Archive

Posts Tagged ‘laptop’

GPD Pocket Cherry Trail 7″ Portable Computer Runs Ubuntu 16.04 or Windows 10 (Crowdfunding)

February 15th, 2017 17 comments

GPD HK launched GPD WIN Windows 10 portable gaming console with a Cherry Trail Atom x7 processor and a 5.5″ display last year on Indiegogo, and while the crowdfunding campaign works very well with over $700,000 raised, the company realized many people just wanted an affordable portable computer, so they removed the joyticks, increased the display size, and upgraded the processor in their GPD Pocket 7″ portable computer powered by an Intel Atom X7-Z8750 SoC and pre-loaded with either Windows 10 Home or Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

GPD Pocket specifications (subject to change):

  • SoC –  Intel Atom x7-Z8750 quad core Cherry Trail processor @ 1.6 / 2.56 GHz  with a 16EU Intel HD graphics Gen9
  • System Memory – 8GB LPDDR3-1600
  • Storage – 128GB eMMC flash
  • Display – 7″ multi-touch display with 1920×1200 resolution, 16:10 aspect ratio; Corning Gorilla Glass 3
  • Video Output – micro HDMI port for final model (prototype has mini HDMI port)
  • Audio – Realtek ALC5645,  built-in stereo speaker, microphone, 3.5mm headset jack
  • Connectivity –  802.11 a/b/g/n/ac WiFi, Bluetooth
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 type C port with power/data/audio/video support,1x USB 3.0 type A port
  • Keyboard – QWERTY keyboard
  • Sensors – Gravity Sensor,Hall sensor
  • Battery – Non-removable 7,000 mh Li-Po battery good for about 12 hours
  • Dimensions – 180 x 106 x 18.5 mm (material: magnesium alloy)
  • Weight – 480g

Click to Enlarge

The portable computer will ship with a  5V/2.5A charger (US plug), an international  warranty card good for one year, and a specification sheet. Note that it won’t be fanless, as it’s cooled with a “copper radiator pipe, a large-diameter heat output pipeline”, and and a fan.

The project has now been launched with a funding goal of $200,000 on Indiegogo, where you can get GPD Pocket with Windows 10 or Ubuntu 16.04 for $399, a $200 discount over the $599 retail price once it becomes broadly available, or so they claim. They also have other rewards including a USB type C hub, and discounts for multiple quantities. Worldwide shipping is included in the price, and delivery is scheduled for June 2017.

$369 CHUWI Hi13 2-in-1 Windows 10 Tablet is Equipped with a 3000×2000 Display, Supports Ubuntu / Linux

February 15th, 2017 10 comments
I’ve recently reviewed CHUWI LapBook 14.1 laptop powered by an Intel Apollo Lake Celeron N3450 quad core processor, and found it to be a perfectly usable entry-level laptop with a few caveats like potential issues with USB ports, and the lack of brightness keys. The company is now about to launch with a higher end model, with the same processor, but instead of a 14.1″ Full HD display it will come with a high resolution 3000×2000 touchscreen 13.5″ display. The tablet will sell with Windows 10, but the company also claims support for Ubuntu, and other Linux distributions will likely work too.

Click to Enlarge

CHUWI Hi13 specifications:

  • SoC – Intel Celeron N3450 quad core “Apollo Lake” processor @ 1.1 GHz / 2.2 GHz (Burst frequency) and 12 EU Intel HD graphics 500 @ 200 MHz / 700 MHz (Burst freq.); 6W TDP
  • System Memory – 4GB DDR3L memory
  • Storage – 64 GB eMMC storage + micro SD slot for up to 128GB extra
  • Display – 13.5″ touchscreen display with 3000 x 2000 resolution, 3:2 aspect ratio
  • Video Output – micro HDMI port
  • Audio –  Via HDMI port, 4x speakers, microphone, 3.5mm audio jack
  • Connectivity – Dual band 802.11 b/g/n/ac WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0 LE
  • Keyboard – Detachable metal rotary QWERTY keyboard
  • USB – 2x USB port on keyboard, 1x USB type C port on tablet with support for power, data, audio & video
  • Camera – 5MP rear camera, 2MP front-facing camera
  • Battery – 10,000mAh battery, fast charging with 24W power supply
  • Dimensions – 334 x 222 x 9.2mm
  • Weight – 1080 grams (tablet only)
The 2-in-1 hybrid tablet/laptop will also sell with a Chuwi HiPen H3, and the older HiPen H1 stylus also works with it.
 The company also provided a comparison table between CHUWI Hi13, Microsoft Surface Book, and Apple iPad Pro.
Hi13 Surface Book iPad Pro (12.9-inch)
Price $369 Starting at $1499 Starting at $799
Operating system Windows 10 (Ubuntu OS support) Windows 10 iOS 10
Screen size 13.5 inch 13.5 inch 12.9 inch
Resolution 3000 x 2000 3000 x 2000 2732 x 2048
Pixel density (PPI) 267 267 264
Aspect ratio 3:2 3:2 4:3
Speakers Four speaker audio Two speaker audio Four speaker audio
Thinness 9.2mm 13.0mm 6.9mm
Processor Quad-core Intel Apollo Lake Dual-core Intel Core i5/i7 Dual-core Apple A9X
Fanless design Yes No Yes
All-metal design Yes No Yes
Type-C port 1 x USB Type-C None None
HDMI port 1x Micro HDMI None None
Stylus HiPen H3 Surface Pen Apple Pencil
Keyboard Detachable rotary keyboard Detachable rotary keyboard Keyboard cover

While there are some similarities, the cheapest Surface Book comes with 8GB RAM and a 128 SSD, and a dual core Core i5 processor that will be much faster than the Apollo Lake processor, and usable for video editing and recent 3D games, which won’t be the case for CHUWI Hi13. Nevertheless, that could still be an interesting option for people looking for a device with a high resolution display for less than $400.

CHUWI Hi13 will be officially released on February 20, with pre-orders for $369 starting on the same date. [Update: You’ll find the device on GearBest, GeekBuying and Aliexpress for about $350]

CHUWI LapBook 14.1 Windows 10 Firmware, Drivers, and BIOS

February 13th, 2017 No comments

In case you’ve installed another operating system like Ubuntu on CHUWI Lapbook 14.1 laptop, and want to re-install Windows 10, CHUWI has released Windows 10 firmware, drivers, and LapBook 14.1 “BIOS” in their forums.

So I’ve re-installed Windows 10 on the laptop using the Windows 10 image. You’ll need to download the 8 files CHUWI LapBook 14.1 Windows.part1.rar to CHUWI LapBook 14.1 Windows.part8.rar, and after extracting them you should get a “CHUWI LapBook 14.1 Windows” directory with all necessary files to reinstall Windows.

The files take 8GB, so it may not fit on all 8GB flash drives, and you may need to use a 16GB or greater drive. I just copied the files to an 64GB flash drive formatted with NTFS, insert the drive into the USB 2.0 port of the laptop, and I could start the installation process at boot time.

Click to Enlarge

However, it quickly failed as it tried to install Windows 10 on the flash drive itself:

Virtual Disk Service Error:

The operation is not supported on removable media.

The system cannot open the device or file specified.

Then I remember I had to set the USB drive label to WINPE for this to work. So I have to repartition the drive, format it to NTFS, set the label WINPE, and copy the files again. I reinserted the drive into the laptop, and update started successfully and went much further this time.

Note that by default CHUWI LapBook 14.1 boots from USB first, but if you have changed the settings in the BIOS, you’ll have to press F7 at boot time in order to select the drive. The installation went ahead, and after a while the laptop shutdown. I removed the USB drive, and pressed the power button to carry on with the installation.

Click to Enlarge

At this point System Preparation Tool 3.10 windows pops up, and I just clicked on OK which rebooted the laptop again, and brought me to the usual Windows 10 setup wizard where you select the language, WiFi network, setup and account, etc…

I just went through it as usual, and everything works.

If you have one of the earlier model, and your BIOS is older than version “A2W6_NA14.012”, you may to upgrade the BIOS by downloading “LapBook 14.1 BIOS 20161230.zip” and extracting the files to a USB flash drive formatted with FAT32/NTFS, insert it in the laptop, and boot it to complete the update.

How to Assign Brightness Keys in Ubuntu 16.04 and Greater

February 8th, 2017 No comments

Yesterday, I installed Ubuntu 17.04 in CHUWI LapBook 14.1, and was surprised everything appeared to work properly. However, the laptop does not come with brightness up and down keys. So I looked for ways to assign other keys to adjust brightness on the laptop, and eventually found a solution on AskUbuntu, and tried the options for Ubuntu 16.04.

First we need to install xdotool, a utility that simulate keyboard input and mouse activity:

Once it’s done, go to the Dash, start Keyboard settings app, select Shortcuts tab, and click on the + icon on the bottom of the window to bring up the “Custom Shortcut” window. Now fill the Name field with “Brightness Up”, and the Command field with:

Repeat the procedure with for the down key filling the Name field with “Brightness Down”, and the Command:

Now we should have our two brightness keys, and we just need to assign key by clicking the right column and selecting the shortcut.

Click to Enlarge

I never use “Audio next” (Fn + F8) nor “Audio previous” (Fn + F7), so I assigned the first to Brightness Up, and the second to Brightness Down, and could control the brightness that way.

That was easy. The only problem is that it only works after you login.

Categories: Hardware, Linux, Ubuntu Tags: chuwi, laptop, Linux, tutorial, ubuntu

Installing Ubuntu 17.04 on CHUWI LapBook 14.1 Apollo Lake Laptop

February 7th, 2017 30 comments

Since I’ve completed the review of CHUWI LapBook 14.1 with Windows 10 last week-end, I’ve decided to give it a try with a Linux distribution, and I chose to go with a daily build of Ubuntu 17.04 since we’ve seen Apollo Lake platforms need a recent Linux kernel. While Ubuntu 17.04 will be officially release in April 2017, likely with Linux 4.10, the current (alpha) build comes with Linux 4.9. I had already quickly booted Ubuntu 17.04 on the Laptop from a USB drive flashed using Rufus right after the review, but today I’ve just decided to wipe out Windows 10, and replace it with the Linux distributions and check what works, what does not.

Click to Enlarge

The first thing you’ll have to do is to press Esc while starting the laptop to enter the BIOS / UEFI “Aptio Setup Utility”, go to the Boot menu, and change from “Windows” to “Linux” for “OS Slelect” (sic.) option.

Click to Enlarge

If you don’t do that, you’ll only have a cursor on the top left of the display when you boot Linux from the USB flash drive. Save to apply the options, and at next boot your bootable USB flash drive should boot into Ubuntu. If not, press F7 at boot time to access the boot menu shown below.

In my case the flash drive was the first boot device so it started automatically, and after a few seconds, you’ll be asked to try or install Ubuntu.

I’d recommend to just try the first time, and if you can login and connect to WiFi, you can do the actual installation, which I did, and after a few second I got to the graphical installation program asking me to select the language.

So I carried on, connecting to my wireless access point in the process, and selecting US keyboard. I also checked “Download updates while installing Ubuntu” and “Install third-party software…”

Click to Enlarge

I was stuck in the installation in the next screen “Installation Type”, after after selecting Erase disk and install Ubuntu, the Install Now button was grayed out. I tried to select other option, but no luck the button was still unusable.

Click to Enlarge

I went back a few times, and I tried again, and after several attempt, I could finally click on Install Now.

Click to Enlarge

At this stage it warns me it will destroy all data on selected partitions, meaning here that it will completely wipe out Windows 10, and I have not yet a recovery method. I have asked CHUWI for a recovery firmware image or Windows 10 drivers, but I have yet to get an answer. Nevertheless I clicked on Continue, and the installation proceeded.

Then remove the USB flash drive, rebooted the laptop, and within half a minute or so, I could browse the web and watching YouTube videos in Ubuntu immediately.

Click to Enlarge

Details app still shows “Ubuntu 16.10”, but checking parameters in the command line shows it’s definitely Ubuntu 17.04:

All specifications are correctly detected with an Intel Celeron N3450 processor, 4GB RAM, 64GB eMMC flash. I also tested all hardware ports and features to check which drivers may be missing.

Features Results
Display OK
Keyboard OK
Mousepad OK
WiFi OK
Bluetooth Pairing with phone OK, file transfer failed
USB 2.0 port OK
USB 3.0 port OK
micro SD slot OK
Headphone jack OK
Speakers OK
Microphone OK
Webcam OK
mini HDMI OK

So everything works, except Bluetooth which can pair with my phone, but I could not transfer files in any direction. So the driver might be OK, with some other issues in Ubuntu? If you’ve read the Windows 10 review you know that I had three USB flash drive, and only one would work in both USB 2.0 & 3.0 ports. In Ubuntu, I still have one that is not recognized at all (and nothing in dmesg), so I guess it might be a contact issue, but the other two work with both USB ports. When I connected the mini HDMI port to my TV, the laptop switches automatically to extended desktop mode.

There may be some issues that I missed, but so far CHUWI LapBook 14.1 looks like a perfectly usable $250 Ubuntu laptop if you use a distribution with a recent Linux kernel. If you are interested you can pre-order it on GearBest or Banggood.

CHUWI LapBook 14.1 Apollo Lake Laptop Review – Part 2: Windows 10 Benchmarks, User Experience, and Battery Life

February 5th, 2017 14 comments

CHUWI LapBook 14.1 is the one of the first Apollo Lake laptop on the market. It features a 14.1″ IPS display, a Celeron N3450 quad core processor, 4GB RAM and 64 GB storage. The company has sent me a sample for review, and I had already check out the hardware in “CHUWI LapBook 14.1 Apollo Lake Laptop Review – Part 1: Unboxing & (Partial) Teardown“, so since then I’ve played with it including checking emails & news, writing a blog post on CNX Software, and watching some YouTube videos, as well as running benchmarks and estimating battery life, so I’ll report about my experience with the laptop in the second part of the review.

Click to Enlarge

CHUWI LapBook 14.1 System Information

LapBook 14.1 runs an activated version of Windows 10 Home 64-bit on an Intel Celeron 3450 “Apollo Lake” quad core processor @ 1.1 GHz / 2.2 GHz with 4 GB RAM (3.84 GB usable)

Click to Enlarge

The internal storage is a 64GB eMMC flash with a 57.1 GB Windows partition. The 64GB storage could mean it does not quality for a discounted Windows 10 license, as the requirements are  4GB RAM max, 14.1 display size max, and up to 32GB eMMC flash/SSD.

64GB storage will be filled quickly in Windows 10, especially if you have lots of emails, and store more and more pictures over time. It’s possible to extend storage via the micro SD slot, and possibly via an M.2 connector inside the device. USB storage is also an option, but as we’ll see below, I would not recommend it with this laptop.

I have taken a screenshot of Device Manager for people who want more details about peripherals.

Click to Enlarge

HWInFO64 mostly reports about the Intel Celeron N3450 processor, and as expected it’s exactly the same part number (CPU/Stepping/SSPEC) as on Voyo VMac Mini.

Click to Enlarge

The motherboard is named Hampoo A2W6_NA14 with the UEFI BIOS dated 12/30/2016.

CHUWI LapBook 14.1 Benchmarks

Let’s run some benchmarls on the laptop and compare them to Voyo VMac mini Celeron N3450 mini PC benchmarks results.

Click to Enlarge

LapBook 14.1 got 1,584 points in PCMARK 8 Home Accelerated 3.0, which compares to 1,566 points on Voyo VMac Mini that contrary to the laptop is actively cooled. So basically the score are identical here.

3DMark results are also pretty close with Ice Storm 1.2 (20,982 points), Cloud Gate 1.1 (2,092 points), and Sky Diver 1.0 (931 points), against respectively 18,892, 2,130, and 941 points for Voyo VMac Mini (N3450).

Click to Enlarge

The laptop achieved 830,7 points in PassMark PerformanceTest 9.0, against 998.4 points for the mini PC which is faster in all 5 categories: CPU, 2D Graphics, 3D Graphics, Memory, and Disk.

Click to Enlarge

Internal storage performance is acceptable with 256/116.4 MB/s sequential R/W speeds, and decent random read and write speeds, but not quite as fast as some other low costs devices.

For example, Voyo V1 VMac Mini SSD achieved about 500 MB/s read speed and 200 MB/s write speed, with significantly faster random R/W operations too.

CHUWI LapBook 14.1 User Experience

Two big parts of deciding whether a laptop is worth your consideration are the display and keyboard. The latter feels really nice to use, but unfortunately lacks brightness adjustment keys, which can be a pain is you set the brightness really low at night, and then need to use the laptop in broad daylight. I’m quite happy with the Full HD display, but you have to know it’s a non-touch display, it does not rotate that much (see video below), and viewing angles are not that great on the side. For my personal use, those did not affect me at all.

I’ve run some typical tasks, and shot a video with:

  • Multi-tasking – Launching and using Firefox, Thunderbird, LibreOffice, and Gimp at the same time
  • Web Browsing with Firefox
    • Loading multiple tabs with CNX Software blog
    • Playing a flash game  (Candy Crush Saga)
    • Playing a 1080p YouTube Videos
  • Gaming with Asphalt 8

Overall, I’m quite happy with the performance considering it’s a low power, fanless, entry-level laptop. I could load my hundreds of thousands emails in ThunderBird, while browsing the web with multiple tabs, and editing photos with gimp. 1080p YouTube videos are watchable in Firefox, although there are a few dropped frames here and there from time to time. I did not really notice it, and if you want slightly better playback, you can use Microsoft Edge browser with YouTube. Asphalt 8 feels a little smoother than in VMac Mini (N4250) possibly because the display is smaller.

The laptop also comes with a mini HDMI port to connect to an external display. A cable is not included so you’ll have to buy your own adapter or cable.

Click to Enlarge

Once connected Windows 10 will default in clone mode, but I had no trouble switching to extended display, and I had two Full HD independent displays.

I used a USB mouse connected to the laptop for close to 5 hours, and I had no problems, but this was another story with USB flash drives.

USB 2.0 Port OK Not detected OK
USB 3.0 Port OK Not detected Detected, but not mounted (“No Media”)

The laptop has two USB ports, one 2.0 port, and one 3.0 port, as you can see I did not have always have luck with my flash drives, especially the USB 3.0 port. This is what my DataTraveler G4 USB 3.0 flash looked like in Disk Management while connected to the USB 3.0 port.

“No Media”, but if I plugged the very same flash drive to the USB 2.0 port, it could be mounted.

A USB hub allowed me to work around the issues. However, I downloaded some system info and benchmarking tools on the laptop, copied them to one of the USB drive, but once I try to install those on another computer some of the files appeared to be corrupted. So I would not trust USB storage with important data, or you have to make sure you run some data sanity check (e.g. MD5) on your files. It’s also possible I was just unlucky, but it’s something to keep in mind.

CHUWI LapBook 14.1 Battery Life

Battery life is also an important aspect. While companies like Hewlett Packard are using MobileMark 2014 for testing battery on their Windows 10 laptops. but it’s a paid program, and I could not find a free battery testing application. So instead, I did my own “real use” case by charging the battery to 100%, and doing things on the laptop,  I normally do on my desktop PC in a typical day with two main use cases:

  1. Working outside from 9:00 to 12:00 with 100% brightness, checking emails, browsing the web, and editing pictures in Gimp
  2. Play YouTube videos in Firefox indoor with brightness set to 25% from 12:30 to about 14:00

When I started, Windows expected about 5 hours and a half of battery life.

I’d like to note I have lots of messages in Thunderbird because of mailing lists and RSS feeds (a few hundreds thousands), so Thunderbird was pretty active during the morning.

Click to Enlarge

After 3 hours I had 37% of battery capacity left. I had lunch, and then I went indoor to watch YouTube videos, and it lasted about 1h30 until the battery was fully depleted. So I had 4h30 of battery life on a charge.

An earlier full charge of the battery from 13% to 100% took just under 3 hours.

Conclusion

CHUWI LapBook 14.1 laptop almost matches all my needs. It is lightweight, the full HD display is good enough for me, battery life is good for about 5 hours, performance is acceptable for tasks such as web browsing, office applications, watching YouTube videos, and occasional light gaming. Normally I like to get at least 512 GB storage in a laptop, and that one only comes with 64GB eMMC flash with average performance, but it can be expanded with a micro SD card and possibly and M.2 SSD, but the latter are still quite expensive compared to hard drives. I also miss the keys to adjust brightness, and the main issue I found on the device is that USB mass storage is unreliable with some flash drives not  supported, and potentially data corruption when they are.  One of my other requirements is to run Ubuntu, so I’ll try to install Ubuntu 17.04 (daily build) on the laptop.

I’d like to thank CHUWI for sending an early sample of the laptop, which is not yet for sale, but available for pre-order on sites like GearBest and Banggood for $259.99 and up with shipping scheduled by the end of February.

Olimex Teres I A64 DIY Open Source Hardware Laptop Kit Design Complete, To Sell for 225 Euros

February 2nd, 2017 21 comments

Olimex has been working on an open source hardware Olimex A64 laptop for a little over a year, and the company has now complete thed hardware design of their TERES I laptop, and are working on finalizing the software design before accepting orders for 225 Euros for TERES-A64-BLACK and TERES-A64-WHITE models.

As explained in the instructions manual, Olimex laptop will not be sold assembled, but as a kit to let the users assemble the following parts themselves:

  • TERES-006-Keyboard QWERTY keyboard
  • TERES-023-Touch touchpad with TERES-022-Touch-Cover and TERES-010-Touch-Btns
  • TERES-014-Screw-Set with 42 pieces of different kind of screws.
  • TERES-PCB3-Touch PCB
  • TERES-PCB2-IO PCB with headphone jack, micro SD slot, and a USB port
  • TERES-PCB4-Btn PCB for the power button together with TERES-009-Pwr-Btn plastic and TERES-013-LED-pipe
  • TERES-PCB1-A64 motherboard based on Allwinner A64 processor.
  • TERES-PCB5-KEYBOARD keyboard control board
  • Display parts: TERES-008-LCD-Back, TERES-016-Hinge-Set, TERES-007-LCD-Frame, and TERES-015-LCD 11.6″ LCD panel
  • TERES-019-Camera & TERES-020-Camera-Lens for the webcam
  • Speakers, battery,WiFi antenna, and a few flat cables to connect all the boards together

Click to Enlarge

That’s quite a lot of parts, but the instructions are clear enough, and you and/or your kid) will have bragging rights to say “I’ve made my own laptop!” wchich should have the following specifications:

  • SoC – Allwinner A64 quad core ARM Cortex-A53 processor @ 1.2 GHz with Mali-400MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR3L
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC Flash, micro SD slot
  • Display – 11.6″ 1366×768 pixels display
  • Video Output – 1x mini HDMI 1.4 port
  • Audio – Via mini HDMI, 3.5mm audio jack, 2x speakers, microphone
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n WiFi up to 150Mbps, Bluetooth 4.0 LE
  • USB – 2x USB port ports
  • Front camera
  • QWERTY keyboard + touchpad with 2 buttons
  • Battery – 7,000mAh capacity
  • Weight – 980 grams

You’re not quite done yet, as you still have to flash the firmware/operating system – either Android or Linux – on a micro SD, in order to boot the laptop. Software and hardware documentation is available in github. The software currently includes ARM trusted firmware, u-boot, the Linux kernel and device tree files with more common soon. The hardware has been designed with KiCAD open source EDA software, and if you want to change or improve one of the boards in the design, you can do so, as the source schematics and PCB layout are there for everyone to study and/or modify. If you don’t want to modify anything, but would like to have access to spare parts, you will be able to buy them instead.

eMMC, Audio, T-Card section of the Schematics – Click to Enlarge

If you go FOSDEM 2017, you’ll have opportunity to check out the laptop yourself since Olimex will be there.

Lenovo Yoga Book 2-in-1 Hybrid Laptop Features a Drawing Pad instead of a Keyboard, Ships with Windows, Android or DOS

January 28th, 2017 11 comments

Lenovo has launched yet another 2-in-1 hybrid laptop, but the Yoga Book has some interesting new feature as it does not come with an actual keyboard, but instead a large “Create Pad” (Wacom digitizer) that allows you to draw sketches, take notes, and yes, it can also be converted into a virtual keyboard too when needed. Lenovo has a $499 version with Android 6.0, and another one with Windows 10 for $549, but I initially found it on GearBest, selling the device for $642.91 shipped with DOS operating system instead to give the user the option to install his/her own choice of operating system.

Click to Enlarge

Lenovo Yoga Book specifications:

  • SoC – Up to Intel Atom x5-Z8550 quad core Cherry Trail processor
  • System Memory – Up to 4 GB LPDDR3
  • Storage – Up to 64 GB internal storage, and micro SD slot supporting up to 128 GB
  • Display – 10.1″ IPS LED Touch (1920 x 1200) with capacitive touch with AnyPen Technology
  • Create Pad – Capacitive touch and EMR Pen Technology
  • Audio – Dolby Atmos
  • Connectivity – 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.0
  • Camera –  8 MP auto-focus rear camera, 2 MP fixed-focus front-facing camera
  • Sensors – Vibrator, G-sensor, ambient light sensor, hall sensor, GPS, A-GPS
  • Battery – 8,500 mAh Li-ion Polymer battery with over 70 days in standby mode, and 15 hours for general usage
  • Dimensions – 25.65 cm x 17.07 cm x 0.96 cm
  • Weight – 690 grams and up

Click to Enlarge

According to Lenovo website, the laptop ships with one Real Pen, a Book Pad with 15 pages, and 3 Real Pen Ink Refills. I’d assume the power adapter and a user manual is also included. The model on GearBest only ships with the power adapter, a user manual and one touch screen pen.

The laptop/table was released at the end of last year, and several reviews have been published already, for example on TabletPCreview.com with Android and TechRadar with Windows 10, and reviewers were quite impressed with the Create Pad. The pen can be switched between a rubber tip and one with an ink cartridge better suited respectively for drawing and notetaking. The virtual “Halo” keyboard mode had more mixed reviews with some claiming it’s not really suitable for long typing sessions, while others saying that after a short learning curve, the keyboard worked well for them. However, reviewers wished Lenovo had used a faster processor in the device.