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Posts Tagged ‘Linux’

Zsun Wifi Card Reader Adds up to 64GB to Your Smartphone

February 27th, 2015 6 comments

I’ve previously covered Zsun SD11x USB flash drives with 8 to 128 GB internal flash, a battery, and Wi-Fi connectivity in order to easily add storage to devices without micro SD slots. The company has now launched a new Wi-Fi card reader to do the same, but with your own micro SD card instead allowing up to 64GB extra storage, and easy replacement.

Zsun_Wi-FI_Card_ReaderZsun card reader specifications:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Atheros AR9331 WiSoC
  • System Memory – 256 Mbit RAM (32 MB)
  • Storage – Internal flash for firmware (capacity TBD), micro SD slot up to 64GB
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi @ 150 Mbps
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 port for power and use as standard USB card reader
  • Dimensions – 33 x 30 x 13 mm

There’s no battery, so you’d have to connect the dongle to a power bank, PC, car charger etc.. to power it. If you connect it to a PC it will also be shown as an external USB drive. The company claims up to 8 people can watch movies simultaneously over Wi-Fi using their Android, iOS, or Windows app, but then it must be some low resolution 3gp video… I could not find a link for these apps, but it could the same Apple Extender (Android) and Phone Flash Disk (iOS) apps as for SD111.

SD111 Wi-Fi USB flash drive is hackable, as it’s been possible to access the Linux command line with the serial console after some soldering, and later on the root password (usable with telnet) was found to be zsun1188, so the same password might also work on this device.

Zsun Wi-Fi card reader sells for 79 CNY ($12.60) in China, and $14.99 on Aliexpress. The company also sells it for $39.99 on Amazon US (Model: Zsun-C1001R) with a 64GB card inside according to the page title. Further details can be found on Zsun W-Fi card reader page (Chinese).

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Categories: Hardware, Linux, Qualcomm Atheros Tags: Linux, usb, wifi, zsun

Linaro 15.02 Release with Linux 3.19 and Android 5.0

February 27th, 2015 No comments

Linaro 15.02 has just been released with Linux 3.19 (baseline), Linux 3.10.68 and 3.14.34 (LSK), Android 5.0.2, and Ubuntu Linaro Utopic.

Listed changes for Linux Linaro are exactly the same as last month, except they’ve used Linux 3.9 release. Power management tools have been added to their AOSP build, and some work has been done for Android 5.0 on the new Hikey board.

Here are the highlights of this release:

  • Linux Linaro 3.19-2015.02
    • GATOR topic: version 5.20.1
    • updated integration-linaro-vexpress64 topic by ARM LT (FVP Base and Foundation models, and Juno support)
    • updated topic from Qualcomm LT (ifc6410 board support)
    • updated topic from HiSilicon LT (Hi36xx, HiP04, and X5HD2 families support)
    • updated LLVM topic (the community llvmlinux-latest branch)
    • included ILP32 patch set v3 rebased onto 3.19. Initial tests using syscalls LTP tests done. When using ILP32 userland, a few tests have to be skipped (msgctl07, msgrcv0[1-7], msgsnd01) to avoid the stalls, and to make the testing to complete. No stalls with LP64 userland.
  • Linaro builds of AOSP 15.02 – Added Power Management Working Group tools (PM QAqa, powertop and powerdebug)
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2015.02
    • integrated Linaro GCC 4.9-2015.02
    • fixed linux-dummy to work with new rootfs.py depmod
    • fixed udhcpc command options to prevent
    • updated linux-linaro(-stable) recipes
    • dropped qemu overlay in favour of OE-core version
    • dropped kexec-tools overlay in favour of OE-core version
    • upstreaming – busybox: update to 1.23.1 release
  • Linaro Ubuntu 15.02 – added packages: ti-uim; updated packages: LSK 3.10.68/3.14.32 and linux-linaro 3.19 kernels
  • CI bring up: member build for TI J6-Vayu platform
  • Native ARMv8 build slave for CI
  • WIFI, bluetooth and USB integration with Android L for HiKey

Visit https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1502/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB, LMB (Linaro Member Builds), and community builds, as well as Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain components.

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GroBotz Interactive Robot Project is Made of Easy to Assemble Smart Blocks (Crowdfunding)

February 25th, 2015 No comments

GroBotz makes me think of Lego applied to robotics. The project consists of modules such as motors, sensors, buttons, switches, or cameras that snap together in order to create a robot on wheels, games, toys, a musical instrument, or whatever idea you may have, and the hardware is then programmed using a graphical user interface.

Grobie

GroBie is made for GroBotz Modules

A Raspberry Pi board is used for the brain of the robot, and Microchip PIC MCUs for the smart blocks. The software is programmed in C# using Xamarin, the user interface is based on Unity, OpenCV is used for image processing, and during development a plastic part where printed with Makerbot, and schematics and PCB layout designed with CadSoft EAGLE.

The company has now come up with a number of modules as shown in the picture below.

GroBotz_Smart_Blocks

Your robot can then be controlled over Wi-Fi with GroBotz app which works on Windows, Mac OS, iOs, Android and Linux devices. The software provide a “wire editor” to link up to 127 modules together, and define the robot’s behavior. For example, you can wire a motor module to a joystick module, and easily control the motor with the joystick.

Grobotz_AppGroBotz has just been launched on KickStarter, where the developers look to raise at least $300,000 to go ahead with production. The simplest kit is composed of Light Game Cube and battery with a GroBotz T-Shirt and builders cube (which must be the plastic enclosure for the module), and requires a $50 pledge, but if you want something a bit more fun like the GroBie shown on the first picture, you’ll need to pledge $100 in order to receive 2 DC Motors, a brain  (Raspberry Pi), a battery and charger, a caster, and 2 wheels, and there are other rewards with for example $500 for 30 building blocks. Delivery is scheduled for August to October 2015 depending on the chosen perk. You may also want to visit grobotz.com for a few more details.

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UDOO Neo Development Board is Powered by Freescale i.MX 6SoloX Processor

February 25th, 2015 No comments

UDOO boards combine a Freescale i.MX6 dual or quad core processor with an external Atmel SAM3X MCU that’s programmable as an Arduino board, so as Freescale has now formally announced their i.MX 6SoloX processor with a Cortex A9 core running Linux and Android, and a Cortex M4 core running MQX real-time operating systems, it was logical that the company would soon launch a low cost development board based on this heterogeneous processor. Meet UDOO Neo. UDOO_NeoUDOO Neo board specifications:

  • SoC – Freescale i.MX 6SoloX ARM Cortex-A9 core @ 1GHz and ARM Cortex-M4 Core with 2D/3D GPU
  • System Memory – 512MB or 1GB DDR3 (only Plus version)
  • Storage – On-board NOR SPI Flash, micro SD slot, 8-bit SDIO interface (on headers)
  • Video Input/Output
    • micro HDMI port
    • LVDS interface + touch (I2C signals)
    • Analog camera connection supporting NTSC and PAL
    • 8-bit Parallel camera interface (on headers)
  • Audio – HDMI
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 Type A ports, 1x USB OTG (micro-AB connector)
  • Connectivity –  10/100Mbps RJ45 connector,  Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n (including Wi-Fi Direct Mode SmartConfig), Bluetooth 4.0 Low Energy
  • Arduino compatible and extended GPIOs headers providing access to:
    • Serial – 3x UART ports, 2x CAN Bus
    • 8x PWM
    • 1x I2C interface, 1x SPI interface
    • 6x multiplexable signals
    • 36 GPIOs
    • 6 Analog inputs
  • Sensors – 3-Axis Accelerometer, 3-Axis Magnetometer, 3-Axis Digital Gyroscope
  • Misc – Coin Cell RTC Battery Connector, Green Power Status LED, Configurable Red LED
  • Power Supply – 5V DC Micro USB;  6-15V DC Power Jack
  • Dimensions – 56mm x 68.6mm

UDOO_Neo_Top_BottomUDOO Neo will run Android & Linux, and the Cortex-M4 MCU will be compatible with Arduino environment, offering an integrated single chip solution for applications requiring both Linux and Arduino. The company claims the board will be open source, but based on the files released for their UDOO dual and quad, that probably means schematics (PDF), mechanical files, as well as resources for Linux / Arduino development will be released. UDOO has also released some fun and useful tutorials for their boards in the past.

Both UDOO Neo and Neo Plus do not appear to be shipping just yet, and pricing information has not been released either. You can checkout the board at Embedded World 2015, at Hall 4, Stand 539 on February 24-26, 2015. More information should eventually surfaced on UDOO Neo product page.

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Freescale Announces i.MX 6SoloX ARM Cortex A9 & Cortex M4 Processor

February 25th, 2015 5 comments

Freescale i.MX6 SoloX processor started to show up in the ARM Linux Kernel mailing list last year, and Cortex A9 + Cortex M4 processor showed up in some marketing documents, but so far all documentation was tied to a non-diclosure agreement. However, all resources are now publicly available, as the company officially launched i.MX 6SoloX processor at Embedded World 2015.

IMX6SX Block Diagram

IMX6SX Block Diagram (Dotted line are for optional features)

Freescale i.MX 6SoloX specifications:

  • CPU – ARM Cortex-A9 up to 1 GHz with 512 KB L2 cache, 32 KB instruction and data caches and NEON SIMD media accelerator
  • MCU – ARM Cortex-M4 up to 200 MHz with 16 KB instruction and data caches, 64 KB TCM, MPU and FPU
  • Memory Interface
    • 16/32-bit DDR3-800 and DDR3L-800, 16/32-bit LPDDR2-800
    • SLC/MLC NAND, 62-bit ECC, ONFI2.2
    • 2x DDR Quad SPI NOR flash, 16/32-bit NOR Flash
  • Display and Camera Interfaces
    • Parallel RGB
    • LVDS
    • 20-bit parallel CMOS sensor interface
    • NTSC/PAL analog video input interface
  • Multimedia
    • GPU – Vivante GC400T 3D GPU supporting OpenGL ES 2.0. 27Mtri/s & 133Mpxl/s and 2D GPU
    • PiXel Processing Pipeline (PXP) – Image re-sizing, rotation, overlay and CSC
  • I/O and Peripherals
    • 2x 10/100/1000 Ethernet with \hardware AVB and support for IEEE1588
    • 1x PCIe 2.0 (1 lane)
    • 2x 8ch 12-bit ADC
    • 3x USB 2.0 ports, 2x HS OTG + PHY, 1x HS Host HSIC
    • 4x SD/MMC 4.5
    • 5x SPI, 6x UART, 4x I²C, 5x I²S/SSI
    • FlexCAN
    • MLB 25/50
  • Power management – Partial PMU integration,Freescale PF0200 PMIC
  • Security
    • Multicore unit includes for multi-core isolation and sharing
    • Resource Domain Controller (RDC)
    • Secure Messaging Unit (MU)
    • Hardware Semaphores
    • High Assurance Boot, cryptographic cipher engines, random number generator, and tamper detection
  • Packages – 19 x 19 mm 0.8 mm BGA;  17 x 17 mm 0.8 mm BGA (two ball map options); or 14 x 14 mm 0.65 mm BGA
  • Temperature Range
    • Consumer (Extended Commercial) –  -20C to +105C
    • Industrial – -40C to +105C
    • Automotive – -40C to +125C)

There are 13 i.MX 6SoloX parts divided into consumer, industrial and automotive categories with or without GPU, and different peripherals options as shown in the table below.

Freescale i.MX 6SoloX Family (Click to Enlarge)

Freescale i.MX 6SoloX Family (Click to Enlarge)

Documentation including datasheets, migration guide, various applications, and the full Technical Reference Manual can be freely downloaded, as well as Android 4.4.3 BSP and Linux 3.10.53 documentation. The Yocto Project has also been ported to i.MX 6SoloX (IMX6SX). The Cortex M4 core can run MQX RTOS in parallel.

SABRE-SDB Board for i.MX 6SoloX (Click to Enlarge)

“SABRE for Smart Devices”- Board based on Freescale i.MX 6SoloX (Click to Enlarge)

The company also also launched an i.MX 6SoloX version of their SABRE development board with the following key features:

  • SoC – Freescale i.MX 6SoloX Cortex A9 processor @ 1GHz with Cortex M4 MCU @ 200MHz
  • System Memory – 1 GB DDR3 SDRAM
  • Storage – 32 MB x2 QuadSPI Flash + 3x full-size SD/MMC card slots
  • Display
    • LVDS connector – Pairs with MCIMX-LVDS1 LCD display board
    • LCD expansion connector (parallel, 24-bit) – Pairs with MCIMXHDMICARD adapter board
  • Audio – Stereo audio codec; 1x 3.5mm audio ports
  • Connectivity – 2x 10/100/1000 Ethernet ports; optional Wi-Fi module
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 Host Type A connector, 1x micro USB 2.0 OTG connector
  • Other ports and I/O Expansion
    • mPCIe connector
    • 2x CAN (DB-9) connectors; Freescale MC34901 High-Speed CAN Transceiver
  • Debugging – 20-pin JTAG connector
  • Sensors – Freescale MMA8451 3-Axis Accelerometer, Freescale MAG3110 3D Magnetometer, ambient light sensor
  • Power Supply – 5V
  • Power Management – Freescale PF0200 PMIC
Back of SABRE i.MX 6SoloX Board (Click to Enlarge)

Back of SABRE i.MX 6SoloX Board (Click to Enlarge)

The board comes with a 5V/5A power supply, the printed quick start guide, a micro USB to USB cable, and a bootable SD card pre-loaded with a Linux image built with the Yocto Project. Android, Linux and Yocto BSP are available for the board, as well as hardware design files. Some optional hardware modules can be purchased with the board such as a 10.1″ touchscreen display (XGA resolution), an RGB to HDMI adapter, and a Wi-Fi radio card.

You can watch an overview of the board, and learn how to get started in the video below.

Freescale i.MX 6SoloX applications processors and SABRE board are both shipping in volume production, with the SoC selling for $10.84 to $13.99 in 1K quantities depending on exact SKU, and the development board priced at $399. For complete details, software and hardware documentation, visit Freescale i.MX 6SoloX and SABRE board product pages. Freescale also exhibits the solution at Embedded World, in Hall 4A, Booth 4A-220, on February 24-26, 2015.

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EZChip TILE-Mx100 is a Network Processor with 100 ARM Cortex A53 Cores

February 24th, 2015 3 comments

As ARM gets into the server and networking business, the number of ARM cores in SoC starts to shoot up, and after Cavium ThunderX 48 core processor, here comes EZChip TILE-Mx100 Hecta-core network processor with 100 ARM Cortex A53 cores and capable of delivering up to 200 Gigabit throughput.

Tile-MX100 Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

Tile-MX100 Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

Key features listed for EZchip TILE-Mx100:

  • One hundred 64-bit ARM Cortex A53 CPU cores in one chip
  • 3-level coherent cache architecture with over 40 Mbytes on-chip cache.
  • DDR4 DRAM controllers with ECC and supporting up to 1TBytes of memory.
  • SkyMesh coherent architecture for massive bandwidth, low latency and linear scalability
  • Multitude of networking hardware accelerators for high-performance data-path packet processing including
    • Wire-speed mPIPE packet processing engine delivering 300 million packets-per-second I/O.
    • Integrated 5-level hierarchical Traffic Manager with 256,000 queues.
    • MiCA™ acceleration engines for over 100Gbps of crypto.
  • Over 200Gbps of integrated I/O including 1G, 10G, 25G, 40G, 50G, 100G Ethernet, Interlaken, PCIe 3.0.
  • Precision packet timestamp and IEEE1588v2 support.
  • Best power/performance ratio for small systems’ rack and power footprint
Close Up on Quad Cortex A53 Cluster in TILE-Mx100

Close Up on Quad Cortex A53 Cluster in TILE-Mx100

Target networking applications for the processor include load balancing, security, network monitoring, NFV & SDN, virtualization, IDS/IPS (Intrusion Detection/Prevention), application recognition and video processing, for markets such as data center, cloud, enterprise and carrier networks. The processor will also leverage ARM software and tools, run Linux, and supports C/C++ / Java programming model, as well as hypervisors like KVM or Xen.

TILE-Mx is scheduled to sample in the second half of 2016, and the company also plans to offer 64 and 36 ARM cores version of the chip. More details can be found on EZchip TILE-Mx Multicore processor page, and a presentation will be given at the Linley Data Center Conference on February 25, 2015 in San Jose, California.

Via EETimes.

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Categories: Hardware, Linux, Processors Tags: Linux, arm, armv8, ezchip, server

DENX Computer Systems Introduces Atmel SAMA5D44 and Freescale i.MX6 System-on-Modules

February 22nd, 2015 No comments

Embedded World 2015 exhibition and conference will take place in Nuremberg, Germany on February 24-26, 2015, and we should expect interesting news related to MCU, industrial processors, and related development kits and boards next week. DENX Computer Systems has already unveiled two new SoM families with MA5D4 based on Atmel SAMA5D44 Cortex A5 processor, and M6R based on Freescale i.MX 6 Cortex A9 processors.

DENX MA5D4 System-on-Module

Denx_MA5D4MA5D4 SoM specifications:

  • Processor – Atmel SAMA5D44 Cortex A5 @ 528MHz with 720p hardware video decoder supporting H264/263, VP8, JPEG.
  • System Memory – 128 – 512MB DDR2 RAM
  • Storage – 4 – 32GB eMMC Flash (or optionally 256MB NAND Flash); 4 MB MByte SPI NOR-Flash;
  • I/Os via 230-pin MXM2 edge connector
    • Video Out / Display Support –  HDMI.  TFT controller, overlay support for image composition, resitive Touchscreen controller
    • Camera – CMOS image sensor interface
    • external bus A/D 25/16 bit
    • 2x 10/100MBit Ethernet, IEEE1588 support
    • 2xUSB Host / 1x USB OTG
    • RTC
    • 1x/2x CAN optionally
    • SD-card
  • Security features – On-the-fly encryption/decryption of code from external DDR, Encryption engines supporting AES/3DES, RSA, ECC – TRNG, SHA, tamper detection pins, memory content protection (secure key storage).
  • Power Consumption – ~500mW power dissipation
  • Dimensions – 70 x 40mm
DENX MA5D4 Block Diagram

DENX MA5D4 Block Diagram

The board supports U-Boot and Linux 3.x. Development or evaluation can be done with MA5D4EVK evaluation kit that comes with SAMA5D44 modules with 256MB DDR2, 4GB eMMC, a 7″ LCD with touchscreen and a power supply. The baseboard has the following specifications:

Evaluation Kit

Evaluation Kit

  • MXM socket for MA5D4 SoM
  • Storage – SD card socket
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 host port, 1x USB 2.0 OTG port
  • Video / Display – HDMI connector, and LCD flat cable header
  • Audio – Line IN/Mic IN, headphone/speaker out
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet
  • Camera port
  • 2x CAN and 2x RS-232 on DSUB9
  • Debugging – JTAG interface
  • Misc – RTC battery slot
  • Power Supply – 5V

Price and availability information has not been disclosed. You should be able to find out by contacting the company via their MA5D4 product page.

DENX M6R System-on-Module

M6R_moduleDENX M6R CPU module specifications:

  • SoC – Freescale i.MX6Solo, i.MX6DualLite, i.MX6Quad Cortex A9 processor up to 800MHz/1.0GHz with Vivante GPU
  • System Memory – 512MB to 2048MB DDR3 RAM
  • Storage – 4 GB eMMC NAND Flash, optional up to 128MB SPI NOR Flash
  • I/Os via 3x 120-pin board-to-board connectors
    • Camera interface – MIPI/CSI2
    • Connectivity – 10/100/1000 MBit Ethernet, IEEE1588 support
    • Video/Display – HDMI, up to 2xLVDS (24 bit)
    • USB2.0 Host/OTG
    • SATA II
    • PCIe x1 2.0
    • I2, SPI, UART, CAN
    • SPDIF
    • PWM
  • Misc – Watchdog timer
  • Dimensions – 80 x 60mm
  • Temperature Range – Commercial (0°C…70°C) or Industrial  (-40°C…+85°C)
  • Production Certification – IPC-A-610 Class 3 (Acceptability of Electronic Assemblies)
DENX M6R SoM Block Diagram

DENX M6R SoM Block Diagram

This module also supports U-boot and Linux 3.x. M6REVK evaluation kit can also be provided by the company, and includes a 7″ LCD display with touchscreen, a power supply, the baseboard, and one of the three module versions:

i.MX6 SoM Evaluation Kit

i.MX6 SoM Evaluation Kit

  • i.MX6 Solo, 512MB DDR3, 4GB eMMC
  • i.MX6 DualLite, 1GB DDR3, 4GB eMMC
  • i.MX6 Quad, 4GB DDR3, 4GB eMMC

Features of the main board include:

  • 3x 120-pin board-to-board connector for M6R SoM
  • Storage – SD card socket
  • Video/Display – HDMI, and dual LVDS interface
  • Audio – Line IN/Mic IN, headphone/speaker out
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet
  • 1x USB 2.0 OTG port, 1x USB 2.0 host port
  • 2x RS232 and 2x CAN on DSUB9
  • Debugging – JTAG interface

More details may be found on DENX M6R product page. Availability and pricing have not been disclosed by the company.

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Toucan-0700 HMI Panel Runs Linux or Android on Freescale i.MX6 Processors

February 21st, 2015 4 comments

TechNexion Toucan-0700 is an HMI (Human Machine Interface) panel based on Freescale i.MX6 modules and a baseboard following EDM standard for system-on-modules. The 7″ panel PC features the same EDM1-CF-IMX6 SoM used in Wandboard development boards, and runs various Linux distributions, as well as Android 4.3 or 4.4.

Toucan-0700Toucan-0700 specifications:

  • SoC – Freescale i.MX6 Solo/Duallite Cortex A9 processor with Vivante GPUs (i.MX6 Dual/Quad on request)
  • System Memory – 512MB (Solo), 1GB (Duallite)
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC + micro SD slot
  • Display – 7″ LCD display with LED backlight, 1024×600 resolution;  16M colors;  500 cd/m²; 4 points touchscreen
  • Video Output – HDMI 1.4 for external display
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet with POE function 802.3at, and optional WiFi 802.11 b/g/n + Bluetooth 4.0 (Broadcom BCM4330)
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 host port, 1x USB OTG 3.0 connector, 2x internal pin headers
  • Serial – 1x RS-232 (galvanic isolated), 1x RS-232/422/485 (galvanic isolated), 2x Flex CAN version 2.0B Compliant (galvanic isolated)
  • Other I/Os and expansions
    • 4x GPIO
    • 1x internal pin header (if touchpanel is not used)
    • Audio speaker connectors (Left / Right) (2 Watt pre-amplified)
  • Misc – 1x Reset button, 1x Boot select button (force SD card boot)
  • Power Supply –
    • 10~30VDC via 2 pin DC power terminal block
    • 36~57VDC Power over Ethenet (PoE) 802.3at
  • Power Consumption – 7 Watt
  • Dimensions – 184 (W) x 122 (H) x 30 (D) mm
  • Weight 595 grams
  • Temperature Range – Operation 0° to 60° C; Storage: -20° to 70° C
  • Relative Humidity – 10 – 90%
  • MTBF – 50,000 hours
  • Shock – 50G / 25 ms; Vibration 20G / 0-600 Hz
  • Certifications – CE, FCC, RoHS, REACh directives

Mounting can be achieved via 4 mounting clips (included), or an optional 35×75 VESA Mount (MIS C. Standard). You find hardware and software documentation, as well as Linux 3.x, Yocto 1.5, Ubuntu 12.04, Android 4.3 (jellybean), Android 4.4 (Kitkat) images, and Linux 3.0.35 SDK on Toucan-0700 Documentation and Downloads page.

Toucan-0700_Connectors

Vertical or Horizontal Connectors Configuration

Toucan-0700 HMI panel appears to be available now. Further information can be fond on TechNexion’s Toucan-0700 product page. The product can also be purchased in Europe via DENX Computer or Texim Europe, which lists the product for 540.09 Euros without Wi-FI/Bluetooth, and 584.00 Euros with.

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