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Posts Tagged ‘lte’

U-blox SARA-R410M-02B Module Supports LTE Cat M1 and Cat NB1 in a Single Package

July 10th, 2017 No comments

We previously covered U-blox SARA-R4 LTE Cat M1 and SARA M2 NB-IoT (Cat NB1) modules, but in case you need support for LTE Cat M1 and Cat NB1, instead of just one or the other, in your product, U-blox launched a new SARA-R4 model with SARA-R410M-02B module supporting both standards.

U-blox SARA-R410M-02B module specifications:

  • LPWAN connectivity
    • LTE Cat M1 Half-duplex: 375 kb/s DL and UL
    • LTE Cat NB1 Half-duplex: 27.2 kb/s DL, 62.5 UL
    • Shared bands – 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 12, 13, 17, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 28;  Cat M1-only band – 39
    • Coverage enhancement Mode A and Mode B (in upcoming firmware),
    • 3GPP Rel 13 e-DRX  (Extended Discontinuous Reception) supported in upcoming firmware
    • SMS support – MT/MO PDU / Text mode; SMS over SG/NAS
    • Voice – VoLTE (Cat M1) using AMR-WB codec
    • (U)SIM supporting 1.8 and 3V
  • GNSS/GPS support with CellLocate and Hybrid positioning coming in new firmware version
  • I/Os – 1x UART, 1x USB 2.0 HS, 1x SDIO master, 1x DDC (I2C), 1x SPI, up to 6 GPIOs
  • Power Supply – 3.3 to 4.3V; 3.8V nominal
  • Power Consumption – Power save mode: 8 μA; active mode: 8 mA; LTE connected mode: 105 to 125 mA
  • Package – 96 pin LGA;  26.0 x 16.0 x 2.5 mm; < 3 grams
  • Extended temperature range: –40 to +85°C
  • Certifications – FCC, ISED, IFETEL, GCF, RCM, CCC, SRRC, NCC, RED, PTCRB, Verizon, AT&T, Telstra, GMA (Global M2M Association). Deployed bands: 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 12, 13, 20, 28

The other advantage of this model is that it’s configurable and works worldwide, instead of just USA, Noth America or ANZ + North America for the other 3 modules, meaning you could make one product and sell it worldwide without having to make variants for different locales. The module integrate IPv4 and IPv6 stacks, as well as a range a network protocols ranging from TCP/IP to MQTT and TLS. Device management is done through OMA LWM2M, and firmware update works either via USB or FOTA.

SARA-R4 modules can be used in various applications such as gas/water/electricity meters, city street lighting, building automation, HVAC, industrial monitoring and control, telematics, insurance, asset & vehicle tracking, security systems, alarm panels, outpatient monitoring and  consumer wearables.

The company did not provide pricing information, but mentioned product samples are available on request. You may find futher details on SARA-R4 Series product page.

Via ElectronicsWeekly

Categories: Hardware Tags: industrial, IoT, lpwan, lte, ublox

Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 1200 Platform for Wearables Supports LTE Cat M1 and NB1 (NB-IoT)

June 28th, 2017 No comments

After Snapdragon Wear 2100 and 1100 launched last year , Qualcomm has announced a new Snapdragon Wear 1200 platform still designed for wearables, but with lower power consumption, less processing power, a more compact package, and built-in support for LTE IoT communications standards such as LTE Cat M1 and LTE NB-IoT (Cat NB1).

 

Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 1200 key features and specifications:

  • CPU – ARM Cortex A7 @ 1.3 GHz
  • Memory / Storage – Support for discreet or MCP NAND and LPDDR2
  • Display – Support via SPI for simple UI and displays
  • Modem
    • Global multi-mode supporting Cat-M1 / NB1 / E-GPRS.
    • Supports LTE FDD and TDD for Cat-M1 and E-GRPS and FDD only for Cat-NB1
    • Up to 300 kbps downlink and 350 kbps uplink for Cat-M1
    • 10 kbps download and 60 kbps upload speeds for Cat-NB1
    • Integrated voice support for VoLTE
  • Other Connectivity – Pre-integrated support for Qualcomm 11ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.2 / Bluetooth Low Energy
  • Location
    • GLONASS, Galileo, and BeiDou constellations supported
    • Accurate Wi-Fi and cellular positioning, optimized for Cat-M1/NB1
    • Low power Geo-Fencing
    • Qualcomm Cloud Based Location Services with   day GNSS predicted orbits service, Qualcomm end-to-end Global Terrestrial Positioning (GTP) Wi-Fi
      and cellular service
  • Security
    • Qualcomm Trusted Execution Environment
    • Wireless protocol security
    • Hardware based security with Secure Boot/storage/debug, hardware crypto engine, hardware random number generator, and Trustzone
  • Power Management
    • Ultra-low Rock Bottom Sleep Current (RBSC) for extended standby
    • Power Save Mode (PSM)
    • Extended Discontinuous Receive (eDRX)
    • Charging – Companion charging chipset
  • Package / Process – 79mm2 package; 28nm manufacturing process

The product brief actually mention an ARM Cortex-A1 core, but this must be a mistake, as later on Qualcomm explains the platform is cost-optimized to reduce the BOM and NRE with an ARM Cortex A7 core “eliminating the need for MCUs” . The company also claims the solution is scalable thanks to broad software re-use, and the possibility to add voice, WiFi, and Bluetooth. The solutions is also said to last 10 day on a charge with LTE standy, when paired with 350 mAh battery and using eDRX.

Linux and ThreadX operating systems will be supported, and while Wear 1200 chipset is supposed to target wearables such as kid, pet, elderly, and fitness trackers, I’d assume it might also be useful for some IoT applications like GPS trackers provided it’s cost-effective. Reference designs from Borqs and Quanta are available in order to allow manufacturers to bring products to market quickly. You may be able to find a few more details on Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 1200 product page.

MangOH Red Open Source Hardware Board Targets Cellular Industrial IoT Applications

June 14th, 2017 3 comments

Sierra Wireless has announced MangOH Red open source hardware platform designed for IIoT (Industrial IoT) applications with a snap-in socket for 2G to 4G & LTE-M/NB-IoT modules, built-in WiFi and Bluetooth, various sensors, a 26-pin expansion header, and more.

mangOH Red Board without CF3 / IoT Modules – Click to Enlarge

MangOH Red board specifications:

  • Snap-in socket to add any CF3-compatible modules, most of which based on Qualcomm MDM9215 ARM Cortex A5 processor including:
    • Airprime WP7502 LTE Cat 3, HSPA, WCDMA, EDGE/GPRS module
    • Airprime WP7504 LTE Cat 3, HSPA, WCDMA, CDMA module
    • Airprime WP7601 LTE Cat 4 module
    • Airprime WP7603 LTE Cat 4, WCDMA module
    • Airprime WP8548 HSPA, WCDMA, EDGE/GPRS, and GNSS module
    • AirPrime HL6528RD quad-band GSM/GPRS Embedded Wireless Module designed for the automotive market
    • And more….

      mangOH Red with CF3 Module, Shield, and IoT Module – Click to Enlarge

  • Storage – micro SD slot
  • Wireless MCU Module – Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n and Bluetooth 4.2 BLE module with an ARM Cortex-M4 core MCU (Mediatek MT7697) providing access to real-time I/Os
  • Wireless Connectivity “Accessories”
    • Micro SIM card holder; ESIM
    • Main, GNSS, & Diversity antennas connectors, and WiFi/Bluetooth chip antenna
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 host port
  • Audio – 3.5mm audio jack (unpopulated)
  • Sensors – Bosch Sensortec Accelerometer, Gyroscope, Temperature and Pressure sensors, Light sensors
  • Expansion
    • 26-pin Raspberry Pi compatible connector
    • IoT Expansion Card slot to plug in any technology based on the IoT Connector open standard
    • 6-pin real-time I/O header controlled by WiFi/BLE module.
    • 6-pin low power I/O header
  • Debugging – 1x micro USB port for serial console
  • Misc – LEDs; reset and user buttons;
  • Power Supply – 5V via micro USB port; battery connector; power source jumpers

Click to Enlarge

mangOH Red hardware design is fully open source with BoM, schematics (PDF an Allegro/OrCAD), PCB Layout (Intercept Pantheon), Gerber, and mechanical files available for download in the resources section, where you’ll also find other documentation and getting started guides for users and developers.  The CF3 modules run Legato Linux developed by Sierra Wireless, and open source with the source code on Github. Code specific to MangOH Red + WP8548 was also upstreamed in Linux 4.10.

The company also offers Sierra Wireless Smart SIM with up to 100 MB free data, but you can use the board any commercially available SIM car. The board also supports AirVantage IoT Platform to create, deploy and manage solutions in the cloud.

MangOH Red board can be purchased as a bareboard, but most people will probably want to get a Starter Kit with MangOH Red plus Air Prime WP8548, WP7502 or WP7504 sold on Digikey. I’m very confused by the price list, as $99 is shown for both the bare board, and kits including the board and a CF3 module. So I’ll assume $99 is for mangOH board only, and you’d likely have to pay $200+ for a board plus a CF3 module with the total price depending on the selected module. You may find additional details on MangOH Red product page.

Windows 10 ARM Mobile PCs Demonstrated with Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 SoC at Computex 2017

June 1st, 2017 13 comments

Windows on ARM has been tried before with Windows RT, but the systems were crippled, and it was not exactly a success. Microsoft and Qualcomm are now giving it another try with ARM mobile computers running the full version Windows 10 on Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 processor, and Asus, HP, and Lenovo building devices based on the solution.

There are plenty of inexpensive Intel PCs running Windows 10, so what would be the benefits of using Snapdragon 835 SoC? Qualcomm explains that it’s the first to coming integrate Gigabit LTE, it offers up to 50% longer battery life in specific use cases like watching videos and gaming, and thanks to big.LITTLE technology provides up to 4 to 5 times improvement in battery life compared to Intel’s solutions.

Windows 10 does not have the same limitations as Windows RT had, and you can do pretty everything that you would on an Intel PC, including installing and running 32-bit x86 application thanks to an emulation layer that convert x86 instructions to ARM ones.

Qualcomm Mobile PC Board vs Intel Mobile PC Board

Mobile Geeks filmed a demo in Qualcomm booth, showing Office (Word, Excel, Powerpoint), Outlook, installing a 32-bit x86 application, multi-tab web browsing over an LTE connection, and playing some YouTube video, including a 4K video. As a side note, the demo guy told the “legal department told him to only show Qualcomm content”, probably because of inane copyrights laws. That’s really ridiculous that those laws apply to showing a 10s clip for an hardware demo. But I digress, and it was stressed again that it was the first time big.LITTLE was supported in Windows 10, and allowed for much better efficiency.

Via Liliputing

Boardcon Introduces Rockchip RK3399 PICO3399 CPU Module and EM3399 Baseboard

May 31st, 2017 3 comments

There’s a limited number of boards based on Rockchip RK3399 processor, with the easiest to work with (for non-Chinese readers) probably being Firefly-RK3399. Shenzhen Xunlong is working on their own Orange Pi RK3399 board, 9Tripod released their X3399 SoM and devkit, Boardcon has also launched their own RK3399 SoM (system-on-module) and baseboard solution with respectively PICO3399 CPU module and EM3399 board.

PICO3399 SoM specifications:

  • SoC – Rockchip RK3399 hexa core processor with a dual ARM Cortex-A72 core cluster @ up to 2.0 GHz, quad ARM Cortex-A53 cluster, and ARM Mali-T860MP4 GPU
  • System Memory – 4GB LPDDR3
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC flash
  • 314-pin edge connector with 2x USB2.0 Host, 2x USB3.0 or 2x  Type-C, UART, MIPI, GbE, HDMI in&out, Audio, I2C, I2S, PCI-E, SD/MMC/SDIO, GPIO, eDP..
  • Power Supply – 5V
  • Dimensions – 82 x 50mm (8 layers)

The company provides support  for Android6.0.1 and Debian for the module. If the info provided in the website is correct, the Android BSP includes Linux 4.4.36 kernel, U-boot 2014-10, and drivers, while the Debian BSP includes Linux 4.4.41 kernel, U-boot 2016-12-03, and drivers.

You can get started quickly with the CPU module using EM3399 development board with the following specifications:

  • Socket for PICO3399 CPU module
  • External storage – 1x micro SD socket, PCIe connector for SSD
  • Display & Video Output
    • Output – 1x eDP LCD via 40-pin header, 2x MIPI DSI connector, 1x HDMI 1.4/2.0 port
    • Input – HDMI input via TC358749XBG
  • Audio – ALC5651 audio codec; 3.5mm audio jack
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet (RJ45) port, optional 802.11 b/g/n/ac WiFi & Bluetooth 4.1 (AP6354), SIM card slot, optional 3G/4G mini PCIe card
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host, 1x USB3.0 host, 1x USB Type-C
  • Camera I/F – 2x MIPI CSI with 3D capture support
  • Expansion
    • 1x PCIe x4 slot for graphics card
    • 1x PCIe connector for SSD or 3G module
    • 5 “GPIO” headers for a total of 122 I/Os
  • Debugging – 1x 3-pin UART header
  • Misc – RTC powered by external lithium battery; Recover, Power, Reset buttons;
  • Power Supply – 12V/2A via power barrel
  • Dimensions – 145 x 100 mm

The module is expected to be used in application such as  smart devices, digital signage, all-in-one machines, PoS systems, vehicle control terminals, etc…

The module and board appear to be available now, but price is not public since I understand the company focuses on the B2B market. You’ll find further details on the product page.

Thanks to Theguyuk for the tip.

OpenH PULSAR and QUASAR Boards Add 4G LTE Cat M1, or Cat 4/1 to Raspberry Pi Boards

May 31st, 2017 No comments

We’ve seen a bunch of IoT boards with 2G connectivity recently including Orange Pi 2G-IoT, Wio GPS, and Nadhat, but while in some countries 2G will still work for many years, those boards are already obsolete – or soon will be – in many other countries. However, finding low cost 3G / 4G  boards is more difficult, and while one solution is to use 3G or 4G USB dongles,  “OpenH – Open Hardware” – part of KLiP Industries – has designed two boards with 4G connectivity provided by Quectel modules.

OpenH PULSAR Board

PULSAR board is compatible with Arduino Zero and features the following specifications:

  • MCU – Atmel/Microchip SAMD21 ARM Cortex M0+ MCU (the as the one used in Arduino Zero)
  • Connectivity
  • Security – Dedicated management CPU with crypto engine
  • Power Supply 10W digital power supply and battery charger with direct solar input
  • FCC and Carrier certified

The board can work in standalone mode, but if needed, a Raspberry Pi Zero can optionally be mounted to the board. PULSAR is designed for low-bandwidth projects up to 200 kbps, support OTA firmware updates, and can work with the cloud provider of your choice.

OpenH QUASAR Raspberry Pi HAT Board

If your project needs more bandwidth, you can use QUASAR boards instead on a Raspberry Pi 2/3 board:

  • Connectivity
  • Expansion connectors
  • Security – Dedicated management CPU with crypto engine
  • Power Supply – 25W digital power supply and battery charger with direct solar input
  • FCC and Carrier certified

You’ll get up to 150 Mbps bandwidth using LTE Cat 4 module, and just like the other board is can support OTA firmware update, and popular cloud services like Amazon Web Service (AWS) IoT, Azure IoT Hub, IBM BlueMix, Google Cloud for IoT, ThingSpeak, etc…

Installation and IP67 Enclosure

OpenH explains Bluetooth and NFC are for installation and maintenance, and they appears to have a mobile to access the serial console, authorize access, reboot the board, check GPS coordinates…. over Bluetooth, as shown above using QUASAR board.

Click to Enlarge

Many such long range IoT projects are designed to be placed outdoor, so the company also offer Rubicon IP67 weatherproof enclosure that works with both 4G boards, as well as Raspberry Pi, Arduino, BeagleBone, etc.. and is high enough for one or more add-ons board thanks to a selection of shallow or deep covers. The photo above shows the case with a Raspberry Pi board (left) and Beaglebone Black + PRUDAQ cape (right).

The downside is that the board are not available yet, pricing is unknown, and documentation is very limited right now. If you are interested, you can register your email on openh.io website by clicking on Pre-order Now button. Rubicon IP67 enclosure is available now for $35 plus shipping.

8Power Vibration Energy Harvesting Technology Powers Batteryless LPWAN GPS Trackers, MEMS Sensors

May 23rd, 2017 No comments

While IoT products usually promises one to 10 years battery life, they will be several billions of them, and ARM’s CEO even forecast one trillion IoT devices in the next 20 years. Recharging batteries at home may be fine, but imagine having to recharge or replace batteries on top of electric poles, inside walls, in remote locations, and other hard to reach places, considerable resources would have to be deployed just to replace or recharge battery every year or whenever the battery is close to being depleted.  That’s why work on energy harvesting technology for batteryless devices may be so important, and 8Power is one of the companies working in the field through their vibration energy harvesting technology that is said to harvest up to 10x the power of competing devices under comparable condition thanks to the use of parametric resonance phenomenon.

8Power LTE NB-IoT GPS Tracker (Left) and MEMS Sensor (Right)

The company has recently announced their Track 100 family of LPWAN GPS tracker, such as Track 100XL relying on LTE NB-IoT, but they also have models supporting LTE Cat M1 and LoRaWAN. The IP67 devices include vibration energy harvesting technology, as well as optionally a solar panel. The company also provides a “secure cloud hosted data platform to provide dashboards, analytics, device management, security and application API access to manage fleets of devices”. There’s no battery, and no need for (battery related) maintenance. Track 100 trackers are powered through the vibration generated by trucks, trains, or other vehicles.

The company is also working on integrating the technology into MEMS sensors that consume very little power (10 mW) in continuous operations. Beside leveraging vibrations from the transportation industry, and 8Power technology can also generate power from vibrations from  infrastructure (bridges, embankments, transmission lines) or machinery (high-power motors and rotating equipment), and the technology has already been validated through a experiment to monitor the structure of an older bridge in Scotland.

The company showcased their technology and latest products at IDTechEx 2017.

Via ARMDevices.net

Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 Octa-core Processor To Feature ARM Cortex A75 Cores (Reports)

May 22nd, 2017 7 comments

According to reports from China, Qualcomm’s next application processor (or rather mobile platform) will be Snapdragon 845, and if accurate, the comparison table below between the Snapdragon processor and Hisilicon Kirin 970 SoC shows the former will be powered by some customized (魔改) version of yet-to-be announced ARM Cortex 75 cores.

Snapdragon 845 octa-core processor will be manufactured using Samsung 10nm LPE processor, come with four custom Cortex A75 cores, four Cortex A53 cores, an Adreno 630 GPU, and an LTE X20 modem supporting LTE Cat 18 for up to 1.2 Gbps download speed. Other features like 802.11ad (High bandwidth, short range WiFi), UFS 2.1, and LPDDR4X were already found on earlier model.

I’ve been unable to find further details about ARM Cortex A75 right now, and we have to wait until ARM Techcon 2017 before getting more details. Mobile phones powered by Snapdragon 845 are supposed to start shipping in Q1 2018.

Via Wccftech