DNS requests based on VirusTotal reports
  • Detect and report the presence of Malware executables and other components based on VirusTotal reports
  • Detect and report Domain Generation Algorithm (DGA) Malware patterns
  • Detect and report on Malware spamming activity
  • Detect and report on internal and outbound port scans
  • Report details of all new devices connected to your network
  • Block ads based on open source lists
  • Monitor a custom list of personal or family accounts used in online services for public reports of hacking

The software relies on dependencies such as Bro IDS, Python 2.7, Nginx,Dnsmasq,Exim, and PHP, as well as Have I been pwned API, and as been tested with Debian Jessie Lite on Raspberry Pi 2/3 and Banana Pi M2+ boards, with the Raspberry Pi boards limited to 10/100M Ethernet, potentially a bottlenck if you have a fast Internet connection, but FalconGate should also be supported on other (ARM based) boards running Debian or Ubuntu.

The easiest way to install it to get the SD card image for the tested boards. For other boards, you can try a manual installation:

This will take a while depending on your platform and storage device. Your FalconGate powered board will also become your new DHCP server, so you’ll need to disable DHCP in your router. Reboot both, and login to the web interface to configure the email address(es) to be used as recipients for alerts and optionally your VirusTotal API key. Finally, remember to change the default root password, and re-generate the SSH keys.

Via n0where

Dell Edge Gateway 3000 Series Are Powered by Intel Bay Trail-I SoCs for Automation, Transportation, and Digital Signage

March 17th, 2017 No comments

Dell has recently introduced Edge Gateway 3000 series with three models powered by Intel Bay Trail-I processor, running Ubuntu Core 16 or Windows 10 IoT, with each model targeting respectively general-purpose automation, transportation & logistics, and digital signage and retail.

The specifications for the three models can be found in the table below.

Dell Edge Gateway 3001
Model for General-Purpose Automation
Dell Edge Gateway 3002
Model for Transportation & Logistics
Dell Edge Gateway 3003
Model for Media & Retail Kiosks
SoC Intel Atom E3805 dual core processor  @ 1.33 GHz (3W TDP) Intel Atom E3815 single core processor @ 1.46 GHz with GPU @ 400 MHz (5W TDP)
System Memory 2 GB DDR3L-1066
Storage 8 or 32 GB eMMC flash
Industrial-grade Micro-SD card: 8GB / 16GB / 32 GB / 64 GB
Connectivity 1 x 10/100 Fast Ethernet (RJ-45)
with PoE (15.4W)
WiFi 802.11 b/g/n
Bluetooth 4.0 LE
Optional ZigBee module.
2x 10/100 Fast Ethernet (RJ-45), main port supports PoE (15.4W)
WiFi 802.11 b/g/n
Bluetooth 4.0 LE
Integrated Zigbee/802.15.4 module for mesh
networking.
2 x 10/100 Fast Ethernet (RJ-45).
Main port supports PoE (15.4W)
WiFi 802.11 b/g/n
Bluetooth 4.0 LE
Optional ZigBee module
Cellular Connectivity 3G or 4G LTE for select countries, US/Canada 4G LTE with AT&T or Verizon
Video & Audio DisplayPort 1.1 up to 2560×[email protected]
3.5mm Line Out/Line
In; RealTek codec
Serial Interfaces 2x RS-232/422/485.
GPIOs 8x channel, independently
programmable, DAC, ADC.
CAN Bus CAN2.0 A/B/FD 1Mbps (CAN2.0), 5Mbps (CAN-FD)
USB 1x USB 2.0, 1x USB 3.0
GNSS Integrated GPS
Sensors Accelerometer, Pressure, Temperature and Humidity
Power Supply 12V-57V wide DC input;
PoE compliant with IEEE 802.3.af standard up to 15.4 W, 48 V over existing Ethernet infrastructure, no
modifications required.
Dimensions 125 mm x 125 mm x 51 mm
Weight Around 1.1 kg

While all three models can run Ubuntu Core 16 and Windows 10 IoT Enterprise LTSB 2016, the latter requires a 32GB eMMC flash. Each gateway also comes with a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 2.0, secure boot, BIOS password and I/O port disablement, and a fleet of gateway can be managed via Dell Edge Device Manager (EDM) cloud-based manageability suite (sold separately).

Gateway 30001 used for Mining Operations – Click to Enlarge

The gateway can be used for all sort of applications from mining management systems as shown above, to 18-wheelers, and revenue generating city fountains.

Dell Edge Gateway 3000 series will start selling this May for $399 and up. More details can be found on Dell website.