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Posts Tagged ‘intel’

The First Intel Core M Skylake-Y Low Power Processors: Core M3 6Y30, M5 6Y54, M5 6Y57 and M5 6Y75

August 28th, 2015 3 comments

Last year, Intel unveiled Core M Broadwell-Y processors with 4.5W TDP aimed at laptops and tablets, and offering a middle ground between the performance achieved by Atom/Celeron/Pentium processor and the more powerful Core i3/i5/i7 processors. CPU World has now released details about the new Skylake-Y Core M processor that still feature 2 cores and 4 threads, as well as a TDP of 4.5W.

Intel_Core_M_Skylake

There are now four models:

Model Cores /
Threads
Frequency /
Turbo
L3
cache
Graphics GPU
Frequency
TDP
Core m3 6Y30 2 / 4 900 MHz / 2.2 GHz 4 MB HD 515 300 / 850 MHz 4.5 Watt
Core m5 6Y54 1.1 / 2.7 GHz 300 / 900 MHz
Core m5 6Y57 1.1 / 2.8 GHz 300 / 900 MHz
Core m5 6Y75 1.2 / 3.1 GHz 300 / 1000 MHz

The processors have the same number of cores and thread, the same amount of L3 cache, and the same HD515 GPU, which the only differences appearing be to the CPU and GPU frequencies.  The SoCs are sais to all have up to 2 SATA 6Gb/s ports, 10 lanes of PCI-Express interface, 6x USB2 & USB3 ports, eMMC 5.0 interface, as well as support for DDR3L-1600 and LPDDR3-1866 memory. Although they are rated at 4.5 Watt TDP and 3 Watt SDP, they can also run at 7 Watt TDP (cTDP up) if need be.

None of the processors are listed on Intel website at this time, and information is limited, but there are some benchmark results for a system based on M3 6Y30 processor, which you can compare to other systems.

Intel_Core-M_Skylake_BenchmarkSeveral products based on Skylake-Y processors have already been leaked to the press including HP Pavilion x360 and HP Spectre  X2, as well as an update to Asus Zenbook UX305.

Via Liliputing

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Categories: Intel Core M Tags: benchmark, intel, laptop, skylake

MinnowBoard Turbot SBC Gets an Intel Atom E3826 Dual Core Processor, FCC & CE Certification

August 20th, 2015 2 comments

MinnowBoard MAX launched las year as a low cost board based on Intel Bay Trail-I single or dual core processor, and was mostly targeting developers of embedded systems and hobbyists, but could not be used by OEMs as it lacked FCC & CE certifications. ADI Engineering designed a MinnowBoard compatible board named MinnowBoard Turbot with a faster Intel Atom E3826 dual core processor, FCC & CE certifications, and various other hardware modifications bringing improved HDMI, a better voltage regulator, and populating several connectors.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

MinnowBoard Turbot specifications:

  • SoC – Intel Atom E3826 dual-core processor @ 1.46 GHz (7W TDP)
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3L 1333 MT/s (Soldered) – Options: 1GB, or 4GB DDR3L
  • Storage – 1x Micro SD card slot, 1x SATA2 3Gb/sec, 8 MB SPI Flash for firmware (Tianocore UEFI, Coreboot / SeaBIOS)
  • Video & Audio Output – micro HDMI connector
  • Connectivity – 10/100/1000M Ethernet RJ-45 connector
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 host, 1x USB 2.0 host
  • Debugging – Serial debug via FTDI cable
  • Expansion headers
    • Low-speed expansion (LSE) port – 2×13 (26-pin) male 0.1″ pin header with access to SPI, I2C, I2S Audio, 2x UARTs (TTL-level), 8x GPIO (including 2x supporting PWM), +5V, and GND
    • High-speed expansion (HSE) port –  60-pin, high-density connector with access to 1x PCIe Gen 2.0 Lane, 1x SATA2 3Gb/sec, 1x USB 2.0 host, I2C, GPIO, JTAG, +5V, and GND
    • 8x buffered GPIO
  • Power Supply – 5V DC input via coaxial jack, 5V DC output via  2-pin header
  • Dimensions – 99 x 74mm
  • Temperature Range –  Operating: 0 – 70 deg C (fanless); Storage: -20 to +85 deg C
  • Certifications – FCC part 15 Class B, CE Class B, IEC-60950, RoHS/WEEE

The Turbot board will support Lure expansion boards designed for MinnowBoard MAX, as well as its software including operating systems such as Windows 10, Windows 8.1, Android 4.4, Yocto Project Linux, Ubuntu, Fedora, and FreeBSD.It will be open source hardware with design files (schematics, PCB layout, gerber, BoM) released under Creative Commons BY-SA 3.0.
MinnowBoard_Turbot_EnclosureThe platform is currently sampling to early customers, and will be listed on minnowboard.org in mid-September 2015, before shipping in quantities in October 2015. Price is  $139 MSRP for single unit order, and the board, lures and an anodized aluminum case can already be pre-ordered from Netgate. Further information can be found on ADi Engineering MinnowBoard Turbot product page.

Via LinuxGizmos

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Intel Announces Optane Brand for 3D XPoint SSD and DIMM Modules

August 19th, 2015 1 comment

Last month, Intel and Micron unveiled 3D XPoint technology – pronounced 3D Crosspoint – promising over 1,000 times the performance and durability of NAND flash, and 10 times the density of DRAM for non-volatile memory. Intel has now showcased some of the first products to use that technology with an Optane SSD.

Intel_Optane_3D_XPoint_SSDAt IDF 2015, Intel compared the performance of their high-end P3700 SSD delivering 10,600 IOPS against an early 3D Xpoint “Optane” SSD prototype that could deliver 76,600 IOPS or 7.23 times more I/O per seconds, while according to Anandtech some other tests still ran 5 times faster on 3D Xpoint compared the NAND based SSD.

Intel plans to release 3D XPoint SSD in 2016, as well as 3D Xpoint DIMM modules for the datacenters. These are exciting developments, but it will probably take a few more years before it comes affordable for consumer devices, as a 400GB P3700 SSD already costs close to $900.

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Categories: Hardware Tags: 3d xpoint, intel, server, ssd

Ubuntu 14.04.3 Desktop Image for Intel Atom Z3735F mini PCs and Sticks

August 12th, 2015 3 comments

If you’ve been trying to run Ubuntu on Intel Atom Z3735F, chances are that you’ve come across Ian Morrison (Linuxium) work, even MeegoPad T02 is using one of its older Ubuntu image (without his direct knowledge / authorization), and the developer has now released an Ubuntu 14.04.3 Desktop image for Intel Atom Z3735F based devices around five days after the official Canonical release.

Ubuntu_14.04.3_MeegoPad_T02The official Ubuntu 14.04.3 includes the newer 3.19 Linux kernel from Ubuntu 15.04, and a matching X.org stack, and has been upgraded that way for hardware enablement, i.e. to support more hardware platforms. Unfortunately, the image for Z3735F is still using a 3.16 kernel because some dynamic kernel modules only work with 3.16. The image supports 32-bit and a 64-bit bootloaders and includes WiFi, Bluetooth, and Audio support.

If you’d like to update Ubuntu on your device, download and flash ubuntu-14.04.3-desktop-linuxium.iso to a USB drive with ‘Rufus’ in Windows or ‘dd’ in Linux. Insert the USB flash drive in your device, and press F7 or F10 (depending on your UEFI device) in order to select the mass storage device to boot to, and complete the installation. All features should work right after installation with a 64-bit bootloader as found in Intel Compute Stick, but if you have a 32-bit bootlader as found in MeegoPad T02, you’ll have to run two extra scripts: 

Good luck! If you appreciate Ian’s work, you can consider leaving a donation on his Paypal account.

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Intel Skylake-U Processors Run as Low as 7.5W TDP. A Closer Look at Configurable TDP

August 12th, 2015 2 comments

I try to mostly cover low power systems on this blog, so when it comes to x86 processors I have a cut off TDP of 10 Watts. The next generation of Intel Skylake processors have a TDP of 15 Watts, but when I read Skylake-U lineup post on FanlessTech, I discovered Intel processors also have a configurable TDP option, and in the case of Skylake-U processor their configurable TDP (cTDP) can be as low as 7.5W or 10W depending on models.

Skylake-U Processor Line (Click to Enlarge)

Skylake-U Processor Line (Click to Enlarge)

U-Processor family has Pentium and Celeron processors, but also Core i3, Core i5 and even Core i7 processors such as i7-6600U and i7-6500U clocked up to 3.4 GHz and all with a 15W TDP, but you’ll also notice a column called “cTDP Down” showing 7.5W and 10W values, which shows the great progress made by Intel with regards to low power design.

So I decided to look into configurable TDP in a little more details. First, it’s not really new, as it was first found in Ivy Bridge processors and covered by Anandtech in late 2011. However, that does not mean there’s a wealth of information about cTDP on the Internet, probably very few people intend to slow down their system on purpose to save a few watts. For an overview, Wikipedia is good though:

Configurable TDP (cTDP), also known as programmable TDP or TDP power cap, is an operating mode of later generations of Intel mobile processors (as of January 2014) and AMD processors (as of June 2012) that allows adjustments in their TDP values. By modifying the processor behavior and its performance levels, power consumption of a processor can be changed altering its TDP at the same time. That way, a processor can operate at higher or lower performance levels, depending on the available cooling capacities and desired power consumption.

Intel processors that support cTDP provide three operating modes:

  • Nominal TDP – this is the processor’s rated frequency and TDP.
  • cTDP down – when a cooler or quieter mode of operation is desired, this mode specifies a lower TDP and lower guaranteed frequency versus the nominal mode.
  • cTDP up – when extra cooling is available, this mode specifies a higher TDP and higher guaranteed frequency versus the nominal mode.

For example, some of the mobile Haswell processors support cTDP up, cTDP down, or both modes. As another example, some of the AMD Opteron processors and Kaveri APUs can be configured for lower TDP values. IBM’s POWER8 processor implements a similar power capping functionality through its embedded on-chip controller (OCC).

It’s a bit harder to find documentation on how to enable and configure it on your system though. A post on superuser.com mentions Intel Dynamic Platform & Thermal Framework Driver meaning different TDP levels are configurable from the operating system, Windows in that case.

Configurable_TDP_in_WindowsA “High TDP” value will actually run the system over its nominal TDP, which should be possible with appropriate cooling, while “Nominal TDP” will operate the processor at its specified TDP, and “Low TDP”  refers to cTDP down as shown in the Skylake-U processor table at the top of this post. The “Acoustic Limit” in this driver is also interesting as it controls the maximum fan speed, which may be useful for HTPCs.

I also searched for “configurable TDP in Linux” but I did not find anything specific, and instead came across a Phoronix article where they test cTDP on AMD A10-7800 running Linux, and set the max TDP in the UEFI BIOS utility instead of the OS.

Configure_TDP_BIOS_UEFI

The benchmark results show lower average power consumption for all tests, and in most cases lower performance too as expected, but the performance per watt is often better when using the nominal TDP rather than a lower TDP, because despite a lower average power consumption, a given task such as building the kernel takes longer, leading to higher overall power consumption.

Update: Intel Dynamic Platform & Thermal Framework Driver is also available for Chromium OS, with source code, and if you check the README.txt, it can also be tried in Linux (Ubuntu instructions provided).

Have you ever used configurable TDP on any of your systems? Please share your experience.

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Intel and Micron Promise 1000x Faster Storage with 3D XPoint Memory

July 30th, 2015 1 comment

Non-volatile memory is usually the bottleneck in electronics systems and computers, as it takes much longer to move data from storage than in RAM or cache, so any improvement may yield great benefits, especially when your application requires lots of I/Os. Micron and Intel claim to have developed a new category of memory, and announced 3D XPoint (Read “3D cross-point”) memory as the first break through since the launch of NAND Flash in 1989.

What_is_3D_XPointThere’s great variability between different NAND flash chips, but the companies announced that 3D XPoint is 1,000 times faster and endurant (write cycles) than NAND flash, and 10 times denser than conventional DRAM. The technology would mainly benefit most applications, but especially more demanding ones such as high resolution gaming (4K/8K), real-time pattern recognition, and genomics.

Based on the presentation video below, it even seems 3D XPoint memory can be used to replace RAM and NAND chips by a single chip. 3D Xpoint would still be slightly slower than current DRAM, but latency is comparable, and you would not need to load data from storage to RAM, since 3D Xpoint would be both system and storage memory.

You can also read 3D XPoint presentation to find out a little more.

3D XPoint technology will sample later this year with select customers, and Intel and Micron are currently developing products based on the technology, so I assume we might start to see the first products featuring 3D XPoint memory sometimes in 2016.

Via Forbes

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Categories: Hardware Tags: 3d xpoint, intel, micro

Tronsmart Ara BJ19 is an NUC-like Mini PC Powered by Intel Celeron J1900 Processor

July 15th, 2015 5 comments

Tronsmart has launched several ARM based TV boxes in the last couple of years, but now they’ve now unveiled an Intel based mini PC with Tronsmart Ara BJ19. The barebone PC looks very much like an Intel NUC, and features an Intel Celeron J1900 Bay Trail-D quad core processor.

Tronsmart_BJ19Tronsmart Ara BJ19 specifications:

  • SoC – Intel Celeron J1900 Quad core processor  @ 2.0 GHz (base) / 2.41 GHz (burst) with Intel HD graphics (10W TDP)
  • System Memory –  DDR3L 1333/1666 MHz SO-DIMM slot
  • Storage – 2.5″ SATA hard drive or SSD
  • Video Output – mini HDMI + mini DisplayPort
  • Audio – mini HDMI, 3.5 mm jack for headphone and MIC-in
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet, mPCIe Wi-Fi (2.4GHz) and Bluetooth 4.0 module
  • USB – 3x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x USB 3.0 port.
  • Misc – Power button, power LED
  • Power Supply – 19V/2.1A
  • Dimensions –  116.6 x 112 x 5.1 mm
  • Weight – ~360 grams

Tronsmart_BJ19_NUC_DescriptionThe mini PC does not come with memory nor storage, nor an operating system, so you can just install the on you prefer without having to purchase a license for an OS you may never use. It ships with its power adapter, an HDD bracket, and various screws.

Tronsmart Ara BJ19 costs $130 including shipping, which seems to be a decent deal, and it can be purchased from eBay, GeekBuying, or Aliexpress. You’ll also need to buy storage and RAM separately to have a fully working system.

Via AndroidPC.es and Onebir (for the eBay link).

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Intel Introduces Braswell NUCs with Celeron N3050 and Pentium N3700 Processors

May 26th, 2015 11 comments

Intel has already announced several Braswell processors as successors for Bay Trail-M processor with 4 to 6W TDP and 14nm manufacturing process. Two of these, namely Intel Celeron N3050 (dual core) and Pentium 3700 (quad core), have fund their way into the latest Intel NUCs that are currently listed for $140 and $180 in the US with the official release date fixed on June 8.

Intel_NUC_Braswell

The dual core version is called NUC5CPYH, while the quad core is NUC5PPYH. Both share the following specs:

  • Processor
    • Intel Celeron N3050 dual core processor @ up to 2.16 GHz with 2MB cache, Intel HD Graphics @ 600 MHz max, 6W TDP
    • Intel Pentium N3700 quad core processor @ up to 2.4 GHz with 2MB cache, Intel HD Graphics @ 700 MHZ max, 6W TDP
  • Memory – 1x DDR3L SODIMM 1.35V, 1333/1600 MHz up to 8GB maximum
  • Storage – 1x SATA @ 6.0 Gbps for 2.5¨ HDD or SSD up to 9.5mm thick, 1x SDXC slot
  • Video Output – 1x HDMI 1.4b, 1x optional VGA port
  • Audio I/O – HDMI audio, 3.5mm jack for microphone/headphone, and mini optical S/PDIF
  • Connectivity – 10/100/1000Mbps Ethernet port (Realtel 8111HN), Dual band Wireless-AC 3165 module installed in M.2 slot supporting 802.11ac up to 433Mbps, 1×1 WiFi, and dual mode Bluetooth 4.0.
  • USB – 2 x USB 3.0 port on the front panel (including an Orange one that is charging capable), 2 x USB 3.0 ports on the back panel, 2x USB 2.0 internal ports with one reserved for M.2 module.
  • Misc – Front panel consumer IR sensor, Kensington lock support, power button, LEDs, RTC + battery
  • Power Supply – 19V
  • Dimensions – 101.6mm x 101.6mm

Intel_NUC_Celeron_N3050The mini PC comes with a fan, so if you are looking for a fanless system, you’ll need to find something else. Intel NUC do not come with memory and storage, so you’d probably need to add around $100 to the prices listed above to get a fully working system. Benchmark results don’t seem to be available for these recent Braswell processors.

Via Liliputing and FanlessTech

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