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Posts Tagged ‘kernel’

Linaro 14.12 Release with Linux 3.18 and Android 5.0

December 19th, 2014 No comments

Linaro usually releases images and source code on the last Thursday of the month, but since most people will have long holidays for Chritsmas and New Year, the last working Thrusday of this month was yesterday (18th). Linaro 14.12 release includes Linux kernel 3.18 (baseline), Linux 3.10.62 & 3.14.26 (LSK, same versions as last month), and Android 5.0.1 Lollipop.

Here are the highlights of this release:

  • Linux Linaro 3.18-2014.12
    • Based on v3.18 release
    • GATOR topic: version 5.20
    • updated topic from Qualcomm LT (includes IFC6410 board support)
    • updated integration-linaro-vexpress64 topic by ARM LT (FVP Base and Foundation models, and Juno support)
    • updated LLVM topic (uses the community llvmlinux-latest branch)
    • included ILP32 patch set v3  rebased on 3.18. Boot tested with aarch64 userland. Work is in progress to test with aarch64-ilp32 userland.
    • config fragments updated – SELinux related config options enabled in linaro-base.conf, device tree runtime self tests enabled in distribution.conf
  • Linaro builds of AOSP 14.12
    • built with AOSP toolchain
    • All the Android builds have been updated to 5.0.1
    • Audio on Versatile Express TC2 is fixed (Android 5.0.1)
    • DNS issue fixed on Juno, FVP models and Versatile Express TC2 (Android 5.0.1)
    • daily CI updated to include benchmarks for Versatile Express TC2 and Juno
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2014.12
    • integrated Linaro GCC 4.9-2014.11 and Linaro binutils 2.24-2014.11
    • switched from eglibc to Linaro glibc 2.20-2014.11
    • improved external toolchain support
    • improved ACPI tooling
    • added python-numpy to images for LAVA tests
    • upstreaming:
  • Linaro Ubuntu 14.12 – updated packages: juno-pre-boot, LSK 3.10.62/3.14.26 and linux-linaro 3.18 kernels
  • CI loop for testing the pre-built Linaro toolchain using the OpenEmbedded external toolchain support has been reactivated
  • ARMv8 Ubuntu engineering build for Enterprise is available
  • CI bring up: HiSilicon Hi3716cv200
  • CI bring up: EAS (Energy Aware Scheduling) development – integration branch testing
  • Publish OpenSDK images on snapshots.linaro.org
  • Ship board recovery image into hwpack for Juno

You can visit https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1412/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB, LMB (Linaro Member Builds), and community builds, as well as Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain components.

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U-Boot and Linux Source Code for ODROID-C1 Board Has Been Released

December 16th, 2014 7 comments

Hardkernel ODROID-C1 board, a more powerful $35 alternative to the Raspberry Pi, garnered a lot of attention when it was announced last week. At the time source code was not available, but as scheduled, U-boot and Linux source code is now available, and the full Android SDL should be released on February 2015. Instructions to get the code, and build both Linux and U-boot are available on ODROID-C1 Wiki, and I’ve just given a try to Linux instructions myself to see if I would encounter any issues in Ubuntu 14.04.

ODROID-C1-Linux

  1. Download Linaro GCC 4.7 toolchain from Linaro or Odroid website.
  2. Install the toolchain. They install it on /opt/toolchain, but instead I’ve installed in ~/opt/toochain, so I don’t need superuser permissions:

    mkdir -p ~/opt/toolchains
    tar xvf gcc-linaro-arm-linux-gnueabihf-4.7-2013.04-20130415_linux.tar.bz2 -C ~/opt/toolchains/

  3. Add the following lines to ~/.bashrc

    export ARCH=arm
    export CROSS_COMPILE=arm-linux-gnueabihf-
    export PATH=~/opt/toolchains/gcc-linaro-arm-linux-gnueabihf-4.7-2013.04-20130415_linux/bin:$PATH

  4. To apply change, log out and log in, or run:
    source ~/.bashrc
  5. Double check Linaro GCC 4.7 is installed properly:

    arm-linux-gnueabihf-gcc -v
    Using built-in specs.
    COLLECT_GCC=arm-linux-gnueabihf-gcc
    COLLECT_LTO_WRAPPER=/home/jaufranc/opt/toolchains/gcc-linaro-arm-linux-gnueabihf-4.7-2013.04-20130415_linux/bin/../libexec/gcc/arm-linux-gnueabihf/4.7.3/lto-wrapper
    Target: arm-linux-gnueabihf
    Configured with: /cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/.build/src/gcc-linaro-4.7-2013.04/configure --build=i686-build_pc-linux-gnu --host=i686-build_pc-linux-gnu --target=arm-linux-gnueabihf --prefix=/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/install --with-sysroot=/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/install/arm-linux-gnueabihf/libc --enable-languages=c,c++,fortran --enable-multilib --with-arch=armv7-a --with-tune=cortex-a9 --with-fpu=vfpv3-d16 --with-float=hard --with-pkgversion='crosstool-NG linaro-1.13.1-4.7-2013.04-20130415 - Linaro GCC 2013.04' --with-bugurl=https://bugs.launchpad.net/gcc-linaro --enable-__cxa_atexit --enable-libmudflap --enable-libgomp --enable-libssp --with-gmp=/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/.build/arm-linux-gnueabihf/build/static --with-mpfr=/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/.build/arm-linux-gnueabihf/build/static --with-mpc=/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/.build/arm-linux-gnueabihf/build/static --with-ppl=/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/.build/arm-linux-gnueabihf/build/static --with-cloog=/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/.build/arm-linux-gnueabihf/build/static --with-libelf=/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/.build/arm-linux-gnueabihf/build/static --with-host-libstdcxx='-L/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/.build/arm-linux-gnueabihf/build/static/lib -lpwl' --enable-threads=posix --disable-libstdcxx-pch --enable-linker-build-id --enable-gold --with-local-prefix=/cbuild/slaves/oorts/crosstool-ng/builds/arm-linux-gnueabihf-linux/install/arm-linux-gnueabihf/libc --enable-c99 --enable-long-long --with-mode=thumb
    Thread model: posix
    gcc version 4.7.3 20130328 (prerelease) (crosstool-NG linaro-1.13.1-4.7-2013.04-20130415 - Linaro GCC 2013.04)

  6. Both Linux and Android Linux are available, and depending on which kernel should want to get checkout the code from the right branch:
    git clone https://github.com/hardkernel/linux.git -b odroidc-3.10.y-android

    or

    git clone https://github.com/hardkernel/linux.git -b odroidc-3.10.y
  7. I selected the Linux branch. Time to configure the build for ODROID-C1:
    cd linux
    make odroidc_defconfig
  8. Install u-boot-tools for mkimage, and build the kernel image
    sudo apt-get install u-boot-tools
    make uImage -j8
  9. And the device tree file for ODROID-C1:
    make meson8b_odroidc.dtd
    make meson8b_odroidc.dtb
  10. I’ve stopped there, but if you have a board you’ll want to copy / flash the files arch/arm/boot/uImage and arch/arm/boot/dts/amlogic/meson8b_odroidc.dtb to a bootable eMMC or SD card
    • For Linux – Copy uImage and meson8b_odroidc.dtb to the FAT32 partition of your boot device, replacing the existing files
    • For Android – Use fast boot as follows:
      sudo apt-get install android-tools-fastboot 
      sudo fastboot flash boot <path/of/your/uImage>
      sudo fastboot flash dtb <path/of/your/meson8b_odroidc.dtb>
  11. Have fun :)

This source code release for ODROID-C1 should also open the way for Linux Kernel ports, and Ubuntu / Debian or other Linux distributions for other Amlogic S805 devices such as MK808B Plus, MXQ S85, or MINIX NEO X6.

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ODROID-XU3 Lite Board Ubuntu Review – Setup, Usability, and Performance

December 14th, 2014 13 comments

After testing ODROID-XU3 Lite with Android 4.4, and finding a workaround to some HDMI issues, I could finally try out Ubuntu, or rather Lubuntu with LXDE instead of Unity, in Hardkernel low cost octa-core development board. I’ll start this review by explaining how to install and setup Lubuntu on the board, followed by running various program to test the system usability as a desktop computer with LibreOffice, Chromium, XBMC, and 3D graphics, and finally run some performance tests with Phoronix Test Suit, build the Linux kernel natively, and transcode a video with avconf.

Setting Up Ubuntu on ODROID-XU3 Lite

All firmware images for ODROID development boards, can be found on odroid.in website, and if you want Ubuntu 14.04 image, go to ubuntu_14.04lts folder, to select the latest firmware file for your board. The latest image for ODROID-XU3 (Lite) is currently ubuntu-14.04.1lts-lubuntu-odroid-xu3-20141105.img.xz, it’s the same for micro SD card or eMMC boot. You should have gotten a eMMC to micro SD adapter if you’ve purchased an eMMC module from Hardkernel.

You can download, extract, and flash the image with dd (Linux) or Win32DiskImager (Windows). For example. in a terminal in a Linux computer:

wget http://odroid.in/ubuntu_14.04lts/ubuntu-14.04.1lts-lubuntu-odroid-xu3-20141105.img.xz
sudo apt-get install xz pv
xz -d ubuntu-14.04.1lts-lubuntu-odroid-xu3-20141105.img.xz
dd if=ubuntu-14.04.1lts-lubuntu-odroid-xu3-20141105.img | pv | sudo dd of=/dev/sdX

Where X is the letter of your micro SD or eMMC module inserted into your computer. Check the value carefully with lsblk before running the dd command, or you may lose your data stored on other drives connected to your computer,. For extra safety, you could also consider doing this procedure in a virtual machine, for example by running Ubuntu in VirtualBox.

Now insert the micro SD card or connect the eMMC module to the board, and you configure the boot switch between the Ethernet and USB ports as shown below using a pen or tweezers. For eMMC both must be in high position, whereas for SD card boot one must be down.

ODROID-XU3_Lite_Boot_Switch

Left: eMMC Boot; Right: Micro SD Card Boot

Now connect a keyboard, mouse, the HDMI cable, Ethernet, and/or other peripherals you may want to connect and power up the board by connecting the provided 5V/4A power supply. A typical boot should complete in around 22 seconds, although the first boot might take a little longer.

Lubuntu Desktop in ODROID-XU3 Lite

Lubuntu Desktop in ODROID-XU3 Lite

A this stage, the installation is nearly complete, and you should already have a usable system, however, if you’ll see that the rootfs partition is only 4.9GB with 310 MB available (that’s after installing LibreOffice):

df -h
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/mmcblk0p2  4.9G  4.4G  310M  94% /

Since my eMMC module has a capacity of 16GB, it would be nice to use all of it. Normally, you’d use fdisk/parted, and resize2fs  to get the full size, but Hardkernel provides ODROID Utility that can do just that among others. So click on the icon on the top right to launch the program, input the password (odroid), and after running apt-get update automatically, the following interface should appear.

ODROID_UtilityClick on Resize your root partition, and after making sure the root partition is in /dev/mmcblkp2, click <Yes> to continue and resize the root partition on your micro SD card or eMMC module. After a reboot, you can check all the available storage in a terminal:

df -h
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/mmcblk0p2   15G  4.4G  9.4G  32% /

9.4GB available out of a 15GB partition. Perfect! The setup is now complete.

Using ODROID-XU3 Lite as a Desktop Computer / Media Player

The Ubuntu image comes pre-loaded with Firefox, Chromium, Transmission, Arduino IDE, Abiword, PacmanFM, XBMC and a few others programs. Since they probably wanted to keep the image reasonably small, they did not install large program, but I install LibreOffice for a better office suite, and Nautilus for a file manager with Network Shares access:

sudo apt-get install libreoffice nautilus

The system is extremely responsive, and if you’re using a computer with a mechanical drive, ODROID-XU3 Lite will boot and load programs much faster than your full-blown Intel/AMD computer.

The best way to showcase ODROID-XU3 (Lite) capabilities is to shoot a video, so I’ve just done that showing:

  1. 20 seconds boot
  2. ODROID Utility options
  3. List of installed applications
  4. LibreOffice (Writer)
  5. Chromium – Multi-tabs, YouTube (embedded / full screen; VP9 / H.264/AVC1), and Candy Crush Saga (Flash game) in Facebook
  6. 3D hardware acceleration with es2gears
  7. XBMC Media Player with 2D/3D OpenGL ES and hardware video decoding.
  8. Power off

I’ve also opened a terminal running htop to show the eight cores CPU usage during these tests.

Side note: Since my camera (Canon Powershot A2300 HD) is pretty poor at shooting videos of screens, I’ve used SJ1000 action camera instead as the image is much sharper, but there’s a fisheye effect due to the wider angle of such camera. There are some tools in Linux including Python scripts and KDEnlive that can remove the fishing effect, but they introduce some aliasing, which does not look nice in this type of video, although it’s probably acceptable for content without text or thin lines.

Based on these tests, ODROID-XU3 Lite can be used as a desktop replacement or an XBMC media center, but you have to be aware of some limitations:

  • YouTube embedded videos play usually well, and 360p/480p full screen video play quite well, but the user experience is not very good with 1080p full screen videos, either with VP9 or H.264 codec.
  • Adobe Flash is not pre-installed, but in Chromium, it should be quite easy to install libpepperflash.so to enable Flash support. I have not tried, but normally, flash performance on ARM is rather subpar compared to x86.
  • The window manager may not be hardware accelerated with the GPU.

For all other uses, ODROID-XU3 Lite is clearly the best ARM Linux platform, I’ve tried so far, with a fast eMMC, 2D/3D hardware accelerated graphics (for apps that support OpenGL ES only), and hardware video decoding.

Other Use Cases and Performance

Before starting some benchmarks, I’ll check what type of Exynos 5422 I have in my system:

root@odroid:~# dmesg | grep BIN                                                 
[    0.355271] [c6] CPU Info : Samsung Exynos5422 Soc is BIN2

BIN1 is for the Exynos 5422 processor clocked up to 2.2 GHz found in ODROID-XU3 board, and BIN2 is limited to 1.8 GHz, and normally found in the Lite version of the board which I’m reviewing right now.

Phoronix Suite Benchmarks

Antutu is the most famous benchmark in Android, but in Linux, Phoronix Test Suite is the reference. It’s a bit more complicated to use than Antutu, but more flexible, and throrough.

sudo apt-get install php5-cli php5-gd php5-gd
wget http://phoronix-test-suite.com/releases/repo/pts.debian/files/phoronix-test-suite_5.4.0_all.deb
sudo dpkg -i phoronix-test-suite_5.4.0_all.deb

After apt-get install,. I had to run “sudo apt-get install -f” to complete the installation.

Than I’ve followed the instructions here, and selected four tests from the suite to test audio encoding, multi-core file compression, server, and disk I/Os:

phoronix-test-suite batch-benchmark pts/encode-mp3 pts/compress-7zip pts/apache pts/iozone

It turns out the iozone test for disk I/O takes nearly five hours, and recently my computer tends to turn off randomly, and since I started the test from an ssh console, the test got interrupted, so I only ran encode-mp3, compress-7zip, and apache benchmarks which last only about 15 minutes in total.

Out of the three test, compress-7zip failed because of a lack of memory:

[c4] Out of memory: Kill process 9593 d
[16693.088181] [c4] Killed process 9593 (7za) total-vm:1844536kB, anon-rss:1509B

So the whole Phoronix benchmarks did not exactly work out as expected, but you can find the result for MP3 encoding and Apache tests @ http://openbenchmarking.org/result/1412146-LI-20141214131

ODROID-XU3-Lite_Phoronix_Intel_Core_i3_radxa_proI’ve compared the ODROID-XU3 Lite results to some recent results on Openbenchmarking website including an Intel Core i3-4150 quad core system (cpu-ubuntu), an older Intel Atom N570 system (2G), and Radxa Pro board powered by Rockchip RK3188 processor. So Exynos 5422 can’t match a recent Core i3 processor yet (which by itself costs more than ODROID-XU3 Lite board), but does well against N570 netbook processor, and is about twice as fast as Radxa Rock Pro board in these two tests.

Mainline kernel compilation

People may want to use this powerful low cost Octa core board in build farm, so I though it would be fun to try building Linux mainline kernel natively. Let’s installing dependencies, and get the source latest Linux release (3.18) first.

sudo apt-get install libncurses5-dev gcc make git exuberant-ctags
git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git
cd linux-stable
git checkout -b stable v3.18

Ubuntu 14.04 comes with gcc 4.8.2 only, but this compiler will break Linux mainline build, so I had to install gcc 4.9 instead:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-toolchain-r/test
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install gcc-4.9

You’ll also note some ODROID boards are already part of mainline, probably with partial support, but unfortunately ODROID-XU3 (Lite) kernel has not been upstreamed yet.

root@odroid:~/linux-stable# ls -l  arch/arm/boot/dts | grep odr                 
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root   8334 Dec 14 14:11 exynos4412-odroid-common.dtsi        
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root   1310 Dec 14 14:11 exynos4412-odroidu3.dts              
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root    829 Dec 14 14:11 exynos4412-odroidx2.dts              
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root   1691 Dec 14 14:11 exynos4412-odroidx.dts

Anyway, let’s build the kernel for Exynos processor, and see how fast the board can compile a Linux kernel:

make exynos_defconfig
time make -j8 CC=gcc-4.9
...
real    5m43.746s
user    31m25.235s
sys     4m11.130s

So it takes less than 6 minutes to build the kernel on ODROID-XU3 Lite, about 4 times longer than on a powerful, but much more power hungry (300W) AMD FX8350 based computer. In other words, it should be possible to achieve the same performance as my computer using 4 or 5 ODROID-XU3 Lite boards in a mini build farm using distcc compilation for about the same price, but only a fraction of the power consumption, and of course native compilation has advantages over cross-compilation, since some tests may have to be skipped for the latter.

Video Transcoding with avconv

Finally, one follower on G+ asked me to test MPEG2 to H.264 video transcoding with ffmpeg. The latter does not seem to be available, and as been replaced by avconc, so I installed libav-tools instead, and ran the transcoding.

sudo apt-get install libav-tools
time avconv -i big_buck_bunny_1080p_MPEG2_MP2_25fps_6600K.MPG \
-vcodec libx264 -minrate 300k -maxrate 300k -bufsize 1835k bbb-h.264.avi
avconv version 9.16-6:9.16-0ubuntu0.14.04.1, Copyright (c) 2000-2014 the Libav s
built on Aug 10 2014 18:32:09 with gcc 4.8 (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.8.2-19ubuntu1)
Guessed Channel Layout for  Input Stream #0.1 : stereo
Input #0, mpeg, from 'big_buck_bunny_1080p_MPEG2_MP2_25fps_6600K.MPG':
Duration: 00:00:44.74, start: 0.240000, bitrate: 7159 kb/s
Stream #0.0[0x1e0]: Video: mpeg2video (Main), yuv420p, 1920x1080 [PAR 1:1 Dc
Stream #0.1[0x1c0]: Audio: mp2, 44100 Hz, stereo, s16p, 160 kb/s
[libx264 @ 0x6c9c0] using SAR=1/1
[libx264 @ 0x6c9c0] MB rate (734400000) > level limit (2073600)
[libx264 @ 0x6c9c0] using cpu capabilities: ARMv6 NEON
[libx264 @ 0x6c9c0] profile High, level 5.2
Output #0, avi, to 'bbb-h.264.avi':
Metadata:
ISFT            : Lavf54.20.4
Stream #0.0: Video: libx264, yuv420p, 1920x1080 [PAR 1:1 DAR 16:9], q=-1--1c
Stream #0.1: Audio: libmp3lame, 44100 Hz, stereo, s16p
Stream mapping:
Stream #0:0 -> #0:0 (mpeg2video -> libx264)
Stream #0:1 -> #0:1 (mp2 -> libmp3lame)
Press ctrl-c to stop encoding
frame= 1035 fps= 8 q=55.0 size= 30701kB time=40.52 bitrate=6206.7kbits/s

It took 2 minutes 31 seconds to encode a 44 seconds video, so real-time 1080p video transcoding is currently not feasible with avconv / ffmpeg.

Have said that, Exynos 5422 supports video decoding and encoding, so it should be possible to write a program using the MFC (Multi-Format Codec) driver for Exynos. I could not find any sample code, but having a look a XBMC source code for ODROID boards might be a start, since it’s using the MFC drivers for decoding.

ODROID-XU3 Lite can be purchased directly from Hardkernel for $99 + shipping, or through distributors like Ameridroid (USA) or Pollin Electronics (Germany). Adding an eMMC module, an HDMI cable, and the serial debug board to your order is recommended, although you could replace the eMMC with a fast micro SD card (class 10 or greater) for a still decent performance.

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Linux 3.18 Released

December 10th, 2014 2 comments

Linus Torvalds released Linux Kernel 3.18 last Sunday:

It’s been a quiet week, and the patch from rc7 is tiny, so 3.18 is out.

I’d love to say that we’ve figured out the problem that plagues 3.17 for a couple of people, but we haven’t. At the same time, there’s absolutely no point in having everybody else twiddling their thumbs when a couple of people are actively trying to bisect an older issue, so holding up the release just didn’t make sense. Especially since that would just have then held things up entirely over the holiday break.

So the merge window for 3.19 is open, and DaveJ will hopefully get his bisection done (or at least narrow things down sufficiently that we have that “Ahaa” moment) over the next week. But in solidarity with Dave (and to make my life easier too ;) let’s try to avoid introducing any _new_ nasty issues, ok?

Linus

Linux 3.17 added support for Xbox One controllers, USB device sharing over IP, more secure random numbers, several modifications for perf and more.

Some of the changes made to Linux 3.18 include:

  • Performance improvements for the networking stack thanks to bulk network packet transmission, which “allows a relatively small system to drive a high-speed interface at full wire speed, even when small packets are being transmitted.”
  • Faster suspend and resume by replacing a 100ms polling loop with proper completion notification. This will mostly be noticeable on systems with a large number of cores. Git pull.
  • Berkeley Packet Filter bpf() system call. “The hooks to use this code (in tracing and packet filtering, for example) will take a little longer, but the core support for a “universal virtual machine” in the kernel is now present.”
  • Nouveau drivers for Nvidia GPUs now supports basic DisplayPort audio
  • Several filesystems improvements, notably for BTRFS and F2FS
  • Audio hardware. Codecs: Cirrus Logic CS35L32, Everest ES8328 and Freescale ES8328; others: Generic Freescale sound cards, Analog Devices SSM4567 audio amplifier

New features and improvements specific to the ARM architecture include:

  • Allwinner
    • Allwinner A31/A23 –  RTC  & Watchdog
    • Allwinner A23 – MMC, pinctrl, DMA and I2C
    • New boards: Olimex A20-OLinuXino-Lime, Merrii Hummingbird A20, and HSG H702 tablet board.
  • Rockchip
    • Added new clock-type for the cpuclk
    • Ethernet: Added support for Rockchip SoC layer device tree bindings for arc-emac driver, and emac nodes to the rk3188 device tree.
    • Added driver for Rockchip Successive Approximation Register (SAR) ADC.
    • RK808 PMIC: Added regulator driver, clkout driver, and mfd driver.
  • Amlogic – Added MesonX support, only Meson6 for now (Amlogic AML8726-MX). DTS for Geniatech ATV1200 media player
  • Added basic support for BCM63138 DSL SoC, Texas Instruments AM57xx family, Atmel SAMA5D4, Qualcomm IPQ8064, Renesas r8a7794 SoC,
  • New Device tree files for various board and products: Gateworks GW5520, SAMA5D4ek board,  i.MX1 Armadeus APF9828, i.MX1 ADS board, Technexion Thunder support (TAO3530 SOM based, Sony Xperia Z1, IFC6540 board, CM-QS600 SoM,  etc…

I could find a few changes for MIPS architecture in Linux 3.18 too:

  • SEAD3: Nuke PIC32 I2C driver.
  • Loongson: Make platform serial setup always built-in
  • Netlogic: handle modular USB case & AHCI builds
  • tlbex: Fix potential HTW race on TLBL/M/S handlers
  • cpu-probe: Set the FTLB probability bit on supported cores
  • fix EVA & non-SMP non-FPU FP context signal handling
  • Etc.. You can find a few more changes @ http://lwn.net/Articles/623825/

A more thorough changelog for Linux 3.18 will soon be published on Kernelnewbies.org. Remember to also check ARM architecture and drivers sections, for more details about changes related to ARM platforms.

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Linaro 14.11 Release with Kernel 3.18, Android 5.0, & Ubuntu Utopic. Debian 8.0 Gets ARM64 Port

November 28th, 2014 3 comments

Linaro 14.11 has been released with Linux kernel 3.18-rc5 (baseline), Linux 3.10.61 & 3.14.25 (LSK, same versions as last month), and Android 4.4.2, 4.4.4, and for the first time Android 5.0 Lollipop. There’s also been some news with regards to Linux desktop distributions, as Ubuntu baseline has been upgraded to Utopic (14.10), and Debian 8.0 (Jessie) will officially support ARM64 with 93% of packages built as of November 5th. Android Lollipop images are said to be built for TC2, Juno, Nexus 7, Nexus 10, and FVP models, but I could not find the images. Finally, it’s the first time I’ve noticed Hisilicon X5HD2 development board with a dual core Cortex A9 processor, but apparently it’s the same as Hi3716cv200.

Here are the highlights of this release:

  • Linux Linaro 3.18-rc5-2014.11
    • updated GATOR to version 5.20
    • updated topic from Qualcomm LT (include IFC6410 board support)
    • updated integration-linaro-vexpress64 topic by ARM LT (FVP Base and Foundation models, and Juno support)
    • updated integration-hilt-linux-linaro topic by HiSilicon LT (Hi36xx, HiP04, and X5HD2 families support)
    • updated LLVM topic (uses the community llvmlinux-latest branch) includes ILP32 patch set v3 rebased on 3.18-rc5. Build tested only.
  • Linaro builds of AOSP 14.11
    • built with Linaro GCC 4.9-2014.11
    • migrated to Android 5.0 (Lollipop) for all the targets on all CI loops. Here are the combinations: TC2-LSK-3.10, TC2-LSK-3.14, Juno-LSK, Nexus 7, Nexus 10, FVP-LSK-3.10 and FVP-LSK-3.14.
    • updated LSK pre-merge CI for 3.10 and 3.14
    • revamped to use overlay manifest with local_manifests
    • added AOSP master builds setup for Versatile Express TC2, Juno, Nexus 7 and Nexus 10
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2014.11
    • integrated Linaro GCC 4.9-2014.11
    • included perf tools in the rootfs
    • fixed gator FTBS
    • updated strace aarch64_be patch
    • fixed external toolchain support
    • upstreaming:
      • updated LTP to 20140828 release
      • updated PM QA to 0.4.14 release
      • updated ACPICA to 20140828 release
  • Linaro Ubuntu 14.11
    • Ubuntu baseline migrated from Trusty to Utopic
    • updated packages: Juno firmware 0.9.2, LSK 3.10.60/3.14.24 and linux-linaro 3.18-rc5 kernels
  • Debian release team announced ARM64 architecture has made enough progress to be a released architecture for Debian 8.0 (Jessie)
  • SELinux support is enabled in linux-linaro kernel
  • Test usage of Linaro toolchain binary to build OE rootfs has been added
  • CI bring up: coresight enabled build for TC2

You can visit https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1411/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB, LMB (Linaro Member Builds), and community builds, as well as Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain components.

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Linaro 14.10 Release with Kernel 3.17 and Android 4.4.4, Debian ARM64 Port Almost Complete

October 31st, 2014 No comments

Linaro 14.10 has just been released with Linux kernel 3.17 (baseline), Linux 3.10.54 & 3.14.19 (LSK, same versions as last month), and Android 4.4.2 & 4.4.4.

Most of the work is a continuation of previous months working member hardware, and ARM64, but one particularly interesting point is that 90% of Debian packages have been built for ARM64, and the next version of Debian should have an official ARM64 port.

Here are the highlights of this release:

  • Linux Linaro 3.17-2014.10
    • updated linaro-android topic. In particular, CONFIG_IPV6=y is no longer the requirement for linux-linaro tree builds
    • GATOR version 5.19 (same version as in 2014.08 release). gatord is fixed to build for ARMv8.
    • dropped multi_pmu_v2 topic by ARM LT (no longer used)
    • updated topic from Qualcomm LT (include IFC6410 board support)
    • replaced integration-linaro-vexpress topic by integration-linaro-vexpress64. Starting from 2014.10 release, linux-linaro kernel tree will use the mainline support for 32-bit vexpress boards. integration-linaro-vexpress64 carried over FVP Base and Foundation models, and Juno support from the integration-linaro-vexpress.
    • updated LLVM topic (uses llvmlinux-2014.10.01 branch – the most recent v3.17-based version of llvmlinux-latest)
    • dropped ARMv7 big endian topic(obsoleted; most of the patches are upstream)
    • added ILP32 patch set v3 with one minor build fix. (ILP32 vs LP64 data models)
    • config fragments changes – distribution.conf: CONFIG_IPV6=y replaced with CONFIG_IPV6=m
  • Linux Linaro LSK 2014.10:
    • The v3.14 based LSK based on kernel.org 3.14.19 stable tree
    • Updates to:
      • kernel.org 3.10.55 stable tree
      • Android support (from Google and Linaro)
      • ARMv8 fixes and performance enhancements
      • UEFI support
      • Mailbox framework
  • Linaro Toolchain Binaries 2014.10
    • based on GCC 4.9 and updated to latest Linaro TCWG releases (Linaro GCC 4.9-2014.10)
    • first release built with cbuild2, adding more maintainable code base and automatic testing
    • binary tarballs have been splitted into 3 parts. As a result, you can install only the parts needed:
      • gcc-linaro-*.tar.xz – the compiler and tools
      • runtime-linaro-*.tar.xz – runtime libraries needed on the target
      • sysroot-linaro-*.tar.xz – sysroot (a set of libraries and headers to develop against)
  • Linaro builds of AOSP 14.10
    • built with Linaro GCC 4.9-2014.10
    • AOSP master build for Juno is cleaned up. It now builds without any patches on AOSP projects. It builds by adding 9 projects to AOSP manifest related to device, kernel, toolchain and helper tools.
    • LSK Android testing issues are fixed for ARMv8 Fast Models
    • bc tool is added to ARMv8 Android Juno build
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2014.10
    • integrated Linaro GCC 4.9-2014.10
    • fixed shadow securetty for SBSA compatible UART
    • switched OpenJDK to upstream aarch64 hg repos
    • dropped mongodb from LAMP images
    • upstreaming:
      • updated acpica 20140828 release
      • updated acpitests 20140828 release
      • updated pm-qa to 0.4.14 release
      • added aarch64 support to libunwind
      • fixed PHP build warnings
  • Linaro Ubuntu 14.10 – Updated packages: Juno firmware 0.8.2, LSK 3.10.58/3.14.22 and linux-linaro 3.17 kernels, xf86-video-freedreno 1.3.0
  • Debian arm64 support is going very well. More than 90% of the packages are built. The effort is on track to get next Debian release with an officially supported arm64 architecture.
  • KVM CI loop on Juno is completed. The remaining work is happening on Xen CI loop.

You can visit https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1410/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB, LMB (Linaro Member Builds), and community builds, as well as Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain components.

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Linux 3.17 Released

October 9th, 2014 5 comments

Linus Torvalds announced the release of Linux Kernel 3.17 on Sunday:

So the past week was fairly calm, and so I have no qualms about releasing 3.17 on the normal schedule (as opposed to the optimistic “maybe I can release it one week early” schedule that was not to be).

However, I now have travel coming up – something I hoped to avoid when I was hoping for releasing early. Which means that while 3.17 is out, I’m not going to be merging stuff very actively next week, and the week after that is LinuxCon EU…

What that means is that depending on how you want to see it, the 3.18 merge window will either be three weeks, or alternatively just have a rather slow start. I don’t mind getting pull requests starting now (in fact, I have a couple already pending in my inbox), but I likely won’t start processing them for a week.

Anyway, back to 3.17. Nothing major happened during the last week, as you can see from the appended shortlog. Mostly drivers (i915, nouveau, ethernet, scsi, sound) and some networking fixes. With some misc noise all over.

Go out and test,

Linus

Kernel 3.16 added Nouveau drivers for GK20A GPU (Tegra K1), ARM64/EFI boot, improved support for Xen, KVM, EFI, NFS, as well as various changed to networking, and more…  Some noticeable changes for Linux 3.17:

  • Gamepads – Added Microsoft Xbox One controller support, improvements to Sony SIXAXIS support
  • Toshiba “Active Protection Sensor” support which stops your harddrive from spinning when the accelerator detects your laptop is in free fall…
  • “Cross-thread filter setting” for secure computing facility:
        int seccomp(unsigned int operation, unsigned int flag, const char *args);
    

    See manpage for details.

  • Enhanced AMD Radeon R9 290 support
  • Miscellaneous Nouveau driver improvements, including Kepler GPU fixes

New features and improvements specific to the ARM architecture include:

  • AllWinner
    • A10/A20 – IR driver
    • A31 – PIO/R_PIO external interrupts, DMAengine, GMAC
    • A23: Timers, UARTs, initial bringup, Basic clocks,  PIO/R_PIO drivers
    • New boards: ba10-tvbox; Merrii A31 Hummingbird; pcDuino V3
  • Rockchip
    • Enabled RK3288 SoC support
    • Added RK3xxx I2S controller, RK3288 clock controller, RK3066 and RK3188 clock driver.
    • Added RK3288 evaluation boards
  • Added basic support for Mediatek MT6589 SoCs
  • NEON implementation of crypto algorithms (SHA1; SHA512).
  • Marvell Kirkwood now fully “device tree-ified”, mach-kirkwood directory deleted
  • Added APM X-Gene SoC ethernet driver support.
  • Various changes for Broadcom BCM7xxx STB SoCs, Fresscale i.MX, Samsung Exynos & S5PV210, Nvidia Tegra, Renesas SH and TI AM43xx SoCs.
  • ARM64 / ARMv8 – Added 48-bit adress space, CONFIG_CC_STACKPROTECTOR (GCC’s -fstack-protector), audit support, and context tracking

I’ve also been asked about MIPS changes last time, so here it is:

  • Add Loongson-3B support
  • Add NUMA support for Loongson-3
  • BCM47XX: Detect more then 128 MiB of RAM (HIGHMEM)
  • BCM47XX: add Microsoft MN-700 and Asus WL500G
  • Support CPU topology files in sysfs
  • kernel: cpu-probe: Add support for the HardWare Table Walker
  • perf: Add hardware events for P5600

Further details on Linux 3.17 changes will soon be available on Kernelnewbies.org. For more details about ARM changes, remember to also check ARM architecture and drivers sections.

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Mediatek Releases Linux Source Code for Android One Smartphones

September 18th, 2014 6 comments

Android One is a program by Google aiming at bringing low cost smartphones to the emerging markets with firmware updates to the latest Android version guaranteed for two years. Three phones part of Android One program have recently been announced for the Indian market: Micromax Canvas A1, Karbonn Sparkle V, and Spice Dream Uno, and Android One phones will be available in Indonesia, the Philippines and South Asia (Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka) by the year of the year. The three phones currently available sell for $100, which based on the specs (quad core processor, 1GB RAM, 4GB flash, 4.5″ display) is not exactly an aggressive pricing compared to what is already available from Aliexpress, but the main advantage here is clearly Google support with promised firmware updates, and currently Android 4.4.4. All these phones appear to be powered by Mediatek MT6582, and company decided to release the Linux 3.4.67 source code on Google servers. Please note it’s not the first time Mediatek Linux source code has been released, but at the time, the code was pretty messy, and not standard, so hopefully working with Google may have improved things.

Mediatek_Linux_Kernel_Android_One

Here’s how you can get it:

git clone https://android.googlesource.com/kernel/mediatek/ -b android-mediatek-sprout-3.4-kitkat-mr2

Before building the kernel, you may want to install Android gcc toolchain (in Ubuntu 14.04):

sudo apt-get install gcc-arm-linux-androideabi

Then the build should start with a script::

./build.sh

But it fails looking for an existing external script… Oh well. So I located a config file for MT6582, and completed the build the usual way:

make ARCH=arm sprout_defconfig
make ARCH=arm CROSS_COMPILE=arm-linux-androideabi- -j8

and it could generate zImage successfully.

I’ve also checked the Kernel Configuration, and it seems the “Mediatek Properitary Configuration” (sic) section found in the older 3.4.5 source code has now disappeared, and the company is using a standard method to define the kernel configuration (see screenshot above).

Via XDA Developers Blog

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