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Posts Tagged ‘Linux’

VIA ARTiGO 1300 Quad Core x86 Rugged Digital Signage Player

September 17th, 2014 No comments

VIA has recently announced ARTiGO 1300, a rugged digital signage player powered by a VIA quad core E-Series x86 processor with VX11PH media processor, provides two HDMI outputs for independent displays, USB 3.0 ports, Gigabit Ethernet and more. Beside digital signage applications, it can also be used for kiosks, menu boards, HMIs, and other IoT applications.

 

ARTiGO_A1300_Rugged_Signage_Player

ARTiGO A1300 Specifications:

  • Processor – VIA QuadCore E-Series @ 1.0 GHz
  • Chipset – VIA VX11PH Media System Processor with Chrome 645/640 GPU for 2D/3D, and hardware video decoding  support (MPEG-2, WMV9, VC-1 and H.264)
  • System Memory – 1x DDR3 1066/1333 SODIMM socket (up to 8GB)
  • Storage – Support 1x 2.5” SATA SSD/HDD, 1x mSATA SSD. 32Mbit Flash memory for AMI Aptio UEFI BIOS.
  • Video Output – 2x HDMI ports supporting resolutions up to 1920 x 1080 pixels. Dual independent HDMI display support.
  • Audio – VIA VT2021 High Definition Audio Codec, Line-in and Line-out
  • Connectivity – 1x Gigabit Ethernet port (Realtek RTL8111G) with support for Wake-On-LAN and Boot from LAN (PXE), optional Wi-Fi and 3G support
  • USB – 2x USB 3.0 ports and 2x USB 2.0 ports
  • Serial Port – 1x COM portfor RS-232/422/485
  • Expansion Slot – 1x Mini-card slot (PCIe + USB 2.0), 1x SIM card slot, 1x DIO port for 8-bit GPIO
  • Misc – Blue LEDs for 3G and USB Wi-Fi, 1x Red LED for SSD activity, 1x Green LED for power status, power on/off button, Watch Dog Timer
  • Power – 12V DC-in (typical: 28W). ACPI 3.0 compliant
  • Dimensions – 185mm(W) x 44.4mm(H) x 162mm(D)
  • Weight – 2.0 kg without HDD

ARTiGO_A1300_COM_DIO_USB_LEDThe design is fanless, and supports Windows 8, Windows 7, WES 7, and Linux based operating systems. Wi-Fi and 3G connectivity can be added with respectively VNT9271 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi module and Ublox 3.75G HSPA/UMTS mini PCIe module.

VIA ARTiGO A1300 is available now on VIA Embedded Store for $550 plus shipping ($45 to Thailand). Further details can be found on Artigo A1300 product page.

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Intrinsyc OPEN-Q 8084 Development Kit Powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 Processor

September 12th, 2014 4 comments

Inforce Computing IFC6540 was the first low cost development board powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 processor I discovered a few months ago, but is currently “for pre-approved customers only and have not yet been released to public”. Intrinsyc has now launched their own Snapdragon 805 development kit called OPEN-Q 8084 based on a mini-ITX carrier board, and a SoM with 3GB RAM, and 16GB eMMC. The board target applications include ruggedized tablets, digital signage, government/public safety, medical, robotics, wearable displays, video streaming/conferencing, gaming systems, and in-flight entertainment.

OPEN-Q 8084 Snapdragon 805 Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

OPEN-Q 8084 Snapdragon 805 Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

Specifications of APQ8084 Open-Q System-on-Module:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 (APQ8084) quad core Krait 450 @ 2.5GHz, with Adreno 420 GPU @ 500MHz, Hexagon QDSP6 V5A (600MHz), and two ISPs for up to 55-megapixel stereoscopic 3D
  • System Memory – 3GB PoP LPDDR3 RAM
  • Storage – 16GB eMMC 5.0 flash, expandable to 64GB, micro SD signals, and SATA signals (via MXM connector)
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet (via MXM connector), 802.11a/b/g/n/ac WiFi (2.4GHz/5GHz) for 600Mbps throughput, Bluetooth 4.1
  • Other I/Os accessible via 314-pin MXM 3.0 edge connector:
    • PCIe
    • HDMI
    • SPI, I2C. I2S, GPIO
    • 3x MIPI CSI, 2x MIPI DSI
    • NFC, UIM
    • Slim bus
    • USB – 2x USB 2.0 (host and client),  2x USB 3.0 (host and client), USB HSIC
    • JTAG
    • Serial ports
  • Power +3.3V DC; PMIC supporting processor and peripheral LDOs, boost regulators as well as clock management and auxiliary signals.
  • Dimensions – 82 x 35mm
  • Temperature Range – 0 to 70°C

One of the advantages of Snapdragon 805 is its 4K/UHD capabilities including 4K capture with H.264/AVC format, 4K playback with H.264/AVC and H.265/HEVC formats, and 4K UHD on-device display concurrent with 4K UHD output to HDTV.

Open-Q 8084 devkit mini-ITX + SoM has the following specs:

  • Processor, Memory, Storage and Connectivity – As listed forAPQ8084 Open-Q SoM with Snapdragon 805, 3GB RAM, 16 GB Flash, Wi-Fi…
  • External Storage – microSD slot, SATA 3.0 I/F
  • Connectivity – Apart from Wi-Fi and Bluetooth on the module, the carrier board adds a Gigabit Ethernet port, GPS with GLONASS and COMPASS support
  • Video Output
    • HDMI 1.4
    • 2x MIPI-DSI I/F with support for optional qHD LCD capacitive touchscreen
  • Camera I/F – 3x MIPI-CSI I/F with support for optional cameras
  • Audio – 5.1 channel, 3.5mm headphone output and microphone input jacks, 6 digital mics
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 host port, 1x micro USB 3.0 port, 2x USB 2.0 host ports.
  • Sensors – Optional compass, gyro, accelerometer
  • Debugging – JTAG and UART (DB9)
  • Headers – Sensor/IoT header, NFC/UIM header
  • Expansion Slot – mini-PCIe slot
  • Misc – 3x user buttons, 3x user LEDS and power indicator
  • Power – 12V power supply with external battery connector; optional PMIC with battery support
  • Dimensions – 170×170 mm (Mini-ITX form-factor)
OPEN-Q 8084 Block Diagram

OPEN-Q 8084 Block Diagram

The company will provide an Android 4.4 BSP, but “embedded Linux customization” is also available. The full development kit includes Open-Q 805 8084) SoM in MXM 3.0 custom form factor, the Mini-ITX Carrier board for IO and expansion, a power supply, an HDMI cable, a Quick Start Guide, a licence agreement, and access to documentation and platform BSP. Cameras, LCD touchscreen displays, and extra sensors are available as options.

Intrinsyc’s OPEN-Q 8084 module is selling for $219, whereas the development kit goes for $449, with shipments scheduled for October. You may want to visit  Open-Q 8084 SOM and Open-Q 8084 Development Kit product pages for further details.

Via LinuxGizmos

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Emtrion SBC-SAMA5D36 ARM Cortex A5 Linux Development Board Comes with Dual Ethernet, HDMI Output

September 10th, 2014 1 comment

A few months ago, I reviewed Atmel Xplained SAMA5D3 development board powered by SAMA5D36 Cortex A5 processor. The kit is supported by the Yocto Project, so I could build and run Poky distribution with a recent Linux kernel (it support mainline), it features Arduino compatible headers, and I found the board to be a nice platform for headless applications, or applications that require an LCD display. However, if you wanted to connect an HDMI display you’d be out of luck, unless you design your own LCD to HDMI add-on board. Emtrion SBC-SAMA5D36 could be an interesting alternative, as it features very similar specifications, but adds an HDMI output port.

SBC-SAMA5D36 Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

SBC-SAMA5D36 Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

Emtrion SBC-SAMA5D36 specifications:

  • MPU – Atmel SAMA5D36 single core Cortex-A5 @  536 MHz
  • System Memory – 256 MB RAM
  • Storage – 512 MB NAND Flash, up to 16 MB NOR Flash, and micro SD Card socket
  • Connectivity – 100Base-TX Ethernet,  10/100/1000Base-TX Ethernet (Gigabit Ethernet)
  • Video Output – HDMI, LCD connector and 4-wire touch
  • USB -  2xUSB Host,  1x USB Device
  • Other I/Os:
    • I2S Audio Interface
    • 5x serial ports (LVTTL)
    • up to 52 GPIOs
    • 2x CAN buses
  • Misc – 2x user buttons, 4x user LEDs, RTC (battery buffered)
  • Power Supply – 5V.
  • Power Consumption -  Typ. 1 W
  • Dimensions – 135mm x 74mm
Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

The board is said to support Debian 8.0 (Jessie), as well as build frameworks such as the Yocto Project and Buildroot. Just like Atmel SAMA5D3 Xplained, SBC-SAMA5D36 is supported in Linux mainline, except the LCD driver which is work in progress. The SDK includes a pre-configured rootFS based on Debian 8, Qt 5.2 support, GNU toolchain, build scripts, a VMware virtual machine for development and various software and hardware documents.

The board is available now for around 100 Euros for a single unit, and around 80 Euros for 1k order. You can find more information, including the hardware manual, on the company’s blog, and SBC-SAMA5D36 product page.

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$50 Intel Edison Board for Wearables Features an SoC with a Dual Core Atom Processor, and a Quark MCU

September 10th, 2014 7 comments

Intel announced the Edison board for wearables applications last January at CES 2014. When it first came out, it looked like an SD card, but the board look has now drastically changed. Nevertheless, the important point is that Intel Edison is now available, together with various development kits, and runs Linux (Yocto built), as well as an RTOS.

Intel_Edison_ModuleWith the official release, we’ve also got the full specifications:

  • SoC – Dual-core, dual-threaded Intel Atom (Silvermont) processor (22nm) processor @ 500 MHz and a 32-bit Intel Quark micro-controller @ 100 MHz. Includes 1GB LPDDR3 PoP memory
  • System Memory – 1 GB LPDDR3 (PoP memory) – 2 channel 32bits @ 800MT/sec
  • Storage – 4 GB eMMC (v4.51 spec) + micro SD card connector
  • Connectivity -  Dual band 802.11 a/b/g/n Wi-Fi (Broadcom 43340) with either an on-board antenna or external antenna, and Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB – 1x micro USB connector
  • I/Os:
    • 2x UART  (1 full flow control, 1 Rx/Tx)
    • 2x I2C, 1x SPI with 2 chip selects
    • 1x I2S
    • 12x GPIO including 4 capable of PWM output
  • Module connector – 70-pin connector (Hirose DF40 series – 1.5, 2.0, or 3.0 mm stack height)
  • Power Supply – Input: 3.3 to 4.5 V; Output: 100mA @ 3.3V and 100 mA @ 1.8V
  • Power consumption – Standby (No radio): 13 mW;  Standby (Bluetooth 4.0): 21.5 mW (BLE in Q4 2014);  Standby (Wi-Fi): 35 mW.
  • Dimensions – 35.5 × 25.0 × 3.9 mm
  • Temperature Range – 0 to 40°C

The company will provide Yocto 1.6 Linux for the two cores of the Atom processor, and the Quark MCU will run an unnamed RTOS. Development tools for the Atom cores includes the Arduino IDE, Eclipse with support for C, C++ and Python programming languages, and Intel XDK for Node.JS and HTML5 development. An SDK and IDE will be available for the Quark MCU. Intel IoT Analytics Platform is the cloud solution adopted for the board, and will be free for limited and non-commercial use.

Intel Edison Arduino (Click to Enlarge)

Intel Edison Board for Arduino (Click to Enlarge)

Edison is basically a module, so it might be useful to have a baseboard, and Intel has come up with two:

  • Intel Edison Board for Arduino – Board with Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, and headers compatible with Arduino UNO expect it only supports 4 PWM instead of 6.
  • Intel Edison Breakout Board – Minimal board with the following key features:
    • Exposes native 1.8 V I/O of the Edison module.
    • 0.1″ grid I/O array of through-hole solder points.
    • USB OTG with USB Micro Type-AB connector
    • USB OTG power switch.
    • Battery charger.
    • USB to device UART bridge with USB micro Type-B connector.
    • DC power supply jack (7 to 15 VDC input).

Documentation including a product brief, hardware guides for Edison board for Arduino and the Breakout board, the Arduino IDE, and the instructions to get the Yocto BSP can be downloaded on Intel’s Edison Board page.

Intel Edison is available for backorder on Sparkfun for $49.95, and Edison for Arduino and Edison Breakout Board kits are listed Maker Shed for respectively $107 and $75, but currently out of stock. There’s also a Starter Pack on Sparkun for $114.95. Shipping is expected in 6 to 8 weeks.

Thanks to David and Freire.

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PicoZed System-on-Modules are Powered by Xilinx Zynq-7000 ARM + FPGA SoC

September 10th, 2014 1 comment

After the Zedboard, and the Microzed, here comes PicoZed, a family of system-on-modules (SoM) based on Xilinx Zynq-7000 SoCs featuring a dual core Cortex A9 processor and FPGA fabric. The module also comes with 1GB RAM, 4GB eMMC, Gigabit Ethernet PHY, various user I/O, and more. Target applications include embedded vision, test & measurement, motor control, software-defined radio, and industrial automation.

PicoZed 7303 SoM (Click to Enlarge)

PicoZed 7030 SoM (Click to Enlarge)

Four modules are available with support for commercial or industrial temperature ranges, all sharing the following specifications:

  • SoC (depending on module)
    • Xilinx Zynq-7010 with two Cortex-A9 cores @  866MHz, FPGA with 28K Logic Cells
    • Xilinx Zynq-7015 with two Cortex-A9 cores @  866MHz, FPGA with 74K Logic Cells, 4 transceivers @ 6.25 Gb/s
    • Xilinx Zynq-7020 with two Cortex-A9 cores @  866MHz, FPGA with 85K Logic Cells
    • Xilinx Zynq-7030 with two Cortex-A9 cores @  1GHz, FPGA with 125K Logic Cells, up to 4 transceivers @ 12.5 Gb/s
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR3 SDRAM
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC flash, 128Mb QSPI flash
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet PHY
  • PicoZed Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

    PicoZed Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

  • USB – USB 2.0 PHY
  • User I/O via three board-to-board connectors (JX3):
    • 7Z010 Version:
      • 113 User I/O (100 PL, 13 PS MIO)
      • PL I/O configurable as up to 48 LVDS pairs or 100 single-ended I/O
    • 7Z015 Version:
      • 148 User I/O (135 PL, 13 PS MIO)
      • PL I/O configurable as up to 65 LVDS pairs or 135 single-ended I/O
      • 4 GTP transceivers
    • 7Z020 Version:
      • 138 User I/O (125 PL, 13 PS MIO)
      • PL I/O configurable as up to 60 LVDS pairs or 125 single-ended I/O
    • 7Z030 Version:
      • 148 User I/O (135 PL, 13 PS MIO)
      • PL I/O configurable as up to 65 LVDS pairs or 135 single-ended I/O
      • 4 GTX transceivers
  • Debugging – JTAG configuration port accessible via I/O connectors, PS JTAG pins accessible via I/O connectors
  • Misc – Oscillator @ 33.33 MHz
PicoZed 7030 Back (Click to Enlarge)

PicoZed 7030 Back (Click to Enlarge)

The module comes with a getting started card, and the company provides a Linux BSP, as well as reference design files.

To ease development, PicoZed Carrier Board is also available with the following specifications:

  • SoC/Memory/Storage – Via PicoZed modules listed above
  • External Storage — MicroSD slot
  • Connectivity – 2x Gigabit Ethernet ports, SFP+ cage
  • Video Output – HDMI
  • USB – USB 2.0 port, USB UART
  • Other I/O
    • SMA port for GTX/GTP
    • JTAG port
    • Programmable clock mux
    • SMA reference clock input
    • User I/O:
      • FMC (Low Pin Count)
      • PS Pmod (Shared with eMMC)
      • PL Pmod (7015/20/30 only)
      • PL Pmod (7015/30 only)
  • Expansion – 1x PCIe Gen 2
  • Misc – User push buttons and LEDs
  • Power – 12V
PicoZed Carrier Board (Click to Enlarge)

PicoZed Carrier Board (Click to Enlarge)

This baseboard comes with a 12V AC/DC power support, and a quick start card.

PicoZed SoMs and Carrier Board are available now on Avnet with lead times between 8 to 10 weeks. The SoM prices vary between $179 and $399 depending on chosen Zynq SoC and temperature range, and PicoZed Carrier Board can be purchased for $425. You can find more details on PicoZed SoM and PicoZed Carrier Board pages. The board will be demonstrated at X-Fest seminars in Europe, Asia, and North America.

Via LinuxGizmos

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iControlHub is An Upcoming XBMC Media Center Powered by Intel Celeron J1900 Processor

September 4th, 2014 13 comments

Earlier this week, we’ve seen MINIX NEO Z64 mini PC based on Intel Atom Z3735F that will sell for less than $150 in October. If you’d like a low power low cost Intel based fanless mini PC but with a bit more processing power, iControlHub could be an option with an Intel Celeron J1900 Bay Trail quad core processor.

iControlHub Prototype

iControlHub Prototype

Preliminary specifications for iControlHub:

  • SoC – Intel Celeron J1900 processor @ 2.0 GHz (Burst frequency 2.41 GHz)  with Intel HD graphics (Max TDP)
  • System Memory – Up to 8GB DDR3
  • Storage – HDD / SSD via mSATA connector
  • Video Output – HDMI
  • Audio Output – HDMI, optical S/PDIF
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet, Wi-Fi with two external antennas
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x USB 3.0 host port
  • Misc – IR in and out
  • Power Supply – 12V
  • Dimensions – 125 x 125 mm (Board)

You must be confused with the picture as HDMI out is crossed and a “5V/2A” is shown… That’s because that’s an earlier sample based on Intel CE5300, but the company decided to switch to Intel Celeron J1900. The website has not been updated, but the company apparently intends to provide an XBMC based solution that supports features such as Cloud based CCTV solution, and IR blaster. Contrary to system based on “Bay Trail-T” processors where Linux may be complicated to install, Intel Celeron J1900 is a desktop processor, so both Linux and Windows should be easily installable on the platform.

The whole discussion started on XBMC forums last January, but there has been quite a few changes since then, notably the industrial E3822 processor has been dropped, and the developers have announced their intention of release the J1900 based version released above for about $160 + VAT, probably not including RAM, and they also said the Wi-Fi antennas are not included for this price. I hope the product will come to market, but I’m not that confident.. You can visit iControlHub web page with information more or less up-to-date.

Thanks to Harley!

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Cloud Media OpenHour Chameleon Quad Core TV Box Boots Android or Linux from SD Card

September 2nd, 2014 3 comments

Cloud Media, previously known  as Syabas, has been selling Popcorn Hour media players based on Linux for several years, but with OpenHour Chameleon the company is about to launch their first Android media player powered by Rockchip RK3288. The device is similar to other RK3288 TV boxes, except it does not come with internal storage at all, and instead boots Android 4.4.2 from a provided 8GB SD card, with later plans to have support for Linux operating systems such as Ubuntu. Another particularity is that they’ll use an aluminum casing for better heat dissipation of the Rockchip RK3288 processor which can get pretty hot

OpenHour_Chameleon

OpenHour Chameleon specifications:

  • SoC -  Rockchip RK3288 quad core ARM Cortex A12 / A17 processor with ARM Mali-T764 quad-core 3D GPU supporting OpenGL ES 1.1/2.0/3.0, and OpenCL 1.1
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3
  • Storage – No Internal storage + SD card slot with 8GB card (including Android) + micro SD slot up to 32GB
  • Video Output – HDMI 2.0 up to 3840×2160 resolution
  • Audio Output – HMDI,  and optical and coaxial S/PDIF output
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet. No internal Wi-Fi or Bluetooth support.
  • USB – 3x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro OTG port
  • Misc – IR extender port
  • Power – 5V/2A
  • Dimensions – N/A
  • Weight – N/A

The company claims you’ve also be able to change the included 8GB SD card, with a larger SD card ( up to 32 GB) to load your OS of choice, be it Android, Ubuntu (TBC) or another. That should simplify firmware upgrade, as you won’t need to use Rockchip Windows or Linux tools to upgrade the firmware, and you can simply re-flash the SD card, or use another one. They have not mentioned if they’ll support OTA however. The box will run XBMC, and the company claims True-Dolby and HD-DTS pass-through are supported. Bluetooth and Wi-Fi will be optionally supported via external USB dongle(s), and other optional accessories include a Bluetooth game controller, a wireless remote, keyboard and air mouse.

OpenHour_RK3288_Heat_DissipationIt’s not clear when the box will be available, but OpenHour Chameleon will sell for $149. You can find more information, and register your interest on Cloud Media’s OpenHour Chameleon page. You want also want to check out their Wiki (under construction) or forums for more details.

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