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Posts Tagged ‘linaro’

Linaro 15.04 Release with Linux 4.0 and Android 5.1

May 1st, 2015 1 comment

Linaro 15.04 has been released with Linux 4.0 (baseline), Linux 3.10.74 and 3.14.39 (LSK), and Android 5.1.1.

Other noticeable changes include support for the new DragonBoard 410c 96boards compliant board, the addition of A80 Optimusboard (Allwinner A80) to Android Kitkat build, Hisilicon D01 support added to the Debian installer, and support for Ubuntu ARM64 Gnome rootfs.

Highlights of the release:

  • Linux Linaro 4.0-2015.04
    • updated linaro-android topic: aosp/android-3.18 branch has been merged
    • GATOR topic: version 5.20.1
    • updated integration-linaro-vexpress64 topic by ARM LT (FVP Base and Foundation models, and Juno support)
    • updated topic from Qualcomm LT (IFC6410 and DB410c boards support):
      • Resource Power Manager (RPM) – MSM Shared Memory Driver (SMD) driver
      • quite some changes under drivers/gpu/drm/ related to adv7511 and adv7533 support
      • ASoC support for QCOM platforms
      • external Connector Class (extcon) support (used for USB VBUS and ID detection)
  • Linaro builds of AOSP 15.04
    • baseline updated to android-5.1.1_r1
    • updated Nexus 10 CI for LAVA testing
    • added Optimus A80 Android Kitkat build
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2015.04
    • removed stress recipe in favor of oe-core recipe
    • updated linux-linaro to ll_20150422.0 (based on 4.0)
    • libevent-fb: OE-core updated to 2.0.22, fix require statement
    • APM mustang boot failure was tracked down to using ‘arm64′ as U-Boot arch for the initramfs header while the vendor U-Boot 2013.04 expects ‘arm’.
    • upstreaming – strace: fix build for aarch64; libgpg-error 1.18: simplify tuple handling and add armv8b support
  • Linaro Ubuntu 15.04 – updated packages: LSK 3.10.74/3.14.39 and linux-linaro 4.0 kernels
  • U-Boot: upstream fastboot support
  • Add HiSilicon D01 platform support to Debian installer
  • Updated android-build job to work with docker slaves
  • Cleaned up ILP32 build job
  • LSK: enable debug options on regular builds
  • linux-linaro: ll-fold.sh script fixed to work correctly with newer git versions
  • CI bring up: tshark board Android member build
  • Added Ubuntu arm64 gnome rootfs
  • Added D01 platform to Coresight CI loop

Check out https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1504/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB, LMB (Linaro Member Builds), and community builds, as well as Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain components.

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ZTE ZX296702 Dual Core Cortex A9 SoC Boots Android in 10 Seconds with TuxOnice

April 28th, 2015 No comments

ZTE XZ296702 is a dual core Cortex A9 processor with a Mali-400 GPU that targets Android set-top boxes and media players, and while Charbax filmed a video with ZX296702-AD1 development board at Linaro Connect HK, initial patchsets were recently submitted to the Linux ARM Kernel mailing list for XZ296702 SoC and the development board.

ZX296702_Development_BoardThere aren’t any product page for ZX296702 processor, so instead let’s have a look at the board’s specifications:

  • SoC – ZTE ZX296702 dual core ARM Cortex A9 processor with Mali-400 GPU
  • System Memory – 512 MB RAM
  • Storage – 4GB flash + micro SD card
  • Video Output – HDMI + AV (RCA)
  • Audio Output – HDMI + Stereo audio (2x RCA)
  • Connectivity – Ethernet and Wi-Fi
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports
  • Power Supply – 5V

Considering the board is running Android 4.4, the specs are quite low end, however the developers claim to have performed memory optimizations, and improved the boot time to 10 seconds (Closer to 17 seconds based on the video below) in order to make the box feel like a higher-end device. I’ve been reviewing several products with higher end processors like Rockchip RK3288, Allwinner A80 or Mediatek MT6752, and fast eMMC flash, and the best devices can only boot in 15 to 20 seconds. So what kind of sorcery is that?

The developers explain that their reference platform used to boot in 30 seconds, but they’ve used open source tools, namely TuxOnice, to save RAM into the flash, and at boot time it will simply copy/uncompress the saved RAM back to memory, in the same way you use hibernation on your laptop.

ZTE ZX296702 processor is likely to be found only in ZTE set-top boxes for the Chinese and overseas market,s but I’ve also found the processor listed for sale on a Chinese website.

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TBS 2980 Matrix 2 AllWinner A80 Android TV Box Will Support USB Tuners

April 23rd, 2015 9 comments

TBS launched their Matrix 2910 media player based on Freescale i.MX6 Quad processor in 2013, and what made the platform especially interesting was support for the company’s USB DVB tuners in their Android and Ubuntu images. The company has now unveiled its successor with TBS 2980 Matrix 2 powered by Allwinner A80 octa core processor that will also support USB DVB-T2, DVB-C & DVB-S2 tuners.

TBS_Matrix_2TBS Matrix 2 specifications:

  • SoC – AllWinner A80 4x Cortex 15, 4x Cortex A7 big.LITTLE processor with PowerVR GC6230 GPU
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC + micro SD card slot
  • Video  Output – HDMI + AV port
  • Audio – HDMI, AV, and optical S/PDIF
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet, dual band Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 port, 2x USB 2.0 host ports
  • Misc – IR receiver, reset button
  • Power Supply – 5V/3A
  • Dimensions – 101 x 101 x 31 mm
  • Weight – 400 grams

Matrix 2 is significantly smaller than other Allwinner A80 devices like Tronsmart Draco AW80, mostly because it lacks the rather slow SATA port. The box runs Android 4.4 with Kodi pre-installed, and will ship with a power adapter, a remote control, and a user’s guide. I’ve also been told the mini PC will also boot Debian server or Ubuntu Linaro desktop distributions from the micro SD card.

TBS_Matrix_2_ARM_mini_PCThe list of supported USB tuners are not been provided, but I do know TBS 5520 multi-standard USB tuner will be used for development, and it supports DVB-S/S2, DVB-C/C2, DVB-T/T2, and ISBT standards, so all these should be covered. It’s quite likely tuners supported by the original Matrix mini PC will also be supported on Matrix 2.

TBS_5520_TunerTBS Matrix 2 sells for $149.99 plus shipping on BuyDVD.net. You may find more details on TBS 2980 Matrix 2 product page.

Thanks to Ovi for the tip.

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Bubblegum-96 Development Board Complies with 96Boards, Features Actions Semi S900 64-bit ARM Processor

April 16th, 2015 3 comments

We’ve already have two 96Boards compliant boards formally announced with HiSilicon Hikey and Qualcomm Dragonboard 410c, and Actions Semiconductor was also expected to release theirs soon. Albeit it’s not been officially announced yet, the company has been showcasing their Bubblegum-96 board at the Hong Kong Electronics Fair 2015.

Bubblegum-96Bubblegum-96 development board specifications:

  • SoC – Actions Semi S900 quad core Cortex A53 with PowerVR G6230 GPU
  • System Memory – 1 to 8GB LPDDR2 / LPDDR3(800MHz) / DDR3 or DDR3L
  • Storage – 4 to 64 GB eMMC 4.5 flash + micro SD slot
  • Video Output – HDMI 1.4 with HDCP up to 4K, MHL 2.1 up to 4K
  • Connectivity – Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 ports, 1x micro USB 2.0 port
  • Expansion
    • 40-pin LS (Low Speed) Expansion connector – UART, I2C, 12x GPIOs, SPI, PCM, 1.8V, +5V, GND…
    • 64-pin HS (High Speed) Expansion connector – DSI, CSI, SDIO, USB 2.0, I2C, etc…
  • Misc – On/off button
  • Power Supply – ATC2609 PMIC; Should be 8-18V / 2A input as per 96Boards specs but I can’t see any power barrels.
  • Dimensions – 85 x 54 mm (96Boards compliant)

The board can run Android 5.0 or Ubuntu based on Linaro codebase. They did not provide the exact RAM and storage capacity, but since the board needs to be low cost, I’d use they’ll go with 1GB RAM, and 4GB internal storage, just like the Hikey board. There will also be another board called Actduino S900 powered by the same processor, running the same images, but not compliant with 96Boards specifications, and adding an Ethernet port, an LCD connector and so on.

Via AndroidPC.es

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Inforce 6501 Micro SOM is a Tiny Module with Qualcomm Snapdragon S805 Processor

April 8th, 2015 No comments

Inforce Computing has now launched Inforce 6501 micro system-on-module (SoM) based on the same Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 processor found on their Inforce 6540 pico-ITX single board computer. The module measures just 50×28 mm, and integrates up to 3 GB RAM, up to 16 GB eMMC, and Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and GPS connectivity.

Inforce_6510_Micro_SoM

Inforce 6501 specifications:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 (APQ8084) quad core Krait 450 processor up to 2.7 GHz with Adreno 420 GPU, and Hexagon DSP V50 up to 800 MHz
  • System Memory – 2GB to 3GB PoP LPDDR3 @ 800 MHz; 2×64-bit 26.5GB/s memory bus
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC v4.5/v5.0, with options up to 16GB
  • Connectivity – Bluetooth 4.1 & 2×2 dual band 802.11 b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi (QCA6174), and GPS (QCA1530)
  • Peripherals and I/O via two 100-pin SoM connectors:
    • Video / Display – 1x HDMI 1.4a, 2x MIPI-DSI (4-lane) & touch screen,
    • Audio
      • 4x Line out, 3x Mic-in, 1x headphone out
      • 8-channel 7.1 surround sound, Dolby Digital plus, Dolby True HD and DTS-HD via HDMI
      • On-board WDC9320 audio codec
    • Camera – 2x MIPI-CSI (4-lane)
    • USB – 1x USB 2.0 (host), 1x USB 2.0 (device mode debug), 1x USB 3.0 (host)
    • 1x PCIe, SDC, SLIMBUS
    • JTAG, 8x GPIO, UART via 3-pin RS232, 5x I2C, SPI
  • Video / Image Capabilities
    • 4K Ultra HD video with HEVC (H.265) playback and H.264 capture
    • Dual image signal processors (ISPs) with ~1GP/s throughput and image sensors up to 55 MP
  • Power Supply – +3.3V DC input
  • Dimensions – 50 x 28 mm
  • Temperature Range – Operating: 0° C to 70° C; Storage: -20° C to 80° C

Inforce_Micro_SoM_Block_DiagramThe company provides Android 4.4.2 and Ubuntu (Linaro) 14.04 BSPs for the module based on Linux 3.4 kernel, available after board registration on the company’s website. as well as hardware documentation. The product brief can be downloaded freely, but the hardware reference manual also requires board registration.

To speed up development, Inforce SYS6501 development platform can be purchased, and includes the Inforce 6501 Micro SOM, a mini-ITX carrier board, a power supply, micro-USB cable, and an acrylic base.

SYS6501 Carrier Board with 6501 micro SOM

SYS6501 Carrier Board with Inforce 6501 micro SOM

The carrier board has the following key features:

  • Video / Display Output – 1x HDMI v1.4a, 1x eDP (display port), 1x MIPI-DSI connector (4-lane)
  • External Storage – micro SD slot (on back of board)
  • Audio – High Definition 7.1 Audio in/out
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet (RJ45), antenna connectors for Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and GPS
  • Camera – 2x MIPI-CSI connector (4-lane)
  • USB – 1 x USB 2.0 port; 1x USB 3.0 port; 1x USB 3.0 OTG port
  • Expansion
    • 1x Mini PCIe
    • EXP_CON female header for 5x I2C, SPI, 8x GPIOs, …
  • Serial – 1x RS-232
  • Debugging – Serial console, JTAG
  • Sensors – Integrated sensor board that includes 10-axis (Accelerometer, gyroscope, magnetometer, pressure) and motion sensors.
  • Misc – Volume and power buttons, DIP switches for boot selection.
  • Power Supply – +12V (5A typ.), ATX power connector, 2x AA batteries, or external battery via 10-pin header
  • Dimensions – 17cm x 17cm (Mini-ITX)
  • Temperature Range – Operating: 0° C to 70° C; Storage: -20° C to 80° C
Inforce_SYS6501_Development_Kit

Update: First Revision of the Board, the New Revision Will Be Slightly Different

Inforce 6501 Micro SOM sells for $225 with 2GB RAM and 4GB eMMC, while the development kit now goes for $449. However, Inforce computing is currently running a promotion where you can get the baseboard for free, and you can get a the discount coupon to get the complete kit for $225 by registering online (Company name required). More details should be available on Inforce 6501 Micro System on Module and Inforce 6501 Development Kit pages.

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Cubieboard 4 Ubuntu Review – Setup, Usability, and Performance

April 1st, 2015 6 comments

Cubieboard4 is a development board powered by Allwinner A80 octa-core processor with 2GB RAM and 16GB eMMC. I’ve already shown how to get started with the board using the pre-installed Android 4.4 image, and run some benchmarks in Android, so now it’s time to check out the Ubuntu Linaro 14.04 image provided by CubieTech. I’ll show how to install and setup Ubuntu 14.04 on the board using a micro SD card, run desktop applications like Chromium, Libre Office, and son on on the board, and complete the review with some Linux benchmarks.

Setting up Ubuntu on Cubieboard4

Firmware images for Cubiebord4 can be downloaded @ http://dl.cubieboard.org/model/cc-a80/Image/. Currently Android 4.4, Debian server, Ubuntu Linaro server, and Ubuntu Linaro desktop with LXDE desktop environment. That’s the latter I’ll use for the experiment, and two images are available:

  • linaro-desktop-cb4-card-hdmi-v0.4.img.7z – Bootable image from micro SD card
  • linaro-desktop-cb4-emmc-hdmi-v0.4.img.7z – Installation image to eMMC to be written to micro SD card (and not via PhoenixSuite).

I’ve just downloaded and flash the “card” image to a 32GB Class 10 micro SD card in a terminal windows in a Linux computer:

wget http://dl.cubieboard.org/model/cc-a80/Image/ubuntu-linaro/ubuntu-linaro-v0.4/linaro-desktop-cb4-card-hdmi-v0.4.img.7z
7z x linaro-desktop-cb4-card-hdmi-v0.4.img.7z
sudo dd if=linaro-desktop-cb4-card-hdmi-v0.4.img | pv | sudo dd of=/dev/sdX bs=16M

where X is the letter of your SD card, which you can check with lsblk. Be very careful as using the wrong letter may wipe out your hard drive, and you may consider using a virtual machine to be extra safe. This step also be done in a Windows computer with 7-zip and Win32DiskImager utilities.

Now insert the micro SD card into the board, connect the necessary cable, and power it on. After around 35 seconds, maybe a little more the first time, I get a usable desktop. Your own boot time will obviously be impacted by your micro SD card performance.

Cubieboard4_Ubuntu_LXDE

Lubuntu Desktop (Click for Original Size)

Firefox and Nautilus are not part of the default image, but I’ve installed them with apt-get, and added shortcuts to the desktop.

Usually, you need to run gparted or resize2fs to make full use if your SD card capacity, but this is automatically taken care of by the image, and my root partition was automatically extended to 30GB:

linaro@cubieboard4:~$ df -h
Filesystem       Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/root         30G  4.2G   25G  15% /
devtmpfs         814M  4.0K  814M   1% /dev
none             4.0K     0  4.0K   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
none             163M  476K  163M   1% /run
none             5.0M     0  5.0M   0% /run/lock
none             814M     0  814M   0% /run/shm
none             100M  4.0K  100M   1% /run/user
/dev/mmcblk1p2   128M  5.6M  123M   5% /media/mmcblk1p2
/dev/mmcblk1p7   756M  587M  170M  78% /media/linaro/57f8f4bc-abf4-655f-bf67-946fc0f9f25b
/dev/mmcblk1p10  630M   11M  620M   2% /media/linaro/57f8f4bc-abf4-655f-bf67-946fc0f9f25b1
/dev/mmcblk1p1   5.7G  3.4G  2.4G  59% /media/linaro/57f8f4bc-abf4-655f-bf67-946fc0f9f25b2
/dev/mmcblk0p1    12M  6.1M  5.9M  51% /media/linaro/29BC-6723

Since I’m connected to Internet via an Ethernet connection I did not have to configure anything else, except the timezone set with:

sudo dpkg-reconfigure tzdata

At this stage, you’ve got a fully workable ARM Linux computer, although if you want to use Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and/or a printer more configuration work is required, but I haven’t tried any of these.

Cubieboard4 Usability as a Desktop Computer

The image is quite minimal, and beside Pacman file manager and a few other small programs, only Chromium browser is already installed. So I installed Firefox, Libre Office, Nautilis and Gimp with apt-get:

sudo apt-get install libreoffice nautilus firefox gimp

The system is quite responsive, although programs don’t quite load as fast as from an SSD or eMMC, and you need to wait a few seconds for Chromium or Libre Office to load.

Since the font looked quite poor in Chromium, I installed Firefox, but I had the same results. So finally I installed Ubuntu fonts:

sudo apt-get install ttf-ubuntu-font-family

and configured the web browsers accordingly leading to much better font rendering.

I’ve run the following tests in Cubieboard4 to show the performance, and what is working or not:

  1. 30 seconds boot
  2. List of installed applications
  3. LibreOffice (Writer)
  4. Chromium – Multi-tabs, YouTube (embedded / full screen; VP9), and Candy Crush Saga (Flash game) in Facebook
  5. 3D hardware acceleration with es2gears and glmark2-es2
  6. 1080p video playback with VideoLAN
  7. Power off

I also ran htop in a terminal to show the eight cores CPU usage. Sorry the video is not quite straight and audio is poor with SJ1000 camera.

The system is working quite well, except with YouTube videos which are not so smooth, because YouTube has now mostly switched to VP9 codec, and 3D support failed with “DRI2: failed to authenticate”. Candy Crush Saga worked fine, although not amazingly smooth, but performance is not that much different from my regular Ubuntu PC for that game. 2D hardware acceleration is supposed to be implemented (a80-xf86-video-fbturbo), but I’m not quite sure how to formally test this. H.264 and MPEG4 video could be played in VideoLAN with only one CPU core use confirming hardware video decoding support, but MPEG2, VC1 and H.265 codecs all failed.

Click for Original Size

Click for Original Size

In the screenshot above, I play Big Buck Bunny in VideoLAN on the top left corner, but since hardware video decoding is activated, the video won’t show in the screenshot, which is perfectly normal.

Even though Cubieboard4 Ubuntu support is not too bad right now, I still think ODROID-XU3 Lite delivers a better Linux experience, especially when using an eMMC module, as programs load faster, 3D acceleration is working, as well as Kodi with hardware video decoding. The only downside is that flash (Chromium + pepperflash) did not work when I tried on XU3 Lite, but this may have been fixed by now.

Cubieboard4 Performance Testing in Linux

Phoronix Suite Benchmarks

I’ve installed the latest version of Phoronix Test Suite to run a few benchmarks in Linux:

sudo apt-get install php5-cli php5-gd 
wget http://phoronix-test-suite.com/releases/repo/pts.debian/files/phoronix-test-suite_5.4.1_all.deb
sudo dpkg -i phoronix-test-suite_5.4.1_all.deb

After configure the test suite for batch benchmark with

phoronix-test-suite batch-setup

I decide to run the same three tests as on ODROID-XU3 Lite, encoding MP3, compressing files, and performing some HTTP server tasks:

phoronix-test-suite batch-benchmark pts/encode-mp3 pts/compress-7zip pts/apache

Unfortunately, apache failed to compiled, so only the MP3 and 7-zip test completed.

Cubieboard4_vs_ODROID-XU3-Lite_MP3So the only direct comparison with the test I’ve done between ODROID-XU3 Lite and Cubieboard4 is for MP3 encoding, and in this test the Exynos platform is faster, but the Allwinner A80 board still compares favorably to slower or/and older ARM board like Radxa Rock, ODROID-C1, or PCDuino (cpu test) in 7-Zip test, especially this test runs on all available cores.

7-Zip_Cubieboard4_Radxa_Rock_ODROID-C1

 Mainline kernel compilation

Now let’s see how fast the board build Linux 3.19.

sudo apt-get install libncurses5-dev gcc make git exuberant-ctags
git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git
cd linux-stable
git checkout -b stable v3.19

Mainline kernel requires gcc 4.9 to build, but Ubuntu 14.04 only comes with gcc 4.8.2, so let’s install the new compiler. Since add-apt-repository is missing, we have to install the relevant package first:

sudo apt-get install software-properties-common

We’ll also need to edit /etc/lsb-release to replace DISTRIB_ID=Linaro by DISTRIB_ID=Ubuntu temporarly, as the toolchain repo has never heard about a Linaro distribution, and then we can complete gcc 4.9 installation.

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-toolchain-r/test
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install gcc-4.9

Allwinner enginners themselves are not directly involved in mainline kernel develompent, but they are usually in the loop when members of linux-sunxi community send patchsets to the ARM Linux kernel mailing list, which mean Allwinner processor are supported in mainline kernel, albeit with limitation. Allwinner A80 codename is sun9i, and we can see a device tree file for A80 OptimusBoard:

linaro@cubieboard4:~/linux-stable$ ls -l arch/arm/boot/dts/ | grep sun9
-rw-rw-r-- 1 linaro linaro   3561 Apr  1 13:23 sun9i-a80-optimus.dts
-rw-rw-r-- 1 linaro linaro  12608 Apr  1 13:23 sun9i-a80.dtsi

Nevertheless, I’ve built the kernel using sunxi default config used for all Allwinner platforms:

make sunxi_defconfig
time make -j8 CC=gcc-4.9
...
OBJCOPY arch/arm/boot/zImage
Kernel: arch/arm/boot/zImage is ready

real    6m36.198s
user    34m6.070s
sys    4m32.100s

So Cubieboard4 took 6 minutes on 36 seconds to build Linux 3.19, while ODROID-XU3 Lite took 5 minutes 43 seconds to build Linux 3.18, not too bad, but this is show some performance advantage for the Exynos processor.

Video Transcoding with avconv

Ideally video transcoding should not be done by software, since most ARM processors can handle MPEG2 to H.264 transcoding using the VPU, but this can still be useful to evaluate a processor performance, so just like for ODROID-XU3 Lite, I’ve converted a short MPEG2 into H.264 with avconc:

sudo apt-get install libav-tools
time avconv -i big_buck_bunny_1080p_MPEG2_MP2_25fps_6600K.MPG \
-vcodec libx264 -minrate 300k -maxrate 300k -bufsize 1835k bbb-h.264.avi
avconv version 9.11-6:9.11-2ubuntu2, Copyright (c) 2000-2013 the Libav developers
 built on Mar 24 2014 06:21:10 with gcc 4.8 (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.8.2-17ubuntu1)
Guessed Channel Layout for Input Stream #0.1 : stereo
Input #0, mpeg, from 'big_buck_bunny_1080p_MPEG2_MP2_25fps_6600K.MPG':
 Duration: 00:00:44.74, start: 0.240000, bitrate: 7159 kb/s
 Stream #0.0[0x1e0]: Video: mpeg2video (Main), yuv420p, 1920x1080 [PAR 1:1 DAR 16:9], 9792 kb/s, 24.75 fps, 25 tbr, 90k tbn, 50 tbc
 Stream #0.1[0x1c0]: Audio: mp2, 44100 Hz, stereo, s16p, 160 kb/s
[libx264 @ 0x6c9c0] using SAR=1/1
[libx264 @ 0x6c9c0] MB rate (734400000) > level limit (2073600)
[libx264 @ 0x6c9c0] using cpu capabilities: ARMv6 NEON
[libx264 @ 0x6c9c0] profile High, level 5.2
Output #0, avi, to 'bbb-h.264.avi':
 Metadata:
 ISFT : Lavf54.20.3
 Stream #0.0: Video: libx264, yuv420p, 1920x1080 [PAR 1:1 DAR 16:9], q=-1--1, 90k tbn, 90k tbc
 Stream #0.1: Audio: libmp3lame, 44100 Hz, stereo, s16p
Stream mapping:
 Stream #0:0 -> #0:0 (mpeg2video -> libx264)
 Stream #0:1 -> #0:1 (mp2 -> libmp3lame)
Press ctrl-c to stop encoding
frame= 1037 fps= 6 q=56.0 size= 30759kB time=40.60 bitrate=6205.9kbits/s

It took  3 minutes 3 seconds to convert the 44 seconds video, so just like with the Exynos board it’s not possible to transcode a 1080p video @ 25 fps in real-time by software, at least with avconv, and the parameters I used. ODROID-XU3 Lite was a bit faster however, managing to convert the same video in 2 minutes and 33 seconds.

Cubieboard4 can be purchased for $125 + shipping on R0ck.me, Eleduino, Seeed Studio, or others, and it’s also listed on Amazon US for $138.99 including shipping.

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Linaro 15.03 Release with Linux 4.0 and Android 5.1

March 27th, 2015 No comments

Linaro has just announced their 15.03 release with Linux 4.0-rc4 (baseline), Linux 3.10.72 and 3.14.36 (LSK), and Android 5.1.

The organization has worked on hardware platforms from members namely Qualcomm, ARM, HiSilicon, Samsung, and STMicro, including the recently announced 96Boards boards, and other ARMv8 platforms.

Highlights of the release:

  • Linux Linaro 4.0-rc4-2015.03
    • updated linaro-android topic
    • added a few build/boot fixes for Arndale (llct-misc-fixes topic)
    • GATOR topic: version 5.20.1
    • updated integration-linaro-vexpress64 topic by ARM LT (FVP Base and Foundation models, and Juno support)
    • updated topic from Qualcomm LT (ifc6410 board support)
    • simple EEPROM framework (via Qualcomm LT’s topic)
    • updated topic from HiSilicon LT (Hi36xx, HiP04, and X5HD2 families support)
    • rebased “ILP32 patch set v3″ onto 4.0-rc2
  • Linaro builds of AOSP 15.03
    • updated all the baselines to AOSP 5.1
    • added commit based trigger feature to CI builds
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2015.03
    • integrated Linaro GCC 4.9-2015.03
    • dismantled meta-aarch64 layer
    • created meta-ilp32 layer
    • cleaned out meta-bigendian layer
    • synced overlayed recipes with upstream
    • added full wget and rt-test on LAMP image as requested by QA team
    • update busybox xargs config as requested by QA team
    • integrated ODP 1.0
    • upstreaming:
      • sysprof: fix arm big-endian build
      • bitbake.conf: use http:// for GNU_MIRROR instead of ftp://
      • kexec-tools: fix build failure on aarch64_be architecture
      • busybox: update to 1.23.1 release
      • mozjs 17.0.0: fix aarch64 and 64k page builds, generic cleanups
  • Linaro Ubuntu 15.03
    • added packages: ti-calibrator
    • updated packages: LSK 3.10.72/3.14.36 and linux-linaro 4.0-rc4 kernels
    • Added ILP32 support for ARM64 to Linaro engineering builds
    • Dismantled meta-aarch64 in favour of OE-core aarch64 support
    • CI bring up: luvOS (Linux UEFI Validation Operating System)
  • KVM – support testing arm32 with arm64
  • Added b2120stxh410 to linux-mainline and linux-arm-soc-for-next build jobs
  • 96boards: enable Xorg by default in eMMC/SD debian build
  • Added 2 new build slaves
  • Migrated lt-qcom-ubuntu-images to docker based infrastructure
  • Upgraded ARMv8 build slaves to 3.19 kernel
  • Cleaned up LCR (Linaro Confectionery Release) information and instructions

Visit https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1503/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB, LMB (Linaro Member Builds), and community builds, as well as Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain components.

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Qualcomm Dragonboard 410c is Another 96Boards Compliant 64-bit ARM Development Board

March 12th, 2015 10 comments

Linaro announced the 96Boards initiative at Linaro Connect Hong Kong last month, and in collarabation with Huawei announced Hikey development board following this new standard. Qualcomm has now joined the Fray with Dragonboard 410c, a 96Boards board powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 410 quad core Cortex A53 processor.

Qualcomm_Dragonboard_410c

Dragonboard 410c (Click to Enlarge)

Dragonboard 410c specifications:

 

  • SoC- Qualcomm Snapdragon 410 (APQ8016) quad-core ARM CortexA53 @ 1.2 GHz with Adreno 306 GPU @ 400MHz
  • System Memory – LPDDR2/3 533MHz, Single-channel 32-bit (4.2GBps)
  • Storage – eMMC 4.51 + micro SD 3.0 (UHS-I)
  • Video Output – HDMI up to 1080p
  • Connectivity – Integrated 802.11 b/g/n, BT/FM, GPS
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB OTG port.
  • Camera – Support for 13 MP camera with Wavelet Noise Reduction, JPEG decoder, and other post-processing techniques done in hardware
  • Expansion:
    • 1x 40 pin low speed expansion connector – UART, SPI, I2S, I2C x2, GPIO x12, DC power
    • 1x 60 pin high speed expansion connector – 4L-MIPI DSI, USB, I2C x2, 2L+4LMIPI CSI
    • Analog expansion connector – Headset, Speaker, FM antenna
    • Arduino compatibility through mezzanine board
  • Power Supply – 6.5 – 18V DC input

Qualcomm_Dragonboard_410c_BottomThe board will support Linux and Android, and target embedded computing and Internet of Everything (IoE) products, such as robotics, cameras, medical devices, vending machines, smart buildings, digital signage, casino gaming consoles, etc…

That’s about all we know for now, except it will be launched in summer 2015. You can register your interest on Qualcomm’s DragonBoard 410c page.

 

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