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Posts Tagged ‘intel’

Intel Quark S1000 “Sue Creek” Processor to Support On-Chip Speech Recognition

June 19th, 2017 3 comments

Intel may have announced plans to discontinue several of their IoT boards, but based on some documents I received, the company has not given up on the Quark family, although they may have given up on the Intel architecture for low power microprocessor, as Intel Quark S1000 – codenamed “Sue Creek” – will feature two Tensilica LX6 cores (yes, just like ESP32), and is designed to handle speech recognition at the edge (e.g. locally), so some of your voice commands should still work when Internet is down.

Intel Quark S1000 key features and specifications:

  • Digital Signal Processors
    • Dual Tensilica LX6 cores @ 400 MHz with HiFi3 DSP
    • Single precision scalar floating-point instructions
    • 16KB 4-way I$; 48KB 4-way D$
    • Up to 2400 DMIPS, 3.2 GMACS (16×16), 800 MFLOPS of Compute
  • Speech Accelerators
    • A GMM (Gaussian Mixture Model) and neural network accelerator
    • Low power keyboard and limited vocabulary recognition
    • Up to 9.6 GMACS (16×16) of compute
  • Internal Memory
    • 4MB shared embedded SRAM
    • 64KB embedded SRAM for streaming samples in low power mode
  • External Memory Interfaces
    • Up to 8MB external 16-bit PSRAM
    • Up to 128MB external SPI flash
  •  I/O Interfaces
    • Host I/O – SPI for command and control, I2S for streaming audio, IRQ, reset, wake, optional USB 2.0 HS device
    • Microphone – I2S/TDM 9.6 MHz max. bit clock
    • Digital Microphone – 4 PDM ports 4.8 MHz max. bit clock
    • Speaker – I2S/TDM 9.6 MHz max. bit clock
    • Instrumentation – I2C master @ 100/400 MHz
    • Debug – UART Tx/Rx/RTS?CTS up to 2.4 Mbaud/s
    • GPIO – 10 mA sink/source, 8x PWM outputs
  • Power Management / Consumption
    • Low power idle (memory retention); voice activity detection; play through; full active
    • Clock and power gating support
    • < 20 mW voice activity detection
    • < 250 mW full active
  • Package (preliminary) – FCCSP132 7.45 x 8.3mm 0.6/0.7mm pitch staggered/orthogonal
  • Temperature Range – Commercial: 0 to 70 °C; industrial: -40 to +85 °C

The diagram above shows Quark S100 is supposed to be connected to a host processor providing network connectivity, getting commands over SPI, audio over I2S, and the Intel processor can handle some speech recognition likely for a limited subset of words, and use cloud based recognition for more complex requests. The solution could be used in product like Google Home or Amazon Echo look-a-likes, or other voice-controlled appliances.

I don’t know when the processor will be available, and I could not find any information online yet.

Intel Issues End-of-Life Notices for Galileo / Galileo 2, Edison and Joule Boards & Modules

June 19th, 2017 11 comments

While I’m not sure many of my readers are using them, Intel introduced several IoT development kits and modules over the years, with products like Intel Galileo, followed by Galileo 2, Edison module development board all based on Quark processors, and more recently Intel Joule modules powered by Intel Atom T550x / T570x processors.

The three boards / modules and corresponding modules will soon be no more, as Intel issues three end-of-life (EOL) notices for:

  • Intel Galileo Board, and Intel Galileo Gen2 Board Products – PDF
  • Select Intel Edison Compute Module, Intel Edison Breakout Board, Intel Edison Kit for Arduino, and Intel Edison Breakout Board Kit Products – PDF
  • Intel Joule 570x Compute Module, Intel Joule 550x Compute Module, Intel Joule 570x Developer Kit and, Intel Joule 550x Developer Kit Products – PDF

All three follow the same “forecasted key milestones”:

  • June 16, 2017 – Product Discontinuance Program Support Begins
  • July 16, 2017 – Product Discontinuance Demand To Local Intel Representative
  • September 16, 2017 – Last Product Discontinuance Order Date
  • September 16, 2017 – Orders are Non-Cancelable and Non-Returnable After
  • December 16, 2017 – Last Product Discontinuance Shipment Date

EOL notices are normal, and potentially understandable for Galileo and Edison products announced in 2013 and 2014, but Intel Joule modules were just announced last August, so they may not have been used any products considering development time, and I can’t even find Atom T5500/550X or T5700/570x on Intel Ark website. So it does not look good for Intel’s IoT initiatives. Note that some Edison modules will be sold in 2018, so not all SKUs are discontinued.

Via Hardware.info. Thanks to Sander for the tip.

Intel DLIA is a PCIe Card Powered by Aria 10 FPGA for Deep Learning Applications

May 29th, 2017 No comments

Intel has just launched their DLIA (Deep Learning Inference Accelerator) PCIe card powered by Intel Aria 10 FPGA, aiming at accelerating CNN (convolutional neural network) workloads such as image recognition and more, and lowering power consumption.

Some of Intel DLIA hardware specifications:

  • FPGA – Intel (previously Altera) Aria 10 FPGA @ 275 MHz delivering up to 1.5 TFLOPS
  • System Memory – 2 banks 4G 64-bit DDR4
  • PCIe – Gen3 x16 host interface; x8 electrical; x16 power & mechanical
  • Form Factor – Full-length, full-height, single wide PCIe card
  • Operating Temperature – 0 to 85 °C
  • TDP – 50-75Watts hence the two cooling fans

The card is supported in CentOS 7.2, and relies on Intel Caffe framework, Math Kernel library for Deep Neural Networks (MKL-DNN), and works with various network topologies (AlexNet, GoogleNet, CaffeNet, LeNet, VGG-16, SqueezeNet…). The FPGA is pre-programmed with Intel Deep Learning Accelerator IP (DLA IP).

Intel DLIA can be used by cloud services providers to filter content, track product photos, for surveillance and security applications for example for face recognition and license plate detection, in the factory to detect defects automatically, and in retail stores to track foot traffic, and monitor inventory.

You’ll find more details including links to get started and the SDK in the product page.

Intel Compute Card Apollo Lake and Kaby Lake SKUs, Block Diagrams, and Specifications

May 29th, 2017 2 comments

Intel Compute cards are the latest ultra-thin CPU cards introduced by Intel at the beginning of the year, with a concept similar to EOMA68 CPU cards, that it to allow  CPU card upgrades or replacements, and interoperability across compatible devices such as smart kiosks, IoT gateways, and so on. But at the time, Intel did not reveal that many details about the different cards, although we know NexDock is working on laptop dock compatible with Intel Compute Cards. But I’ve recently received some block diagrams for Apollo Lake Pentium/Celeron, and Kaby Lake Core M/Core i5 compute cards.There will two SKUs for Apollo Lake compute cards sharing the same specifications, except for the processor:

  • SoC
    • CD1C64GK SKU – Intel Celeron N3450 quad core processor @ 1.1 / 2.2 GHz (base/turbo) with 12EU Intel HD Graphics Gen9; 7.5W TDP
    • CD1P64GK SKU – Intel Pentium N4200 quad core processor @ 1.1 / 2.5 GHz with 18 EU Intel Gen9 HD graphics; 6W TDP
  • System Memory – 4GB dual channel LPDDR3-1866
  • Storage – 64 eMMC flash, SPI flash for BIOS
  • Connectivity – Intel Wireless-AC 7265 (2×2 802.11ac & Bluetooth 4.2)
  • Compute Card connector:
    • USB type C part with  USB 3.x, USB CC (Configuration Channel), DisplayPort 1.2 and USB 2.0 signals
    • Extended part with USB 2.0, DisplayPort 1.2, USB 3.x, 2x multiplexed SATA & PCIe x1 interfaces
  • Others – PMIC, Embedded Controller, and Crypto Element Device

There will also be two more powerful and expensive Kabe Lake compute card with the following specifications:

  • SoC
    • CD1M3128MK SKU – Intel Core m3-7Y30 dual core / quad thread processor @ 1.0 / 2.6 GHz (base/turbo) with Intel HD Graphics 615; 4.5W TDP
    • CD1IV128MK SKU – Intel Core i5-7Y57 dual core / quad thread processor @ 1.2 / 3.3 GHz with Intel HD Graphics 615; 4.5W TDP; Support Intel vPro
  • System Memory – 4GB dual channel LPDDR3-1866
  • Storage – 128GB PCIe SSD, SPI flash for BIOS
  • Connectivity – Intel Wireless-AC 8265 (2×2 802.11ac & Bluetooth 4.2)
  • Compute Card connector:
    • USB type C part with  USB 3.x, USB CC (Configuration Channel), DisplayPort 1.2 and USB 2.0 signals
    • Extended part with USB 2.0, DisplayPort 1.2, USB 3.x,  1x multiplex Gigabit Ethernet / PCIe x1, and 1x PCIe x1
  • Others – Voltage regulators (VRs), Embedded Controller, and Crypto Element Device; CD1IV128MK only: TPM

I was not aware of any Core i5 processors with such a low TDP, which can also be tuned up to 7W, and down to just 3.5W. The processor was just launched in January, a few devices are equipped with the processor, but I still managed to find Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet 20JB ( $1,450), as well as some benchmarks for reference.

Intel To Make Thunderbolt 3 Royalty-free, Release Specifications

May 25th, 2017 10 comments

Intel Thunderbolt 3 is a single port connect that supports multiple standards (Thunderbolt, USB 3.1, DisplayPort, PCIe), leverages USB-C connector, and offers up to 40 Gbps throughput. So far, it’s mostly found in higher end computers and laptops, but Intel has now announced plans to make it royalty-free, and “release the  specifications to the industry” (so maybe not completely free/public) in order to increase adoption of the standard.

Thunderbolt-3 main features:

  • Thunderbolt, USB, DisplayPort, and power on USB-C
  • USB-C connector and cables (small, reversible)
  • 40 Gbps Thunderbolt 3 – double the speed of Thunderbolt 2
    • Bi-directional, dual-protocol (PCI Express and DisplayPort)
    • 4 lanes of PCI Express Gen 3
    • 8 lanes of DisplayPort 1.2 (HBR2 and MST)
      • Supports two 4K displays (4096 x 2160 30bpp @ 60 Hz)
  • USB 3.1 (10 Gbps) – compatible with existing USB devices and cables
  • DisplayPort 1.2 – compatible with existing DisplayPort displays, devices, and cables
    • Connect DVI, HDMI, and VGA displays via adapters
  • Power (based on USB power delivery)
    • Up to 100W system charging
    • 15W to bus-powered devices
  • Thunderbolt Networking
    • 10Gb Ethernet connection between computers
    • Daisy chaining (up to six devices)
    • Lowest latency for PCI Express audio recording

That means eventually we may get devices with a single Thunderbolt/USB-C like smartphones to connect all peripherals including 4K displays,  NVMe SSDs, Ethernet, external GPU, etc.., and power/charge the device though a Thunderbolt 3 dock, which can be purchased for $200 and up. One example is StarTech.com Thunderbolt 3 Docking Station with 4K display, Ethernet, Audio and USB ports going for $199.99 on Amazon US.

Intel also announced plans to integrate Thunderbolt 3 into future Intel CPUs.

Categories: Hardware Tags: displayport, intel, thunderbolt, usb

ARM Chromebooks Run Android Apps Better, Exhibit Longer Battery Life than Intel Chromebooks (Study)

May 24th, 2017 4 comments

Google has been working on supporting Android apps and the Play Store on Chromebooks, which are normally sold with either ARM or Intel processors. So the ability to run Android apps well is one of the things to consider before purchasing a Chromebook. Shrout Research has published a paper entitled “Chromebook Platform Choice Important for Android App Performance” comparing an Acer Chromebook R13 with a Mediatek MT8173C ARM Cortex A72/A53 processor to Acer Chromebook R11 with an Intel Celeron N3060.

Click to Enlarge

The Intel Chromebook has a smaller resolution so this could be an advantage, so less resources are needed to update the display. However, the ARM processor is significantly more powerful than the Intel one according to GeekBench results, and Chromebook R13 is sold for $399 on Amazon US, while Chromebook R11 goes for $299 (and lower during promotions). So it’s not a perfect comparison, but it should give an idea especially when it comes to app stability.

Click to Enlarge

The ARM Chromebook can run Android apps “well” (only minor issues) and “very well”, while the Intel Chromebook also did a good job for entertainment and productivity apps, but performed unreliably, and in some cases very poorly with some social media apps, and games. Since most mobile phones are based on ARM, developers spent more time optimization code for the platform. Some performance issues may also be partially due to different CPU and GPU performance, but the study did not address this at all, except when saying R11 screen resolution was lower.

Click to Enlarge

The research company also ran “education simulation” in both Chromebooks, not using Android apps, but instead various website and apps in the web browser such as Edmodo, Google Docs, Solar Explorer, etc… and found out the Intel chromebooks was depleting the battery faster with the ARM Chromebook uses 11.5% less power.

One last point shown in the disclaimer at the end of the paper:

This paper was commissioned by ARM Holdings. All testing, evaluation and analysis was performed in-house by Shrout Research and its contractors. Shrout Research provides consulting and research services for many companies in the technology field, other of which are mentioned in this work

Via Brent Sullivan on G+

$399 Intel Euclid Robotics Devkit Runs Ubuntu & ROS on Intel Atom x7-Z8700 Processor

May 22nd, 2017 No comments

We’ve seen many mini PC based on Intel Atom x5/x7 “Cherry Trail” processor in the last year, but Intel has also integrated their low power processor into hardware aimed at robotics, such as Intel RealSense development kit based on Atom x5 UP Board and RealSense R200 depth camera. The company has now launched its one-in-all Intel Euclid development kit combining Atom X7-Z8700 processor with a RealSense camera in a single enclosure.

Click to Enlarge

Intel Euclid specifications:

  • SoC – Intel Atom x7-Z8700 Cherry Trail quad core processor @ up to 2.4GHz with Intel HD Graphics Gen 8
  • System Memory – 4GB LPDDR3-1600
  • Storage – 32GB eMMC 5.0 flash, Micro SD slot up to 128GB
  • Video Output – micro HDMI port up to 4K @ 30 Hz
  • Audio – 2x I2S interfaces, 1W mono speaker, 3x DMIC with noise cancellation
  • Camera – Intel RealSense ZR300 camera
    • RGB camera – 2MP up to [email protected], 16:9 aspect ratio, rolling shutter, fixed focus, 75° x 41.5° x 68° FOV
    • Stereo imagers – 2x [email protected], global shutter, fixed focus, 70° x 46° x 59° FOV
    • Depth output – up to 628 × 468 @ 60fps, 16-bit format; Minimal depth distance: 0.6 M (628 x 468) or 0.5 M (480 x 360); active IR stereo technology
    • Tracking module
      • Fisheye camera resolution: VGA @ 60fps,  FOV: 166° × 100° × 133° FOV,
      • IMU: 3-axis accelerometer & 3-axis gryroscope with 50 μsec time stamp accuracy
  • Connectivity – Dual band 802.11 a/b/g/n 1×1 WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0, GPS (GNS, GLONASS, Beidou, Galileo, QZSS, WAAS, EGNOS)
  • Sensors – Integrated Sensor Hub (ISH), accelerometer, digital compass, gyroscope, ambient light, proximity, thermal, environmental (barometer, altimeter, humidity, temperature)
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 port, 1x micro USB OTG port with power, 1x micro USB 2.0 port for UART / serial console
  • Misc – ¼” standard tripod mounting hole; power and charging LEDs;
  • Battery – 2000 mAh @ 3.8V
  • Power Supply – 5V/3A via battery terminals
  • Temperature Range — up to 35°C (still air)

The kit runs Ubuntu 16.04 with Robotic Operating System (ROS) Kinetic Kame, and custom software layer to allow developers to control the device using a web interface. It also supports remote desktop application, and includes evaluation versions of Intel SLAM and Person Tracking Middleware.

Euclid Camera Output: Color Stream, Depth Stream, and Fisheye Stream – Click to Enlarge

Intel RealSense SLAM Library middleware enables applications in robots and drones to understand their location and surroundings more accurately than GPS allows in GPS denied environments and inside yet unmapped spaces. You’ll find documentation about SLAM, person tracking middleware, the camera API,  RealSense SDK framework, Euclid user guide and more in Intel Euclid product page. You’ll be able to get support in RealSense forums and Euclid developer kit community, where you’ll find tutorials and example projects.

Intel Euclid Development Kit can be pre-order for $399.00 on the product page with shipping starting on May 31, 2017.

Via LinuxGizmos

Embedded Systems Conference 2017 Schedule – May 3-4

April 5th, 2017 No comments

The Embedded Systems Conference 2017 will take place over two days in Boston, US on May 3-4, and the organizers have published the schedule of the event. Even if you’re not going to attend, you’ll often learn something or find new information by just checking out the talks and abstracts, so I’ve created my own virtual schedule with some of the most interesting sessions.

Wednesday, May 3rd

  • 08:00 – 08:45 – Combining OpenCV and High Level Synthesis to Accelerate your FPGA / SoC EV Application by Adam Taylor, Adiuvo Engineering & Training Ltd

This session will demonstrate how you can combine commonly used Open source frameworks such as OpenCV with High Level Synthesis to generate a embedded vision system using FPGA / SoC. The combination of OpenCV and HLS allows for a much faster algorithm development time and consequently a faster time to market for the end application.

  • 09:00 – 09:45 – Understanding the ARM Processor Roadmap by Bob Boys,   Product Manager, ARM

In 2008, the ARM processor ranged from the 32-bit ARM7 to the Cortex-A9. There were only three Cortex-M processors. Today the roadmap has extended up to the huge 64-bit Cortex-A72, down to the tiny Cortex-M0 and out to include in the winter 2016, the new Trustzone for ARMv8-M.

The ARM roadmap, in order to effectively service many markets, has grown rather complicated. This presentation will explain the ARM roadmap and offer insights into its features. Questions answered include where processors should be used and sometimes where it makes more sense to use a different processor as well as different instruction and core feature sets.

This will start at ARM 7 TDMI and how and why ARM turned into the Cortex family. Each of the three components: Application (Cortex-A), Real-Time (Cortex-R) and Microcontroller (Cortex-M) will be explained in turn.

  • 10:00 – 10:45 – Mixed Signal Analysis: digital, analog and RF by Mike Borsch,  Application Engineer, Rohde & Schwarz

Embedded systems increasingly employ both digital, analog and RF signals. Debugging and analyzing these systems can be challenging in that one needs to measure a number of different signals in one or more domains simultaneously and with tight time synchronization. This session will discuss how a digital oscilloscope can be used to effectively debug these systems, and some of the instrumentation challenges that go along with this.

  • 11:00 – 11:45 – Panel Discussion: The Extinction of the Human Worker? – The Future Role of Collaborative Robots in Smart Manufacturing
  • 12:00 – 12:45 – How Will MedTech Fare in our New Public Policy Environment by Scott Whittaker, President & Chief Executive Officer, Advanced Medical Technology Association (AdvaMed)
  • 13:00 – 13:45 – Embedded Systems Safety & Security: Dangerous Flaws in Safety-Critical Device Design by Michael Barr, Co-founder and CTO, Barr Group

When safety-critical devices come online, it is imperative that the devices are not only safe but also secure. Considering the many security concerns that exist in the IoT landscape, attacks on connected safety-critical devices are to be expected and the results could be deadly. By failing to design security into dangerous devices, too many engineers are placing life and limb at risk. Join us for a look at related industry trends and a discussion of how we can work together to put future embedded systems on a more secure path.

  • 14:00 – 14:45 – Intel EPID: An IoT ID Standard for Device Authentication & Privacy by Jennifer Gilburg, Director IoT Identity, Intel Platform Security Division

Approved as a TCG & ISO direct anonymous attestation method and open sourced by Intel—EPID (Enhanced Privacy ID) is a proven solution that has been shipped in over 2.5 billion processors since 2008. EPID authenticates platform identity through remote attestation using asymmetric cryptography with security operations protected in the processors isolated trusted execution environment. With EPID, a single public key can have multiple private keys (typically millions). Verifiers authenticate the device as an anonymous member of the larger group, which protects the privacy of the user and prevents attack maps that can be created from traditional PKI authentication. Learn how to utilize or embed EPID in a device and discover the wide range of use cases EPID enables for IoT including 0 touch secure onboarding to IoT control platforms.

  • 15:00 – 15:45 – Building A Brain With Raspberry Pi and Zulu Embedded JVM by Simon Ritter, Deputy CTO, Azul Systems

Machine and deep learning are very hot topics in the world of IT at the moment with many projects focusing on analyzing big data to make ‘intelligent’ decisions.

In this session, we’ll use a cluster of Raspberry Pis running Azul’s Zulu embedded JVM to build our very own brain. This will use a variety of programming techniques and open source libraries to emulate a brain in learning and adapting to data that is provided to it to solve problems. Since the Raspberry Pi makes connecting sensors straightforward we’ll include some of these to provide external stimulus to our artificial brain.

We’ll conclude with a demonstration of our brain in action learning and adapting to a variety of input data.

  • 16:00 – 16:45 – Vulnerabilities in IoT: Insecure Design Patterns and Steps to Improving Device Security by M. Carlton, VP of Research, Senrio

This talk will explore vulnerabilities resulting from insecure design patterns in internet-connected embedded devices using real-world examples. In the course of our research, we have observed a pattern of vendors incorporating remote configuration services, neglecting tamper proofing, and rampantly re-using code. We will explore how these design flaws resulted in vulnerabilities in a remote power supply, a web camera, and a router. This talk is intended for a wide audience, as these insecure design patterns exist across industries and market segments. Attendees will get an inside view into how attackers operate and walk away with an understanding of what must be done to improve the security of embedded devices.

Thursday, May 4th

  • 08:00 – 08:45 – Heterogeneous Software Architecture with OpenAMP by Shaun Purvis, Embedded Systems Specialist, Hardent

Single, high-performance embedded processors are often not adequate to meet today’s system-on-chip (SoC) demands for sustained high-performance and efficiency. As a result, chips increasingly feature multiple processor types to deliver flexible compute power, real-time features and energy conservation requirements. These so called heterogeneous multiprocessor devices yield an extremely robust SoC, but also require a more complex software architecture capable of orchestrating multiple dissimilar processors.

This technical session introduces the OpenAMP software framework designed to facilitate asynchronous multiprocessing (AMP) in a vendor agnostic manner. OpenAMP can be leveraged to run different software platforms concurrently, such as Linux and an RTOS, on different processors within the same SoC whether homogeneous (multi-core), or heterogeneous (multi-processor), or a combination of both.

  • 09:00 – 09:45 – How to Build Products Using Open Platform Firmware by Brian Richardson,  Technical Evangelist, Intel Corporation

Open hardware platforms are great reference designs, but they’re often not considered “product ready” due to debug features built into the firmware… but a few firmware changes can turn an open hardware board into a production-quality platform.

This session demonstrates how to optimize firmware for product delivery, using the MinnowBoard Max as a practical example, by disabling debug interfaces and optimizing the platform for an embedded software payload. Examples are also given for enabling signed firmware updates and secure firmware recovery, based on industry standard UEFI firmware.

  • 10:00 – 10:45 – Understanding Modern Flash Memory Systems by Thomas McCormick, Chief Engineer/Technologist, Swissbit

This session presents an in-depth look at the internals of modern flash memory systems. Specific focus is given to technologies that enable current generations of flash memory, both SLC and MLC, using < 30 nm process technologies to provide reliable code and data storage in embedded computer applications.

  • 11:00 – 11:45 – Implementing Secure Software Systems on ARMv8-M Microcontrollers by Chris Shore,  Director, Technical Marketing, ARM

Microcontrollers incorporating ARM TrustZone technology for ARMv8-M are here!. Now, software engineers developing on ARM Cortex-M processors have access to a level of hardware security which has not been available before. These features that a clear separation between secure and non-secure code, secure and non-secure data.

This presentation shows how software developers can write secure code which takes advantage of new hardware features in the architecture, drastically reducing the attack surface. Writing software carefully builds on those hardware features, avoiding bugs and/or holes which could compromise the system.

  • 12:00 – 12:30 – Keynote: State of the Medical Device Industry by Frost & Sullivan
  • 13:00 – 13:45 – Enabling the Next Era of Human Space Exploration by Jason Crusan, Director of the Advanced Exploration Systems Division within the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate, NASA

Humankind is making plans to extend its reach further into the solar system than ever before. As human spaceflight moves beyond low Earth orbit NASA’s Advanced Exploration Systems is developing innovative tools to driving these new efforts and address the challenges that arise. Innovative technologies, simulations and software platforms related to crew and robotic autonomous operations, logistics management, vehicle systems automation, and life support systems management are being developed. This talk will outline the pioneering approaches that AES is using to develop prototype systems, advance key capabilities, and validate operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit.

  • 14:00 – 14:45 – Common Mistakes by Embedded System Designers: What They Are and How to Fix Them by Craig Hillman, CEO, DfR Solutions

Embedded system design is a multilevel engineering exercise. It requires synergy between software, electrical and mechanical engineers with the goal to create a system that meets customer requirements while remaining within budget and on time.

The propagation of embedded systems has been extremely successful. Many appliances today contain embedded systems. As an example, many fuel pumps contain single board computers whose sole purpose is credit transactions. Some companies doing positive train control (PTC) use ARM/RISC and ATOM based computer modules. And embedded systems are currently dominating the Internet of Things (IoT) space (ex. mobile gateways).

However, all of this success can tend to mask the challenges of designing a successful embedded system. These challenges are expected to increase dramatically with the integration of embedded systems into IoT applications, where environments can be much more severe than standard home / office installations.

This course presents the fundamentals of designing a reliable embedded device and the most common pitfalls encountered by the system designer.

  • 15:00 – 15:45 – Porting to 64-bit on ARM by Chris Shore, Director, Technical Marketing, ARM

The ARMv8-A architecture introduces 64-bit capability to the most widely used embedded architecture in the world today. Products built to this architecture are now mainstream and widely available. While they are capable of running legacy 32-bit software without recompilation, clearly developers will want to make maximum use of the increased and expanded capability offered by these processors.

This presentation examines the steps necessary in porting current 32-bit ARM software to the new 64-bit execution state. I will cover C porting, assembly language porting and implementation of hand-coded SIMD routines.


If you want to attend ESC ’17, you’ll need to register. The EXPO pass is free if you book in advance, and gives you access to the design and manufacturing suppliers booths, but won’t allow you to attend most of the talks (except sponsored ones), while the conference pass gives you access to all sessions including workshops and tutorials, as well as complimentary lunch vouchers.

CONFERENCE PASS EXPO PASS
SUPER EARLY BIRD
(Ends March 31st, 2017)
$949 FREE
STANDARD
(Ends May 2nd, 2017)
$1,149 FREE
REGULAR/ONSITE $1,299 $75