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Posts Tagged ‘media player’

Winsat V8 Angel Android Set-top Box Supports Satellite, Terrestrial and Cable Television

February 6th, 2016 No comments

A few years ago, there were only a few Android TV boxes with digital TV tuners, but in the last years more and more models are coming to market. Winsat, aka Yuwhua Technology Limited, has been making satellite, terrestrial, and cable TV receivers for several years, but their latest V8 Angel model runs Android 4.4, and supports DVB-S2, DVB-T2 and DVB-C.

Winsat_V8_AngelThe company has not provided a complete list of specifications, and the processor, memory and storage are unspecified, but here’s what we do know:

  • Video Output – HDMI and AV
  • Audio Output – HDMI, AV, and optical S/PDIF
  • Tuners – DVB-S2, DVB-T2, and DVB-C support via LNB IN and RF IN antenna connectors
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet, Bluetooth, and WiFi
  • USB – 2x USB host ports
  • Misc – Mechanical power switch, frontal panel LCD display
  • Power Supply – 12V
  • Dimensions – 156 x 92 x 26 mm

The device runs Android 4.4.2, and supports IPTV & VOD. The company seems to have designed their own Android launcher, and DVB apps.

Winsat_User_Interface

The package should include the receiver, a remote control, a power supply, an HDMI Cable, and a user’s manual. The company claims the box supports PowerVU conditional access system (CAS), Cccam, and Bisskey.

Since the company operates three websites, information is all over the places. There’s a totally useless product page on Yuwhua, a little more info on Freesat.cn, and page where you can purchase V8 Angel on Winsat for $60 + shipping, as well as an Alibaba page. Some “instructions” are available on the download page.

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Zidoo X5 TV Box Unboxing and Teardown

February 2nd, 2016 1 comment

Zidoo X5 is the latest Android TV from Zidoo, based on Amlogic S905 quad core processor, with 1GB RAM and 8GB flash. The company sent me a review sample, and I’ll start with pictures of the device and board, before writing a full review in a couple of months.

Zidoo X5 Unboxing

I got the device by DHL in the typical white and green Zidoo branded package.

Zidoo_X5_Package

The device ships with an HDMI cable, a remote control with IR learning function that requires two AAA batteries (not included), a 5V/2A power adapter, and Zidoo X5 “simple manual”.

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Click to Enlarge

Zidoo is innovating for the enclosure of the devices, not following the rectangular shape of most TV boxes on the market.

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Click to Enlarge

The front panel is extra thin and includes a small window for the power LED and IR receiver, while on one side, we can find two USB 2.0 ports and a micro SD slot, and the rear panel features most of the ports and connectors with a reset/recovery button, the power jack, a 3.5mm jack for video composite (CVBS) and stereo audio, a Fast Ethernet port, HDMI 2.0 output, and optical S/PDIF.

Zidoo X5 Teardown

If you want to open the device, turn it upside down, remove the four rubber pads, and loosen the four screws holding two plastic parts together.

Zidoo_X5_Bottom

There’s not much to see on the bottom side of the PCB, except a sticker with a MAC address with 80:0A:80 prefix that indeed belongs to Shenzhen Zidoo Technology Co., Ltd.

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Click to Enlarge

I had to remove three more screws to complete take out the board, and we can see that beside the heatsink directly on Amlogic SoC, the company also added a metal bar and a thermal pad that’s in contact with the heatsink for further cooling.

Zidoo_X5_Cooling_Heatsink
The board is called Z_X5_V1.0, and we can see both on-board and a soldered antenna. Amlogic S905 processor is connected to two SKhynix H5TQ4G63CFR DDR3 DRAM chips (2x 512MB) and a Samsung KLM8G1WEMB-B031 eMMC 5.0 flash with theorithecal read and write speeds of respectively 100 MB/s and 6MB/s with 2500/200 R/W IO per second (IOPS).

Click to Enlarge

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Wireless connectivity is achieved with a Realtek RTL8723BS WiFi module, IC+ 101GR and PPT C1522C are used for Fast Ethernet, and the board also features Everest Semi ES7154 24-bit audio DAC for stereo output.  The serial console header can be found on the right side of the board on the picture above.

I’d like to thanks Zidoo for sending their X5 TV box for review. It can be purchased for $59 and up on sites like GeekBuying, Aliexpress, or Banggood.

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Mini Review of G9C Android Media Player

January 30th, 2016 16 comments

Shenzhen Tomato sent me their G9C Android TV box at the beginning of December, but as Google Play was not working reliably in the first firmware, I decided to delay the review a little, and the company has provided a new working firmware a few weeks ago, and I’ve now taken the time to test some the main issues I normally find on Amlogic S905 Android TV box. I’ve also ready shown pictures of the device and the board, so today, I’ll only report my experience with the firmware.

First Boot and First Impressions

I’ve connected all necessary cables, and several USB devices include an harddrive and RF dongles for MINIX NEO A2 Lite air mouse and Tronsmart Mars G01 gamepad. The device started automatically upon connecting the power, and on average the boot takes between 25 to 30 seconds. Not bad at all for an entry-level device.

Click for Original Size

Click for Original Size

The launcher looks familiar…

Click for Original Size

Click for Original Size

…and the list of apps as well (I installed DRM info by myself). So I invite you to check out MINI MX review if you want to find how more about the launcher and settings, as they are identical in G9C.

About_G9CIn the about section, the Android version (5.1.1), and kernel version (3.14.29) are also identical. But at least the person who built the kernel is different so the complete firmware must be a little different.

There’s a single storage partition with 4.76 GB total space, and 3.51GB available once I had installed the apps I needed for testing, and copied some files.

Like with other Amlogic S905, G9C did not like my AV receiver (Onkyo TX-NR636) for HDMI-CEC, and i was unable to enabled it, with the system reporting that “This remote device does not support CEC”.

Google Play works pretty well with the latest firmware (I can uploaded it if somebody needs it, as I was only given a temporary link), and I could install Riptide GP2 via Amazon Underground too, although the installation of the later took a little longer than usual, and it crashed the first time right after I logged in.

Power control is implemented properly as you can turn on and off the device with the remote, or go into standby. A short press will go into standby, and a long press on the power button of the remote control will pop-up a window asking whether you want to power off the device.

The firmware itself appears to be relatively stable, however I could sometimes notice slowdowns, where the mouse pointer could not move for short periods, and in several instances I had apps just exiting for not obvious reasons.

Video Playback with Kodi 15.2

The device is pre-loaded with a version of Kodi 15.2 built on November 4, 2015, and I played all videos from a SAMBA share over Gigabit Ethernet unless other stated.

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Click to Enlarge

I’ve started with 1080p Linaro media samples (except for Real Media @ 720), and they could all play:

  • H.264 codec / MP4 container (Big Buck Bunny) – 1080p – OK
  • MPEG2 codec / MPG container –  1080p – OK
  • MPEG4 codec, AVI container 1080p – OK
  • VC1 codec (WMV) – 1080p – OK
  • Real Media (RMVB), 720p / 5Mbps – OK
  • WebM / VP8 – OK
  • H.265 codec / MPEG TS container (1080p) – OK
  • WebM / VP9 (no audio in video) – OK
  • hddvd_demo_17.5Mbps_1080p_VC1.mkv (17.5Mbps) – Network: Could be smoother, and later on the video is buffering; USB HDD: Could be smoother.
  • h264_1080p_hp_4.1_40mbps_birds.mkv (40 Mbps) – Won’t play at all (stays in UI)
  • Jellyfish-120-Mbps.mkv (120 Mbps video without audio) – Network: buffering all the time. USB: Playing, but not really smooth

So the system buffers even while playing videos with less than 20 MBit/s bitrate. That’s not quite normal, and they should look into it. The device is also struggling to play the 120 Mbps from the hard drive, but this should be Amlogic S905 limitation since it occurs on all other devices with that processors.

I’ve also tested HDMI audio pass-through from my USB hard drive, because from the network video playback was quite a disaster with constant buffering. Here are the results after changing audio device to HDMI pass-through, and corresponding Kodi settings:
  • AC3 / Dolby Digital 5.1 – Audio OK (Dolby D 5.1). Video not smooth
  • E-AC-3 / Dolby Digital+ 5.1 – OK (Dolby D 5.1)
  • Dolby Digital+ 7.1 – PCM 2.0 only
  • TrueHD 5.1 – No audio
  • TrueHD 7.1 – No audio
  • Dolby Atmos 7.1 – PCM 2.0 only
  • DTS HD Master – DTS 5.1 only
  • DTS HD High Resolution – Network: Won’t play (stays in UI); USB HDD: DTS 5.1 only.

G9C simply does not support audio pass-through very well. Using some other version of Kodi could help.

I’ve also tested AC3 using PCM output (downmixing) with MoviePlayer and Video Player apps and there was no audio, most likely due to the lack of licenses for those codecs.

I’ve completed the video testing, but checking some 4K videos:

  • HD.Club-4K-Chimei-inn-60mbps.mp4 – Network: Lots of buffering; USB HDD: OK
  • big_buck_bunny_4k_H264_30fps.mp4 – OK
  • Ducks Take Off [2160p a 243 Mbps].mkv (H.264) – Won’t play at all (stays in UI)
  • Beauty_3840x2160_120fps_420_8bit_HEVC_MP4.mp4 (H.265) –  OK
  • Samsung_UHD_Dubai_10-bit_HEVC_51.4Mbps.ts (10-bit HEVC / MPEG-4 AAC) – Won’t play at all (stays in UI)
  • BT.2020.20140602.ts (Rec.2020 compliant video) – Won’t play at all (stays in UI).
  • Fifa_WorldCup2014_Uruguay-Colombia_4K-x265.mp4 (4K, H.265, 60 fps) – OK
  • Astra-11479_V_22000-Canal+ UHD Demo 42.6 Mbps bitrate.ts (10-bit H.265 from DVB-S2 stream) – Won’t play at all (stays in UI)

I’ve added a very high bitrate video with Ducks Take Off [2160p a 243 Mbps].mkv which plays at 243 Mbps, and is supposed to work on the latest RK3229 processor. But g9C did not manage to play that one at all, and none of the 10-bit H.265 videos either.

Automatic frame rate switching did not work, even after setting it in Android settings (HDMI self-adaptation) and Kodi settings.

G9C_DRM_InfoI’ve run DRM Info to confirm there was indeed no DRM installed at all in the device, like with many others. Shenzhen Tomato however told me they can implemented for OEM/ODM customers that need it.

WiFi performance

I’ve tested WiFi performance by transferring a 278MB between the internal flash and a SAMBA share three times with ES File Explorer, and with 1.7MB/s transfer on average, G9C is one of the devices with the poorest WiFi performance, at least with my setup.

Throughput in MB/s

Throughput in MB/s

Storage

The mini PC could mount my FAT32 SD card, as well as NTFS and exFAT partitions on my USB hard drive, but sadly the usual 10MB free space bug found in other Amlogic S905 devices is still there.

File System Read Write
NTFS OK No (10 MB free space)
EXT-4 Not mounted Not mounted
exFAT OK No (10 MB free space)
BTRFS Not mounted Not mounted
FAT32 OK OK

The eMMC flash has a pretty good read speed @ 38.64, but a poor write speed @ 6.64MBs with the former explaining fast boot times, and the latter most likely being the reasons with the slowdowns experienced during use.

G9C_eMMC_Read_Write_Speed

Gaming Performance

3D graphics performance of Amlogic S905 platforms is quite well known, and usually the main difference between devices is how well the maintain the performance over several minutes of play time. So I tested Riptide GP2 for 15 minutes for this purpose. However, I had a few other issues at the beginning. The game would be choppy in the user interface at the beginning, but it quickly become usual after a minute of so, and I went through the tutorial without issues or slowdowns. Then I went to the settings, and tried to maxed out the graphics “resolution”, but it would crashed at MAX-2, and I repeated it three times with the same results. So I only set it to MAX-3, but the game would then crash when I wanted to play. So I reverted to default settings, and played for 15 minutes with the games being rendering at a good frame rate over the duration of the games. The temperature at the top and bottom was around 55 C after the game.

G9C Benchmarks

CPU-Z still reports a quad Cortex A53 processor @ up to 2.02 GHz with a Mali-450MP GPU, and the device reports itself as being model “AOSP on p200”.

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G9C achieved 36,060 points in Antutu 6.0.1, or in the same ball park as other S905 platforms such as MINIX NEO U1 (38,032 points)  or Vega S95 Telos (36.741 points). Please note that I had to run Antutu 4 times to get a score, as the app would crash before ending the results, or completely fail the 3D benchmark leading to a very low score.
G9C_Antutu_6.0

You can access the full results here.

Conclusion

G9C Android TV box has one of the fastest boot time of any other Amlogic S905 devices I’ve tried so far, but apart from that the media player has poor WiFi performance, a slow internal storage write speed leading to regular slowdowns, and possibly some apps crashing, Kodi still have a few issues that have mostly been resolved on other devices (e.g. frame rate switching, audio pass-through), and some older bugs I found on other devices that have not been resolved.

PROS

  • Recent Android 5.1 OS firmware
  • Video Output – HDMI 2.0 up to 2160p 60Hz; 24/25/30/50/60 Hz refresh rates supported
  • Fast boot time (25 to 30 seconds)
  • Relatively fast internal storage read speed
  • Power handling properly implemented (Power on/off with remote, and standby)
  • Performance seems to be constant over the hours.
  • Dolby 5.1 and DTS audio pass-through is working.

CONS

  • Frequent slowdowns due to slow write speed of internal storage
  • Potential instability with app using 3D graphics, e.g. Antutu, and Riptide GP2 with high graphics settings
  • Kodi does not support 10-bit H.265, HDMI pass-through is limited to Dolby 5.1 (AC3) and DTS 5.1, and automatic frame rate switching is not working
  • Streaming over Gigabit Ethernet will often buffer in Kodi.
  • 10 MB free space bug on some USB device is still not fixed, meaning those drives are basically read-only.
  • Complete lack of DRM support
  • No Dolby and DTS licenses, which can be an issue if you don’t use Kodi.
  • Poor WiFi performance

I’d like to thanks Shenzhen Tomato for sending a unit for review. If you are a distributor, reseller, or have a custom project that could use G9C hardware, you could contact the company via their G9C product page. Individual can purchase G9C on Amazon US ($56.99) or GearBest ($52.57).

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Zappiti Player 4K Duo UHD Media Player Supports Two 3.5″ Hard Drives for Up to 16TB Video Storage

January 27th, 2016 3 comments

If you are the kind of person who mostly likes to watch online videos, Zappiti’s media players won’t have much to offer over cheaper alternatives, but if you have a large library of videos, either downloads or your own Blu-Ray rips, and would like to watch your movies both at home or on the go, Zappiti Player 4K Duo media player may fulfill your needs thanks to its two 3.5″ SATA bays providing up to 16TB storage, and a RealTek RTD1195 dual core processor supporting 1080p60 and 4K30 video playback.

Zappiti_Player_4K_Duo

Zappiti Player 4K Duo specifications:

  • SoCRealtek RTD1195 dual core ARM Cortex A7 processor @ 1.1 GHz with Mali-400MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – N/A
  • Storage Zappiti_4K_Duo_Side
    • 5 GB  internal memory (I assume available space out of a 8GB NAND flash)
    • 2x SATA Bay with 3.5″ hard drive up to 8TB each formatted with FAT16/FAT32, EXT2/EXT3, NTFS, or Mac OS enhanced (HFS+) file system.
    • SD card reader
  • Video Output – HDMI 1.4 with CEC support up to 1080p60 / 3840x2160p30 / 4096x2160p24, and AV port
  • Video Input – HDMI port
  • Video codecs HEVC/H.265, MVC, AVC, MPEG-2, MPEG-4, XVID, DIVX, WMV9, FLV, VC-1, H.264/x.264, CVD 1.0/2.0, SVCD, AVS, Sorenson Spark L70, VP8 ; Very High Speed video bitrates supported up to 120Mbit/s.
  • Video file formats – BD ISO, BDMV, MKV, MPEG-TS, MPEG-PS, M2TS, VOB, AVI, MOV, MP4, QT, WMV, DVD-ISO, VIDEO_TS, AVCHD 2.0 (AVCHD 3D, AVHD Progressive, and AVCHD 3D / Progressive).
  • Audio Output – HDMI, AV and optical S/PDIF
  • Audio Codecs – AC-3, DTS, MPEG, AAC, LPCM, ALAC, AIFF, WAV, VSELP, FLAC, Ogg/Vorbis; lossless and audiophiles formats support (up to 192 kHz / 24-bit).
  • Multichannel Audio HD DTS, DTS-HD, Dolby Digital, Dolby Digital Plus, Dolby TrueHD, Dolby Atmos – Bitstream (RAW) and downmix 2.0.
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11 b/g/n WiFi with 2 antennas
  • USB – 4x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x USB 3.0 port (side)
  • Misc – AC button On/Off (at the back), recovery button, LED display on front switchable with RC.
  • Power Supply – 12V
  • Dimensions – N/A
Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

The device runs Android 4.4 with Zappiti Media Center interface, which can play videos from the internal drives, but also external USB drives, the built-in SD card reader, but also via the network through SAMBA, UPnP, DLNA 1.5/2.0, or HTTP, as well as Internet. PlayReady, Widevine, HDCP, and DTCP-IP DRM solutions are also said to be implemented. The media player also supports true 24p (1080p @ 23.976 Hz) for a smooth viewing experience. I’m not quite support whether the HDMI input is support, and when I reviewed another Realtek RTD1195 device (M-195), it was not really working. They also have not reported the memory installed, but hopefully they went with 2GB, or did some software optimization, as on M-195 I often had issues due to the low memory, as some memory out of the 1GB installed was reversed for the GPU and VPU. That was in 2014, so it’s quite possible those issues have been resolved.

Zappiti Player 4K Duo ships with an IR remote control, a 2.4GHz air mouse, HDMI & AV cables, a power adapter, and a quick installation guide. They showcased the player, as well as their lower  end Zappiti Player 4K (1 hard drive bay), and Zappiti 4K mini at CES 2016, where Charbax interviewed the French start-up’s owners.

They also covered Zappiti Media Center V4, the app that runs on their players, and that is also available for Windows, Mac OS, and Synology NAS for free. All devices that runs the media center app share the videos, so I understand you can play a video from any device in your home network, and on Windows and Mac OS, the server can also perform on the fly transcoding to let you watch videos on the go on your mobile device.

Zappiti Player 4K Duo sells for 290.83 Euros (inc VAT) without hard drive on the company’s e-Store, and but you also select various storage options up to 2x 8TB drives which brings the price to 889.17 Euros. More details can be found on Zappiti Player 4K Duo product page, including the user’s guide in English and French.

Via ARMDevices.net

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MXQ 4K RK3229 Android TV Box Sells for $29.99 Shipped

January 15th, 2016 22 comments

This morning I wrote about Sunchip CX-R9 TV box based on Rorkchip RK3229 that is said to be selling for $32, as long as you buy 1,000 pieces, but the new Rockchip SoC might truly disrupt the low-end market, as MXQ 4K RK3299 TV box has just launched on GeekBuying where it is sold for only $29.99 shipped.

MXQ-4K_H.265_VP9_TV_Box

MXQ-4K specifications:

  • SoC – Rockchip RK3229 quad core ARM Cortex A7 processor @ 1.5 GHz with  ARM Mali-400MP2
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR3
  • Storage – 8GB NAND flash + SD card slot up to 32GB
  • Video Output – HDMI 2.0 up to 4K2K @ 60 fps, and 3.5mm AV output (composite)
  • Audio Output – HDMI, AV, and coaxial S/PDIF
  • Connectivity – 100Mbps Ethernet, 802.11 b/g/n WiFi
  • USB – 4x USB 2.0 host ports
  • Power Supply – 5V/2A
  • Dimensions – N/A
MXQ-4KThe device runs Android 4.4 with Kodi 16, and the specs list 10-bit H.264 and H.265, without mention of VP9 (but it should support it up to 4K @ 30 fps), and will ship with an IR remote control, an HDMI cable, a power adapter and a user’s manual.
MXQ-4K_RK3229_Antutu

With a quad core Cortex A7 processor the device won’t be a top of the benchmark charts, and GeekBuying reports 21,134 points in Antutu 6.0, but if you just want to play 4K videos at 60 fps, or even just 10-bit H.264 (Hi10p) videos, you can certainly not beat the price. I hope to get a sample soon to check it’s actual video playback abilities.

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Sunchip CX-R9 Rockchip RK3229 Android TV Box Sells for $32 (Factory Price)

January 15th, 2016 1 comment

We’ve already seen Rockchip RK3229 quad core processor with 4K 10-bit H.264 and H.265, and 4K VP9 support announced at CES 2016. Sunchip CX-R9 will be one of the first devices on the market with the new processor, and includes 1GB RAM and 8GB storage.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Sunchip CX-R9 specifications:

  • SoC – Rockchip RK3229 quad core ARM Cortex A7 processor @ 1.5 GHz with  ARM Mali-400MP2
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR3
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC + SD card reader
  • Video Output – HDMI 2.0 up to 4K2K @ 60 fps
  • Audio Output – HDMI, and optical S/PDIF
  • Video Codec – 4K2K 10-bit H.265 @ 60 fps (Up to 200 Mbps),  4K 10-bit H.264 @ 30 fps (Up to 250 Mbps) and 4K 8-bit VP9 @ 30 fps (Up to 200 Mbps)
  • Connectivity – 100Mbps Ethernet, 802.11 b/g/n WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB – 3x USB 2.0 host ports, including on OTG port (Based on CX-R8 design)
  • Power Supply – TBC
  • Dimensions – 134 x 117 x 18.5 mm

Sunchip_CX-R9_SpecificationsAs previously mentioned one downside of RK3229 SoC is that it only supports Android 4.4.2, against similarly priced competitor like Amlogic S905. However, it is one of the rare platforms, actually the only I know of baring software decode, that supports 10-bit H.264, so you should be able to play the many anime videos distributed with that codec. VP9 support at up to 4K @ 30 Hz if also an advantage against S905, and Rockchip also claims faster video start time, and higher bitrate support up to 200+ Mbps. I’ve noticed Amlogic S905 cannot play one of my video sample at 120 Mbps smoothly, so this would definitely be an advantage for RK3229, although I’m not sure there are that many 100+ Mbps videos.

Sunchip CX-R9 should become available in February, and it currently sells for $32 for 1k orders.

Via ARMDevices.net

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Rockchip RK3229 and RK3399 32-bit and 64-bit Processors Support 4K 10-bit H.265 and HDMI 2.0

January 12th, 2016 16 comments

Rockchip RK3288 was the first SoC from the company that was supposed to support HDMI 2.0 and 4K 10-bit HEVC, but the HDMI implementation was not perfect since it did not support YUV420 colorspace available on cheaper 4K television like mine (LG 42UB820T), and so I’m limited to 4K @ 30 Hz on RK3288, Rorkchip RK3368 fixed that, but the low cost processor does not support 10-bit HEVC. Rockchip is about to launch two new processor that should bring both features to the low end and high end of the market with RK3229 quad core Cortex A7 processor, and RK3399 hexa core Cortex A72/A53 processor.

RK3229_RK3399

Rockchip RK3229 specifications:

  • CPU- Quad Core ARM Cortex A7 @ 1.5 GHz
  • GPU – ARM Mali-400MP2
  • Memory I/F – DDR3-1866/LPDDR3-1333
  • Video Output – HDMI 2.0 with HDCP 1.4/2.2 + CVBS
  • Video Codec – 4K2K 10-bit H.265 @ 60 fps (Up to 200 Mbps),  4K 10-bit H.264 @ 30 fps (Up to 250 Mbps) and 4K 8-bit VP9 @ 30 fps (Up to 200 Mbps)
  • Video Encoder – 1080p H.264 and VP8
  • Ethernet – 100Mbps (PHY)
  • Audio Codec – Yes
  • DRM – Widewine Level 1, PlayReady, Verimatrix

The processor also supports BT.2020 to Rec.709/Rec.601 conversion, and is pin-to-pin compatible with Rockchip RK3128. Boot time is about half of the RK3128 with the company claiming a 12 seconds boot time, and they also claim a smaller delay to start playing high bitrate videos compared to S905 and 3798M. One downside is that it only support Android 4.4, no Android 5.1.

Rockchip RK3399 specifications:

  • CPU- Hexa Core processor with 2x ARM Cortex A72 @ 2.0 GHz, 4x ARM Cortex A53
  • GPU – ARM Mali-T864 GPU
  • Memory I/F – Dual Channel DDR3/LPDDR3/LPDDR4
  • Video Output – HDMI 2.0
  • Video Codec – 4K2K 10-bit H.265
  • Video Encoder – 1080p
  • Ethernet – Gigabit
  • Audio Codec – No

Information is limited for now, but we can already find some RK3229 TV boxes listed on Alibaba such as Vplus M9 selling for $25 in quantities, but I’m not sure information and pricing can be trusted on this page, as they mention both H.265 and VP9 4K video decoding, and this would be a big omission in Rockchip product table that I found on a NotebookItalia video filmed at CES 2016.

Rockchip RK3399 is particularly interesting as it is the first high-performance 64-bit ARM SoC announced by one of the three main Chinese TV Box SoC manufacturers: Amlogic, Rockchip and Allwinner.

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Specs, Unboxing and Teardown of KI Plus Android TV Box with DVB-T2/S2 Combo Tuner

January 8th, 2016 24 comments

If you’ve been following this blog, you must now that I reviewed K1 Plus Android TV box based on Amlogic S905 processor a little while ago. Videostrong has sent me yet another K1 Plus device, except this time it is an Android receiver with a tuner card supporting both satellite (DVB-S/S2) and terrestrial (DVB-T/T2) reception. Today, I’ll list the specs, take a few pictures of the device, before checking out the tuner board.

K1 Plus Android DTV receiver specifications

The specifications are exactly the same as the TV box, except for the added tuner:

  • SoC –  Amlogic S905 quad core ARM Cortex-A53 @ up to 2.0GHz with  penta-core Mali-450MP GPU @ 750 MHz
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR3
  • Storage – 8GB NAND flash (4 to 32GB optional) + micro SD card slot
  • Video Output – HDMI 2.0 up to 4K @ 60Hz with HDCP 2.2 support, and 3.5mm AV jack
  • Audio – HDMI, AV (stereo), optical S/PDIF
  • Video Codecs – 10-bit H.265 up to 4K60, MPEG/VC-1/AVS+/H.265 up to 4K30
  • Tuner – Combo DVB-T/T2 and DVB-S/S2 with two connectors
  • Connectivity – Fast Ethernet (Gigabit optional), 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi, optional Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB – 4x USB 2.0 host ports
  • Misc
    • Power button and LED, IR receiver
    • Optional DRM: Playready, Verimatrix, Widewine (Probably not available right now)
  • Power Supply –  DC 12V/1A
  • Dimensions – 130 x 120 x 32 mm

The device is still running Android 5.1.

K1 Plus DVB-S2/T2 Combo Picture

The package looks exactly the same as the media player model with KI Plus Quad-core Androdi DVB marking.

K1_Plus_DVB_Packageand the included accessories are exactly the same too with a 12V/1A, an HDMI cable, a remote control, and a user’s manual.Android_Digital_TV_Receiver_AccessoriesThe device itself also looks the same with 4 USB ports on the side…

KI_Plus_TV_Box..until we look at the rear panel where DVB-T2 and DVB-S2 antenna connectors have been added to a place where there was simply a marking with “Android TV Box” on the standard model.

K1_Plus_DVB-T2_DVB-S2_Antenna_Connectors

Click to Enlarge

K1 Plus DVB Teardown

I’ve already torn down K1 Plus without tuner, and the way to open it, and the mainboard are exactly the same, even the components, and only the tuner board has been added.

K1_Plus_Board_with_Tuner

So I’ve loosened the 3 connectors holding the mainboard and tuner to the casing, and removed the shield to have a closer look at the tuner board itself.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

The board is called S2&T2_R848_Rev1.0 and includes Availink AVL6862TA DVB-C/T/T2 + DVB-S/S2 demodulator and Rafael Micro R848 tuner. The hardware configuration is very similar to TBS5520 multi-standard USB tuner with R848 tuner and AVL6882 demodulator with support for DVB-T2/C/S2/ISDB-T/J.83B standards.

Videostrong has listed the product on on their Alibaba website, and if you are a reseller or distributor you may consider contacting the company there to purchase in quantities.. I could not find it for sale yet on any online shops, and the name does not really make it easy to find either…

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