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Posts Tagged ‘mips’

Linux 4.2 Release – Main Changes, ARM and MIPS Architectures

September 2nd, 2015 No comments

Linus Torvalds released Linux Kernel 4.2 last Sunday:

So judging by how little happened this week, it wouldn’t have been a mistake to release 4.2 last week after all, but hey, there’s certainly a few fixes here, and it’s not like delaying 4.2 for a week should have caused any problems either.

So here it is, and the merge window for 4.3 is now open. I already have a few pending early pull requests, but as usual I’ll start processing them tomorrow and give the release some time to actually sit.

The shortlog from rc8 is tiny, and appended. The patch is pretty tiny too.

Go get it,

Linus

Some notable changes made to Linux 4.2 include:

  • File systems
    • New features for F2FS including per file encryption
    • CIFS support SMB 3.1.1 (experimental)
  • Cryptography – Jitter Entropy Random Number Generator, Chacha20 stream cipher and Poly1305 authentication (RFC7539),New RSA implementation. See lwn.net for details.
  • AMD GPU driver added support for AMD “Tonga,” “Iceland,” and “Carrizo” systems. That driver has now over 400,000 lines of code…
  • Networking

Some of the new features and improvements specific to the ARM architecture include (With a focus on Allwinner/Rockchip/Amlogic/Mediatek processors often discussed in this blog):

  • Allwinner:
    • A10/A10s/A13/A20/A31/A23 – SRAM Controller
    • A23 – SMP support, architected timer support
    • A31/A31s – CPUFreq support
    • A33 – Machine support, Bring-up sharing most drivers with A23, pinctl driver, PIO controller
    • A80 – Architected timer support, USB support
    • AXP221 PMIC driver
    • New boards and devices: LinkSprite pcDuino3 Nano, Cubietech Cubieboard4, Gemei G9, Auxtek T004, Utoo P66, Wexler TAB 7200, MK808C, Jesurun Q5, Xunlong Orange Pi, Xunlong Orange Pi Mini, Sinlinx SinA33
  • Rockchip
    • Fixes for GPU DRM driver
    • RK3368 – Added pinctrl and Ethernet (dwmac) support
    • Device tree – Files relicensed under GPLv2/X11 dual-license, Enable A12 HW PMU events in RK3288 boards, and TSADC for Firefly and PopMetal boards
    • Fixed IR receiver bug and modify some GPIO code in RK3288
  • Amlogic – Added documentation to the clock controller… nothing else.
  • Mediatek
    • Fixed clock registration in MT8135
    • Small changes and fixes to pinctrl driver
    • Added driver for Mediatek MT8173 I2C controller
    • Some fixes for PMIC
    • MT7601U driver (WiFi device)
    • Pinctrl driver for MT8127, MT6397,
  • Qualcomm
    • Added SPMI PMIC Arbiter device tree node for MSM8916
    • Added 8×16 chipset SPMI PMIC’s nodes
    • Added MSM8916 restart device node
    • Added initial set of PMIC and SoC pins for APQ8016 SBC board
  • Samsung
    • Fix exynos3250 MIPI DSI display and MIPI CSIS-2 camera sensor
    • Bring back cpufreq for exynos4210
  •  ARM64
    • New processors: Hisilicon ARM64 SoCs (e.g. Hi6220)
    • Various fixes for ARM64 for ACPI, MMU, SMP, perf, and more.
    • Enabled EDAC on ARM64
    • Support for Hikey board, ARM Juno r1 board
  • Various changes to some Atmel and Marvell processors, see Free Electrons blog post for details.
  • Other new ARM SoCs & hardware platforms – Freescale i.MX 7Dual, ZTE ZX29670, Buffalo WXR-1900DHP, ASUS RT-AC87U, SmartRG SR400ac, Compulab CM-A510, and more

There has also been some interesting changes for the MIPS architecture:

  • many bug fixes: LLVM build issue, KVM fixes, fix seccomp MIPS64, fix for oprofile (get_c0_perfcount_int), Fix JR emulation for R6, etc…
  • Some code cleanups (fixed misspellings, removes some code)
  • Added support for appended DTP
  • Improvements for R12000, R3000, Broadcom BCM47xx and BCM63xx,  ATH79
  • Large patchset for Ingenic JZ4740 SoC
  • Added support to Pistachio SoC
  • New MIPS platforms: MIPS Creator CI20 board and XWR-1750 board

A complete changelog for Linux 4.2 should soon be published on Kernelnewbies.org, and you’ll probably also want to look at their ARM architecture and drivers sections for more details about to various platforms including ARM and MIPS. I’ve also generated a complete Linux 4.2 Changelog with comments only (13.9MB) using git (git log v4.1..v4.2 --stat)

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Baikal T1 is a Dual Core MIPS P5600 Communication Processor

May 28th, 2015 No comments

When allegations surfaced that the NSA messed with devices manufactured by US companies, and possibly other, government of geopolitical significance started to take measures. For instance, China may have removed Apple and Cisco products from its list of approved products due to security reasons, and Russia decided to design its own Baikal processors to replace Intel and AMD solutions. At the time of the announcement, Baikal M and M/S chip were supposed to be the first ones and based on ARM Cortex A57 cores, but Imagination Technologies recently announced that Russia based Baikal Electronics was working on Baikal T1 communication processor with two MIPS P5600 cores.

Baikal_T1

Baikal-T1 Block Diagram

Some of the specifications include:

  • CPU – Dual core MIPS 5600 processor @ 1.2 GHz with 1MB L2 cache
  • Memory – DDR3 controller
  • Storage – SATA 6Gbps controller and PHY
  • Connectivity – 2x Gigabit Ethernet controller, 1x 10Gigabit Ethernet controller and PHY
  • USB 2.0 controller
  • PCIe 3.0 controller and PHY
  • GPIO, I2C, UART, SPI
  • Power consumption – 5W (total)
  • Package and process – 25x25mm package, manufactured with 28nm process technology

Baikal-T1

Baikal-T1 processor targets telecommunications, industrial automation and embedded systems. There was no word on supported operating systems, with the only reference to software being “the SoC comes with a set of extensible software based on open source code”, so it’s likely it will run Linux and leverage GNU tools.

The processor is close to being fully developed, as engineering samples are available to developers now, and Baikal-T1 based commercial solutions are expected by the end of 2015.

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Categories: Linux, Processors Tags: baikal, Linux, mips

Samsung Artik is a Family of Arduino Compatible Boards for IoT Applications

May 13th, 2015 14 comments

There was a time when development boards were only reserved to companies, then boards like Arduino or Beagleboard made these available and affordable to consumers, and with the introduction of the Raspberry Pi, the maker movement grew even more rapidly, and many low cost boards started to be designed and manufactured mostly my smallest companies. But now larger companies like Intel or Qualcomm have jumped on the makers’ bandwagon, and the latest entry is Samsung with their Artik platform currently comprised of three boards that are programmable with the Arduino IDE.
Samsung_Artik
Let’s go through specifications for the three boards:

  • Artik 1
    • SoC – Dual Core MIPS32 processor @ 250MHz (microAptiv UP) and 80MHz (microAptiv UC) without GPU
    • Memory – 1MB RAM on-chip
    • Storage – 4MB SPI flash
    • Display – Up to WVGA (800×480)
    • Connectivity – Bluetooth Low Energy with chip antenna
    • Security – Secure element
    • Sensor – 9-axis motion sensor with gyroscope, accelerometer and magnetometer
    • Dimensions – 12×12 mm
  • Artik 5
    • SoC – Dual core ARM processor @ 1GHz with ARM Mali 400 MP2 GPU
    • Memory – 512 LPDDR3 (on-chip)
    • Storage – 4GB eMMC (on-chip)
    • Display – TBD
    • Video Decode/Encode – H.263/H264/MPEG-4/VP8 (720p)@30fps and decoding of MPEG-2/VC1/Xvid
    • Connectivity – Wi-Fi, Bluetooth Low Energy, Zigbee/Thread
    • Security – Secure element, TEE (Trustzone)
    • Expansion – 60-pin and 40-pin headers for USB, MIPI, I2S, I2C, SPI, UART, Analog inputs, etc…
    • Sensor – N/A
    • Dimensions – 29x25mm
  • Artik 10
    • SoC – Octa core processor with 4x ARM Cortex A15 @ 1.3GHz, 4x ARM Cortex A7 @ 1.0 GHz, and ARM Mali-T628 GPU
    • Memory – 2GB LPDDR3 (on-chip)
    • Storage – 16GB eMMC
    • Display – TBD
    • Video Encode/Decode – 1080p@120fps H.263/H.264/ MPEG-4/VP8 + MPEG-2/VC1 decoding
    • Audio – HW 5.1 Channel I2S + TDM up to 8 Channels + HW mixer 
    • Connectivity – Wi-Fi, Bluetooth Low Energy, Zigbee/Thread
    • Security – Secure element, TEE (Trustzone)
    • Sensor – N/A
    • Expansion – 80-pin and 40-pin headers for USB 2.0/3.0, MIPI, I2S, I2C, SPI, UART, Analog inputs, etc…
    • Dimensions – 39×29 mm
Artik 10 Block Diagram

Artik 10 Block Diagram

Artix 1 runs Nucleus OS, and can be programmed with Arduino IDE, and/or Samsung SDK with C/C++ language. Artix 5 and 10 run a Fedora distribution built with Yocto 1.6, and on top of tools and languages supported by Artix 1, they can also be programmed in Java or Groovy.

The boards are not available yet, and pricing has not been announced either, but Samsung invites developers to register for an alpha kit by May 31, 2015.

Via Make

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Linux 4.0 Release – Main Changes, ARM and MIPS Architectures

April 15th, 2015 11 comments

Linus Torvalds “Ima Sheep” released Linux Kernel 4.0 on Sunday:

So I decided to release 4.0 as per the normal schedule, because there really weren’t any known issues, and while I’ll be traveling during the end of the upcoming week due to a college visit, I’m hoping that won’t affect the merge window very much. We’ll see.

Linux 4.0 was a pretty small release both in linux-next and in final size, although obviously “small” is all relative. It’s still over 10k non-merge commits. But we’ve definitely had bigger releases (and judging by linux-next v4.1 is going to be one of the bigger ones).

Which is all good. It definitely matches the “v4.0 is supposed to be a_stable_ release”, and very much not about new experimental features etc. I’m personally so much happier with time-based releases than the bad old days when we had feature-based releases.

That said, there’s a few interesting numerological things going on with 4.0. Looking at just the statistics in git, this release is not just when we cross half a million commits total, but also cross the 4 million git object limit. Interestingly (if you look for numeric patterns), Linux 3.0 was when we crossed a quarter million commits and 2 million git objects, so there’s a nice (and completely unintentional) pattern there when it comes to the kernel git repository.

[ Another quick historical numerological footnote: the old historical BK tree was getting close to the 16-bit commilt limit that BK originally used to have. So that whole “quarter of a million commits” is actually quite a lot. During all of the BK years we only got 65k commits. Of course, we only used BK for three years, and we’ve now been on git for almost exactly ten years, but still – it shows how the whole development process has really sped up a _lot_ ]

Feature-wise, 4.0 doesn’t have all that much special. Much have been made of the new kernel patching infrastructure, but realistically, that not only wasn’t the reason for the version number change, we’ve had much bigger changes in other versions. So this is very much a “solid code progress” release.

Go get it and enjoy,

Linus “we’re all sheep” Torvalds

Linux 3.19 brought improvement to btrfs (raid), the network stack, added ARM Coresight, device tree overlays support, and more.

Some key changes made to Linux 4.0 include:

  • pNFS (Parallel NFS), UBIFS, F2FS and BTRFS File Systems improvements
  • Live Kernel Patching – Install kernel updates without rebooting
  • Intel Quark x86 SoC support
  • Various patches to improve Linux running on a  Playstation 3
  • Open source AMD Radeon driver supports DisplayPort Audio and improves fan support

Some of the new features and improvements specific to the ARM architecture include:

  • Allwinner:
    • A20 – PS/2 Controller
    • A31 – IR receiver
    • A31s – Bring-up sharing majority of drivers with A31, pinctrl driver
    • A80 – MMC
    • All SoCs – LRADC Input driver, CPUFreq, PWM Driver
    • AXP209 power button input driver
    • New boards and devices:  CSQ CS908, LeMaker Banana Pro, Chuwi V7 CW0825, Rikomagic mk802, Rikomagic mk802ii, Rikomagic mk802_a10s, MarsBoard A10, Hyundai A7HD
  • Rockchip
    • Fixes for rk808 regulator
    • Watchdog fix
    • Add Rockchip timer for RK3288
    • HDMI output enabled on rk3288-firefly and rk3288-evb
    • Disable GMAC by default
  • Amlogic – pinctrl driver for Amlogic Meson SoCs
  • Mediatek
    • Regulator driver for Mediatek MT6397
    • Added watchdog driver
    • Added Mediatek MT8173 64-bit processor
  • ARM64
    • New processors: Exynos 7, Freescale LS2085A, and Tegra 132 (Denver)
    • Various fixes for ARM64 including UEFI and KVM code.
  • Preparation work for Atmel AT91 support for multiplatform
  • Other new platforms – Alphascale ASM9260, Marvell Armada 388, CSR Atlas7, TI Davinci DM816x, Hisilicon HiP01, ST STiH418, and Conexant Digicolor (CX92755).

There has also been some interesting changes for the MIPS architecture:

  • Fixes for KVM support
  • Support for MIPS R6 processors
  • Preliminary support for Cavium Octeon 3 SoCs which feature up to 48 MIPS64 R3 cores with FPU and hardware virtualization

A more detailed changelog for Linux 4.0 will soon be available on Kernelnewbies.org, and once it’s up you may also want to have a look at their ARM architecture and drivers sections for more details about changes related to ARM, MIPS and other platforms. I’ve also generated a complete Linux 3.19 vs Linux 4.0 changelog (3.4MB) with git (comments only, no code).

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Firefox OS Ported to MIPS Based Tablet (Ingenic JZ4780)

March 24th, 2015 1 comment

Imagination has announced that an experimental version of Firefox OS has been ported to a reference tablet powered by Ingenic JZ4780, a MIPS based processor, that’s also used in MIPS Creator CI20 development board, and that the company organized a raffle to send 15 of these tablets for people to try or develop on.

Firefox_OS_MIPS_TabletThe tablet is said to cost less than $100, runs either Firefox OS or Android 4.4 KitKat, and comes with the following specifications:

  • SoC – Ingenic JZ4780 dual core MIPS32 processor @ 1.2 GHz with Imagination PowerVR SGX540 GPU. 32kI + 32kD per core, 512K shared L2.
  • System Memory – N/A
  • Storage – N/A
  • Display – 9.7” screen; 1024 x 768 resolution
  • Video Output – mini HDMI port
  • Audio – Headphone jack, stereo speakers, microphone
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB – 1x Micro USB port
  • Camera –  Front and rear cameras
  • Misc – Sleep/wake, back, and volume buttons
  • Power – 5V
  • Battery – Unknown capacity
  • Dimensions – N/A

I could not find Ingenic JZ4780 based tablets on Aliexpress, Alibaba, or anywhere on the web, so this model is just a reference design, possibly to be sold in a few weeks or months. Firefox OS source code for the tablet and CI20 development board should soon be available on GitHub.

The build is still experimental, and they still have some work to do as the tablet still feels quite sluggish as you can see from the demo below. YouTube appears to be working just fine though thanks to the H.264/VP8 video decoder (up to 1080p30) inside the MIPS processor.

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Ingenic Halley is a $20 Linux based IoT Board with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.1 Connectivity

February 10th, 2015 5 comments

Ingenic introduced Newton2 platform for wearables a few months ago, and the kit with an AMOLED display, camera board and other accessories should go on sale in March for $80. In the meantime, the company has also been working on a lower cost internet of things (IoT) module and development kit powered by Ingenic M150 with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.1 targeting smart appliances, Wi-Fi speakers, smart toys, industrial control applications, and other smart devices.

Ingenic_Halley

Halley IoT Module (Click to Enlarge)

Halley IoT module specifications:

  • SoC – Ingenic M150 XBurst (MIPS) single-core processor up to 1.0GHz with 128MB LPDDR on-chip, 2D graphics GPU, VPU supporintg 720p30 H.264 video decoding.
  • Storage – 8MP SPI NOR flash (GIGA GD25LQ64)
  • Connectivity – Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n and  Bluetooth 4.1 via Broadcom 43438 chip.
  • Expansion headers (2mm pitch)
    • 8-bit parallel LCD interface,
    • Audio – MIC, Line-In and headphone, 2x I2S,
    • SD card (MMC interface)
    • USB device 2.0, and USB host 1.1
    • 3x UART (2 with hardware flow control), 2x I2C, 1x SPI up to 50Mbps,
    • 5-pin JTAG
    • 2x 12-bit ADC,
    • 2x PWM
  • Power Supply – 3.3V
  • Power Consumption – 2mW (Standby, no radio); 10 mW (Standby, Wi-Fi)
  • Dimensions – 24 x 40 x 2.4 mm
Halley Module Block Diagram and Pinout

Halley Module Block Diagram and Pinout

The module is running Linux 3.10 with TCP/IP stack, and the company claims Android OS could also run on external storage. This would have to be a lightweight version of Android as only 128MB RAM is available. The development kit is comprised of the module, a baseboard, and a debug board.

Halley_Development_Kit

Ingenic Halley Devkit (Click to Enlarge)

The baseboard includes power circuitry to power the board with a micro USB port, reset and boot keys, some LEDs, a 14-pin male header, and UART connection to the debug board. It would have been good to have a micro SD slot on the back of the board, but none seems to have been included.

Even the board has not been formally launched, some documentation is already available for download including a product brief, a datasheet, and a developer’s guide. A Linux demo image and the SDK have also been released. The SDK includes a toolchain, source code for Linux and U-boot, drivers & tools, and a demo Android app (Airkiss).

M150 Block Diagram

M150 Block Diagram

It’s the first time I see details about Ingenic M150, so it might interesting to go through the specs:

  • CPU – XBurst core, 1.0GHz (MIPS-based). 32KB L1 cache, 256KB L2 cache.
  • GPU – X2D: Resizing, Rotating, Mirror, Color Convention and OSD etc.
  • VPU – Video encoder: H.264, D1@30fps. Video decoder: H.264, MPEG-1/2/4, VC-1, VP8, RV9, 720P@30fps.
  • Memory
    • On-chip 128MB LPDDR, up to 320Mbps.
    • 64-bit ECC NAND flash, 512B/2KB/4KB/8KB/16KB page size.
    • Conventional and toggle NAND flash.
  • Display
    • LCD controller with OSD: TFT, SLCD, up to 1280*720@60Hz(BPP24).
    • Embedded E-Ink controller with color engine.
  • Camera – DVP interface, up to 2048 x 2048.
  • Audio – Embedded audio CODEC; Digital DMIC controller; AC97/I2S/SPDIF interface for external audio codec; PCM interface, master and slave mode.
  • ADC – 7 channels SAR A/D controller, 12-bit resolution.
  • On-chip Peripherals
    • USB 2.0 OTG, USB 1.1 Host.
    • MMC/SD/SDIO controller.
    • Full-duplex UART port.
    • Synchronous serial interface.
    • Two-wire SMB serial interface.
  • Security – Total 256bits OTP memory.
  • Package – BGA261, 11 x 11 x 1.4 (mm), 0.5mm pitch.

That confirms it’s one of the rare SoC with enough built-in RAM to run Linux. Renesas RZ/A1 is another one, but with only 10MB RAM, and a Cortex A9 core.

Halley IoT module and development kit will be available around March 10, for respectively $20 and $50. You can find more information, and ordering information on Ingenic’s Halley module page.

Thanks to Victor for the tip.

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Linux 3.19 Release – Main Changes, ARM and MIPS Architectures

February 9th, 2015 4 comments

Linus Torvalds released Linux Kernel 3.19 yesterday:

So nothing all that exciting happened, and while I was tempted a couple of times to do an rc8, there really wasn’t any reason for it.

Just as an example, Sasha Levin used KASan and found an interesting bug in paravirtualized spinlocks, but realistically it’s been around forever, and it’s not even clear that it can really ever trigger in practice. We’ll get it fixed, and mark it for stable, and tempting as it was, it wasn’t really a reason to delay 3.19.

And the actual fixes that went in (see appended shortlog) were all fairly small, with the exception of some medium-sized infiniband changes that were all reverting code that just wasn’t ready.

So it’s out there – go and get it. And as a result, the merge window for 3.20 is obviously also now open.

Linus

Linux 3.18 improved performance of the network stack, received BTRFS and EXT-4 file systems improvements, introduced overlayfs for live CDs, and more.

Some changes made to Linux 3.19 include:

  • Btrfs: support scrubbing and fast device replacement in RAID 5&6Btrfs  – Added support for fast & live device replacement (see btrfs-replace), much faster and efficient than adding the new device and removing the old one in separated commands. This feature could not fast-replace devices from file systems using RAID 5 & 6, this release has removed that limitation. Support for the process of scrubbing a btrfs filesystem (with btrfs-scrub) has also been added for RAID 5&6 file systems.
  • Support for Intel Memory Protection Extensions – Intel’s Memory Protection Extension (MPX) is a set of CPU instructions which brings increased robustness to software by checking pointer references usurped maliciously at runtime by buffer overflows. This Linux release adds support in the Linux kernel, although CPUs with MPX support are not sold yet (To be introduced with Intel Skylake and Goldmont microarchitectures). LWN article: Supporting Intel MPX in Linux
  • SquashFS adds LZ4 Compression Support
  • Work on year 2038 bug – do_settimeofday(), timekeeping_inject_sleeptime(), and mktime() now have 2038-safe replacements
  • The networking layer has a new subsystem for offloading switching and routing duties to suitably capable hardware
  • Audio – Intel Baytrail-based audio devices, Samsung Exynos7 I2S controllers, NXP Semiconductors TFA9879 amplifiers, and Texas Instruments TS3A227E headset chips.

Some of the new features and improvements specific to the ARM architecture include:

  • Allwinner:
    • Simple Framebuffer and USB phy driver support for usb0  for Allwinner A10 / A10s / A13 / A20 / A31 / A23
    • NAND Flash driver for Allwinner A10 & A20
    • DMAengine driver for Allwinner A23 (Shared with A31)
    • Allwinner A80 – initial machine support, basic clocks and reset, pinctrl driver, extra UART, I2C, LEDS
    • New boards: Mele M3, LeMaker Banana Pi, Merrii A80 Optimus Board, Olimex A20-OLinuXino-Lime2
  • Rockchip
    • RK3288 – Basic SMP support
    • Device tree for MarsBoard RK3066
    • Added support for rk3066-tsadc variantof rockchip_saradc
    • Add support for the mmc clock phases using the framework
  • Amlogic
    • Added DTSI for Meson8 SoCs
    • Driver for Meson IR remote control
    • Support for Meson SPIFC
  • Mediatek
    • Basic support for MT6592, MT8127 and MT8135
    • DTS for 8127 Moose board, MT8125 evaluation board, and MT6592-EVB
  • ARM64
    • Added Device tree for Juno and AMD Seattle platform
    • Added framework for legacy instruction emulation, secomp suport, SMBIOS/DMI support, etc…
  • Atmel AT91 architecture has gotten rid of board files, and is now fully converted to device tree
  • Other new device tree files: Altera Arria10 SoC, Synology DS213j/DS414, Braodcom BCM5301X devices (Asus RT-N18U, Buffalo WZR-1750DHP, Buffalo WZR-600DHP2, Netgear R6300 V2 ), DLink DIR665, Raspberry Pi model B+, Freescale LS1021A, TBS2910 Matrix ARM mini PC, NHK15 board (nomadik)

Some changes have been listed for MIPS architecture too:

  • BMIPS: Add PRId for BMIPS5200 (Whirlwind)
  • Enable VDSO randomization
  • Loongson-3 –  Add PHYS48_TO_HT40 support, Add RS780/SBX00 HPET support, Add oprofile support
  • Loongson1B – Add a clockevent/clocksource using PWM Timer
  • Loongson –  Allow booting from any core
  • Support for hybrid FPRs
  • ath25 – Add basic AR2315 SoC support, add AR2315 PCI host controller driver, add basic AR5312 SoC support
  • bcm3384 – Initial commit of bcm3384 platform support
  • ralink – add mt7628an support, add rt2880 pci driver, add support for MT7620n

A more detailed changelog for Linux 3.19 will soon be available on Kernelnewbies.org. You can also checkout ARM architecture and drivers sections for more details about changes related to ARM, MIPS and other platforms.

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UyeSee SoundMate WM201 Wi-Fi Music Streamer Features Actions Semi AM8253 SoC

December 15th, 2014 7 comments

EZCast dongles are wireless display dongle supporting Miracast, DLNA, Airplay, and EZCast protocol, and are all based on Actions Semiconductor AM8251 MIPS processor. The company has now designed AM8253 SoC specially for audio applications using these standards, and found in upcoming products such as UyeSee WM201 Wi-Fi music streamer.

UyeSee_WM201UyeSee WM201 specifications and features:

  • SoC – Actions Semi AM8253 32-bit RISC processor @ 600 MHz with built-in 24-bit 96 KHz DAC
  • System Memory – 64 MB DDR3
  • Storage –  128MB for firmware, and micro SD card for audio files
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi (150 Max). WPA, WPA2, and WPA2 Mixed security
  • Audio Ports – 3.5mm audio jack, optical S/PDIF
  • Wireless Audio Standard – Airplay, DLNA, Qplay and Ezcast
  • Audio Format – MP3, AAC, WAV, FLAC, APE, OGG, WMA, DTS, AC3 (Dolby Digital), ra, AIF, AIFF, M4A(ALAC), MKA, MIDI,, TTA
  • USB – 1x USB host port, 1x micro USB port for power
  • Misc – Reset button, power LED
  • Power Supply – 5V/0.5A (via micro USB port)
  • Dimensions – 82 x 82 x 24 mm

This wireless audio streamer comes with a USB cable, an audio cable (for 3.5mm jack), and a user’s manual. The functionality should be similar to SoundMate M2, except that EZMusic app for Microsoft Windows, Mac, Android, and iOS will be provided instead of controlling the device via a web interface. It should also be possible to use it with Linux using a DLNA client (TBC).. You can also play music from a micro SD card, or a USB mass storage device.

Actions Semi AM8253 Block Diagram

Actions Semi AM8253 Block Diagram

There’s no mention of the architecture for the RISC processor, but it should probably be MIPS like for AM8251. The blank rectangles in the block diagram, are probably because they used an old block diagram with GPU and VPU used in AM8251, which is not needed in AM8253 audio processor. There’s also no mention of any operating systems, but it’s probably a Linux based device.

The product should eventually be listed on Uyesee audio streaming page yet, and a dedicated website should be launched on www.ezmusic.cn soon (site is down for now).

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