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Embedded Linux Conference 2015 Schedule – IoT, Cars, and Drones

February 6th, 2015 No comments

Embedded Linux Conference 2015 will take place in San Jose, California, on March 23 – 25, 2015, and will focus on Drones, Things and Automobiles. The schedule has been published, and whether you’ll attend or not, it’s always interested to have a look at what will be talked about to have a peak into the future of Embedded Linux, or simply keep abreast with the progress in the field.

Embedded_LInux_Conference_2015So as usual, I’ve gone through the schedule, and made my own virtual program with talks that I find interesting.

Monday 23rd

  • 9:00 – 9:30 – Driving standards and Open Source to Grow the Internet of Things by Mark Skarpness, Director of Systems Engineering at Intel

Billions of devices are beginning to come online, and many of these devices, large and small, are running open source software.  To fuel this innovation, it’s more important than ever for these devices to use a common framework to communicate with each other and the cloud.  Intel is a founding member of the Open Interconnect Consortium (OIC), which will use both open source innovation and standards specifications to drive interoperability across multiple operating systems and communication protocols to enable the Internet of Things. As one of the founding members of the Linux Foundation, a top external contributor to the Android Open Source Project, and a leader behind USB, WiFi, Bluetooth and other projects and standards, Intel has the depth of knowledge and a unique approach to move things forward to benefit developers and consumers.

  • 9:30 – 10:00 – Project Ara with Paul Eremenko, Head of Project Ara, ATAP at Google & Marti Bolivar, Project Ara Software Lead, Google

Marti and Paul will discuss Project Ara’s aim to develop an open hardware platform for modular smartphones, with the goal of creating a vibrant module developer community and a marketplace from which consumers can create an entirely custom mobile device.

  • 10:45 – 11:35 – Generalizing Android for Low-Cost 64-Bit ARM-Based Community Boards by Khasim Syed Mohammed, Linaro

Linaro is developing an open hardware platform specification to encourage software development on low-cost boards to lower the cost and accelerate the availability of maker and embedded products based on ARM SoCs. By end of 2015 there will be many compliant boards based on and adhering to this specification. The key challenge for the Android community is to enable and maintain Android for multiple platforms on a common code base. This presentation highlights the issues like non-standard SoC customizations, peripheral controller customizations from vendors and shares the possible solutions through Android software generalization.

  • 11:45 – 12:35 – Open Source Drones on Linux by Lorenz Meier

This presentation will summarize the current state in academia and industry using Linux on drones, which is by now already a widespread and common pattern.

  • 14:00 – 14:50 – IoTivity and Embedded Linux Support by Kishen Maloor, Intel

IoTivity is a new collaborative project, hosted at the Linux Foundation and sponsored by the Open Interconnect Consortium. Its goal is to facilitate interconnections across the billions of “things” to be on the Internet in coming years. A majority of these “things” would be low-power embedded devices. To satisfy their connectivity needs, IoTivity must support a variety of transmission media, such as WiFi, Bluetooth, Bluetooth LE, 6LoWPAN over 805.15.4, etc. This session will present an overview of IoTivity’s current support for the Yocto Linux environment on embedded platforms, and how it allows us to be flexible for multiple purposes. It will also present how a developer can enable IoTivity on Yocto and make modifications.

  • 15:00 – 15:50 – Performance Analysis Using the perf Suite by Mans Rullgard

When faced with a performance problem, the initial steps towards a solution include identifying the sections of code responsible and the precise reasons they are time-consuming. To this end, the ‘perf’ profiling tools provide valuable insight into the characteristics of a program. The presentation will show, using real-world examples, how the ‘perf’ tools can be used to pinpoint the parts of a program in need of optimisation.

This presentation will be a version of that given at ELCE 2014 updated based on questions and audience feedback.

  • 16:20 – 17:10 – Poky meets Debian: Understanding How to Make an Embedded Linux by Using an Existing Distribution’s Source Code by Yoshitake Kobayashi, Toshiba

Poky has already become one of the most popular build system to make an embedded Linux environment. Poky refers to OpenEmbedded originally. However if you want to use other source code, how to do it? We have some experience we would like to share with you. For this study, We choose Debian source and already tried two ways to use it. The first try was probably an incorrect way and the second try may be a correct way.

In this talk, we will show both of them and also describe why we choose Debian. If you are interested in this implementation, you can download the source code from GitHub (cnxsoft: empty for now). There are some implementations available for development boards such as pandaboard, minnowboard and etc. Let’s enjoy Bitbake!

  • 17:20 – 18:10 – Teaching More Fish to Fly by John Hawley, Intel

n 2013, at the Embedded Linux Conference in Europe in Edinburgh, there was a race between a dog and a blimp. It was said that despite the dogs win, that the blimp had participated in the miracle of flight. In 2014 we started showing how the MinnowBoard can be lofted and show useful. In 2015 we just want to give an update on where we are at and what interesting projects are being done both with the MinnowBoard and other platforms in the UAV space. The talk is mainly targeting taking an off the shelf embedded platform, Minnowboard Max, and it’s use in UAVs, specifically quad-copters. With the ability to do real time computer vision, as well as various GPIO capabilities we’ll explore the directions that significantly more autonomous UAVs can take with Linux and embedded platforms using, mostly, off the shelf components.

Tuesday 24th

  • 9:00 – 10:50 – Customizing AOSP for my Device by Rafael Coutinho, Phi Innovations

Android BSP gives you some tools to create your own device customizations. This can be achieved without changes on the Android main code, and just some customizations on the devices folder. It is possible to overlay some system apk configurations, ui and even services. In this tutorial I plan to show the step by step of creating a custom Android device using a AOSP. Setting up some Kernel parameters, customizing the lights HAL and sensors HAL, changing the look and feel of Settings apk etc.

  • 11:20 – 12:10 – Room For Cooperation: Bionic and musl by Bernhard Rosenkränzer, Linaro

A while after Android started Bionic, another interesting libc project was started: musl. Its licensing is compatible with Android’s – so there may be room for picking the best of both worlds. This talk investigates where musl outperforms Bionic and vice versa — and whether or not (and how) Android can benefit from pulling musl code into Bionic.

  • 13:40 – 14:10 – Dronecode Project and Autopilot With Linux by Andrew Tridgell, Technical Steering Committee Chair of Dronecode Project

Andrew “Tridge” Tridgell provides updates on the progress of Dronecode’s open source software project for commercial drones, and insight into the future of drone development. He will also delve into the specific task of running an autopilot directly on a Linux-based platform.

  • 14:10 – 14:55 – IoT Panel with Dominig Ar Foll, Intel (Tizen); Greg Burns, AllSeen Alliance; Bryant Eastham, Panasonic; Guy Martin, Samsung; Tim Bird, Sony Mobile (Moderator)
  • 15:40 – 16:30 – Linux for Microcontrollers: From Marginal to Mainstream by Vitaly Wool, Softprise Consulting OU

The story of a DRAM-less Linux-operated microcontroller delivered at ELC a year ago, which came as a surprise for many, wouldn’t be that surprising now. However, there are some important updates to share: moving to mainline-aligned 3.x baseline, compiling out VM-specific code, optimizing kernel XIP, and the last but not the least, starting to use picoTCP kernel networking stack.

Some size and performance benchmarks will also be presented, along with the Linux demo on the DRAM-less microcontroller board.

  • 16:40 – 18:20 – Building a General Purpose Android Workstation by Ron Munitz

In this tutorial, you will have a hands-on journey of customizing, building, and using a General Purpose Desktop variant of the Android-X86 project. The tutorial assumes previous experience with building Android off the AOSP, Android-IA, CyanogenMod, or any other build system, and describes the special additions of Android-X86, such as a Kernel build system, general X86 hardware detection based HAL’s/firmware and live cd/disk installer generation and more. Then, we will explore the Linux friendly busybox minimal image, and describe the way a fully fledged Android version can be spawned out of it (with similar techniques for any other Linux distribution with the Android patches!) using chroot, and provide a listing of the ultimate Android init process.

We will continue the discussion with day to day uses, and a joint brainstorming of Linux developer uses, and justify Android-X86 as yet another X-less Linux distribution – until the time we add X to it… As a special bonus, we will address how to make any app run using a user-QEMU based ARM translator.

  • 18:20 – 19:20 – BoFs: Yocto Project / OpenEmbedded by Jeff Osier-Mixon

Got a question, comment, gripe, praise, or other communication for the Yocto Project and/or OpenEmbedded? Or maybe you’d just like to learn more about these projects and their influence on the world of embedded Linux? Feel free to join us for an informal BoF.

Wednesday 25th

  • 9:00 – 9:30 – Embedding Openness in the Connected Car by Matt Jones, Jaguar Land Rover

A future vehicle will be a “thing” on the Internet, but how can industry and community come together to accelerate the future concepts into production. The keynote will explore the platforms and standard needed for the future, and relate them to open prototypes from Jaguar Land Rover and the Automotive Grade Linux projects.

  • 9:30 – 10:00 – Community Involvement: Looking Forward and Looking Back by Deepak Saxena

Linux has grown by leaps and bounds in the last decade, finding its way into billions of mobile devices and also into the core of cloud based services that we rely on for business, entertainment, and increasingly, security. With this explosion of devices, we have seen more companies get involved with the kernel community, some successfully, and some struggling. In this talk, we will look at some of the challenges that the industry and the community continue to face in working with each other and also more importantly think about what is next? The adoption of Linux will continue to increase throughout all market segments, bringing in numerous new organizations and new developers. How do we move forward and what changes need to happen within the industry and community cultures to work better together?

  • 10:45 – 17:50 – Embedded Android Workshop by Karim Yaghmour, Opersys

While Android has been created for mobile devices — phones first and now tablets — it can, nonetheless, be used as the basis of any touch-screen system, whether it be mobile or not. Essentially, Android is a custom-built embedded Linux distribution with a very elaborate and rich set of user-space abstractions, APIs, services and virtual machine. This one-day workshop is aimed at embedded developers wanting to build embedded systems using Android. It will cover Android from the ground up, enabling developers to get a firm hold on the components that make up Android and how they need to be adapted to an embedded system. Specifically, we will start by introducing Android’s overall architecture and then proceed to peel Android’s layer one-by-one.

That’s a just a small selection of the talks, and there are many other interested sessions if you are interested in IoT, automotive or drone applications.

If you’d like to attend, you can register online with a single fee for the Embedded Linux Conference and Android Builders Summit 2015, as well as breakfasts and breaks, a T-shirt, and access to evening events:

  • Early Bird Registration Fee – US$500 through January 30, 2015
  • Standard Registration Fee – US$650 through March 5, 2015
  • Late Registration Fee – US$750 after March 5, 2015
  • Student Registration Fee – US$150
  • Hobbyist Registration Fee – US$150

If you attend as a hobbyist, you need to contact events [at] linuxfoundation.org to receive a discount code.

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Embedded Linux Conference Europe 2013 Videos and Presentation Slides

November 21st, 2013 2 comments

I uploaded several Embedded Linux Conference Europe videos in 2011 and 2012 that were hosted by Free Electrons and/or the Linux Foundation for download, but this year, it seems the Linux Foundation has discovered a new (to them) online video service called YouTube, and created a playlist with (for now) 18 sessions of ELCE 2013. I’ve embedded the playlist below starting with the “Status of Embedded Linux (2013)“, by Tim Bird, Sony Mobile which takes place every year, and is among the most popular presentations.

Most of ELCE 2013 presentation slides are already available from eLinux.org. You can also have a look at the list of ELCE 2013 talks I featured before the event took place.

[Update: I’ve just watched the Status of Embedded Linux video, and I though it may be interested to list the topics (and keywords) used for what has happened in embedded linux in the last year. There are 70 slides over less than 50 minutes, so It’s going pretty fast, with little details:

  • Kernel versions – 3.6 to 3.12
  • Technology Areas:
    • Graphics – Framebuffer less and less used. Talk about open source GPU projects: Lima, etnaviv, grate, freedreno… and GPU market share: Imagination significantly down, ARM and, especially Vivante, up
    • Boot time – Kernel 1s, Android normally 30s, but optimized by 0xlab to 15s
    • Filesystems – UBIFS is the most used mow, but F2FS can be interesting for eMMC and is used in Moto X. exFAT code should be avoided (royalties).
    • Memory management – ION memory allocator
    • Power management – Work on autosleep, big.LiTTLE, memory power management, and full tickless
    • System size – Work on kernel and libraries (olibc, eglibc), and advanced size optimization with “Auto-reduce” project.
    • Security – SMACK (Tizen), SE-Linux now used in embedded Linux  and Android. Embedded integrity
    • Tracing – Ktap
    • Device tree – “Royal pain”, bad for optimization, but have to use it.
    • Things to watch
      • Short term – Volatile ranges and ION memory allocator for Android, as well as device tree maturation, and power-aware scheduling
      • Longer term – Non-volatile mass-memory
  • CE Workgroup – eMMC tuning guide, open project proposal, and LTSI
  • Others
    • Tools and debugging techniques
    • Testing framework (Autotest, LAVA, )
    • Build systems (Yocto, Buildroot,Android)
    • Distributions (Tizen, headless Android, Yocto poky, Angstrom)
    • Wiki – eLinux.org
    • Misc – Kernel community civility, embedded contributions status (better), hardware (Intel Quark, Apple M7, )
  • (Tentative of) Best of embedded products:
    • Smallest – TP-Link MR320U WiFi hotspot (4MB flash, 32MB RAM)
    • Fastest boot – Beagleboard (<630ms)
    • Longest battery life – N/A
  • Resources – Links to embedded Linux resources (lwn.net, kernelnewbies.org, elinux.org…)
  • Status of the industry – World domination achieved!

]

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LinuxCon Europe 2013 Schedule – Web Technologies, Debugging Techniques, Wayland, and More

August 22nd, 2013 No comments

I’ve just received an email from the Linux Foundation saying the schedule for LinuxCon and CloudOpen Europe 2013 had been made available. The conference will take place for 3 days (October 21-23, 2013) in the Edinburgh International Conference Center, Edinburgh, United Kingdom. There will be over 100 conference sessions, and several co-located events including: Automotive Linux Summit, the Embedded Linux Conference, Gluster Workshop, KVM Forum, Tizen Summit, Xen Project Developer Summit.

LinuxCon_Europe_2013

As I’ve recently done with LinuxCon North America 2013 and ARM TechCon 2013, I’ll make a virtual schedule with selected developer sessions using the event’s schedule builder. You may find out several sessions will also be given in LinuxCon North America.

Monday – 21st of October

This presentation will cover a brief introduction on how the Bluetooth Low Energy technology works. Then it will present the current status of its support on Linux, including the profiles we’re currently working on what can be expected to be finished on the near future. The currently available APIs and how to interact with Bluetooth Smart devices will be shown and there will be a few demos of Bluetooth Smart devices working with Linux.

Web Browsers are quickly becoming the most frequently used individual application in any modern desktop, following the same trend in mobile devices. They are growing in capabilities and performance, enabling an era of new webapps ranging from email to vehicle navigation and games. Current browsers are powerful enough to run even the Linux kernel in a Javascript PC emulator. Browsers are enabled by web engines, but have you ever questioned how they work? The objective of this talk is to present how a modern web engine works, following the several steps from the first user input to access a webpage up to the moment where content is rendered in the screen. Topics like multiprocess browser architecture, process sandboxing, content parsing and rendering will be covered. The web engine used for the discussion will be WebKit, with some examples drawn from Blink and Gecko.

The many tracing tools available on Linux today provide a wide array of choices for the users. Deciding which of them to use to diagnose system problems on production systems can prove challenging. Various tools have various states of integration within the Linux kernel, and also within different Linux distributions. Bleeding edge features are often just being merged into the upstream Linux kernel. It takes often a long time for such features to be incorporated in commercial distributions. The required set up for the tools and their level of usability also vary significantly. This talk will cover the more popular and actively developed tracing areas focusing on their latest updates and will describe the infrastructure they rely on. An overview of the tracing tools (ftrace, perf, systemtap, DTrace for Linux, etc) will be included with some examples of usage of each.

HTML5 is going to be used widely because of its powerful specification. A lot of browsers are now supporting HTML5. It is a new technology, so that currently only few engineers can use this technology. Needs of such skillful engineers are urgent and necessary from the point of Industry, such as automotive and others. We started the development of the certification program of HTML5 skill set. The purpose of this program is to encourage engineers to learn and and improve their skill set, and increase number of skillful engineers. In this presentation, I will provide why we started this program, how we develop, and time-frame.

Being one of the most successful open source projects to date, WebKit development process consists of a series of protocols and strict policies in order to obtain committer and reviewer status. Blink follows a similar approach with committers and scoped code owners, in a similar fashion as Linux Kernel does with its subsystem maintainers. Their open source success is due to not only solid support from major technology companies, but also to the high quality and automated testing performed on patches before submission. In this presentation, Bruno explains how the development process of both WebKit and Blink projects are – from submitting well-tested patches with strict policies to check, get review from community, and commit upstream via commit-queue system (including early warning system bots). This is a very practical talk with live demonstrations of patch submissions on both projects.

Tuesday – 22nd of October

Most of the kernel messages would be intended to know developers what’s going on in the kernel, and they tend to be not friendly to users and machines. To improve this, Hidehiro Kawai is trying to add hash value for each kernel message to identify them easily. If this feature becomes available, users can consult external manuals by feeding the hash and know detailed information. Or a monitor tool can identify specific message in low overhead and trigger a fail-over or collect related information automatically. In this presentation, he explains the implementation of the first RFC patch set, on-going discussions (if there are), and how utilizing the feature in user space, while introducing a similar challenge 5 years ago and how addressed its objections.

The Wayland project is growing fast, as well as its adoption by several toolkits. EFL (Enlightenment Foundation Libraries) specifically has a Wayland backend being actively developed over the last 2 years, with its latest features being already incorporated. EFL developers are also contributing back to the Wayland project itself, helping to improve the protocol and implementation, from a toolkit point of view. This talk will present the current development state of the Wayland backend of EFL, describing the latest incorporated features. It will also present the changes that this port has passed since the beginning of its development, and its improvements so far. A comparison to the other EFL backends will be done, as well as future plans for Wayland on EFL and the Enlightenment Window Manager.

Window managers and desktop environments in the Open Source community number in the dozens, but only a small number of those include compositors; fewer still can boast that they run seamlessly on embedded devices or in Wayland. Enlightenment is so flexible that it was chosen by Samsung to be to window manager for their new Linux-based mobile operating system, Tizen, in addition to being used by tens of thousands of users worldwide for over a decade. With the current development of E19, it’s time to take a step back and look at the main feature: compositor design. This presentation will give a brief introduction to compositing and window management before jumping directly into the history of Enlightenment’s compositor architecture and its progression to the current state of full Wayland and X support.

The 2013 version of this popular talk describing the current state of kernel development and where it can be expected to go in the near future. There will be some technical content, but this talk is highly accessible to non-technical participants as well.

Concurrency issues in the software, and data races in particular, may have devastating effects but are often quite hard to reveal. Hunting down such problems is especially important for the Linux kernel, which is inherently concurrent. Although there is a variety of tools to help reveal data races in the user-space code (Helgrind, DRD, ThreadSanitizer, etc.), there are only a few that can be applied to the kernel. In his presentation, Eugene Shatokhin will give an overview of such tools and the techniques they rely upon. Among other things, he will present KernelStrider, a component of KEDR Framework that collects data about the operation of the kernel modules in runtime. The data are then analyzed by an “offline” detector in the user-space to actually reveal the races. The results obtained so far as well as possible directions of future development will also be discussed.

Wednesday – 23rd of October

git bisect” is a command that is part of the Git distributed version control system. This command enables software users, developers and testers to easily find the commit that introduced a regression. This is done by performing a kind of binary search between a known good and a known bad commit. git bisect supports both a manual and an automated mode. The automated mode uses a test script or command.People are very happy with automated bisection, because it saves them a lot of time, it makes it easy and worthwhile for them to improve their test suite, and overall it efficiently improves software quality.

The GFS2 cluster filesystem has been under development for a number of years, however there has been no up-to-date presentation covering all of the latest features since OLS 2007. The intent of this talk is to provide an overview of the current feature set, noting recent significant developments, as well as an introduction into the major algorithms of GFS2 for those less familiar with its capabilities. During the development process, many lessons were learned which would apply equally to any open source project, and these will be discussed too.

October 21, 2013 marks the Qt Project’s second anniversary. Launched in 2011 to be the home of the Qt libraries and frameworks under Open Source Governance, the Qt Project has seen quite a lot of change in these 2 years., good and bad. It lost its main sponsor and many doubted the project would continue, but it did, and it managed to release the first major release in 7 years (5.0), one more feature release and half a dozen patch releases. This presentation will review the principles of the project’s governance, who the contributors are and how they work, the major changes that happened in the past two years and how they’ve influenced the project. It will explore the development process from patch to release and to maintenance / bug fixing, and will also show how non-code contributors participate.

As the number of cores in systems steadily increases, you may find that the good old mutual exclusion synchronization is not sufficient to let your application use more cores not only for heat generation, but primarily for effective computing. The Userspace RCU library implements Read-Copy Update (RCU) synchronization and various lock-free data structures that allow user-space applications to leverage very lightweight synchronization across cores. It allows a broad range of demanding applications to scale to large numbers of cores. This library is released under LGPL v2.1, so it can be used by all applications. This tutorial will walk the audience through the basics of Read-Copy Update, and then through the synchronization and data structure APIs exposed by Userspace RCU.

You can register to LinuxCon Europe 2013 and CloudOpen Europe 2013 online for the following fees:

  • US$475 through July 14th (Early)
  • US$575 July 15th – September 1st (Standard)
  • US$675 thereafter (Late)
  • Student Registration – $150
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Tizen Shows Up in Smartphones, Ultrabooks, and Cars

May 25th, 2013 3 comments

I’ve seen a lot of tweets about Tizen in the last fews days, mainly because Tizen Conference 2013 just took place. First there’s been Tizen 2.1 SDK release, and few demos have surfaced,  showcasing Tizen in their target devices: smartphones, tablets,smart TVs, laptops, and In-vehicle infotainment devices. Beside all the work done, the companies behind the project will also offer $4 million to developers who publish apps on Tizen store. There will be 9 categories. The best 3 games will get $200,000 each, and the best apps in the other 6 categories $120,000 each. Tizen App Challenge will start on June 3, 2013, and you can see details for this program here.

Tizen in a Laptop (Left) and an Automotive Infotainment System (Right)

Tizen in a Laptop (Left) and an Automotive Infotainment System (Right)

Let’s see the demos. First Tizen in Samsung developer smartphone running Qt 5.1, and the usual Qt5 Cinematic Experience demo, as well as 2 others apps, both super smooth. (via TizenExperts). You can find more information in Qt for Tizen page.

This is not the first time we see Tizen running on Samsung Developer platform, but Qt5.1 is very recent.

The next demo shows Tizen running on an Intel Core i7 Ivy Bridge UltraBook at Tizen Conference 2013 via TizenExperts. The desktop environment is based on GNOME 3 Shell, and beside the HTML5 apps, you’ll be able to run applications such as LibreOffice and Chrome, just like in any other Linux distributions. They also demo Stream in the device, running Team Fortress 2. Finally, they showed Tizen SDK, developing Tizen Apps, and running an OpenGL accelerated smartphone simulator.

Overall, I find the experience feels a little like Ubuntu. Th demo shown above runs the latest Tizen 2.1, but laptop support should be officially part of Tizen 3.0 release.

Jaguar Land Rover, Intel, and the Linux foundation collaborated to create the last demo I’ll show today (via TizenTalk). It’s an in-vehicle infotainment systems (IVI) running Tizen in a Land Rover. It features a standard car interface, support for gstreamer to play audio and video, a demo app store, and a demo GPS positioning system app. The demo is not a product per say, it’s said to be a fully open source demo, so that other people can work on it. You can find the detail on Linux Foundation Automative Grade Linux (AGL) page.

If you’re particularly interested in the work done for “alternative” mobile operating systems with project such as Sailfish, Mer, Tizen, and Qt, on ARM and x86 hardware, you may want to follow @vgrade on twitter.

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LTSI 3.4 is Now Available for Download

January 22nd, 2013 No comments

Nearly 2 years ago, the Linux Foundation’s Consumer Electronics (CE) working group created the Long Term Support Initiative (LTSI) Linux kernel for consumer electronics devices in order to have a common stable platform released every 2 years, and share the kernel development work among competing companies including Hitachi, LG Electronics, NEC, Panasonic, Qualcomm Atheros, Renesas Electronics Corporation, Samsung Electronics, Sony and Toshiba.

Last week, the  CE working group has released LTSI 3.4 kernel, based on Linux 3.4.25 kernel release and including several backported features from newer kernels including:

 

  • The Contiguous Memory Allocator (CMA), which is extremely useful for embedded devices that have very limited hardware resources and will better handle the large memory requirements of multimedia applications. CMA originally was merged into the 3.4.0 kernel release, but its functionality was quite limited. Since then, the feature has been significantly improved in the kernel.org releases and those fixes have been added to the LTSI 3.4 kernel release. For more information about this kernel option, please visit LWN.net.
  • AF_BUS, a kernel-based implementation of the D-Bus protocol. This feature was created for systems that required a faster D-Bus speed than the existing userspace method could provide, specifically the automotive entertainment systems. For more information about this feature, please see LWN.net.
  • CoDel (controlled delay), a transmission algorithm that optimizes TCP/IP network buffer control, is backported for LTSI 3.4. This is a feature used to help control the “buffer bloat” problem that has been identified by the networking community as an issue that all devices need to be aware of. This feature was backported from the 3.5.0  kernel.org release.  For more information about it, please see this LWN.net post.

This release also includes patches for specific board / processor support:

  • Armadillo 800 board – Based on Renesas R-Mobile A1 processor
  • AT91 – Patches for Atmel SoCs (ARM9)
  • kzm9d platform – Based on Renesas Emma Mobile EV2 SoC
  • kzm9g platform –  Based on Renesas R-Mobile APE5R processor (Board: KMZ-A9-GT)
  • Marzen development board – Based on Renesas R-Car H1 (Quad Cortex A9 @ 1GHz + IMG SGX543MP2 GPU) automotive processor

The patches are available for download (1.1 MB), or alternatively you can access the source code via the Linux foundation’s git repository.

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A Novel Approach to In-Vehicle Infotainment (IVI) – Android Builder Summit 2012

March 15th, 2012 No comments

Thomas B. Rücker,  Program Manager at Tieto, discusses In-Vehicle Infotainment (IVI) with Android at the Android Builder Summit in February 2012.

Abstract:

In the future vehicles are going to be always online. The constantly increasing number of electronic devices raises consumer expectations. Both driver and passengers want to be online. This requires new and flexible IVI and HMI solutions. Users expect intuitive and simple to operate interfaces, but at the same time they expect the systems to handle a lot of their data and apps. We are witnessing a paradigm shift in Infotainment solutions. Open software platforms will allow users to add new functionality and services, also by third parties, over the whole life-span of a product. This requires solutions that reconcile the multi-media world of consumers with traffic security requirements, in a cost effective and secure hardware platform. The presentation will highlight challenges and opportunities by bringing Android to the IVI environment and introduce the audience to security requirements so far not addressed by smart-phones or tablets. A technology demonstrator will be shown.

You can also download the presentation slides on linuxfoundation.org website.

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Using OpenOCD JTAG in Android Kernel Debugging – Android Builder Summit 2012

March 15th, 2012 11 comments

Mike Anderson, CTO and Chief Scientist for The PTR Group, gives a tutorial about Linux kernel debugging in Android with OpenOCD JTAG at the Android Builder Summit in February 2012.

Abstract:

Owing to the use of the Linux kernel, Android device drivers can be debugged using many of the same techniques as Linux. Still, much of the user-space interface code typically found in Linux is missing in Android. This complicates the debugging of kernel driver code. This presentation will demonstrate the use of the open on-chip debug (OpenOCD) software and an inexpensive JTAG to debug Android kernel code. The target audience for this presentation are platform developers looking to debug their kernel code such as device drivers. This presentation is targeted at intermediate-level developers with some understanding of kernel code development.

You can also download the presentation slides on linuxfoundation.org website.

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Android Device Porting Tutorial – Android Builder Summit 2012

March 14th, 2012 No comments

Benjamin Zores, Open Source Software and Multimedia Architect at Alcatel-Lucent, gives step-by-step to port Android to your own device at Android Builder Summit in February 2012.

Abstract:

This talk is presented as a step by step tutorial meant for Android platform rookies, as to discover all Androidisms one has to tackle down to bring his own custom device to life. Based on a real-life Android 4.0 ICS device porting experience, the talk will cover early board bringup (from U-Boot and Fastboot to Linux kernel and drivers), AOSP device integration, Android-specific device init customization, touchscreen input layer adaptations and Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) driver interfaces development.

You can also download the presentation slides on linuxfoundation.org website.

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