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Posts Tagged ‘Linux’

Linaro 15.03 Release with Linux 4.0 and Android 5.1

March 27th, 2015 No comments

Linaro has just announced their 15.03 release with Linux 4.0-rc4 (baseline), Linux 3.10.72 and 3.14.36 (LSK), and Android 5.1.

The organization has worked on hardware platforms from members namely Qualcomm, ARM, HiSilicon, Samsung, and STMicro, including the recently announced 96Boards boards, and other ARMv8 platforms.

Highlights of the release:

  • Linux Linaro 4.0-rc4-2015.03
    • updated linaro-android topic
    • added a few build/boot fixes for Arndale (llct-misc-fixes topic)
    • GATOR topic: version 5.20.1
    • updated integration-linaro-vexpress64 topic by ARM LT (FVP Base and Foundation models, and Juno support)
    • updated topic from Qualcomm LT (ifc6410 board support)
    • simple EEPROM framework (via Qualcomm LT’s topic)
    • updated topic from HiSilicon LT (Hi36xx, HiP04, and X5HD2 families support)
    • rebased “ILP32 patch set v3″ onto 4.0-rc2
  • Linaro builds of AOSP 15.03
    • updated all the baselines to AOSP 5.1
    • added commit based trigger feature to CI builds
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2015.03
    • integrated Linaro GCC 4.9-2015.03
    • dismantled meta-aarch64 layer
    • created meta-ilp32 layer
    • cleaned out meta-bigendian layer
    • synced overlayed recipes with upstream
    • added full wget and rt-test on LAMP image as requested by QA team
    • update busybox xargs config as requested by QA team
    • integrated ODP 1.0
    • upstreaming:
      • sysprof: fix arm big-endian build
      • bitbake.conf: use http:// for GNU_MIRROR instead of ftp://
      • kexec-tools: fix build failure on aarch64_be architecture
      • busybox: update to 1.23.1 release
      • mozjs 17.0.0: fix aarch64 and 64k page builds, generic cleanups
  • Linaro Ubuntu 15.03
    • added packages: ti-calibrator
    • updated packages: LSK 3.10.72/3.14.36 and linux-linaro 4.0-rc4 kernels
    • Added ILP32 support for ARM64 to Linaro engineering builds
    • Dismantled meta-aarch64 in favour of OE-core aarch64 support
    • CI bring up: luvOS (Linux UEFI Validation Operating System)
  • KVM – support testing arm32 with arm64
  • Added b2120stxh410 to linux-mainline and linux-arm-soc-for-next build jobs
  • 96boards: enable Xorg by default in eMMC/SD debian build
  • Added 2 new build slaves
  • Migrated lt-qcom-ubuntu-images to docker based infrastructure
  • Upgraded ARMv8 build slaves to 3.19 kernel
  • Cleaned up LCR (Linaro Confectionery Release) information and instructions

Visit https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1503/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB, LMB (Linaro Member Builds), and community builds, as well as Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain components.

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Mr.NUC V3-J1900 is an Intel NUC Clone Based on Celeron J1900 Processor

March 25th, 2015 11 comments

Intel NUC (Next of Computing) are tiny and relatively low cost computers made by Intel. But in case you wondered if there were any clones available to save a few extra dollars, and/or gain a faster processor, a Chinese company is now selling Mr.NUC V3-J1900 barebone system with an Intel Celeron J1900 quad core processor for $169 + shipping, which adds over $40 since the mini PC only ships by courier. If you happen to live in the US, it’s probably not such as good deal, but in other countries maybe…

Mr_NUC_V3-J1900This mini PC is said to be based on a custom designed motherboard made by Gigabyte (MZBAYAP) for Realan, with the following technical specifications:

  • SoC – Intel Celeron J1900 Quad core processor  @ 2.0 GHz (base) / 2.41 GHz (Burst) with Intel Gen 7 HD graphics (10W TDP)
  • System Memory –  DDR3L 1333/1666 MHz SO-DIMM slot
  • Storage – 2.5″ SATA hard drive or SSD
  • Video Output – HDMI + VGA
  • Audio – HDMI, 3.5 mm jack for headphone or S/PDIF?
  • Connectivity – Realtek RTL8111 Gigabit Ethernet, optional Wi-Fi via mPCIe module
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x USB 3.0 port.
  • Misc – Power button, power LED, Kensington lock
  • Power Supply – TBD
  • Dimensions –  113 x 115 x 5.7 mm
  • Weight – 700 grams
The mini PC comes with a power adapter and cord, a VESA mount with screws, an installation manual, and a warranty card.

Intel_NUC_Clone Shenzhen Realan does not sell complete kits with Wi-Fi , RAM and hard drive, so you’d also have to purchase an Intel NUC compatible wireless module, a 2.5″ hard drive or SSD, as well as a SO-DIMM DDR3L module to have a fully functional computer. You’d also need to install your preferred operating system be it Windows or a Linux distribution by yourself. Some other alternatives like CSQ CSW9, X29-J1900, or even an original Intel NUC might be a better deal depending on where you live.

You can also check out the manufacturer’s page. which also claims support for an extra mSATA SSD just line in an Intel NUC.

Via AndroidPC.es

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How to Install Ubuntu 14.04 on Acer Aspire E5 Laptop

March 23rd, 2015 No comments

I’ve been owning an Acer Aspire One D255E netbook with a 10″ display, an Intel Atom N455 processor and 1GB RAM that served me well during my travels, but as I’ve become older and less patient, I felt I needed to upgrade it. I planned to spend around 10,000 Baht (~$300), wanted a 14″ display, one of the low power CPU such as Intel Bay Trail-M or AMD Mullins / Beema processors, at least 500GB storage, 4GB RAM, and the ability to install Ubuntu. Finally, after going through several products at my local shop, I had to chose between Acer Aspire E5-411-P3CL with a 7.5W TDP Intel Atom N3540 and Acer Aspire E5-421G-45L0 with a 15W TDP AMD A4-6210 processor that both sell for 11,900 Baht ($365). Despite my preference for processor with lower TDP, I still went with the AMD system, since the performance is a little better, the warranty is good for 2-years (vs. 1 year for the Intel laptop), and I’ve always rooted for AMD in the past as an alternative to Intel.

Both laptop are pre-loaded with Linpus Linux 9.2, but when I boot the laptop at the shop, I discovered it was just a headless version that boots to the command line. The seller even told me something like “oohhh, Linux is like that? I did not know, normally just just format the hard drive…” So it’s like FreeDOS it’s installed to test hardware during MP, and let the shop sell legal system so that customers can install Windows themselves. Sometimes you also get given a free coupon to get it installed in a small shop.

Acer_Linpus_LinuxNevertheless, I finally purchased the laptop and planed to install Ubuntu on the system.

Since I had already downloaded Ubuntu 14.04 64-bit ISO, that’s the one I installed, but once Ubuntu 15.04 is released, you would probably avoid several of the issue I had during installation. You are likely to face issues with Ubuntu 14.10 too.

I followed the standard installation procedure, by “flashing” ubuntu-14.04-desktop-amd64.iso to a USB flash drive formatted with FAT32 using Unetbootin software in another Ubuntu machine, but you could also use a Windows machine with Rufus.

Then I inserted the USB flash into the Aspire E5 laptop, press F2 at boot time to enter InsydeH20 Setup Utility, and select the USB drive as primary boot device, and Ubuntu setup started normally, but the touchpad did not work, so you’ll have to connect a USB mouse unless you’re comfortable with using the keyboard for everything. The touchpad probblem is a known issues, that’s fixed in Linux 3.17 or greater+.

Ubuntu_Acer_Aspire_E5_Installation_Type_Replacing_LinpusApart from this issue the installation went smoothly, and I selected “Replace Linpus Linux 9.2 with Ubuntu” option. The laptop is usually with Ubuntu 14.04 as it is as long you don’t use the not-so-convenient-anyway touchpad, don’t need to use the HDMI and VGA port, and accept some slow animation from time to time.

The latter appears to be due to AMD/ATI open source graphics drivers, so I went to “Additional Drivers” and clicked on “Using Video driver for the AMD graphics accelerators from fglrx-updates (proprietary)”, and after installation the system appeared o run a bit smoother.

AMD_graphics_accelerators_from_fglrx-updatesAlbeit an extra /dev/sda3 partition appeared to have been created for swap, it was not mounted in Ubuntu, so I installed and ran Gparted to check it out, and formatted the partition to linux-swap there. And completely by modifying /etc/fstab with the line:

/dev/sda3 none            swap    sw              0       0

Since it’s not always convenient to connect a USB mouse to the laptop, I also decided to upgrade the kernel, as I explained in my “build a kernel module in Ubuntu” post. I started with Linux kernel 3.19.2, as it was the latest stable kernel at the time, but unfortunately Unity would not start anymore. So I booted again to Linux 3.13.xx installed by default in Ubuntu 14.04 and changed the graphics drivers back to the open source one, and that did the trick, with the touchpad working, but the display seemed to be using the wrong resolution, and although HDMI output worked the lower part was garbled.

Acer_Aspire_E5-421G_HDMI_Issue_640pxSo instead I installed graphics drivers downloaded directly from AMD website, and Unity would not run with either Linux versions installed.

Finally I found that Linux 3.18.9 with fglrx-updates graphics drivers work best for me. That’s how I installed that version of Linux.

cd /tmp
wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v3.18.9-vivid/linux-headers-3.18.9-031809-generic_3.18.9-031809.201503080036_amd64.deb
wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v3.18.9-vivid/linux-image-3.18.9-031809-generic_3.18.9-031809.201503080036_amd64.deb
wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v3.18.9-vivid/linux-headers-3.18.9-031809_3.18.9-031809.201503080036_all.deb
sudo dpkg -i linux-headers-3.18*.deb linux-image-3.18*.deb

Finally Acer Aspire E5-421G laptop runs fairly well with Ubuntu 14.04 with the following working just fine:

  • 1366×768 display
  • VGA and HDMI output (with caveats, see known issues)
  • USB 2.0 ports
  • USB 3.0 port (USB 3.0 hard drive tested with 103 MB/s read speed)
  • Ethernet and Wi-Fi
  • Touchpad
  • Webcam, speakers, and audio jack
  • DVD drive and SD Card reader

However, there are still some known issues:

  • Only mirroring mode works with HDMI and VGA output (no extended display), and HDMI/VGA might be unstable.
  • It’s not possible to enable three displays (Screen + HDMI + VGA) simultaneously, I could only manage two displays at once.
  • Ubuntu will always start with the screen’s brightness set to the lowest setting.
  • Battery only lasts about 3h30 on a full charge. (not fully sure it if it an issue, or is to be expected)

If you plan to use AMD-V virtualization extension, for example for 64-bit OS in Virtualbox, you’ll need to hack UEFI settings since the option to enable it is not available by default.  Anyway, I’ve now come to a point where Ubuntu 14.04 is perfectly usable on Acer Aspire E5, although I would not have complained if the whole installation process would have been easier…

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Orange Pi 2 Allwinner H3 Quad Core Development Board Sells for $35

March 21st, 2015 25 comments

After Orange Pi Plus development board powered by Allwinner H3 quad core cortex A7 processor, the company has decided to launch a lower cost version of their Allwinner H3 board with Orange Pi 2, that has started selling for a compelling $35 + about $4 shipping worldwide, and provides another sub-$50 alternative to Raspberry Pi 2, ODROID-C1, and Radxa Rock Lite boards.

Orange Pi 2 (Click to Enlarge)

Orange Pi 2 (Click to Enlarge)

Orange Pi 2 board specifications:

  • SoC – Allwinner H3 quad core Cortex A7 @ 1.6 GHz with 256KB L1 cache, 1MB L2 cache, and an ARM Mali-400MP2 GPU up to 600 MHz
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR3
  • Storage – micro SD card slot (up to 64GB)
  • Video Output – HDMI, AV port
  • Audio I/O – HDMI, AV port, on-board microphone
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet, 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi (Realtek module)
  • USB – 4x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB OTG port
  • Camera – CSI Interface
  • Expansions – 40-pin Raspberry Pi Model A+/B+ (mostly) compatible header with 28 GPIOs, UART, I2C, SPI, PWM, CAN, I2S, SPDIF, LRADC, ADC, LINE-IN, FM-IN, and HP-IN
  • Debugging – 3-pin UART header for serial console
  • Misc – IR receiver; Power, reset, and u-boot buttons; Power and Ethernet LEDs
  • Power Supply – 5V/2A via barrel jack (micro USB OTG cannot be used to power the board).
  • Dimensions – 93 x 60 mm
  • Weight – 46 grams

Orange_Pi_2_BottomThe cost savings compared to the $59 Orange Pi Plus have been achieved by removing the 8GB eMMC flash and SATA port, replacing Gigabit Ethernet by Fast Ethernet, and reducing the board dimensions. Allwinner H3 has the same ARM Cortex A7 cores as found as in BCM2836 processor used by Raspberry Pi 2, but if H3 is indeed clocked at 1.6GHz, Orange Pi 2 should be nearly 80% faster than RPi 2 when it comes to integer and floating-point performance. It also features a built-in Wi-Fi module that is lacking on both ODROID-C1 and RPi 2, so from an hardware prespective it’s certainly very good value for money. On the software front, the board runs Android 4.4.2, and Lubuntu, Debian and Raspbian images are being worked on, but I can’t find any Allwinner H3 images in the Download section of Orange Pi website, so I’m not sure how you are supposed to boot the board… I’d also expect a much lower level of support compared the Raspberry Pi, ODROID or even Radxa communities, so if you have a problem you might be mostly on your own.

Update: There’s also a version without Wi-Fi called Orange Pi mini 2 that sells for $33.99 including shipping.

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Cloudsto Embed+ RK3288 is a Rockchip RK3288 Board for Digital Signage and Point-of-Sale Applications

March 20th, 2015 No comments

As Rikomagic launched their MK80LE (Linux Edition) mini PCs on Cloudsto a few days ago, I also noticed a new page entitled embed+ RK3288, which described what should be the first board sold by Rikomagic/Cloudsto. The Rockchip RK3288 based board can be used as an Android & Linux development board, but it appears to mainly target OEMs for applications such as digital signage, point-if-sale, and web kiosks.

embed+_rk3288_boardRikomagic embed+ RK3288 specs:

  • SoC – Rockchip 3288 quad core ARM Cortex A17 up to 1.8 GHz with Mali-T764 GPU supporting OpenGL ES 1.1/2.0 /3.0, and OpenCL 1.1
  • System Memory – 2G DDR3
  • Storage – 8 to 32 GB eMMC flash. The daughterboard adds an SD card slot.
  • Video / Display interfaces – HDMI 2.0, LCD interfaces (backlit, power, data)
  • Audio Output – HDMI, 3.5mm earphone / audio output jack, and built-in microphone.
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi , and Bluetooth 4.0 (external). Gigabit LAN via a daughterboard.
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x mini USB OTG. 2 extra USB ports via a daughterboard.
  • Expansion Headers – 11 headers for connection to daughter board, display and others.
  • Misc – RTC + battery slot, RS232, power and reset function.
  • Power Supply – TBC
  • Dimensions – 118 x 83 mm
embed+ RK328 Board and Daughterboard

embed+ RK328 Board and Daughterboard

A daughterboard and 11.6″ to 65″ IPS display (1366×768 to 4K resolutions) can also be provided. The daughterboard includes an SD card slot  (up to 32GB), 2x USB 2.0 host port, and Gigabit LAN.

Embed+ RK3288 kit supports Android 4.4 or Linux (Ubuntu). People interested in this platform can contact Cloudsto for pricing and availability information, since these will depends on the project’s requirements such as eMMC size and display used.

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Xilinx Zynq-Z7015 FPGA + ARM based System-on-Modules Include High Speed Transceivers

March 20th, 2015 No comments

There’s a fair amount of low cost boards powered by Xilinx Zynq Z-7010 and Z-7020 with dual core Cortex A9 processor and Artix-7 FPGA, but those who wanted to have PCIe ports or high speed transceivers had to go with the higher-end Xilinx Z-7030/7040/7050 with Kintex-7 FPGA fabric for a much higher cost. But Xilinx introduced Zynq Z-7015 late last year, a low cost Artix-7 FPGA + Cortex A9 SoC that also adds four 6.25Gbps SerDes ports and one PCIe Gen2 x4 integrated block. At least two modules based on the new SoC are currently available with DAVE Embedded Systems’ BORA Xpress  and Trenz Electronic TE0715 Series.

DAVE Zynq XC7Z015/XC7Z030 BORA Xpress

BORA_XpressBORA Xpress specifications:

  • SoC
    • Xilinx ZYNQ XC7Z015 dual ARM Cortex-A9 @ up to 866MHz with Artix-7 FPGA with 74K logic cells, 46K LUTs, 92K Flip flops, 380 KB RAM. 32 KB I-cache, 32 KB D-cache, 512 KB L2 for each core
    • Xilinx ZYNQ ZC7Z030 dual ARM Cortex-A9 @ up to 1GHz with Kintex-7 FPGA with 125K logic cells, 78K LUTs, 157K Flip flops, 1,060KB RAM. 32 KB I-cache, 32 KB D-cache, 512 KB L2 for each core.
  • System Memory – Up to 1GB DDR3 @ 533 MHz
  • Storage – 8 or 16 MB SPI bootable NOR flash, NAND flash on request (256 to 1024MB), up to 2 x SD/MMC card
  • Connectivity – 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet, additional RMII interface
  • CPU I/Os
    • up to 2x UART ports
    • up to 2x 2.0 OTG ports
    • up to 2x CAN
    • Up to 6x I²C, Up to 6x SPI
    • GPIOs available
  • High speed I/Os – Up to 4 PCI Express gen2; SERDES: 6.25Gbps transceivers
  • Debugging
    • JTAG IEEE 1149.1 Test Access Port
    • CoreSight and Program Trace Macrocell (PTM)
  • Supervisor – On-board power supply supervision and power sequencer, Watchdog and RTC
  • Expansion Connectors – 3 x 140 pin 0.6mm pitch
  • Power Supply – 3V, on-board voltage regulation; FPGA banks: 1.2 to 3.3V
  • Dimensions –  85 mm x 50 mm
  • Temperature Range –  Commercial: 0°C / +70°C; Industrial: -40°C / +85°C
Z-7015/Z-7030 BORA Xpress Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

Z-7015/Z-7030 BORA Xpress Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

The company provide a U-Boot and Linux 3.x.x BSP for the board. A development kit (BORA Xpress devkit) is said to be available with one SoM, one carrier board and all accessories required for immediate startup, but no details are currently provided for the kit on DAVE’s BORA Xpress page. More documentation should eventually be uploaded the site, and I could not find any pricing nor availability information.

Trenz Electronic TE0715 Series SoM

Trentz

Trentz TE0715-01-15 SoM ((Click to Enlarge)

TE0715 Series modules are more compact than DAVE’s, and feature the following hardware specifications:

  • SoC
    • Xilinx Zynq 7015 XC7Z015-1CLG485C dual ARM Cortex-A9 @ up to 866 MHz with Artix-7 FPGA with 74K logic cells, 46K LUTs, 92K Flip flops, 380 KB RAM. 32 KB I-cache, 32 KB D-cache, 512 KB L2 for each core
    • Xilinx Zynq 7030 XC7Z030-1SBG485C dual ARM Cortex-A9 @ up to 1GHz with Kintex-7 FPGA with 125K logic cells, 78K LUTs, 157K Flip flops, 1,060KB RAM. 32 KB I-cache, 32 KB D-cache, 512 KB L2 for each core.
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR3 32-bit SDRAM
  • Storage – 32 MB QSPI flash with XiP support,
  • Connectivity – 10/100/1000M gigabit Ethernet transceiver (PHY) with SGMII
  • USB – USB 2.0 high-speed ULPI transceiver
  • 132 FPGA I/Os (65 LVDS pairs possible) and 14 PS-MIO available on board-to-board connectors
  • 4 GTP/GTX (high-performance transceiver) lanes, GTP/GTX (high-performance transceiver) clock input
  •  Expansion Connectors – 2× 100-pin and 1× 60-pin high-speed hermaphroditic strips
  • Power Supply – High efficiency DC-DC converters: 4.0 A x 1.0 V power rail; 1.5 A x 1.5 V power rail; 1.5 A x 1.8 V power rail.
  • Dimensions –  N/A
  • Temperature Range –  Commercial: 0°C / +70°C

The company claims the “latest documentation, design support files, reference design with source files and tools” are available on the Wiki, but for now at least, this looks very much like a work in progress. I can only see they recommend Vivaldo Webpack for development.

Trentz TE0715 Series modules appear to be available now for 319 Euros for the Z-7015 SoC version and 369 Euros for the Z-7030 SoC version. You may be able to find a few more details on Trentz Electronic’s TE0715 Series product page.

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Categories: Hardware, Linux, Xilinx Zynq Tags: Linux, dave, fpga, som, trentz

MeLE F10 Lite is an Air Mouse with Keyboard using 2x AAA Batteries

March 19th, 2015 4 comments

MeLE has several models of air mouse, and they are great to use with Android mini PCs, and sometimes I also use these with my regular PC. I started with the original MeLE F10, but then switched to MeLE F10 Deluxe which provides a better pointer control. It’s not perfect as game mode only works with MeLE media devices, I could never make the IR learning function work, and the pointer tends to jump when I press the OK button, so I’m using the mouse button for clicks instead as it does not suffer from this issue. Nevertheless, MeLE F10 Deluxe is still the device I prefer to use during my mini PCs and boards’ reviews. Previous MeLE F10 air mice all comes with a built-in battery, but some people prefer to use standard batteries, and that’s just what the latest MeLE F10 Lite uses, with other features similar to the Deluxe version.

MeLE_F10_LiteMeLE F10 Lite hardware specification:

  • Radio – 2.4GHz RF; distance: 10 meters
  • Sensors – G-sensor, 6-axis gyroscope
  • QWERTY Keyboard and remote buttons with 100,000 presses lifespan
  • Power – 2x AAA batteries; auto-sleep time: 2 minutes

The remote ships with a tiny RF dongle, and a user’s manual. The QWERTY keyboard appears to be the same as on the Deluxe version, but the remote side has sadly lost the play/pause, FFWD, and FRWD buttons, and only supports one device for the IR learning function instead for three. Beside Android, the input device can also be used with Windows XP/Vista/7/8/10 and Mac OS X.

MeLE F10 Lite can be pre-ordered for $24.99 on Aliexpress, but you should be able to lower that to $19.99 with a $5 discount that you can get on the Aliexpress page. The official price for Lite is $24.99, and Deluxe is $34.99, but if you may also purchase the Deluxe version for $26.99 on GeekBuying.

Via AndroidPC.es

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Categories: Android, Hardware, Linux Tags: Android, Linux, mele, windows

Giveaway Week Winners Announced (March 2015)

March 18th, 2015 13 comments

The latest Giveaway week has come to an end, and I’m just coming back from the post office, having sent a few Android based TV boxes, a Linux development board, and one wireless audio streamer to the lucky winners.

Android_TV_Box_Giveaway

I’ve already announced winners daily in the comment section of each contest, but here’s the list again with the device, winners’ nickname and their country of residence:

  • Nagrace HPH NT-V6 – Rizwan, Canada
  • Vidon Box – bazsi, Romania
  • RipplTV – driv3l, USA
  • Freescale SABRE Lite – biasio95, Italy
  • Vidon.me AV200 – cityF, Portugal
  • HD18T – Sean, Canada
  • SoundMate WM201 – Orel, France

So people from Canada got lucky, but still no winner from Asia or Oceania.

Giveaway_parcels

The parcel have been send via registered Small Packet Airmail, all the winners should receive them in a few weeks, and certainly I hope they’ll have fun enjoy with their devices. If you haven’t won this time, there should be another giveway week by the end of the year or next year, where you’ll be able to try your luck yet again.

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