Posts Tagged ‘m2m’

LX IoT Cores Are Made for IoT and Wearables with Bluetooth LE, ANT+, 2G/3G, Sigfox, LoRa, and More

May 10th, 2016 No comments

LX Group, an Australian company specializing in electronics design and embedded systems, has introduced three wireless modules for IoT and wearables which they call “LX IoT Cores”, and embeds various wireless protocol such as Bluetooth LE/Ant+, 2G/3G connectivity, WiFi, Lora, Sigfox, Taggle, etc…


Let’s go though the main technical specs for the three modules, one of which it itself modular (hence the max and min size) depending on your requirements.

  • LX Cellular Core (Right)
    • MCU – STMicro STM32F217IGH6 ARM Cortex-M3 MCU @ 120 MHz with 1MB flash, 128kB RAM
    • Storage – 1x micro SD card reader
    • Communication Interfaces
      • Radios – 2G/3G,  WiFi,  BLE,  ANT+,  provision for LoRa,  Taggle,  SigFox, optional GPS via daughter board
      • Wired – USB,  RS485, UART, SPI,  I2C, Digital IO, ADC
    • Sensors – Ambient Luminosity, accelerometer, gyroscope, magnetometer, temperature, humidity, air pressure, microphone
    • USB – 1x micro USB port
    • Misc – Reset and 2x user buttons, 2x LEDs
    • Power – Fused 5VDC boost converter  |  fused 3VDC SMPS
    • Dimensions – Min: 34.2 x 19.0 x 5.9 mm; Max: 83.6 x 19.0 x 5.9 mm
    • Weight – 6.3 grams (for minimal config?)
  • LX Sensor Core (Center)
    • MCU – STMicro STM32L152RET6 ARM Cortex-M3 MCU @ 32 MHz with 512kB flash, 80kB RAM, 4kB EEPROM
    • Communication Interfaces
      • Radios – WiFi,  BLE,  ANT+,  LoRa,  Taggle,  SigFox, GPS/QZSS + GLONASS
      • Wired – RS485, UART, SPI,  I2C, GPIO
    • Sensors – Ambient Luminosity, accelerometer, high G accelerometer, gyroscope, magnetometer, temperature, humidity, and air pressure
    • Misc – Reset and 1x user buttons, 1x LED
    • Power – Fused 5VDC boost converter  |  fused 3VDC SMPS
    • Dimensions – 62.5 x 16.5 x  4.0 mm
    • Weight – 6.2 grams
  • LX Wearable Core (Left)
    • MCU – Nordic Semi nRF51422 Multi-protocol ANT/BLE ARM Cortex-M0 MCU
    • Communication Interfaces
      • Radios -Bluetooth LE and ANT+
      • Wired – UART, SPI,  I2C, GPIO, 10-bit ADC
    • Sensors – Accelerometer, gyroscope, magnetometer, temperature, humidity, and air pressure
    • Misc – Haptic motor and driver support, 1x user/reset button, 3x LED
    • Power – “Bring your own battery” capable of delivering 100mA at 3.3V – 5.5V
    • Dimensions – 30 x 12 x 2 mm
    • Weight – 3.5 grams

IoT Cores can also take breakout and expansion boards.


The cores are apparently pre-loaded with firmware and ready to use, so you can connect to the cloud via customizable LX dashboards to visualize the data and or control the cores. Alternatively you can also design your own solution using LX Cloud API, still in development, but customer can joing the beta list to access devkits and training materials.


The company can also provides enclosures for the module and total solutions, as shown with the solar powered node above.

Pricing and availability are not known yet. You can find more details on LX IoT Core website.

Thanks to Nanik for the tip.

LoRaONE is a Small LoRa IoT Development Board Based on Atmel SAMD21 MCU, Microchip LoRaWAN Module (Crowdfunding)

April 18th, 2016 6 comments

While there are many long range LPWAN standards, LoRa appears to be one of the most popular with boards such as LoPy, and now SODAQ LoRaONE module hitting crowdfunding campaigns. LoRaONE is powered by an Atmel Cortex M0+ micro-controller, features Microchip RN2483 or RN2903 LoRaWAN module, GPS, and various sensors.


LoRaONE board specifications:

  • MCU- Atmel ATSAMD21G18 ARM Cortex M0+ micro-controller @ 48 MHz with 256 KB flash memory, 32KB SRAM, and up to 16 KB EEPROM (by emulation)
  • Connectivity
    • LoRa via Microchip  RN2483 (433/868 MHz) or RN2903 (915 MHz) module depending on your region
    • GPS via u-blox EVA 7M
  • USB – 1x micro USB port for power and programming
  • Expansion headers (unpopulated)
    • 14x digital pin, 12x for analog and 8x for PWM, plus UART, SPI and TWI (I2C)
    • Analog output pin – 10-bit DAC
    • External Interrupts: Available on all pins
    • DC Current per I/O pin: 7 mA
    • Operating Voltage – 3.3V
    • Breadboard compatible
  • Debugging – Serial Wire Interface
  • Sensor – Accelerometer & magnetometer (LSM303D)
  • Misc – RGB LED, push button
  • Power Supply
    • 5V USB power
    • optional 3.7 LiPo battery
    • Solar charge controller, up to 500mA charge current
  • Dimensions –  40 x 25 mm

The board can be programmed via the Arduino IDE. You’ll also need to connect to the LoRa network either through your Telco, The Things Network crowdsourced Internet of Things data network, or roll your own LoRa gateway and server. You’ll also have to select the right module fior your country.: 915 MHz for the mareicas, 433/868 MHz for Europe, Russia, South Africa, and Tunisia. If you country is in a gray area there may not be a clear regulation for the frequency bands used by the LoRa network, or required frequencies may not be supported by the currently available LoRa modules.

Select the right module for your country

Select the right module for your country

If you need even further flexibility, a starter kit is also offered with a 800 mAh LiPo battery, a 500mW solar cell, ONEbase expansion board with multiple Grove connectors, and a micro USB cable.

The company is already using LoRaONE in the field for tracking endangered Rhinoceros, as a remote alarm and tracking device for assets, as a panic button for seniors, to monitor when trashcan are full for local governments, tracking containers in harbors, and so on.

The project has already surpassed its 20,000 Euros funding target on Kickstarter. All early bird rewards are gone, but you can still pledge 89 Euros ($100) to get the board, or 109 Euros ($123) for the starter kit. Shipping add 5 Euros to the Netherlands, and 15 Euros to the rest of the world, with delivery scheduled for July 2016. That’s quite more expensive than the LoPy LoRa development board, but it has a different set of features such as GPS and an accelerometer, but no WiFi and BLE.

Via Atmel Blog

Imagination Releases OpenWrt and LWM2M Stack Source Code for MIPS Creator Ci40 Development Board

March 25th, 2016 No comments

MIPS Creator Ci40 is a development board made by Imagination technology that features the company’s Creator cXT200 “Pistachio” SoC with a dual core MIPS interAptiv processor @ 550MHz and Ensigma C4500 RPU for 802.11ac/ BT 4.1 LE connectivity. The boards are supposed to be shipped to Kickstarter backers in April, but in the meantime, the company has released the source code for OpenWrt distribution as well as LWM2M stack for the board.


OpenWRT source code is available in OpenWrt repo in FlowM2M gitbub account. Building the code for MIPS Creator Ci40 is quite straightforward:


Select IMG MIPS Pistachio in make menuconfig, save the settings, and then run make to build OpenWrt for the board. This will also build the toolchain, so you don’t need to install any before hand.

LWM2M stands for Lightweight Machine to Machine, and is a protocol from the Open Mobile Alliance (OMA) for M2M / IoT device management, which defines the application layer communication protocol between a LWM2M Server and a LWM2M Client running on LWM2M Device. Imagination implementation is called Awa LWM2M. It’s a development suite that provides a number of components and tools.  For example a gateway will run both LWM2M daemon and client, but a sensor node would only run the client, Creator Ci40 board would communicate with sensors over 6LoWPAN using MikroElektronica 6LoWPAN Clicker boards.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

You can find the source code and documentation on Awa LWM2M github repo.

M2.COM is a Standard for IoT Sensors Based on M.2 Form Factor

March 25th, 2016 No comments

The IoT ecosystem really feels like a jungle now, not because of a lack of standards, but because everybody thinks about doing their own, so we’ve ended up with a wide range of communication protocols, initiatives, and consortia, and it will take some time until the winners and losers are sorted out. One the of the latest standard is M2.COM platform form factor for sensors that “adopts the standardized M.2 form factor and is defined as an evolutionary module that combines general wireless connectivity with additional built-in computing ability powered by MCU”.

M2.COM_ArchitectureM2.COM architecture diagram above describes both software and hardware requirements, but the specifications themselves only define the form factor, as well as mechanical and electrical characteristics:

  • Consistent with M.2 standard
    • Module size: 22 mm x 30 mm
    • PCB thickness: 0.8 mm ± 10%
    • Pin count: 75 pins
    • Module input voltage: 3.3V DC-in
    • Connector mating force: 30N Maximum
    • Connector current rating: 0.5A / Power contact
    • Connector operation temperature range: -45°C to +85°C
  • Suitable pin definitions for IoT solution
    • USB – A common interface for extending storage
    • SDIO – Another common interface for extending storage through SD/MMC
    • I2C – The most popular interface for sensors. Ex: pressure sensor, temperature sensor, moisture sensor and lightning sensor
    • I2S – Supports audio codec for broadcasting and playing audio through external speakers
    • UART – A commonly used protocol for device control, such as for motor and electric control units
    • GPIO – Basic I/O control, such as indicating lights, alarm and buzzer
    • SPI – Supports LCM to display values collected from the sensor or transmitted by an external device
    • ADC – Common pins of GPIO, the ADC transforms the analog signal from the sensor into a digital signal so that data can be readable and meaningful to the data analyzer


So the idea is basically to be able to exchange one M2.COM compliant module with another one with better features or a lower cost as needed. You can download the specifications 1.0, design guide, and mechanical information on M2.COM website.

Companies behind the initiative include ARM, Advantech, Bosch, Texas Instruments, and Sensirion. Two products compliant with the standard are currently available: Advantech WISE-1520 M2.COM module and the corresponding WISE-DB1500 carrier board / development board using pico-ITX form factor (100 x 72 mm).


Advantech M2.COM Module and Carrier Board

WISE-1520 M2.COM module specifications:

  • SoC – Texas Instruments CC3200MOD Cortex-M4 MCU with 256KB RAM, 1MB flash
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n @ 2.4 GHz up to 16Mbps (UDP)
  • I/O interfaces – 1x 4-wire UART, 1x I2C, 2 GPIOs, 2x PWM, 1x SPI, 2x ADC as per the specs (but no USB)
  • Debug Port – 1x developer and debug port.
  • Power – 3.3V
  • Dimensions – 30 x 22 mm – M.2 type 2230-D3-E form factor
  • Weight – 3 grams

The module runs TI RTOS or ARM mbed OS, and supports multiple IoT communication protocols including LWM2M, OSGI, AllJoyn and MQTT. Software documentation and SDK do not appear to be available publicly.

The development board features a M.2 socket and brings out an SD card slots, expansion headers, a RS-232/422/485 DB9 connector, and a micro USB OTG port, as well as an on-board  humidity & temperature sensor.

You can find out more about Advantech solution on M2.COM product page.


Izitron I-SEN1 Environmental Sensors Board Works with XBee Modules

February 7th, 2016 5 comments

Izitron, a start-up based in the South of France, has designed a board with temperature, pressure, humidity and light sensors and a XBee header to provide a way to monitoring environmental variables for weather monitoring, agriculture, industrial applications, and more.

I-SEN1_Environmental_monitoring_boardI-SEN1 technical specifications:

  • Sensors
    • Temperature – Microchip MCP9700-E/T0; accuracy: ±4°C Accuracy from 0°C to +70°C | -4°C/+6°C Accuracy from -40°C to +150°C; temperature range: -40 to 125 °C
    • Pressure – Infineon KP236N6165; accuracy: 2%; pressure range: 60 kPa to 165 kPa; temperature range: -40 to 125 °C
    • Humidity – Honeywell HIH-5030-001; accuracy: ±3% RH; range: 0 to 100% RH; temperature range: -40 to 85 °C
    • Light – AMS TSL14S-LF; reponsivity: 16 mV/ (uW/cm2); temperature range: 0 to 70 °C
  • Header for XBee RF module
  • Power Supply
    • 5V via micro USB
    • 5 to 12V via Wago terminal block
    • 2x batteries
    • No power management chip
    • Power on/off button
  • Power consumption – Up to 4 years battery life (2x 3.5V/2.4A) when transmitting once per minute
  • Dimensions – 61 x 33 mm


Beside one or more I-SEN1 boards, you’ll also need an XBee RF module for each board, and a XBee USB adapter and an extra XBee RF module to connect to your computer or gateway board. Software setup is using Digi’s XCTU application for Windows, MacOS or Linux, as well as three XML files for configuration: one for the gateway, and either “battery” or  “cable” XML files for the boards since on battery mode the boards will communicate directly with the gateway (star topology), and use mesh networking in case the boards are powered via their terminal block. You’ll also need to create your own app using XBee API, and the Java based an open source sample, demoed in the video below, will be provided to backers.

The company aims to raise at least 24,600 Euros via Kickstarter in order to go ahead with manufacturing. You can pledge 22 Euros ($24.50) for one Izitron I-SEN1 board (Early Bird) rewards, and after 500 boards the price goes up to 31 Euros ($34.60 Euros). They also offer different packs with several boards, up to 10 boards for 285 Euros. As previously mentioned XBee RF boards are not included, so you’d need to purchase them separately. Shipping varies from 5 to 15 Euros, and delivery is scheduled for August 2015.

Via Time4EE

TI SimpleLink CC1310 Wireless MCU Promises 20 Km Range, 20-Year Battery Life on a Coin Cell

December 18th, 2015 8 comments

Some LPWAN standards such as SigFox, LoRa, or nWave allows for transmission of data at low bitrate over several kilometers, and I’ve very recently featured Microchip’s LoRa modules and motes in this blog. So when Texas Instruments sent their December 2015 newsletter entitled Wireless MCU spans 20 km on a coin cell, I decided to have a look, and the company’s CC1310 wireless Cortex-M3+M0 MCU based on a proprietary sub GHz technology also claims to last 20-year on a coin cell for applications such as grid communication infrastructure and heat and water meters.

TI CC1310 MCU Block Diagram

TI CC1310 MCU Block Diagram

SimpleLink CC1310 key features:

  • Microcontroller – ARM Cortex-M3 @ up to 48 MHz with up to 128KB programmable flash, 8KB DRAM for cache/general purpose, 20KB Ultralow Leakage SRAM
  • Sensor Controller – Ultralow power and autonomous; 16-Bit Architecture; 2KB of Ultralow Leakage SRAM for code and data
  • RF core
    • Cortex M0 core with 4KB RAM, and ROM
    • Data rate – 4000 kbps (Max)
    • Receiver Sensitivity – –124 dBm using long-range Mode, –110 dBm at 50 kbps
    • Selectivity: 52 dB; Blocking performance: 90 dB; programmable output power up to +14 dBm
    • Single-ended or differential RF Interface
    • Suitable for systems targeting compliance with ETSI EN 300 220, EN 303 131, EN 303 204 (Europe); FCC CFR47 Part 15 (US); ARIB STD-T108 (Japan)
    • Wireless M-Bus and IEEE 802.15.4g PHY
  • Peripherals
    • All digital peripheral pins can be routed to any GPIO
    • 4x general-purpose timer modules – 8x 16-Bit or 4x 32-Bit Timers, PWM each
    • 12-Bit ADC, 200 ksamples/s, 8-Channel Analog MUX
    • Continuous Time Comparator
    • Ultralow Power Clocked Comparator
    • Programmable Current Source
    • I2S
    • Real-Time Clock (RTC)
    • AES-128 security module, True Random Number Generator (TRNG)
    • Support for eight capacitive sensing buttons
    • Integrated Temperature Sensor
  • External System
    • On-Chip Internal DC-DC Converter
    • Few External Components
    • Integration with SimpleLink CC1190 range extender
  • Power Supply – 1.8 to 3.8V
  • Power Consumption
    • Active mode – Rx: 5.5 mA; Tx (+10 dBm): 12.9 mA; MCU: 48.5 CoreMark/mA; Sensor Controller @ 24 MHz: 0.4 mA + 8.2 µA/MHz
    • Sensor Controller woken up once per second performing one 12-Bit ADC sampling: 0.85 µA
    • Standby: 0.6 µA (RTC running and RAM and CPU retention)
    • Shutdown: 185 nA (Wakeup on external events)
  • Packages – 7-mm × 7-mm RGZ VQFN48 (30 GPIOs); 5-mm × 5-mm RHB VQFN48 (15 GPIOs); 4-mm × 4-mm RSM VQFN48 (10 GPIOs)
Connected Water Meter Block Diagram

Connected Water Meter Block Diagram

Software and development tools include reference designs for Different RF configurations, packet sniffer PC Software, Sensor Controller Studio, SmartRF Studio, SmartRF Flash Programmer 2, IAR Embedded Workbench for ARM, Code Composer Studio as well as development kits such as SimpleLink sub-1 GHz CC1310 development kit bundle comprised of one  CC1310EMK-7XD-7793 evaluation module kit with  two boards with the wireless MCU and RF layout (779 to 930 MHz) with two antennas, and two SMARTRF06EBK  evaluation board that is the  motherboard for the CC1310 evaluation module, and equipped with an on-board XDS100v3 debugger, LCD, buttons, LEDs, debugger and sensors.

SimpleLink CC1310 Evaluation Module Kit

SimpleLink CC1310 Evaluation Module Kit

TI CC1310 MCU is selling for $2.50 to $3.98 per unit for 1K orders, and the development kit is available for $299 + shipping. More details can be found on Texas Instruments SimpleLink CC1310 and CC1310 development kit product pages.

Microchip Introduces $11 RN2483 & RN2903 LoRa Modules and $70 LoRa Evaluation Kits for IoT & M2M Applications

December 15th, 2015 15 comments

LoRa is one of those long range low power WAN standards used for the machine to machine (M2M) and Internet of things (IoT) applications. I already featured a Semtech Lora module here with a line-of-sight range of up to 20 to 30km, and the company has just partnered with STMicro to deploy LoRa solutions, but today, I’m going to have a look at Microchip Lora modules and development kits that I discovered in the company’s Micro Solutions Nov/Dec 2015 publication.


The company has launched two modules for the European and North American markets with respectively RN2483 LoRa 433/868 MHz
R&TTE Directive Assessed Radio Modem and RN2903 915 MHz North American modem. Apart from the different frequencies, both modules have similar features:

  • On-board LoRaWAN Class A protocol stack
  • Tx/Rx Power
    • RN2483 – 40 mA (14dBm, 868MHz) Tx, and 14.2 mA Rx @ 3.6V
    • RN2903 – 124 mA Tx max, and 13.5 mA Rx @ (2.1 to 3.6V)
  • ASCII command interface over UART
  • Castellated SMT pads for easy and reliable PCB mounting
  • Device Firmware Upgrade (DFU) over UART
  • 14 GPIO for control, status, and ADC
  • Highly integrated module with MCU, crystal, EUI-64 Node Identity Serial EEPROM, Radio transceiver with analog front end, and matching circuitry
  • Operating Voltage – RN2483: 3.6V; RN2903: 2.1V to 3.6V
  • Dimensions – 17.8 x 26.7 x 3 mm
  • Operating Temperature Range – -40C to +85C
  • FCC and IC Certified, RoHS compliant

Demo source code, datasheets, product briefs, and user’s guides are available on the modules’ product pages linked above.

US and EU versions of Microchip LoRa Technology Motes (Click to Enlarge)

US and EU versions of Microchip LoRa Technology Motes (Click to Enlarge)

The first development tool is LoRa Technology Mote with either RN2483 @ 868 MHz or RN2903 @ 915 MHz. It is a standalone battery-powered LoRa node, used to to demonstrate the long-range capabilities of the modem, and verify inter-operability with LoRaWAN v1.0 gateways and infrastructure.  The key features listed for Lora Motes:

    • MCU – Microchip PIC18LF25K50 8-bit MCU
    • Connectivity
      • EU version (RN2483) – 868 MHz High-Frequency SMA Connector & 433 MHz Low-Frequency Antenna test Point
      • US version (RN2903) – 915 MHz High-Frequency SMA Connector
    • Display – OLED display; 128 x 64 resolution
    • USB – USB Mini-B Connector
    • Sensors – Ambient Light Sensor, Linear Active Thermistor (MCP9700T)
    • Programming / Debugging – Mote ICSP Programming
    • Misc – S1 & S2 buttons for menu navigation, 4x LEDs controlled by PIC18 (2), and module (2), battery power switch
    • Power – 2x AAA Battery Pack; LDO Regulator (MCP1825S); alternative power supply through hole connectors
    • Dimensions – N/A
Lora PICtail (Click to Enlarge)

RN2483 Lora PICtail Daughter Board (Click to Enlarge)

The second options is RN2483/RN2903 LoRa Technology PICtail/PICtail Plus daughter boards that can be connected to PIC18 Explorer or Explorer 16 development boards, with the latter supporting PIC24, dsPIC, or PIC32 MCU families.

LoRa PICTail daughter board specifications:

  • US version – Microchip RN2903 Low-Power Long Range, LoRa Technology Transceiver Module with one SMA connector for 915 MHz band
  • EU version – Microchip RN2483 LoRa Technology Transceiver Module with two SMA connectors for 433 MHz and 868 MHz bands
  • MCU – PIC18 MCU for custom functions
  • USB – 1x mini USB connector
  • Expansion interfaces
    • Solder pads around the module for GPIOs, power pins and communication signals
    • PICtail connection interface
    • PICtail Plus connection interface
  • Programming – ICSP header to program the on-board PIC18 MCU
  • Misc – UART traffic LEDs
  • Power Supply – On-board LDO; supply current measurement points
  • Dimensions – N/A

You can find user’s guides and some extra documentation for all four kits on their respective product pages: RN2483 LoRa Technology Mote, RN2903 LoRa Technology Mote, RN2483 LoRa Technology PICtail (Plus) Daughter Board, and RN2903 LoRa Technology PICtail (Plus) Daughter Board.

Both RN2483 and RN2903 modules are available now for $10.90 each in 1,000-unit quantities, while LoRa Technology Motes go for $69.99 and LoRa PICTail boards for $65 on microchipDIRECT or other distributors.

ARM TechCon 2015 Schedule – IoT, Servers, 64-bit ARM, Power Usage Optimization, and More

October 1st, 2015 No comments

ARM_TechCon_2015The ARM Technology Conference (ARM TechCon) will take place on November 10 – 12, 2015, in Santa Clara Convention Center, and just like every year, there will be a free exposition for companies to showcase their latest innovation and/or products, as well as a technical conference with sessions and workshops sorted into various tracks:

  • Automotive/Embedded Vision
  • Embedded
  • IoT
  • Mobile/Connectivity
  • Networking Infrastructure/Servers
  • Tools & Implementation
  • Wearables/Sensors
  • ARM Training Day
  • Sponsored Vendor Training
  • Special Event
  • General Event
  • Software Developers Workshop

You can find the complete schedule on ARM TechCon website. Although I won’t attend, I’ve created my own virtual schedule with some of the sessions I found interesting.

Tuesday – November 10

  • 8:30 – 9:20 – ARM Vision for Thermal Management and Energy Aware Scheduling on Linux by Ian Rickards (ARM), Charles Garcia-Tobin (ARM), Bobby Batacharia (ARM)

This talk will cover the history and where are we going, for ARM’s Power Software (IPA, EAS, and some concepts for the future).

ARM will detail the latest update on our thermal control software Intelligent Power Allocation (IPA) which has just been released in mainline Linux 4.2. The tuning and implementation flow allow IPA to be easily deployed in Linux-based devices including Android.

We will also introduce ‘Energy Aware Scheduling’ (EAS) which is a new development by ARM/Linaro to allow the Linux scheduler to make the most energy efficient decisions using a generic energy model based approach. EAS includes improved upstream Linux support for ARM “big.LITTLE” systems and other advanced multi-cpu topologies.

  • 9:30 – 10:30 – Innovation is Thriving in Semiconductors by Mike Muller (ARM)

The human capacity to find a path past difficult challenges is astonishing. Though traditional silicon scaling is more complex at advanced geometries, electronics design innovation is more robust than ever as engineers devise new ways to improve the latest chips. ARM CTO Mike Muller will describe advances in design innovation spanning low power, trust, and architectural innovation all the way from sensors to server and beyond. And he’ll unveil the latest technology achievements from ARM in his signature lively, humorous and engaging style.

  • 10:30 – 11:20 – IoT Prototyping 101: The All-in-One Platform by Steven Si (MediaTek)

Power efficiency, connectivity and size are top priorities for any developer looking to prototype innovative IoT devices. Best utilizing these key features with ARM’s technology will be the spotlight of this session a live demonstration of how a developer at any level can create the next big thing in IoT. Skills to be shown: connecting sensors; using a cloud interface to build a virtual device; sending data from the device to the cloud and communicating with other smart devices. (cnxsoft: possibly using LinkIt ONE platform)

  • 11:30 – 12:20 – Khronos APIs for Fast and Cool Graphics, Compute and Vision by Neil Trevett (Khronos)

Discover how 100 companies cooperate at the Khronos Group to create open, royalty free standards that enable developers to access the power of hardware to accelerate the demanding tasks in cutting-edge mobile applications including heterogeneous parallel computation, 3D graphics and vision processing. This session includes the latest updates to API standards including OpenGL, OpenCL, OpenVX, and the recent Vulkan new generation graphics and compute API. The session will explore how modern APIs will accelerate the availability of compelling experiences such as neural-net based driver assistance, virtual and augmented reality, and advanced environmental tracking and 3D reconstruction on ARM-based devices

  • 13:00 – 15:00 – Boosting Performance from ‘C’ to Sky with Custom Accelerators on ARM-based FPGAs by Shaun Purvis (Hardent)

Offloading tasks to specialized hardware, such as a GPU or FPU, is a common approach to boosting software performance. However, the fixed nature (i.e. hard-silicon) of such hardware places an upper limit on just how much performance can be boosted. In order to break down this barrier, some modern SoCs have combined ARM processing power with programmable logic allowing software to be offloaded to custom, scalable, accelerators. With accelerators that can be tailored to specific needs, suddenly the sky’s the limit! But that’s not all. Combining these SoCs with modern tools allows designers to migrate high-level functions directly to hardware, skipping all the hardware design in between. This presentation will introduce one such tool and discuss the design methodology that takes a software-defined system and turns it into a custom hardware accelerated one.

  • 15:30 – 16:20 – Bringing Mali, the Android GPU of Choice, to Wearables by Dan Wilson (ARM Ltd.)

In this talk we will look at the trends for the use of graphics processors in Wearable devices and how the technical requirements of this space differ from that of smartphones and other segments. We look specifically at the ARM Mali GPU Utgard architecture which provides the perfect fit for Wearable designs and describe how this architecture has been implemented to create ARM’s latest ultra-low-power Mali GPU.

  • 16:30 – 18:00 – Efficient Interrupts on ARM Cortex-M Microcontrollers by Chris Shore (ARM)

Most real-time embedded systems make extensive use of interrupts to provide real-time response to external events. The design of the interrupt architecture is crucial to achieve maximum system efficiency. When designing software for devices based on ARM’s Cortex-M microcontroller cores, it is important to understand the interaction between interrupt priority, sub-priority, tail-chaining and pre-emption to achieve the most efficient design. This session will examine various use cases and give practical advice to software developers.

Wednesday – November 11

  • 8:30 – 9:20 – How (Not) to Generate Misleading Performance Results for ARM Servers by Markus Levy (EEMBC) & Bryan Chin (Cavium)

Cloud workloads are putting unique demands on SoCs and other system-level hardware being integrated into scale-out servers. Traditional benchmarks address the suitability of processors for different tasks. However, many factors contribute to the whole system performance memory, disks, OS, network interfaces, and network stack. In addition, the manner of generating workloads can affect the results. This session uses a case study from Cavium’s ARM-based Thunder X system and the EEMBC cloud and server benchmark, to present results that demonstrate how subtle test environment variations can obfuscate benchmark results and how a properly designed benchmark can overcome these obstacles.

  • 9:30 – 10:30 – Keynote by Simon Segars (ARM’s CEO)
  • 10:30 – 11:20 – Pentralux Flexible Digital Displays on Paper, Plastic, Cloth & Synthetics by Mathew Gilliat-Smith (DST Innovations), Anthony Miles (DST Innovations)

DST Innovations has created a flexible digital display proof of concept produced on plastic, paper, cloth or synthetic substrates. It’s integrated with the ARM mbed OS and will be suitable for developers and designers to integrate into third party products. Initially the digital screens will be for informational or promotional data and video. Being bright, safe, robust and requiring little power, the design parameters will be significant and far reaching for the wearable sector in thousands of clothing, fashion, promotional and other commercial concepts. The screens will offer inter-connectivity through the mbed ecosystem to receive transmitted IoT cloud generated data.

  • 11:30 – 12:20 – Are you ready for USB Type-C? by Ravi Shah (NXP Semiconductors) & Andy Lin (NXP Semiconductors)

USB Type-C offers new features and benefits like reversible plug orientation, improved data rates up to 10 Gbps as well as an unprecedented, scalable, 100 W power-delivery capability that can power higher wattage devices and support faster charging. This session will review the features, benefits and applications it is being designed into today. In addition, design considerations and lessons learned from the field will be reviewed.

  • 12:30 – 13:20 – From Concept to Reality: Advancing ARM-based Enterprise SoCs – Presented by Applied Micro Circuits Corporation by Dr. Paramesh Gopi (Allied Micro Circuits Corporation)

No abstract…

  • 14:30 – 17:20 – STM32L7 Hands-On Workshop by James Lombard & Steve Miller (STMicroelectronics)

Thursday – November 12

  • 8:30 – 9:20 – All Things Data: Healthcare by Pierre Roux (Atmel)

Examples of IoT are everywhere, including digital home, remote resourcing monitoring and automation, but what gets less attention is how the IoT will impact healthcare with the combination of technologies that leverages big data and analytics that go along with it.

This talk will look at opportunities, hurdles and the skills required to make the most of this intersection of Internet-connected physical objects and the deluge of data. It will examine new generation of data analytics for use cases associated with our changing world and, examine the role big data analytics will play in the future of the healthcare industry.

  • 10:30 – 11:20 – The ARM Cortex-A72 processor: Delivering high efficiency for Server Networking and HPC by Ian Forsyth,  Director of Marketing, ARM

New content-rich features, services and evolving business models are transforming network architectures, giving rise to the Intelligent Flexible Cloud (IFC). Architects are decentralizing intelligence to deliver required flexibility and to cope with increased traffic demands. This, in turn, is driving new classes of SoCs, enabled by technology standards including software-defined networking (SDN) and network functional virtualization (NFV). These require significant throughput-per-watt efficiencies within networking and servers. This talk will explore how the latest Cortex-A72 CPU offers compelling performance and throughput to meet the requirements of these future workloads.

  • 11:30 – 12:20 – Porting to 64-bit on ARM by Chris Shore (ARM)

With the introduction of the A64 instruction set in ARMv8-A, many developers need to port existing code to work in a 64-bit environment. At the coding level, this presentation will cover porting C code, assembly code and NEON code. Issues covered will include data typing and type conversion, pointers, bitwise operations, differences in the SIMD register bank layout, mapping of assembly instructions. At a system level, we will cover maintenance operations and extensions to the security architecture.

  • 13:30 – 14:20 – Keynote- The Hard Things About the Internet of Things by Colt McAnlis (Google)
  • 14:30 – 15:20 – Wearable System Power Analysis and Optimization by Greg Steiert (Maxim Integrated), Jesse Marroquin (Maxim Integrated)

This session will demonstrate how to extend battery life by showing the real world impact of system level architecture decisions. The session will introduce a technique for measuring battery current and then use that technique to compare the power efficiency of different system implementations. Tradeoffs analyzed will include: power architecture, operating voltage, sensor data interfaces, DMA, SIMD.

Takeaway: a method for measuring real time power consumption,  advantage of operating at the lowest voltage possible with efficient regulators, tradeoffs of different sensor interfaces and of different micro-controller architectures (peripherals/M0+/M3/M4)

  • 15:30 – 16:20 – Improving Software Security through Standards Compliance and Structural Coverage Analysis by Shan Bhattacharya (LDRA)

This presentation will focus on secure software best practices. Ensuring the security of embedded devices involves more than simply using vulnerability preventive programming. However, paying attention to and leveraging security standards such as CWE/CVE, CERT C and even CERT Java, will certainly improve the probability of delivering a secure and effective system.

  • 16:30 – 17:20 – Top Android Performance Problems of 2015 by Colt McAnlis (Google)

When you look at performance problems all day, you’re bound to lose your hair. So rather than balding early yourself, Colt McAnlis will walk you through the top performance problems that dominated 2015. This talk will cover the range of issues from Memory, to Rendering, to Networking, listing specific topics that have shown up in many of the top apps in Google Play. We’ll even take some time to look at the differences in some form factors, and how you should plan around that.

  • 17:30 – 18:30 – Happy Hour 🙂

If you are going to attend, you can register online. While as usual, going to the expo and attending vendor’s sponsored sessions is free, there are different passes to join the conference sessions, ARM training day, and software developers workshops. The earlier you register, the cheaper.

Conference Pass ARM Training Day Software Developers
Expo Pass
Super Early Bird
(Ends July 24)
$599 $199 $99 Free
Early Bird
(Ends Sept. 4)
$799 $249 $149 Free
(Ends Oct. 30)
$999 $299 $199 Free
Regular/Onsite $1249 $349 $249 Free

There are also discounts for groups, students, press & media, and government employees. You can check details on ARm TechCon 2015’s Passes & Prices page.