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Posts Tagged ‘qt’

Emcraft Systems Introduces IoT Devkit with LCD Display Powered by Freescale Vybrid VF6 SoC

August 7th, 2014 No comments

Emcraft Systems has launched a IoT development kit based on on their Freescale Vybrid VF6 SoM featuring MVF61 SoC with a Cortex A5 MPU and a Cortex M4 MCU, and connected to a baseboard (IOT-BSB-EXT) with various connectors (USB, Ethernet, …) as well as a 4.3″ LCD (480×272 resolution) with touchscreen. The kit targets IoT gateway applications where a GUI (Graphical User Interface) and/or HMI (Human Machine Interface) are required.

Emcraft_IoT_LCD_Devkit

LCD Side

Vybrid IoT devkit specifications:

  • SoC/Memory/Storage – Via Vybrid VF6 SoM with Freescale MVF61NN151CMK50 (No Security), or Freescale MVF61NS151CMK50 (with Security),  128 MB DDR3, Up to 512 MB NAND Flash, and 32 MBytes dual QSPI Flash
  • Storage on Baseboard – micro SD card slot
  • Display – 4.3″ 480×272 LCD with touch panel connected to the back side of the baseboard.
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet
  • USB – 2x micro USB OTG ports, 1x micro USB for debugging and/or power
  • Debugging – 20-pin JTAG interface, USB UART interface connected to UART port of the Vybrid VF6 (can also be used to power the kit)
  • Misc – “Power good” LED, User LEDs, Reset push button
  • Dimensions – 100 x 70 mm
IoT Baseboard and Vybrid VF6 SoM

IoT Baseboard and Vybrid VF6 SoM

The kit includes a VF6 System-on-Module (SOM), the IOT-BSB-EXT baseboard, the IOT-LCD board and 4.3″ 480×272 LCD with touch panel connected to the baseboard, a mini USB Y cable for UART and power interface, an Ethernet cable, and a  USB OTG cable.

Emcraft Vybrid IoT Starter Kit (KIT-VF6-IOT) supports both Linux for the ARM Cortex A5 core and Freescale MQX RTOS for the Cortex M4 core. The kit comes pre-loaded with U-Boot and a sample Linux configuration “demonstrating fast boot to the GUI, sophisticated GUI interfaces using Qt as well as various wired and wireless connectivity interfaces”. Documentation and software/hardware resources specific to the IoT devkit includes a Starter Kit Guide, VF6 SOM Software Development Environment, prebuilt Linux/MQX image ready to be loaded to the VF6 SOM, NAND Firmware configuration block image ready for installation onto the VF6 SOM, as well as schematics (PDF) and BoM the the baseboard and LCD board. Some resources are available publicly, and some require a login only available to those who purchased the kit.

Vybrid IOT Starter Kit is available now (2 weeks lead time) for $229. You can find more information on Emcraft IoT Kit page, as well as links to documentation and software/hardware files via the Release and Hardware tabs.

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Hummingbird A31 Is a $70 Feature-packed Development Board Powered by AllWinner A31

May 9th, 2014 27 comments

Merrii Technologies introduced the Hummingbird development kit powered by AllWinner A20 last year. Since then they’ve sold 10,000 pieces, and have been working on another development board based on AllWinner A31 with lots of different ports and options, including an optional 7″ capacitive touch screen.

Quad_Core_Hummingbird_development_board“Quad Core” Hummingbird specifications:

  • SoC – AllWinner A31 quad core ARM Cortex-A7 with PowerVR SGX544MP2 GPU compliant with OpenGL ES2.0, OpenCL 1.x, DX 9_3
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR3
  • Storage – 8GB Flash + micro SD card slot
  • Video Output – HDMI, VGA, LVDS
  • Video Input – 3.5mm jack for CVBS (or YPbPr?) In (TV IN)
  • Audio I/O – HDMI, 3.5mm jack for stereo audio, 3.5mm jack for Line IN (Same as TV IN). 2x 15w amplifier on-board.
  • Camera – MIPI interface
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth (AP6210 module)
  • Cellular Connectivity – SIM card slot + mini PCIe connector for 3G modem
  • USB – 2x USB host port, 1x micro USB OTG, and 3 internal USB headers.
  • Debugging – UART console
  • Expansion Headers – Two 2×30 headers with access to GPIOs, LVDS, and other signals
  • Misc – Speaker headers, RS485 port, IR receiver, power, reset and uboot keys, RTC + battery slot
  • Power – 12V

 

A31_Hummingbird

Detailed information is not available for this board, but thanks to Charbax video below we know the board will be compatible with the same 7″ display (800×600) support by Hummingbird A20, and the company can provide Android 4.4 and Linux 3.3 + Qt SDKs with full source code for the board. Compared to the previous versions, Hummingbird A31 adds supports for 3G Modules, a VGA interface, and more accessible pins.

The board is available for purchase now via Aliexpress for $70 plus shipping by courier ($15 to $20).

Via armdevices.net

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DATA MODUL mini-ITX Board Supports Freescale i.MX6 & Intel Bay Trail-I QSeven Modules

March 5th, 2014 1 comment

DATA MODUL, a specialist supplier of display technology, has recently unveiled eDM-mITX-CB-Q7-Info, a mini-ITX Baseboard for ARM & x86 Qseven modules optimized to drive large panels for digital signage applications. In theory, the board should support any Qseven modules, but for now only Data Modul’s Freescale i.MX6, and Congatec conga-QA3 Intel Atom E3800 series modules have been optimized and officially certified to work with the motherboard.

DATA MODUL eDM-mITX-CB-Q7-Info

DATA MODUL eDM-mITX-CB-Q7-Info (Click to Enlarge)

Precisely, the board is optimized and certified for the following modules:

  • DATA MODUL ARM Qseven SoMs:
    • eDM-QMX6 (i.MX6Quad)
    • eDM-DMX6 (i.MX6Dual)
    • eDM-DLMX6 (i.MX6Dual lite)
  • Congatec x86 Qseven SoMs:
    • Conga-QA3 with Atom E3845 (Quad core)
    • Conga-QA3 with Atom E382x (Dual core). Three models: Atom E3827, E3826 or E3825.
    • Conga-QA3 with Atom E3815 (Single core)

You may have heard about EDM, a competing module standard, previously, but the eDM prefix in the ARM modules or the mini-ITX board names has nothing to do with this standard, as all is based on Qseven standard.

DATA MODUL eDM-mITX-CB-Q7-Info give access to the following external interfaces (depending on the used module) :

  • 1 x RS232
  • Up to 2x Gigabit Ethernet
  • 2 x USB 2.0/3.0, 1 x USB OTG
  • 1 x DVI-D, 1 x DisplayPort 1.2
  • 1 x Audio Line Out

You can also connect a monitor via the 2x 24 Bit LVDS interface, and access more I/Os via connectors on the board including more USB Ports, CAN, SPI, GPIOs, I²C, and SD Card. Optical isolated RS485/422 Interface modules, IR-remote control interface, light sensors, external LEDs, temperature sensors and up to 6 PWM system fans are also available as an option. The company also mention a 2.5″ SATA slot to connect SSD or HDD without cables. It can be seen on the picture, so I’m not sure if it’s another option, or the slot is just at the back of the board. The baseboard can be powered by +12VDC or +24VDC and optionally +5VDC can be supported for standby voltage.

DATA MODUL can provide its own Monitoring Software for Linux (QT) and Windows operating systems.

Availability and pricing information has not been disclosed, and there’s very little information about this ARM/x86 Qseven mini-ITX board except the actual announcement. There are however more details about the company eDM-QMX6 module. Refer to my post about conga-QA3 for more details about the Bay Trail-I Qseven modules.

Via LinuxGizmos

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$69.95 NanoPC-T1 by FriendlyARM Features Samsung Exynos 4412 SoC

January 20th, 2014 18 comments

If you like low cost boards by Hardkernel such as ODROID-U3, but the add-ons required, and/or shipping costs put you off, an alternative will soon be available thanks to FriendlyARM NanoPC-T1, a tiny computer designed and manufactured by CoreWind Tech FriendlyARM Guangzhou, and powered by Samsung Exynos 4412 quad core Cortex A9 SoC with 1GB RAM, and 4GB built-in flash.
NanoPCFriendlyARM NanoPC specifications:

  • SoC – Samsung Exynos 4412 quad core Cortex-A9 @ 1.5GHz + Mali-400MP4 GPU
  • System Memory1GB DDR3 RAM, 32bit data bus
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC Flash + SD Card slot
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet (RJ45)
  • Video Output – HDMI
  • Audio -  3.5mm Audio Out jack
  • USB – 1x micro USB OTG, 2x USB 2.0 host ports
  • Expansions and I/Os:
    • UART -  4 x TTL UART
    • LCD -  TFT LCD interface, support Capacitive/Resistive touch driver
    • 2x Digital sensor input
    • CMOS CAMERA Interface
    • MIPI interface – Support HD Camera
    • 30x GPIO
  • Misc – 2x User keys,  2x User LEDs
  • Power Supply – DC 5V/2A input

FriendlyARM_NanoPC_Description

The company will provide support for Linux + Qt, Ubuntu 12.04, and Android 4.2.2, and the source code will be available in a DVD sent with the board.

Compared to ODROID-U3, NanoPC uses a slightly slower processor (Exynos 4412 vs Exynos 4412 Prime), has less RAM (1GB vs 2GB), only 2 USB ports (vs 3 for ODROID-U3), but it does come with 4GB eMMC (only eMMC socket for U3), has much more available I/Os, and the case is included in the price.

NanoPC will be available on the 25th of February 2014 for 399 CNY / $69.95  + shipping?. Accessories (PSU, Ethernet, Serial, and USB cables) and a Universal RS-232 adapter included free for the first orders.  There’s no clear information yet about shipping cost, but checking on CoreWind eStore they have 4 shipping methods: DHL/Fedex ($36), EMS/Post Express ($16), ARAMEX ($31), and “pickup” charged via your courier account. So you may not save much compared to the $25 charged by Hardkernel. When I tried to order an existing board via Paypal it defaulted to $36 on FriendlyARM.

You may also find more information FriendlyARM NanoPC-T1 page, and pre-order via andahammer.com.

Thanks to Dave for the tip.

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Merrii Hummingbird Development Kit Features AllWinner A20 Processor, and an Optional 7″ Touchscreen Display

November 26th, 2013 13 comments

And yet another AllWinner A20 development platform shows up in my news stream in about 24 hours. Merrii Technology, a Shenzhen based electronics design house, has showed off their Hummingbird Development Kit to ARMDevices.net. The development board comes with 1GB RAM, 4GB NAND Flash, Gigabit Ethernet, SATA, HDMI output, and more. There’s also an optional 7″ capacitive touch screen display for the board. The company explains the kit can be used to develop application such as media players, game consoles, IPTV, automotive products (GPS & IVI), robots, servers, surveillance products, and home automation systems.

Merrii_Hummingbird_Development_KitHere are the board specifications:

  • SoC – AllWinner A20 dual ARM Cortex-A7 core @ 1 GHz with ARM Mali400-MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR3 (2x 4Gb 16bits DDR3)
  • Storage – 4GB MLC 64bit ECC NAND Flash (Hynix H27UBG8T2A), SATA II connectors, and micro SD card slot (Up to 32GB)
  • Connectivity – Wifi & Bluetooth (two-in-one module), 10/100/1000M Ethernet (Realtek RTL8201CP)
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 OTG, 2x USB 2.0 Host
  • Video I/O – HDMI out, CVBS out, and YPbPr input. Display connector for LVDS and RGB displays. VGA is apparently available via the expansion headers.
  • Touch Panel – Support quad-line resistive touch screen and capacitive touch screen with TWI interface
  • Audio I/O – Headphone jack, Line-in
  • Expansion – 2x 50-pin headers at the back of the board. For detailed pin assignments, please refer to the board product brief.
  • Debugging – UART connector
  • Misc – Reset and power on keys, IR sensor
  • Power – 5V/2A DC. PMIC: AXP209. Battery slot (for RTC?)
  • Dimensions – 105 x 70 mm

Merrii_Hummingbird_BoardAlthough Merrii Technology is supposed to be a design house, the PCB design seem to have been outsourced to WITS as the marking at the center bottom part of the PCB implies. It’s also possible the two companies have the same owner(s), and WITS / Merrii products are jointly promoted.

The company provides support for Android 4.2, and Linux 3.4 (sunxi). They can also provide a graphical interface based on Qt for Linux. Hummingbird Android SDK is available publicly, and support and Linux images will be available via the company’s BBS.

Charbax video starts with an introduction of the Hummingbird development system, followed by a visit of the company mostly with hardware, software development, and SW QA departments. At the end of the video, they also show WITS A31 development platform ($1300), as well as several AllWinner core boards.

Hummingbird development system is available now for 299 CNY (~$50) for the board only, and 499 CNY (~$82) with the 7″ touchscreen display (800×600). At least that’s the price shown on Merrii’s Hummingbird page, as the company has also setup an Aliexpress store where these are sold for respectively $80 and $108 sometimes including shipping, sometimes excluding shipping. The board is said to come with a power adapter,a USB cable, and a SATA Cable.

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LinuxCon Europe 2013 Schedule – Web Technologies, Debugging Techniques, Wayland, and More

August 22nd, 2013 No comments

I’ve just received an email from the Linux Foundation saying the schedule for LinuxCon and CloudOpen Europe 2013 had been made available. The conference will take place for 3 days (October 21-23, 2013) in the Edinburgh International Conference Center, Edinburgh, United Kingdom. There will be over 100 conference sessions, and several co-located events including: Automotive Linux Summit, the Embedded Linux Conference, Gluster Workshop, KVM Forum, Tizen Summit, Xen Project Developer Summit.

LinuxCon_Europe_2013

As I’ve recently done with LinuxCon North America 2013 and ARM TechCon 2013, I’ll make a virtual schedule with selected developer sessions using the event’s schedule builder. You may find out several sessions will also be given in LinuxCon North America.

Monday – 21st of October

This presentation will cover a brief introduction on how the Bluetooth Low Energy technology works. Then it will present the current status of its support on Linux, including the profiles we’re currently working on what can be expected to be finished on the near future. The currently available APIs and how to interact with Bluetooth Smart devices will be shown and there will be a few demos of Bluetooth Smart devices working with Linux.

Web Browsers are quickly becoming the most frequently used individual application in any modern desktop, following the same trend in mobile devices. They are growing in capabilities and performance, enabling an era of new webapps ranging from email to vehicle navigation and games. Current browsers are powerful enough to run even the Linux kernel in a Javascript PC emulator. Browsers are enabled by web engines, but have you ever questioned how they work? The objective of this talk is to present how a modern web engine works, following the several steps from the first user input to access a webpage up to the moment where content is rendered in the screen. Topics like multiprocess browser architecture, process sandboxing, content parsing and rendering will be covered. The web engine used for the discussion will be WebKit, with some examples drawn from Blink and Gecko.

The many tracing tools available on Linux today provide a wide array of choices for the users. Deciding which of them to use to diagnose system problems on production systems can prove challenging. Various tools have various states of integration within the Linux kernel, and also within different Linux distributions. Bleeding edge features are often just being merged into the upstream Linux kernel. It takes often a long time for such features to be incorporated in commercial distributions. The required set up for the tools and their level of usability also vary significantly. This talk will cover the more popular and actively developed tracing areas focusing on their latest updates and will describe the infrastructure they rely on. An overview of the tracing tools (ftrace, perf, systemtap, DTrace for Linux, etc) will be included with some examples of usage of each.

HTML5 is going to be used widely because of its powerful specification. A lot of browsers are now supporting HTML5. It is a new technology, so that currently only few engineers can use this technology. Needs of such skillful engineers are urgent and necessary from the point of Industry, such as automotive and others. We started the development of the certification program of HTML5 skill set. The purpose of this program is to encourage engineers to learn and and improve their skill set, and increase number of skillful engineers. In this presentation, I will provide why we started this program, how we develop, and time-frame.

Being one of the most successful open source projects to date, WebKit development process consists of a series of protocols and strict policies in order to obtain committer and reviewer status. Blink follows a similar approach with committers and scoped code owners, in a similar fashion as Linux Kernel does with its subsystem maintainers. Their open source success is due to not only solid support from major technology companies, but also to the high quality and automated testing performed on patches before submission. In this presentation, Bruno explains how the development process of both WebKit and Blink projects are – from submitting well-tested patches with strict policies to check, get review from community, and commit upstream via commit-queue system (including early warning system bots). This is a very practical talk with live demonstrations of patch submissions on both projects.

Tuesday – 22nd of October

Most of the kernel messages would be intended to know developers what’s going on in the kernel, and they tend to be not friendly to users and machines. To improve this, Hidehiro Kawai is trying to add hash value for each kernel message to identify them easily. If this feature becomes available, users can consult external manuals by feeding the hash and know detailed information. Or a monitor tool can identify specific message in low overhead and trigger a fail-over or collect related information automatically. In this presentation, he explains the implementation of the first RFC patch set, on-going discussions (if there are), and how utilizing the feature in user space, while introducing a similar challenge 5 years ago and how addressed its objections.

The Wayland project is growing fast, as well as its adoption by several toolkits. EFL (Enlightenment Foundation Libraries) specifically has a Wayland backend being actively developed over the last 2 years, with its latest features being already incorporated. EFL developers are also contributing back to the Wayland project itself, helping to improve the protocol and implementation, from a toolkit point of view. This talk will present the current development state of the Wayland backend of EFL, describing the latest incorporated features. It will also present the changes that this port has passed since the beginning of its development, and its improvements so far. A comparison to the other EFL backends will be done, as well as future plans for Wayland on EFL and the Enlightenment Window Manager.

Window managers and desktop environments in the Open Source community number in the dozens, but only a small number of those include compositors; fewer still can boast that they run seamlessly on embedded devices or in Wayland. Enlightenment is so flexible that it was chosen by Samsung to be to window manager for their new Linux-based mobile operating system, Tizen, in addition to being used by tens of thousands of users worldwide for over a decade. With the current development of E19, it’s time to take a step back and look at the main feature: compositor design. This presentation will give a brief introduction to compositing and window management before jumping directly into the history of Enlightenment’s compositor architecture and its progression to the current state of full Wayland and X support.

The 2013 version of this popular talk describing the current state of kernel development and where it can be expected to go in the near future. There will be some technical content, but this talk is highly accessible to non-technical participants as well.

Concurrency issues in the software, and data races in particular, may have devastating effects but are often quite hard to reveal. Hunting down such problems is especially important for the Linux kernel, which is inherently concurrent. Although there is a variety of tools to help reveal data races in the user-space code (Helgrind, DRD, ThreadSanitizer, etc.), there are only a few that can be applied to the kernel. In his presentation, Eugene Shatokhin will give an overview of such tools and the techniques they rely upon. Among other things, he will present KernelStrider, a component of KEDR Framework that collects data about the operation of the kernel modules in runtime. The data are then analyzed by an “offline” detector in the user-space to actually reveal the races. The results obtained so far as well as possible directions of future development will also be discussed.

Wednesday – 23rd of October

git bisect” is a command that is part of the Git distributed version control system. This command enables software users, developers and testers to easily find the commit that introduced a regression. This is done by performing a kind of binary search between a known good and a known bad commit. git bisect supports both a manual and an automated mode. The automated mode uses a test script or command.People are very happy with automated bisection, because it saves them a lot of time, it makes it easy and worthwhile for them to improve their test suite, and overall it efficiently improves software quality.

The GFS2 cluster filesystem has been under development for a number of years, however there has been no up-to-date presentation covering all of the latest features since OLS 2007. The intent of this talk is to provide an overview of the current feature set, noting recent significant developments, as well as an introduction into the major algorithms of GFS2 for those less familiar with its capabilities. During the development process, many lessons were learned which would apply equally to any open source project, and these will be discussed too.

October 21, 2013 marks the Qt Project’s second anniversary. Launched in 2011 to be the home of the Qt libraries and frameworks under Open Source Governance, the Qt Project has seen quite a lot of change in these 2 years., good and bad. It lost its main sponsor and many doubted the project would continue, but it did, and it managed to release the first major release in 7 years (5.0), one more feature release and half a dozen patch releases. This presentation will review the principles of the project’s governance, who the contributors are and how they work, the major changes that happened in the past two years and how they’ve influenced the project. It will explore the development process from patch to release and to maintenance / bug fixing, and will also show how non-code contributors participate.

As the number of cores in systems steadily increases, you may find that the good old mutual exclusion synchronization is not sufficient to let your application use more cores not only for heat generation, but primarily for effective computing. The Userspace RCU library implements Read-Copy Update (RCU) synchronization and various lock-free data structures that allow user-space applications to leverage very lightweight synchronization across cores. It allows a broad range of demanding applications to scale to large numbers of cores. This library is released under LGPL v2.1, so it can be used by all applications. This tutorial will walk the audience through the basics of Read-Copy Update, and then through the synchronization and data structure APIs exposed by Userspace RCU.

You can register to LinuxCon Europe 2013 and CloudOpen Europe 2013 online for the following fees:

  • US$475 through July 14th (Early)
  • US$575 July 15th – September 1st (Standard)
  • US$675 thereafter (Late)
  • Student Registration – $150
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Digia Brings Qt to Embedded Android Devices with Boot to Qt

May 23rd, 2013 1 comment

Digia has recently announced Boot to Qt Technology Preview, a commercial offering that provides a solution for the creation of user interfaces on embedded systems. For the first version, they stripped out Android of Java, or other unnecessary parts (Zygote, SurfaceFlinger), added Qt/QML, and tested it on on ARM and x86 hardware.

Boot to Qt includes the following main features:

  • Boot_2_Qt_ArchitectureA light-weight UI stack for embedded Linux, based on the Qt Framework - Boot to Qt is built on an Android kernel/baselayer and offers an elegant means of developing beautiful and performant embedded devices.
  • Ready-made images – We have images for several different devices which include the Boot to Qt software stack, making it possible to get up and running with minimal effort from day one.
  • Full Qt Creator Integration – One-click deploy and run on hardware and a fully featured development environment.
  • Simulator – A VirtualBox based simulator which allows device development without hardware and opens up for simulating hardware input, such as GPS and  connectivity.

The software stack includes most of the Qt Framework:

  • Qt Core, Qt Gui, Qt Network, Qt Widgets, Qt Xml
  • Qt QML and Qt Quick
  • Qt Quick Controls
  • Qt Graphical Effects
  • Boot to Qt specific additions, including virtual keyboard, brightness control and power off/reboot functionality

However, it currently excludes Qt multimedia and webkit.

The demo below shows Boot to Qt running on Nexus 7, Beagleboard-XM, and Boundary device SABRE Lite showing Qt Quick 2.0 apps, including Qt Cinematic Experience rendered at 55 to 60fps on all three platforms.

The application launcher uses 2% CPU on Freescale i.MX6, 15% of Beagleboard-XM on a 1280×800 screen, most of which is animated. On Tegra 3, CPU usage was 50%, the reason behind it was CPU frequency scaling, as the Tegra 3 just needs to run one core @ 102 Mhz to achieve 60fps in the Qt launcher.

Digia also published a diagram comparing boot times of Boot to Qt (to B2Qt Launcher) and Android (to Home Screen) showing considerable improvement. The company acknowledges Android adds lots of additional stuff, but for embedded systems you don’t need those, and you can optimize boot time.

B2Qt_Android_Boot_Time

They still expect to improve boot time, as for example,  Qt 5 on Raspberry Pi can start rendering after as little as 3 seconds.

They used Android kernel and baselayer in this preview because of better drivers support, but they are also working on ready-made images and IDE integration for traditional embedded Linux, possibly with a preview coming some time this summer. The official release is expected for the end of the year.

You can find more information and/or request an evaluation on Digia’s Boot to Qt page.

Via Linuxgizmos

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