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Posts Tagged ‘openwrt’

Mixtile LOFT-Q Allwinner A31 Board with SATA Can Now be Purchased for $90

March 4th, 2015 8 comments

Mixtile LOFT-Q and LOFT Kit were unveiled nearly a year ago, the first being a development board based on Allwinner A31 processor with 2GB RAM, 16GB RAM,  SATA connector, Gigabit Ethernet, etc.., while the second is a kit with an enclosure and power supply. The kit does not appear to be available yet, but the board has recently been listed on SeeedStudio for $90.

Mixtile_LOFT-Q

Mixtile LOFT-Q specifications:

  • SoC – Allwinner A31 quad core ARM Cortex-A7 processor with PowerVR SGX544 MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC, SATA III connector for 2.5″ drives, and SD card Slot
  • Video Output – HDMI 1.4 up to 1080p60
  • Video Decoding – H.264 4Kx2K video decoding, multi-format FHD video decoding, including Mpeg1/2, Mpeg4 SP/ASP GMC, H.263, H.264,etc
  • Audio I/O – HDMI, 1 S/PDIF, high definition microphone
  • Camera I/F
    • Integrated Parallel & MIPI I/F sensor
    • Integrated powerful ISP, supporting Raw Data CMOS sensor
    • Supports 5M/8M/12M CMOS sensor
    • Supports 8/10/12-bit YUV/Bayer sensor
  • Connectivity – 10/100/1000M Ethernet, dual band WiFi 802.11 a/g/n + Bluetooth 4.0 (AP6234), and Zigbee (NXP JNS168)
  • USB – 4x USB 2.0 host post
  • Debugging – UART debug connector, JTAG connector
  • Expansion header – 180-pin header with access to I2C, SPI, LCD, MIPI DSI, RGB/LVDS, CSI, MIPI CSI, ADC, CTP, RTP, SPDIF-OUT, SPDIF-IN, GPIO, etc…
  • Sensor – Acceleration sensor, IR receiver
  • Misc- Battery slot for RTC
  • Power – 12V/4A (48W)
  • Dimensions – N/A
Mixtile_LOFT-Q_SATA_USB_Dongles

SATA Connector and Wireless Dongles? are on the Back of Mixtile Board

You won’t find many details on Mixtile Hardare page, but there’s some recently updated documentation and software on Mixtile github account, with various repositories for documentation with a getting started guide, linux and u-boot source code, development tools, and BSPs for Android 4.4.2, Ubuntu Touch, and OpenWRT. What I failed to find however is a clear graphical description of the board and connectors.

Thanks to Embedded_Geek for the tip.
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Gateworks GW5520 Single Board Computer Features Dual Gigabit Ethernet Ports, Two mini PCIe Slots

February 4th, 2015 6 comments

If you need industrial grade ARM Linux boards with lots of Ethernet ports and several mini PCIe slots, you may want to check out Gateworks Ventana boards. The company has now released a smaller member of Ventana family with GW5520 SBC powered by Freescale i.MX6 dual, with two Gigabit Ethernet port, two mini PCIe slots, and support for PoE.

Ventana_GW5520_BoardGateworks Ventana GW5520 SBC specifications:

  • SoC- Freescale i.MX6 Dual Cortex A9 processor @ 800MHz with Vivante Vivante GC2000 / GC355 / GC320 GPUs. Option: i.MX6 Quad
  • System Memory – 512 MB DDR3-800 SDRAM (Up to 2GB RAM as option)
  • Storage – 256 MB Flash (Up to 2GB as option), serial configuration EEPROM
  • Video and Audio Output – HDMI 1.4
  • Connectivity – 2x Gigabit Ethernet ports.
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports
  • Expansion
    • 2x Mini-PCIe sockets
    • Optional mini-PCIe socket to supports a mSATA disk drive (i.MX6 Quad only)
    •  I/Os
      • Serial – CAN Bus 2.0B up to 1Mbps, 3x TTL serial ports
      • 4x GPIOs
  • Misc – RTC with battery backup,  voltage & temperature monitor, watchdog timer
  • Power Supply – 8 to 60V DC input voltage; Power via barrel or passive PoE Ethernet; reverse voltage and transient protection
  • Power consumption –  3W @ 25 C (Typical); 16W shared between mini PCIe slots
  • Dimensions – 100 x 70 x 21 mm
  • Operating Temperature – -40 to +85C

The company claims a 81.9 years MTBF at 55°C, but I’m not quite sure how this is computed… OpenWRT, OpenEmbedded Yocto, and Android BSPs are available for the board.. It’s also supported in mainline kernel since Linux 3.18 release. Documentation is available on Ventana boards Wiki.

Based on the block diagram below, they don’t use the GMAC inside i.MX6, and instead connected an external Gigabit Ethernet via PCIe, so they should not be subject to the 470 Mbps known limitation for Gigabit Ethernet on i.MX6 processor. [Update: The company confirmed that, and they measured 940 Mbps on their Ethernet ports]

Ventana GW5520 Block Diagram

Ventana GW5520 Block Diagram

Gateworks also offers  GW5520 Development Kit which includes GW5520 network computer, U-Boot bootloader, OpenWRT Linux Board Support Package, Ethernet, serial, USB, audio and video cables, as well as a passive PoE power injector and a 24V power supply, and a JTAG Programmer.The network board appears to be available now selling for about $400 on Avnet, while the development kit goes for around $500. You can visit Gateworks GW5520 product page for details, including download links to the datasheet and user’s manual.

[Update: I’ve also been informed about GW5510 based on i.MX6 Solo, but smaller (35x70mm), without Ethernet port (a mini PCIe card can be used to add Wi-Fi), and both HDMI in and out.[

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TCL T1 (SL-WR5028J) is a $46 Wi-Fi Router with a 2.5″ SATA Bay

January 28th, 2015 9 comments

Many routers now come with one or more USB ports to let you connect 3G dongles or/and storage device(s) to share the data on your local network. If you want to go with a fully integrated solution, and obvious solution is to go with a NAS, but these usually cost a bit more, so instead TCL SL-WR5028J (aka TCl T1) router could make a low cost (and low performance) NAS alternative thanks to its internal 2.5″ SATA bay, and it can be had for just $45.99 on DealExtreme.

TCL_T1TCL T1 specifications:

  • SoC – Mediatek MT7260 MIPS WiSoC @ 580MHz
  • System Memory – 64MB DDR2
  • Storage – 8MB Flash for firmware + SATA bay for 2.5″ HDD (5, 7.5 or 9mm thick hard drives are supported). Max capacity: unlimited… :)
  • Connectivity
    • 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi up to 300 Mbps with two external antennas
    • WAN – 10/100M Ethernet port
    • LAN – 2x 10/100M Ethernet port
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 host port
  • Power – 9V/1A
  • Dimensions – 240 x 159 x 45 mm
  • Weight – N/A

The router comes with a power adapter, and a user’s manual in English. The user interface is said to be in English too.

TCL_T1_SATA_Bay

In order to insert the hard drive you just need to lift the top cover, and slide it in there.

Mediatek MT7620 is probably part of the reason for the low cost, but unfortunately it’s also why there’s no Gigabit Ethernet, and for a NAS it can be a serious limitation depending on how many people access the data at the same time, and the type of data. The SoC also supports OpenWRT, so it might be possible to hack the router too, and SATA should not be a problem, since it can only be achieved via a USB to SATA bridge [Update: It’s not clear whether MT7620N or MT7620A is used here, and the latter has a PCIe port too]. Strangely, I can’t find any information about TCL T1 anywhere else on the web.

Thank you onebir! (Which reminds it’s beer time too…).

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Categories: Hardware, Linux, Mediatek Wi-Fi Tags: nas, openwrt, router, tcl

Black Swift is a Tiny OpenWRT Wi-Fi Board Powered by Atheros AR9331 (Crowdfunding)

January 28th, 2015 7 comments

In case you thought there were not enough Wi-Fi board in the market already, here’s another one with Black Swift. The board runs OpenWRT, is a little larger than Vocore, and quite smaller than WRTnode, is powered by Atheros AR9331, provides access to I/Os via headers, and comes with two micro USB ports which should make it easy to use, and allow some interesting applications with USB devices.

Black_SwiftBlack Swift specifications:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Atheros AR9331 32-bit MIPS 24K CPU core @ 400 MHz, or 200 MHz in energy-saving mode selectable by software
  • System Memory – 64 MB DDR2 SDRAM
  • Storage – 16 MB NOR flash
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi (1×1, up to 150 Mbps) with PCB antenna
  • USB –  1 x microUSB for power, 1x microUSB 2.0 port
  • Expansion –  Headers for 26x GPIO, 2x Fast Ethernet, SPI, I²C, 1x 16550 UART, 1x USB 2.0
  • Misc – Factory reset button
  • Power Supply
    • 5 V (with full USB support), 3.3 V (w/o USB power), 3.4…6 V (using onboard voltage regulator, w/o USB power)
    • Integrated voltage regulators: 3.3 V (switching mode, 1 A max, at least 700 mA available for powering external devices), 2.75 V (linear LDO, 300 mA max)
  • Power consumption: 120 mA typical (400 MHz CPU frequency, Wi-Fi enabled), 60 mA in energy-saving mode (200 MHz, Wi-Fi disabled), 300 mA max
  • I/O Voltage / Current – 3.3 V max (5V non-tolerant), maximum load 24 mA
  • Dimensions – 25x35x4 mm
  • Weight – 3 g

Black_Swift_Pinout

The board runs OpenWRT 14.07 Barrier Breaker, and will allegedly be open source hardware with schematics, Gerber files, and BoM released once development is complete. The company will also release OpenWRT patchsets, and utilities they developed for the board.

Black_Swift_Electricty_MeterThey also have developers three projects to showcase their board capabilities:

  • A network music player with a Sound Blaster audio card connected to the USB port via a USB OTG adapter, which can be controlled with MPDroid on Android, QMPDClient on PC, or other MPD compliant clients.
  • A Christmas tree lights controller. A little out of season, but it shows the GPIO capabilities of the board with several Betlux’s BL-FL7600 ultrabright LEDs, and a L293 quadruple H-bridge driver.
  • An electricity meter (pictured on the right) to show a more professional use of the board.  Power measurement is done via  Analog Devices ADE7757 chip with frequency output.

You can have a look at these demos, right after the product introduction in the video below.

https://d2pq0u4uni88oo.cloudfront.net/projects/1609299/video-490528-h264_base.mp4

The project is on Kickstarter trying to raise $33,000 NZD (about $24,700 US) to fund mass production. There are three version of the board / kits available:

  • Black Swift Basic – $35 NZD pledge (~$26 US)
  • Black Swift PRO with on-board USB-UART adapter, and an extra baseboard (1.27mm to 2.54 mm header adapter) – $42 NZD pledge (~$34 US)
Black Swift PRO

Black Swift PRO Connected to a Relay

Perks all include shipping worldwide, and delivery is scheduled for June 2015. You can also visit Black Swift website and its Wiki for a few more details.

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Vonets VM300 Wi-Fi & Ethernet IoT Board with Mediatek MT7620 Runs OpenWRT

January 23rd, 2015 2 comments

Mediatek MT760 is a recent Wi-Fi SoC found in some Nexx WT3020 routers, and WRTnode development board. Both run OpenWRT and costs $17 to $30 depending on the amount of flash, and ports with the former featuring two Ethernet ports, and the latter access to GPIOs. You could probably open the case of the Nexx routers and solder some wires to get access to GPIO, and you can hack an Ethernet cable for WRTnode, but another options could be Vonets WM300 kit that includes a board with Wi-Fi and Ethernet, a cable for USB / Ethernet connection, headers for GPIOs, and two external antennas for less than $30. An OpenWRT SDK is also provided for the kit.

Vonets_VM300Specifications listed for VM300 board:

  • Processor – Mediatek MT7260N MIPS processor @ 580MHz
  • Storage – 4MB SPI Flash (option: 8MB/16MB) for firmware
  • System Memory – 32MB or 64MB SDRAM
  • Connectivity
    • Wi-Fi
      • Single band 802.11 b/g/n 2T2R up to 300 Mbps with two external 2dB antenna.
      • Output power: 15dbm – 16.5dbm
      • Supports 1-14 Wi-Fi channels
      • Working modes – Routing, Bridge (also support AP Client and AP Station), Repeater
    • 10/100M Ethernet
    • 3G/4G supported via USB dongle (no USB port, but signal are available on headers)
    • Functions – Firewall, QoS, VPN
  • Expansion – Mini PCIe, 2x 6-pin and 8-pin headers with access to Ethernet signals, UART, USB host, 2x GPIO, reset signal, status signals
  • Power Supply – 3.3V – 3.4V DC, or 4.5V – 15V DC; Consumption:  <2W
  • Dimensions – 51 x 30 mm
  • Weight – 86g
  • Temperature Range – -25°C – 55°C (operating)

Vonets_VM300_Development_BoardThe mini PCIe connector is probably not following any standard, and can be use in case you make some baseboard for the module. You can find the pinout and a little more in WM300 datasheet. The quick start guide shows the board is not running OpenWRT by default, but you can download the OpenWRT SDK and instructions.

Vonets WM300 can be purchased on several sites including DealExtreme, Aliexpress or Ebay for $25 and up. The only problem is that everybody has just copied and pasted the specs showing 32 or 64MB RAM, and 4 and 8MB Flash, so you don’t know exactly what you are buying, and this could be an issue if you want to run OpenWRT as 64MB SDRAM and 8MB flash are required according to the company. Visit Vonets VM300 product page for details.

Thanks to Onebir for the tip.

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Zero+ IoT Wi-Fi Board is Programmable with Lisp (Crowdfunding)

October 29th, 2014 2 comments

There have been so many low cost Wi-Fi modules and boards with GPIO headers announced this year, especially on crowdfunding sites, and from the hardware point of view, Zero+ (Zero Plus) board looks very much like many other Ralink RT5350 boards such as Vocore or AsiaRF AWM002, but what makes it different is that it can be programmed with Lisp from a web-based IDE.

Zero_Plus_Lisp

But let’s go through Zero+ board specifications first:

  • SoC – Ralink/Mediatek RT5350 MIPS processor @ 360MHz with dual band 802.11n Wi-Fi with data Rate up to 150Mbps
  • System Memory – 32 MB RAM
  • Storage – 8MB to 16 MB SPI Flash (for firmware)
  • Expansions Headers – 2x headers with access to I2C, SPI, USB, 2x UART,  JTAG, and 14x GPIOs
  • USB – 1x USB host port, 1x micro USB for power
  • Misc – 2x buttons
  • Dimensions – 36 x 25mm (possibly module dimensions only, not full board).

I’m quite confident the hardware should be OK, as they are using an existing Wi-Fi module (WL-AM01-5350-V1.2) soldered to a baseboard with USB ports, buttons, and expansion headers.

But as mentioned in the introduction, the interesting part is that it can be programmed and debugged from a WebIDE or a Cloud service using a Lisp programming language called Lambda, and there’s no need to build the code, or load the firmware as the Lisp interpreter will handle your project, a bit like if your programmed with Python or JavaScript.

Preliminary Zero+ WebIDE (Click to Enlarge)

Preliminary Zero+ WebIDE (Click to Enlarge)

The board is also a standard router running OpenWRT, so you should also be able to access it, and configure it in a more usual way if you prefer.

SmartMatrix, the company behind the project, is also providing ChipDuino, a tiny Arduino board supporting DIP MCU, to add more I/Os to Zero+, and support for a variety of sensors such as a VGA webcam, temperature and humidity sensors, light sensors, LEDs, gyroscopes, TFT and OLED screens, a PM 2.5 air quality detector, an infrared module and a microphone.

Zero+ board is shown in a few projects including an air cleaner, an electronic lock, and another project where it interfaces with Espruino JavaScript board.

In order to mass manufacture the board, the company has launched a flexible funding Indiegogo campaign planning to raise $25,000 or more. An early bird pledge of $19 can get you a Zero+ board, and after the first 100 boards, pledge will be $25. Many of the perks are kits going from $39 to $69 with sensors, a camera, an LCD display, etc… Albeit, no explicitly written, international shipping is probably included in all perks, and delivery is scheduled for February 2015.

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Freescale LS1021A-IOTA IoT Gateway Reference Design Powered by QorIQ LS1021A Dual ARM Cortex A7 SoC

October 6th, 2014 3 comments

Freescale has just launched a an IoT gateway reference design powered by their QorIQ LS1021A communication processors running Linux/OpenWRT, designed in partnership with TechNexion, and targeting various IoT applications such as building/home management, smart cities, networked industrial services, etc… Beside the dual core Cortex A7 QoirIQ processor, the board features six Gigabit Ethernet ports, two USB 3.0 ports, a SATA 3 port, two mini PCIe connector, an LVDS interface, HDMI output, Arduino UNO compatible headers, and various others expansions headers.

IoT Gateway Reference Design Board (Click to Enlarge)

IoT Gateway Reference Design Board (Click to Enlarge)

LS1021A-IOTA IoT gateway Specifications:

LS1021A IoT Gateway Enclosure (Click to Enlarge)

LS1021A IoT Gateway Enclosure (Click to Enlarge)

  • SoC – Freescale QorIQ LS1021A dual core Cortex A7 communication processor @ 1 GHz (5,000 coremarks)
  • MCU – Freescale Kinetis K20 Cortex M micro-controller
  • System Memory – 1 GB DDR3L
  • Storage – 1 Gb QSPI NOR Flash, SDHC slot (up to 32 GB) populated with a 4GB SD card, 1x mSATA 3 slot
  • Connectivity – 6x Gigabit ports via SGMII (Serial Gigabit Media Independent Interface) and RGMII (Reduced Gigabit Media Independent Interface) interfaces
  • Display I/F
    • 24-bit LVDS LCD interface muxed with QE UART (QUICCEngine UART) to header for PROFIBUS or RS485 (external transceiver required)
    • HDMI connector
  • Audio I/F – Audio in and out
  • USB – 2x USB 3.0 ports, 1x USB 2 mini port, and USB signals via mini PCIe interfaces
  • Expansions and I/Os:
    • Arduino UNO compatible headers with I2C, SPI, Analog in, etc..
    • 1x Terminal (USB to UART)
    • Header with 1x Four wire LP-UART to Arduino connector (ZigBee), SPI, and ADC
    • GPIO expansion header
    • GPIO, Flextimer, and CAN header
    • 2x mini PCIe (x1) slots
    • 6x Interrupts
    • 1x SPI, 2x I2C
    • 13x GPIO or 8x FTM (PWM)
  • Sensors – MMA8451Q 3-axis MEMS sensor
  • Certification – FCC Class B and CE
  • Power Supply – 12V. MC32VR500 regulator. Under 3 watts typical power consumption.
  • Dimensions – 20.3 x 17.8 x 6.4 cm (full system with enclosure)

The full kit include the board, a metallic enclosure, a 12V/5A power supply, a micro USB cable, and HDMI cables, and SD card with software and documentation. The company provide Linux and OpenWRT for the board, reference design files (schematics, layout, and BOM), as well as an hardware quick start guide and a user guide.

IoT Gateway Block Diagram

LSIoT Gateway Block Diagram

The reference design is “production ready” so that OEMs can bring products based on this design faster market, and a lesser load on their R&D teams. Freescale’s QorIQ LS1021A IoT gateway is available for order from Freescale for $429 (USD). Further details are available on LS1012A-IoT product page, including a video with an overview of the kit with a better look at the various ports, and a demo using MQTT protocol with two Freescale Freedom boards, and uploading data to IBM Cloud services. It also shows how the gateway is programmed with Node-RED JavaScript graphical environment.

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Getting Started with WRTnode OpenWRT Development Board

September 18th, 2014 1 comment

Seeed Studio sent me two nice little boards that can be used for IoT development: WRTNode and LinkIt ONE. Today, I’ll show pictures of WRTNode and accessories, and go through the “starting guide“, and will test LinkIt ONE board a few days later.

WRTnode Unboxing

I’ve received WRTnode by Fedex, and the board is stored in a plastic box.
WRTnode_Package
Inside the box, you’ll find the board, a “special” USB used to power the board and as an OTG adapter, a piece of paper with useful links (Wiki), and some WRTnode stickers.

WRTnode, "special" USB cable, and Quick Start Card (Click to Enlarge)

WRTnode, “special” USB cable, and Quick Start Card (Click to Enlarge)

Any micro USB to USB cable can be used to power the board, but this cable is useless to connect USB devices such as flash drives, webcams (OpenCV is supported), Bluetooth dongles, and so on. You could even connect a USB hub to connect multiple USB devices as shown below.

WRTnode_Webcam_Flash_Drive_USB_Hub

I’ve also taken a picture of both sides of the board shown the antenna on-board antennas, Mediatek MT7620n WiSoC, Elixir N2TU51216DG-AC DDR2 chip (64MB @ 400 MHz), the 16 MB SPI flash, as well as the headers for connecting various peripherals via I2C, SPI, UART, USB, etc…

WRTnode Board (Click to Enlarge)

WRTnode Board (Click to Enlarge)

You can also add Ethernet easily by making your own Ethernet cable using T568B wiring standard. I’m not 100% sure it’s safe though, as there are usually some extra components for Ethernet. I’ve included the board pinout chart for your reference.

WRTnode_pinout

WRTnode Quick Start Guide

To start the board simply connect the USB cable to a power adapter or a USB port on your computer. After about 10 seconds, you should see a blue LED lit up, and shortly after, you should see WRTnodeXXXX ESSID, where XXXX are the last 4 digit of the board MAC address. Connect it with your computer, and input the password: 12345678.
WRTNode_Access_PointNormally the board will resolve as several URL, but at first none of them worked.

$ ping i.wrtno.de
ping: unknown host i.wrtno.de
$ ping openwrt.lan
ping: unknown host openwrt.lan
$ ping wrtnode.lan
ping: unknown host wrtnode.lan

But you can check the route to see which subnet is used by your Wi-Fi connection:

$ route
Kernel IP routing table
Destination Gateway Genmask Flags Metric Ref Use Iface
default 192.168.0.1 0.0.0.0 UG 0 0 0 eth0
192.168.0.0 * 255.255.255.0 U 1 0 0 eth0
192.168.8.0 * 255.255.255.0 U 9 0 0 wlan0

I could finally ping the board with:

$ ping 192.168.8.1
PING 192.168.8.1 (192.168.8.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 192.168.8.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=12.4 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.8.1: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=2.37 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.8.1: icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=12.1 ms

Interestingly, ping openwrt.lan, and the other two URL also work afterwards, so maybe I was a little to impatient during my testing…

The first time you need to connect to the board via telnet in order to set the root password:

$ telnet 192.168.8.1

WRTNode_Telnet

Now change the root password using passwd as you would do in any other Linux machine, and exit the connection, in order to connect via SSH instead:

$ ssh [email protected]
The authenticity of host '192.168.8.1 (192.168.8.1)' can't be established.
RSA key fingerprint is bc:00:71:ac:b1:56:e7:7b:c7:7a:9b:6a:59:8e:da:82.
Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no)? yes
Warning: Permanently added '192.168.8.1' (RSA) to the list of known hosts.
[email protected]'s password:
BusyBox v1.22.1 (2014-08-13 19:31:12 UTC) built-in shell (ash)
.....
root@OpenWrt:~#

At this point, you’ve got another Wi-Fi access point on your network, but it’s not connected to Internet, so let’s start by locating the Wi-Fi routers with aps command:

root@OpenWrt:~# aps
WRTnode AP scaner.
Begin scaning APs, pls wait...
Finished.
APs available are...
ra0 get_site_survey:
Ch SSID BSSID Security Siganl(%)W-Mode ExtCH NT WPS DPID
1 CNX-TRANSLATION 94:0c:6d:e6:5b:10 WPA1PSKWPA2PSK/TKIPAES 100 11b/g/n ABOVE In YES

I only have one ESSID here, but this will list all ESSID in your environment. With that data, you can configure WRTnode to connect to your Wi-Fi router using vw command (vi wireless?):

root@OpenWrt:~# vw
config wifi-device 'ra0'
 option type 'ralink'
 option mode '9'
 option channel '1'
 option txpower '100'
 option ht '20+40'
 option country 'US'
 option disabled '0'
config wifi-iface
 option device 'ra0'
 option network 'lan'
 option mode 'ap'
 option encryption 'psk2'
 option key '12345678'
 option ApCliEnable '1'
 option ApCliSsid 'CNX-TRANSLATION'
 option ApCliAuthMode 'WPA2PSK'
 option ApCliEncrypType 'AES'
 option ApCliPassWord 'router_password'
 option ssid 'WRTnode9A60'

You need to change the lines in bold above using the data from aps. The first line is the Channel (Ch) , and the four lines in the wifi-iface section are pretty much self-explanatory. Save the file with Esc + “:wq”.

aps and vw do not report security features in the same way. Here’s the conversion table in case you don’t use WPA2PSK/AES:

aps:Security           vw:ApCliAuthMode/ApCliEncrypType
=========================================================
WPA1PSKWPA2PSK/TKIPAES	WPA2PSK/AES
WPA2PSK/AES		WPA2PSK/AES
WPA2PSK/TKIP		WPA2PSK/TKIP
WPAPSK/TKIPAES		WPAPSK/TKIP
WPAPSK/AES		WPAPSK/AES
WPAPSK/TKIP		WPAPSK/TKIP
WEP			WEP/WEP

Finally, restart the network:

root@OpenWrt:~# nr

and verify WRTnode got an IP address from the Wi-Fi router using DHCP:

root@OpenWrt:~# ia
apcli0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 66:51:7E:32:9A:60
inet addr:192.168.0.105 Bcast:192.168.0.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
inet6 addr: fe80::6451:7eff:fe32:9a60/64 Scope:Link
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:0 (0.0 B) TX bytes:0 (0.0 B)

Good 192.168.0.105 is an IP adress from local network. Let’s also check we can ping a site on the Internet:

root@OpenWrt:~# ping cnx-software.com
PING cnx-software.com (104.28.18.95): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 104.28.18.95: seq=0 ttl=53 time=81.999 ms
64 bytes from 104.28.18.95: seq=1 ttl=53 time=87.759 ms
64 bytes from 104.28.18.95: seq=2 ttl=53 time=81.381 ms
^C
--- cnx-software.com ping statistics ---
3 packets transmitted, 3 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max = 81.381/83.713/87.759 ms

All good!

Once I had a problem connecting to my Wi-Fi router, and it turned out my router was configured to automatically select the channel, and it had switched to Channel 4. Running vw again to change the configuration withoption channel ‘4’” made the connection work again. There’s probably an option in OpenWRT to automatically detect the channel, but I haven’t investigated.

You can also install packages for okpg. I tried to install luci, but it was pre-installed, so I added openvpn support instead:

root@OpenWrt:~# opkg update
Downloading http://d.wrtnode.com/packages/Packages.gz.
Updated list of available packages in /var/opkg-lists/barrier_breaker.
root@OpenWrt:~# opkg install luci
Package luci (svn-r10457-1) installed in root is up to date.
root@OpenWrt:~# opkg install openvpn-easy-rsa
Installing openvpn-easy-rsa (2013-01-30-2) to root...
Downloading http://d.wrtnode.com/packages/openvpn-easy-rsa_2013-01-30-2_ramips_24kec.ipk.
Installing openssl-util (1.0.1h-1) to root...
Downloading http://d.wrtnode.com/packages/openssl-util_1.0.1h-1_ramips_24kec.ipk.
Configuring openssl-util.
Configuring openvpn-easy-rsa.
root@OpenWrt:~#

That’s it the quick start guide is completed.

I’ve also run some command to show memory and storage usage:

root@OpenWrt:~# df -h
Filesystem Size Used Available Use% Mounted on
rootfs 7.3M 348.0K 7.0M 5% /
/dev/root 7.5M 7.5M 0 100% /rom
tmpfs 30.2M 80.0K 30.1M 0% /tmp
/dev/mtdblock5 7.3M 348.0K 7.0M 5% /overlay
overlayfs:/overlay 7.3M 348.0K 7.0M 5% /
tmpfs 512.0K 0 512.0K 0% /dev

root@OpenWrt:~# free -m
total used free shared buffers
Mem: 61852 29084 32768 0 3536
-/+ buffers: 25548 36304
Swap: 0 0 0

Out of the 16Mb SPI flash, only 7.3M available are available for OpenWRT, the  rest is probably used by the bootloader. There’s nearly 64MB RAM available, and 29MB free.

If you are interested in the board, you can purchase it from Seeed Studio ($25), which provided the board for this review, but it’s also available on other shops such as DFRobot or Eleduino for the same price, although shipping fees may vary. To go beyond this Quick Start Guide, visit WRTnode WiKi to access the source code, schematics, and various documentation including tutorials.

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