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Posts Tagged ‘open source’

Olimex H3-OLinuXino-NANO is a Smaller Allwinner H3 Board with HDMI, Ethernet, and Many I/Os

February 4th, 2016 7 comments

Allwinner H3 processor is quite popular in development boards thanks to some of Shenzhen Xunlong’s Orange Pi boards such as Orange Pi PC or Orange Pi One. However, some specific features may not work 0ut of the box, or are undocumented, so it’s always a plus when more companies create boards for a platform, and that’s exactly what Olimex has done with H3-OlinuXino-NANO, a board that’s smaller than any Orange Pi boards, the first open source hardware Allwinner H3 board on the market, and featuring many more I/O pins available.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Olimex H3-OlinuXino-NANO specifications:

  • SoC – Allwinner H3 quad core Cortex-A7 processor @ 1.2 GHz with Mali-400MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – 512MB of DDR3 RAM
  • Storage – micro SD card slot
  • Video Output- HDMI up to 1080p60
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet
  • USB – 2x USB host ports + 1x micro USB OTG port
  • Expansion – Optional 2x 40-pin headers with GPIOs, I2C, SPI, etc…
  • Debugging – UART console
  • Misc – 4x user buttons, 4x mounting holes
  • Power Supply – 5V via micro USB OTG port
  • Dimensions – 50×50 mm (6-layer PCB)
Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

The board above actually comes after the larger H3-OLinuXino board with 1GB memory, but as the first prototypes would overheat,  it looks like the NANO version may be released first. Eagle schematics and PCB layout are will soon be available on github. The board will support Linux distributions and Android, and can be used as a general purpose Linux computer, a digital signage, a low cost IoT gateway, an Android TV box, for education and so on.

Testing is still in progress, and price and release date are unknown at this stage, but the company said H3-OLinuXino-NANO will be cheaper than A10-OlinuXino-LIME board selling for 30 Euros.

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WeTek Play Now Supports OpenPLi Open Source Linux Distribution for DVB Receivers

February 3rd, 2016 6 comments

WeTek Play satellite receiver was initially launched with Android and OpenELEC support, but the community started to provide other operating systems such as Ubuntu, Elementary OS, Lakka and Enigma 2, and the hardware is even used to receive educational materials or emergency info via satellite thanks to Outernet project. The device now support OpenPLi Linux based distributions for DVB receivers.

Wetek_Play

WeTek Play

If you want to try, you can download one of the latest images of OpenPLi for WeTek Play by loading the firmware onto an SD card. Bear in mind that official has just started so some features may not be implemented, and OpenPLi documentation specific to WeTek Play is basically inexistent. Support is available on the forums.

OpenPLi Screenshot

OpenPLi Screenshot

If you want to get an idea about what OpenPLi is capable, you may however check out th list of  specific features in the wiki, including PLi Movieplayer to allow you to playback different video file formats from any computer that will run the VLC application, PLi Remote Control key mapper, PLi Software management and download tools for add-ons, softcams, games, etc…

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BayLibre ACME Cape for BeagleBone Black Measures Power and Temperature with Sigrok

February 1st, 2016 No comments

Sigrok open source signal analysis software suite had a major release last week-end with libsigrok 0.4.0, libsigrokdecode 0.4.0, sigrok-cli 0.6.0, and PulseView 0.3.0. The new version added numerous bug fixes for supported hardware such as UNI-T UT61E digital multimeter or USBee AX Pro logic analyzer, and added support for several logic analyzers, oscilloscopes, multimeters, programmable power supplies, an electronic load, an LCR meter, a scale, and one BeagleBone Black cape, namely BayLibre ACME.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

The ACME initiative was launched in order to get rid of the limitations of proprietary solutions, and provide an open source hardware and software multi-channel power and temperature measurements solution to the community.

BayLibre ACME cape supports up to 8 probes to measure VBUS (0 to +36V), VSHUNT ( 2.5uV up to 81.92mV), CURRENT AND POWER. Three current / power probes have been developed with all featuring TI INA226 for the ADC conversion:

  • ACME HE10 Power Probe
    • 6-pin HE10 header with up to 6A max current, 13mΩ contact resistance
    • 3 possible current ranges:
      • 0.005Ω for 1.5A < Current < 10A
      • 0.05Ω for 150mA < Current < 1.5A
      • 0.5Ω for 0 < Current < 150mA
  • USB Power Probe
    • Power Control – Power switching capability  through TPS22929
    • High precision resistor – 0.08Ω for Current up to 1A
  • Jack Power Probe
    • Power Control – Power switching capability  through TPS22929; 6A current limitation;20.5V transil for voltage protection
    • High precision resistor – 0.01Ω for Current up to 6A

There’s no much details about the temperature probe except it’s based on Texas Instruments TMP435 temperature sensor.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

A custom Buildroot BBB Linux distribution is available with upstream ACME HW drivers, Sigrok software Suite, and low-level hardware interface interface. You can check the measured data on the command line, or a graphical user interface (PulseView) via HDMI or vncviewer. The solution also works with Xoscope digital oscilloscope application. You can find more technical details on BayLibre ACME Wiki and Sigrok Wiki.

ACME cape and the probes are said to be available now, but for some reasons you need to contact them via the form at the end of BayLibre ACME page in order to purchase them.

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NayuOS is a Developer Friendly Chromium OS Fork without Google Services

February 1st, 2016 4 comments

People at Nexedi, an European based open-source software publisher, are doing a lot of development work on Chromebooks, but with Chrome OS, all your data is kept on Google servers when you login, and by default the OS basically runs Chrome browser with barely any development tools. So the company leveraged Chromium OS, the open source version of Chrome OS, to create their own operating system, called NayuOS, that does not run any proprietary software, does without Google servers, and comes with git, nmp and other developer tools by default.

NayuOS_Nayu_OSThe operating system should also provide a better Chromebook experience in China, thanks to the company’s re6stnet app and GrandeNet system allowing to have IPv6 available even when ISPs only provide IPv4, and to work around the unreliable Internet infrastructure in China.

The source code and instructions to build an image yourself are available, but the company also released binary images for several Chromebooks including Dell Chromebook 13, Acer C720 Chromebook, Toshiba Chromebook 2, Chromebook Pixel 2015, and more.

You can find all details on NayuOS website, as well as on the introduction page on Nexedi.

Via Liliputing and HackerNews

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OpenAMP Open Source Framework Provides the Glue between Linux, RTOS, and Bare Metal Apps in Heterogeneous SoCs

January 27th, 2016 No comments

SoCs becoming more complex, and go beyond homogeneous multicore systems by mixing different type of cores such as high performance cores, low power real-time cores, or even FPGA fabric. Examples include NXP i.MX6 SoloX with an ARM Cortex A9 core for Linux apps, and an ARM Cortex M4 core for real-time tasks, or Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC with Cortex A53 core for higher level apps, Cortex R5 cores for real-time processing, and Ultrascale FPGA logic. All these different cores are running their own Linux based OS, real-time operating system or bare metal application, and all this makes software development an even greater difficult tasks. In order to reduce the complexity, and address some of the issues, the Multicore Association has launched a new working group targeting the management, expansion, and standardization of  OpenAMP (Open Asymmetric Multi Processing), an open source framework that allows operating systems to interact within a broad range of complex homogeneous and heterogeneous architectures and allows asymmetric multiprocessing applications to leverage parallelism offered by the multicore configuration”.

OpenAMP_ArchitectureKey features and benefits of OpenAMP listed by the association:

  • Configure, deploy, and manage multiple OS’s across homogeneous and heterogeneous cores
  • Availability of open source Linux implementations and proprietary RTOS and bare metal implementations
  • Android OS compatibility
  • Inter-OS & inter-processor communication
  • Shared memory protocol – Virtio/rpmsg
  • Lifecycle APIs – remoteproc
  • Proxy technologies emulate Linux processes
  • Compatibility with MCAPI to support high-performance use cases and zero-copy
  • Standardizes OS interaction between Linux and RTOS/bare-metal

Some RTOS support has already been implemented by FreeRTOS, Mentor, Micrium, NXP, Xilinx, and an open source implementation, as well as corresponding documentation, can be found on OpenAMP github repository.You can find out more on OpenAMP page, the mailing list, and the first 2-hour developer meeting that will take place later today (January 27, 2016) at 9:00 pm Pacific Standard Time, and go through OpenAMP governance, the working group goals, current OpenAMP capabilities, and issues, as well as time for an open discussion on architectural proposals.

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Rhombus Tech 15.6″ Libre Laptop is User-Upgradeable with EOMA68 CPU Cards

January 26th, 2016 7 comments

When the first Raspberry Pi model launched, there was just not enough boards to fill the demand, and as people kept waiting they were also investigating alternatives, and a growing community worked on Allwinner based platforms. At the time (2012), the main hardware project  was EOMA68 CPU card using a PCMCIA connector, with ended up inside Improv development board, and aimed at providing user replaceable and upgradeable CPU cards. Sadly the initiative got some issues, and things did not quite work out as expected, but the person who launched the whole project, Luke Kenneth Casson Leighton (LKCL), did not give up on the idea, and has kept on working on EOMA68 standard with CPU cards from Allwinner and other SoC vendors. Recently, he’s been working on a Libre Laptop based on an Allwinner A20 EOMA68 CPU module, and will showcase the prototype at FOSDEM 2016 in Brussels this coming week-end.

Partially Assembled Libre Laptop

Partially Assembled Libre Laptop

Key (preliminary) hardware features of the laptop:

  • User-upgradeable EOMA68 CPU Card (currently based on Allwinner A20)
  • Storage – microSD card slot
  • Display
    • 15.6″ 1366×768 LCD
    • 4.3″ capacitive touch panel with backlit LCD used as a trackpad
  • Keyboard – Full-sized Chicony OEM keyboard with number pad
  • USB – 1x external full-sized USB Port, 2x internal full-sized USB Ports (for WiFi, 3G, Bluetooth, Storage…)
  • Battery – 10000mAh battery providing 6 to 8 hours of battery power (For some reasons, that’s an e-Bike battery)
EOMA68 CPU Card

EOMA68 CPU Card

The Libre laptop will run (mostly) open source software, hence the name, and the prototype has already been shown to boot Linux. If you want to learn more about the design, Luke go through some of the 25 3D printed pieces required, and explains some of the issues he had to solve in the video below. The laptop panels will be made of Bamboo apparently…

You can follow the progress of the project on Rhombus Tech Laptop 15″ news page, as well as on ARM Netbooks mailing list.

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Autonomous Deep Learning Robot Features Nvidia Jetson TK1 Board, a 3D Camera, and More

January 25th, 2016 No comments

Autonomous, a US company that makes smart products such as smart desks, virtual reality kits and autonomous robots, has recently introduced a deep learning robot that comes with a 3D camera, speaker and microphone, Jetson TK1 board, and a mobile base.

Autonomous_Deep_Learning_Robot

The robot appears to be mostly made of the shelves parts:

  • 3D Depth camera – Asus Xtion Pro 3D Depth Camera
  • Speaker & Microphone
  • Nvidia Jetson TK1 PM375 board – Nvidia Terra K1 quad-core Cortex A15 processor @ 2.3 GHz with a 192-core Kepler GPU, 2GB RAM, 16 GB flash
  • Kobuki Mobile Base –  Kobuki is the best mobile base designed for education and research on state of the art robotics. Kobuki provides power supplies for external computer power as well as additional sensors and actuators. Its highly accurate odometry, amended by calibrated gyroscope, enables precise navigation.

The robot is designed for research in deep learning and mobile robotics, and comes with Ubuntu, Caffe, Torch, Theano, cuDNN v2, and CUDA 7.0, as Robot Operating System (ROS) set of open source software libraries and tools.

Kobuki Base

Kobuki Base

While there’s virtually no documentation at all on the product page, I’ve been told that the robot was built on top of TurtleBot open source robot, and re-directed to tutorials available via TurtleBot Wiki, as well useful resources for deep learnings frameworks such as Caffe and Torch, and Google TensorFlow Tutorials.

Autonomous Deep Learning Robot sells for $999 with manual charging, or $1048 with a self-charging dock.

Thanks to Nanik for the tip!

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AsteroidOS is an Open Source Operating System for Your Android (Wear) Smartwatch

January 17th, 2016 3 comments

If you own an Android or Android Wear smartwatch, but would like more control over its functionality or simply prefer a truly open source operating systems for your watch, AsteroidOS could be the answer. Like alternative mobile operating systems such as Sailfish OS or Ubuntu Touch, AsteroidOS leverages existing Android drivers via libhybris library, and the user interface relies on Qt5 and QML running on top of OpenEmbedded, while Bluetooth is handled by BlueZ 5 library.

AsteroidOSThere’s no company behind the project, and it is purely community driven. Currently only the LG G watch is supported, and you can give AsteroidOS a try by following the instructions. The Wiki provides information about the boot process, how to build the OS, creating an Qt5/QML app. etc.. and also explains how to port AsteroidOS to other watches, so if the project gets traction more devices will be supported.

Graphics Stack Architecture in AsteroidOS

Graphics Stack Architecture in AsteroidOS

There are several ways to get involved with the project:

  • Porting AsteroidOS to another smartwatch
  • Developing AsteroidOS by creating Qt5/QML Asteroid apps , and/or packaging or maintaining software and libraries in OpenEmbedded.
  • Testing AsteroidOS
  • Translating AsteroidOS to more languages
  • Documenting AsteroidOS by maintaining the Wiki

Beside Github, you can also contact the developer and community on #asteroid IRC channel.

You can find all details on Asteroidos.org, and the project leader will present AsteroidOS at FOSDEM 2016 at the end of the month.

If you are interested in open source project for smartwatches, you may also consider checking out the open Source sport/smart watch project that runs on the lower end Weloop Tommy, and may run on SMA-Q watch later. as well as Fernly a reverse-engineered operating systems for MediaTek MT626x wearables.

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