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Posts Tagged ‘openwrt’

New FCC Rules May Prevent Installing OpenWRT on WiFi Routers

July 27th, 2015 24 comments

Many cheap WiFi routers are sold with the vendor firmware, but the most popular ones likely also support OpenWRT, which some users may prefer as it is much more customizable. However, this may soon become more difficult according to a talk at the upcoming “Wireless Battle of the Mesh” which will take place on August 3-8 in Maribor, Slovenia.

tp-link_no_openwrtThe talk scheduled for August 6 at 15:00 is entitled “openWRT vs. FCC – forced firmware lockdown?” and Simon Wunderlich, the speaker, provided the following abstract:

The new FCC rules are in effect in the United States from June 2nd 2015 for WiFi devices such as Access Points. They require to have the firmware locked down so End-Users can’t operate with non-compliant parameters (channels/frequencies, transmit power, DFS, …). In response, WiFi access point vendors start to lock down firmwares to prevent custom firmwares (such as OpenWRT) to be installed, using code signing, etc. Since the same type of devices are often sold world wide, this change does not only affect routers in the US, but also Europe, and this will also effect wireless communities.
We would like to discuss:

  • What are your experiences with recently certified WiFi Hardware?
  • How can we still keep OpenWRT on these devices?
  • What can we suggest to Hardware vendors so that they keep their firmware open for community projects while still compliant with the FCC?

The rule in question is listed on the FCC website with the question “What are the software security requirements for non-SDR devices and what limitations apply to software configuration control for such devices?” and the critical part of the answer being “require all devices to implement software security to ensure that the devices operate as authorized and cannot be modified“.

It will be interesting to see how all this develops, and whether it will have some real consequences on the hackability of access points.

Thanks to Zoobab for the tip.

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Categories: OpenWRT Tags: fcc, openwrt

Linux Based Zsun WiFi Card Reader Has Been Hacked Too…

July 13th, 2015 16 comments

A little while ago, I purchased Zsun SD111 W-Fi USB flash drive, and after several tentatives, I finally found a way to access the device’s serial console. Since then the company announced another wireless storage device with Zsun Wi-Fi card reader, and Zoobab decided to try to hack it too.

Zsun_SD_Card_Reader_Serial_ConsoleSince the device is pretty hard to open without damaging the enclosure, connecting the serial pin was not really an option, and the first exploit was to input shell commands in the web interface SSID field… For example, entering `reboot` there, would indeed reboot the device.

However, this would still not allow full shell access, and finally after a broader port scan, it was found out that TCP port 11880 was open for telnet daemon. You can then access the shell as root with the same password as SD111: “zsun1188″. For some reasons, telnet can’t work with the device, and socat must be used instead.

zoobab@zoobab /Users/zoobab [9]$ socat - TCP4:10.168.168.1:11880
������!����
(none) login: root
root
Password: zsun1188

Welcome to
         -------      |            /    /--/        ___      |
          /           |           /|     \/        _____   --|--|
         /_____\      |---       --|--   //--/      /        /  |
          __|__       |           /|\    / \/      /___\    /   |
         ___|___   ___|____      / | \     /               /   \|
                        深圳至上移动科技有限公司
                        Shenzhen Zsun Cloud Technology Co., LTD.
                        www.zsuncloud.com

BusyBox v1.01 (2014.12.27-02:50+0000) Built-in shell (ash)
Enter 'help' for a list of built-in commands.

~ #

That’s it you now have full access to this small and inexpensive Linux device powered by Atheros AR9331 SoC with 32MB RAM and 16MB flash, plus up to 64GB storage on micro SD card.

Thanks to Zoobab for his work.

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Olimex Announces RT5350F-OLinuXino and Evaluation Boards Availability

May 19th, 2015 3 comments

Olimex had been working on a small board with Ralink RT5350F processor for over a year, with delays mostly due to software development and undocumented registers. But RT5350F-OlinuXino is now available together with an evaluation board with tow relays, two Ethernet ports, and expansions headers, as well as a DIN EBV still in development.

RT5350F-OLinuXinoRT5350F-OlinuXino specifications:

  • SoC – Ralink / Mediatek RT5350F MIPS24KEc CPU @ 360 MHz
  • System Memory – 32MB SDRAM
  • Storage – 8MB SPI NAND Flash
  • 3x headers with access to
    • USB 2.0 HOST/Device
    • 5x 10/100 Mbps Ethernet port
    • GPIOs, SPI, I2C
    • I2S, PCM
    • UART
    • JTAG
  • Power – 3x external DCDC power converters releasing internal RT5350F vreg and preventing common problem with overheating with this chip.
  • Dimensions – N/A
  • Operating Temperature Range – -10 to +55C

The board is pre-loaded OpenWRT with Linux 3.18.11. You can find builds instructions and other documentation in the Wiki, as well as github.

RT5350F-OlinuXino_EVB

Baseboard for RT5350F-OlinuXino module

The company jointly launch the module with RT5350F-OlinuXino-EVB evaluation board with the following technical specifications:

  • Module – RT5350F-OlinuXino with RT5350F processor, 32MB RAM and 8MB flash
  • Connectivity
    • WIFI 801.11n 150Mb
    • 2x 10/100 Mbps Ethernet ports (RJ45)
  • 2x Relays 15A/240VAC
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 host port
  • Expansion headers:
    • UEXT connector (I2C, SPI, RS232) for Olimex modules
    • EXT header with 3 remaining Ethernet signals, GPIOs, I2S/PCM, JTAG…
  • Misc – Button
  • Power Supply – 5V DC via power barrel
  • Dimensions – N/A
  • Temperature Range – -10 to +55C

Documentation is available on the same Wiki and Github account as for the module.

RT5350F_DIN_EnclosureOlimex is working is also working an an other EVB with a single Ethernet port, and an LED display that can fit into a DIN enclosure which should be useful for home automation.

It will cost about 35 Euros once it is available in June or a little later. RT5350F-OlinuXino can be purchased now for 15 Euros in single quantities, while RT5350F-OLinuXino-EVB goes for 24 Euros including the module, and you can purchase both directly on Olimex website.

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FireWRT is an OpenWRT 802.11ac Board Powered by Mediatek MT7621A Processor

May 14th, 2015 10 comments

There are plenty of low cost 802.11n routers or boards supporting OpenWRT, even starting at $10 or less such as A5-V11 mini router, but if you’re looking for something a bit more powerful with 802.11ac connectivity, options are much more limited, especially if you need something at a lower cost. One option is Xiaomi MiWiFi router based on Mediatek MT7620A with 64MB RAM, and T-Firefly team is now working on FireWRT board based on the more powerful MT7621A processor coupled with 512 MB RAM, and 16 MB SPI flash.

FireWRTFireWRT specifications:

  • Wi-Fi SoC – Mediatek MT7621A dual core MIPS 1004Kc processor @ 880MHz
  • System Memory – 512 MB DDR3 (Beta version: 256 MB)
  • Storage – 16 MB SPI flash memory, 2x SATA 3.0 ports, micro SD card slot
  • Wi-Fi
    • 802.11 b/g/n @ 2.4GHz up to 300Mbps
    • 802.11 a/n/ac @ 5 GHz, up to 867Mbps (AC1200 class router)
    • External High-Gain Antennas – 2x for 2.4GHz, 2x for 5GHz
  • Ethernet – 2x LAN (Gigabit Ethernet), 1x WAN (Gigabit Ethernet)
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 host port, 1x USB 3.0 port
  • Expansion
    • mini PCIe slot (multiplexed with SATA), on the back of the board
    • 2x 32-pin headers with GPIO, I2C, I2S, UART, NFC, JTAG, RGMII, 12V, 5V, 3.3V, GND
  • Misc – Power, WPS and reset keys. LEDs for Ethernet, WiFi, SATA, and power
  • Power – 12V/2A
  • Dimensions – 125 x 93.5 mm

OpenWRT_SATA_USB_3_PCIeThe boar runs OpenWRT, and the company has already released binary images, source code (U-boot, OpenWRT SDK), schematics (PDF), and mechanical files on the project’s download page, as well as some WIP documentation on the Wiki.

You can’t purchase the board directly on Aliexpress yet, but the company launched a beta program to allow developers to purchase a $69 kit including FireWRT board, a 12V/2A power adapter, an acrylic enclosure, a SATA cable, an heatsink, and a USB TO TTL UART Module. Please note that this beta board only has 256 MB RAM instead of 512 MB for the final version.

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Ventana GW5220 ARM Linux SBC Supports WiFi, Wimax, 3G Cellular Connectivity & PoE

April 29th, 2015 No comments

Gateworks recently launched another Freescale i.MX6 board part of theur Ventana family with Vetana GW5220 single board computer with Freescalei .MX6 dual processor, HDMI out, Ethernet, and a PCIe slot that takes modules adding WiFi 802.11 b/g/n/a, 4G Wimax, and 3G (CDMA/GSM) connectivity, as well as other compatible PCIe modules.
Gateworks_GW5220Gateworks GW5520 board specifications:

  • SoC- Freescale i.MX6 Dual with 2x Cortex A9 core @ 800MHz and Vivante GPU
  • System Memory – 512 MB (default) to 2GB DDR3-800 SDRAM
  • Storage – 256 MB (default) to 2GB Flash, micro SD slot, serial configuration EEPROM
  • Connectivity – 1x Gigabit Ethernet port (RJ45)
  • Video Output and Input – HDMI 1.4 out, CVBS, Y/C, and YPbPr inputs, LVDS output (TIA/EIA 644-A)
  • Audio – HDMI, analog stereo Line In/Out, or Headphone/Mic
  • Expansion – 2x Mini PCIe sockets including one supporting USB and SIM socket, and the other supporting PCIe, mSATA and USB signals.
  • Other I/O ports:
    • Serial – 2x RS232, CAN Bus 2.0B @ 1 Mbps, optional RS485 serial port
    • SPI, GPIO
    • USB – 1x USB 2.0 OTG port up to 480 Mbps
  • Misc – RTC with battery,  voltage & temperature monitor; 6-axis accelerometer/magnetometer, optional GPS receiver, etc…
  • Power Supply – 8 to 60V DC via a power barrel or 36 to 60V DC via 802.3af PoE
  • Typical power consumption – 2W Watts @ 25 C (0.08A @ 24VDC)
  • Dimensions – 100 x 70 x 21 mm
  • Weight – 57 grams
  • Operating Temperature – -40 to +85 C
Ventana GW5220 Block Diagram

Ventana GW5220 Block Diagram

The company can provide OpenWRT, OpenEmbedded/Yocto, and Android BSPs (Board Support Packages). A development kit with GW5220 network computer, cables (Ethernet, Serial, USB, AV), a passive PoE power injector and power supply, and a JTAG programmer is also available. More technical details about the board and supported wireless modules can be found on Ventana Wiki.

Ventana GW5220 board has started shipping, and costs $297 per unit for 100 pieces orders. The development kit pricing has not been disclosed, but you can find request more information via Ventana Development Kits page, as well as Ventana GW5520 product page.

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Domino Core Wi-Fi Module Powers an Arduino Yun Compatible Board (Crowdfunding)

April 20th, 2015 7 comments

The makers of GL.iNet OpenWRT compatible router have decided to build a module and two development boards based on Qualcomm Atheros AR9331 WiSoC. Domino.IO is composed of a Domino Core Wi-Fi module that can be used in your own project, but if also part of Domino Pi, a breadboard-friendly board featuring the module, and Domino Qi mini, a similar board with an Atmel ATMEga32U MCU making it compatible with Arduino Yun board. Domino_BoardsDomino Core specifications:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Atheros AR9331 MIPS processor @ 400MHz with
  • System Memory – 64MB DDR3
  • Storage – 16MB flash
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi with u.FL connector
  • I/Os via half through holes – USB 2.0 host/slave, 3x Ethernet, 29 IOs including UART, SPI, I2S, SLIC, etc…
  • Dimensions – 41 x 25 x 3.8 mm

Domino Pi and Qi mini summarized specifications are shown in the table below.

Domino Pi Domino Qi Mini
Wi-Fi Module Domino Core
MCU N/A Atmel ATMega32U4
USB 1x micro USB for power and programming
Header 2x 28-pin headers 2x 22-pin headers
Dimensions 71.12 x 33.02 x 10 mm 55.88 x 33.02 x 10.8 mm

Both boards can be extended with single Ethernet, single USB, 3x USB + micro SD card, and SPI/JTAG add-on boards, with the latter useless not only for debugging, but also for unbricking the board in case you’ve deleted the complete flash.

Domino Qi Mini and Domino Qi Baseboard

Domino Qi Mini and Domino Qi Baseboard

Domino Pi also compatible with dual Ethernet, I2S audio, and LED add-on board, while Domini Qi mini can be inserted in an Domino Qi baseboard with Arduino compatible headers, a full sized USB port, and Ethernet Port, a micro SD slot, and more.

Domino core comes pre-installed with OpenWRT Linux based operating system, so you can use your favorite programming languages and tools such as  Python, Node.js and npm, PHP, git, Lua, SSH, etc… You can also program the board via Ideino web interface.

The project is now up on Kickstarter, where developers aim to raise at least $30,000. Pledges start at $10 (early bird) with Domino Core, $19 should get you a Domino Pi Basic kit with Ethernet and USB add-on boards, $37 a Domini Qi Mini with the baseboard, and if you want the full package with both boards and all add-on boards, you’ll need to pledge $90. Shipping is $5, and delivery is scheduled for May 2015.  You may also find more information on Domino.IO website.

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RaidSonic Releases Firmware and Source Code for Atheros AR9331 Wi-Fi Audio Streamers

April 16th, 2015 4 comments

RaidSonic is a German company releasing products such as media players and multimedia accessories under their ICY BOX brand. One of those products is ICY Box IB-MP401Air music streaming received based on Atheros AR9331, and that looks very similar to SoundMate M2 I reviewed last year.

SoundMate M2 (Click to Enlarge)

SoundMate M2 (Click to Enlarge)

But if you look on their product page, you’ll find out a few download links:

So I’ve downloaded the source code file (IB-MP401Air_Sources_and%20License_Terms.rar) to have a look. It has two compressed files, one with the license, and IB-MP401Air_Sources.tar.gz with the source code.

tar xzvf IB-MP401Air_Sources.tar.gz
cd dns320B_GPL20150212/
ls -l
total 12
-rwxr--r--  1 jaufranc jaufranc 1400 Apr 16 16:49 building-the-firmware.txt
drwxr-xr-x 14 jaufranc jaufranc 4096 Feb 12 10:54 dns320B_GPL20150212
-rwxr--r--  1 jaufranc jaufranc  925 Feb 12 08:25 making-u-boot.txt

SoundMate_M2_Make_Menuconfig

The file showing how to build the firmware (OpenWRT) explains you should not use a newer Linux distribution:

Please note that this is an older OpenWrt version that might not build on newer distributions like Fedora 19 or later. If you want to build the firmware on a newer distribution you might need to get extra patches from OpenWrt to work around compilation errors. As an alternative you can install an older Linux distribution to build this firmware on.

Fedora 19 was released in July 2013, but I’ve still tried to build it on an Ubuntu 14.04 machine, and it failed:

cd dns320B_GPL20150212/
make
….
x86_64-linux-gnu-gcc -std=gnu99 -I. -O2 -I/media/hdd/edev/sandbox/soundmate/dns320B_GPL20150212/dns320B_GPL20150212/staging_dir/host/include -O2 -I/media/hdd/edev/sandbox/soundmate/dns320B_GPL20150212/dns320B_GPL20150212/staging_dir/host/include -MT clean-temp.o -MD -MP -MF .deps/clean-temp.Tpo -c -o clean-temp.o clean-temp.c
In file included from clean-temp.h:22:0,
from clean-temp.c:23:
./stdio.h:477:1: error: ‘gets’ undeclared here (not in a function)
_GL_WARN_ON_USE (gets, “gets is a security hole – use fgets instead”);
^

It might build better on older Linux distributions, although you may still have to be ready to fix build errors on the way.

Thanks to dhead666 for the tip. Via OpenWRT Forums.

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A5-V11 Mini Router Runs OpenWRT (Linux) For Just $8

March 29th, 2015 14 comments

In case you you still think OpenWRT capable NEXX WT1520 router is still too expensive at $15, what about an $8 OpenWRT router? That’s what LY mini wireless router costs including shipping, and it’s better known as A5-V11, the name of its PCB.

A5-V11_OpenWRT_RouterIt’s not exactly a 3G/4G router as the casing implied, but it does support external USB 3G/4G dongles like most other routers with USB on the market.

A5-V11 specifications:

  • SoC – Mediatek/Ralink) RT5350F MIPS processor @ 360MHz
  • System Memory – 32MB RAM (W9825G6EH-75). Some people reported theirs only have 16MB RAM, so YMMV.
  • Storage – 4MB NAND flash (Pm25LQ032)
  • Connectivity – Wi-Fi 802.11b/g/n up to 150 Mbps; 1x 10/100M Ethernet
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 host port, 1x micro USB port for power
  • Misc – Power LED, factory reset pinhole
  • Power – 5V via micro USB port
  • Dimensions –  6.1 x 2.3 x 1.4 cm

Contrary to WT1520, A5-V11 is already part of OpenWRT trunk, but the firmware image is not automatically built yet. Fully details can be found on OpenWRT Wiki. If you connect a serial board, you may have to add a 470 Ohm to 1 KOhm resistor to the Rx pin to prevent the board from hanging at boot time.

The router can be purchased on Aliexpress for $8.25 including shipping, DealExtreme for $10.86 (with 32MB RAM), or Ebay for $8.72. It might be on other websites too, but since it’s an OEM product without clear branding it may be difficult to find.

Thanks to Maurer for the tip.

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