Archive

Posts Tagged ‘qualcomm’

Qualcomm Announces Snapdragon Wear 2100 for Smartwatches, 3 New Cortex A53 Mobile SoCs

February 12th, 2016 No comments

Qualcomm has unveiled four new Snapdragon processors with three quad and octa core Cortex A53 processors for smartphones with 4G LTE connectivity, and a new wearables SoC with lower power and, area compared to Snapdragon 400 series processor often used in smartwatches.

Snapdragon_Wear_2100

Snapdragon Wear 2100 SoC is the first processor part of Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear, of new platform targeting wearable devices, with the company listing the following highlights:

  • Quad core Cortex A7 processor @ up to 800 MHz or 1.2 GHz
  • Adreno 304 GPU
  • 30% smaller than Snapdragon 400
  • 25% percent lower power than Snapdragon 400
  • Integrated, ultra-low power sensor hub
  • Available in both tethered (Bluetooth and Wi-Fi) and connected (4G/LTE and 3G via X5 LTE modem) pin-to-pin compatible versions

The SoC supports Android Wear, and Android, and should be found in smart watches, smart bands, smart eyewear and smart headsets.

Snapdragon Wear 2100 and other Snapdragon Wear products are available now.

Snapdragon_425The company’s three new mobile SoC key features:

  • Snapdragon 425
    • Quad core Cortex A53 up to 1.4 GHz
    • Adreno 308 GPU
    • Display up to 1280×800 @ 60 fps
    • X6 LTE Cat.4 connectivity up to 150 Mbps DL
    • H.264 and H.265 codecs up to 1080p
  • Snapdragon 435
    • Octa core Cortex A53 up to 1.4 GHz
    • Adreno 505 GPU
    • Display up to 1080p60
    • X8 LTE Cat.7 connectivity up to 300 Mbps DL
    • H.264 and H.265 codecs up to 1080p
  • Snapdragon 625
    • Octa core Cortex A53 up to 2.0 GHz
    • Adreno 506 GPU
    • Display up to 1900×1200 @ 60fps
    • X9 LTE Cat.7 connectivity up to 300 Mbps DL
    • 35% lower power usage than Snapdragon 617
    • H.264 and H.265 codecs up to 4K

All three processors also support Quick Charge 2.0 (Snapdragon 425) or 3.0, Fluence noise cancellation technology, 16 to 24 MP camera with dual ISP, NFC, Bluetooth, WiFi, GPS, etc…

Qualcomm Snapdragon 435, 430, and 425 are pin-to-pin compatible, and all three new processors are expected in samrtphones in H2 2016.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

DragonBoard 410c Development Board Quick Start Guide and Android Benchmarks

November 21st, 2015 3 comments

Linaro’s 96Boards initiative was announced in February with the introduction of Hikey board, and while progress has been rather slow, there are now two boards available for sale: Lemaker Hikey and Qualcomm Dragonboard 410c. The main advantage of these board is that 96Boards is not only an hardware specification, but also a software specifications that mandate most code to be open source, with recent versions of Linux and U-boot, and in the case of Dragonboard 410c work is being done with Freedreno open source GPU drivers.

Now that I’ve got a board I’ll explain my experience with the purchasing process, take a few pictures, and show how to get started with Android, and install the latest version, before running a few benchmarks.

Ordering DragonBoard 410c Development Board

I normally don’t like purchasing from North American and European distributors, because of the potential documentation involved to comply with silly laws, high shipping fees, which are themselves compounded by import taxes at home and the courier’s handling fees, meaning a $75 board could easily ending costing $150… So I did not intend to buy the board at first, and just went to the Arrow’s Dragonboard 410c page to find out how much shipping would be…

The board ships from the United Stated, but to my surprise shipping was free via Fedex Economy.

DragonBoard_410c_ShippingSo I just went ahead, the checkout process was rather straightforward, and paid by Paypal on Wednesday, November 12, with an estimated delivery date of November 18. Not too bad.

Two days later, I received an email asked me to complete an FCC Purchaser’s Certification form, because while the board had passed the company’s internal EMC tests, it had not passed FCC certification yet, so I could only use it as an evaluation platform. EMC certifications is expected by the end of the month. So I filled it up and simply sent it back by email.

The following Wednesday my order was confirmed, and I received the board yesterday (November 20). So it took about a week between my order and shipping, so I’m pretty satisfied how it all went considering the board is sent for free.

I did not pay any import duties, but Fedex did request for 7% VAT, amounting to about $6.

DragonBoard 410c Pictures

I got the board in a box warning about static electricity.

Dragonboard_410c_PackageI’ve seen pictures of the board before with Green and Red PCB, but mine ended up being Cyan, although the overall design did not really change since the first prototypes.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

DragonBoard_410c_Angle

The main difference with the previous photos is that they added shields on top of the power circuitry, as well as on Qualcomm Snapdragon 410c and memory chips.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

I’ve also take a picture with a few “friends” including Raspberry Pi 2, Orange Pi 2 mini, and Roseapple Pi boards. with DragonBoard 410c being slightly smaller.

Getting Started with DragonBoard 410c Development Board (in Android)

Linaro released the first Reference Software Platform for 96Boards a couple of weeks ago, and while Hikey supported both Android and Debian 8.2, ony the latter was released for DragonBoard 410c, so I was expecting the board to come pre-loaded with Debian Linux distribution, but instead it came with Android 5.1. That’s why I’m going to focus on Android in this first post, before checking out Linux in more details.

Since the board comes pre-loaded with an operating systems it should be easy to start with the platform, right? Sort of, but there are still some mini challenges to overcome.

First, the board takes 6.5 to 18V power supply as per 96Boards specifications, and the power barrel has a 1.7mm diameter instead of the more usual 2.1mm. That means all these 5V power supply I’ve accumulated can’t be used, so I had to find a 12V power supply, as well as some adapters to be able to connect it to the board. Luckily, I have a few 12V/1A power adapter from some TV boxes, and I have a 28 power jack adapters set to handle this case. If you don’t have any of those, you could also check out 96Boards power supply page with some recommendations.

12V/1A Power Adapter, and 2.1 to 1.7mm Adapter (Click to Enlarge)

12V/1A Power Adapter, and 2.1 to 1.7mm Adapter (Click to Enlarge)

Once I got this sorted out, I also connected a USB keyboard, and RF dongle for my air mouse, an HDMI cable to my TV, and an Ethernet… wait.. There’s no Ethernet port on 96Boards, so that’s it. As I connected the power, and LED quickly blink once, and then nothing for several (long) seconds, until I saw the Qualcomm boot animation, and later the lock screen.

Click for Original Size

Click for Original Size

These are the few apps pre-installed in the Android image.

Click for Original Size

Click for Original Size

And a look at “About phone” section shows MSM8916 for arm64 is running Android 5.1.1 on top of Linux 3.10.49. So I don’t think that image fully complies with 96Boards software specifications, and hopefully the Android release part of the Reference Software Platform will fix that.

Click for Original Size

Click for Original Size

I could connect to WiFi with issues, and transfer the screenshots via Bluetooth, since Android would not recognize my USB flash drive. Later on I found out micro SD cards work fine.

If you intend to modify the bootloader or kernel, you’ll most probably want to connect a USB to TLL board to the development platform. Unfortunately, while most development boards on the market are perfectly happy with a 3.3V or 5V power debug board, DragonBoard 410c board requires a 1.8V USB to TTL board which needs to inconveniently be connected to pins 1, 11 and 13 on the 40-pin low speed (LS) header.  I could remember that Hardkernel USB-UART board supports both 1.8 and 3.3V, and I got one thanks to the several ODROID board I was given to play with.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

I fired up minicom in my Ubuntu computer, made sure it was set to 115200 8N1, but whatever I did I could not get any debug message on the serial console, even after switching Tx and Rx a few times… I tried to download Snapdragon 410 GPIO Pin Assignment from the Wiki, but the file in question had a “redirect loop”… So I gave up on that part for now.

Installing the latest Android Image

Eventually Linaro is going to update the firmware images and release the source regularly, so you’ll probably want to install the latest the latest build of the Android image, and I followed the instructions on 96Boards github wiki in an Ubuntu computer, which uses fastboot, and there’s also another method using a micro SD card.

Fastboot update

You’ll need fastboot utility to flash the firmware over USB. This command and all other below are typed from your Linux computer (Ubuntu/Debian):

Now download and extract the latest bootloader

Dragonboard_410c_fastboot_switchNow make sure S6 switch on the board is set to 0-0-0-0 as shown in the right photo, and that there’s no micro SD card inserted in the board.

Now keep pressing S4 button (Volume -), while inserting the power jack into the board, and after a few releas the button. You should be in fastboot mode. Let’s check it:

All good. Now flash all files with a single command

The output will start with:

It should take a few seconds to complete. If you forget to add sudo, the following message will show forever:

Now you’ll want to download the latest Android firmware files in your computer:

Once this is done, unzip and flash the files to the board:

Now unplug the power, and the micro USB cable, and put the power jack back into the board. Android should boot, but in my case it did not, and my power meter was stuck at 1 to 1.5 Watts instead of 2.0 to 3.0 Watts during a normal boot.

SD Card Update

So I fell back to the second update method, using a micro SD card. I’ve used a terminal windows in Ubuntu in the instructions below, but you could also use a Windows computer, and Win32DiskImager utility to perform the same tasks over a graphical user interface.

First download and extract the SD card image:

Now insert your SD card into your computer, and check your device with lsblk:

In my case, the micro SD card is 32GB, so my device is sdb. You need to replace <sd_device> with your own device in the command to dump the data to the SD card.

DragonBoard_410c_SD_Card_BootYou can now remove the micro SD card from your computer and insert it into the board.

Set the S6 switch to 0110 (boot from SD-card ,USB Host mode) as shown on the right.

Now power on the board, LED 1 will blink regularly, and after a while NOOBS should show up on your monitor or TV, asking you to choose the operating system to install.

DragonBoard_410c_NOOBS_AndroidAbout_Phone_Android_Qualcomm_Snapdragon_410Click install, and complete the process. Once it asks your to remove the SD card. Disconnect the power, remove the micro SD card, set S6 back to 0000, re-connect the power, and be very patient for the first boot. I propose you make some tea and coffee, drink it, go to relieve yourself, and come back later where Android will have hopefully booted.

My Linux kernel is now a little newer, but still dated in August. So they have not released any Android firmware for a few months. This should change for the December Software Reference Platform release.

If you want to go further with Android on the board, I recommend you read the Android User Guide (PDF),  and visit DragonBoard 410C documentation page on 96Boards.org.

DragonBoard 410c Android Benchmarks

I’ve also side-loaded a few benchmarks to find out more about the board performance. But first let’s see what CPU-Z reports.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Qualcomm Snapdragon 400/410 is properly recognized with a quad core Cortex A53 processor clocked between 200 and 1.21 GHz and an Adreno 306 GPU @ up to 400 MHz. The governor is set to interactive, so it may slightly negatively impact the benchmarks below. The system has indeed 1GB RAM, with 4.84GB internal storage available to the user out of the 8GB eMMC flash.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

After installing Antutu 5.7.1, it asked me whether I wanted to update to the 64-bit version for better performance. It’s the first time it happened in all my testing despite reviewing and benchmarking other 64-bit ARM systems before. The board scores 18,211 points in Antutu, quite lower as I expected compared to Amlogic S905 (quad core @ 2.0 Ghz -> ~28,000 points) and Rockchip RK3368 (octa-core @ 1.2 GHz -> ~34,000 points) processors also Cortex A53 cores.

Several smartphones have launched with Snapdragon 410 processors, so in theory it should be easy to find benchmark for comparison, but most of these phones come with a lower resolution 1280×720 display, and run Android 4.4. I still found Elephone Trunk with Snaprdragon 410, Android 5.1, and a 1280×780 scoring 21,500 points, so the score in DragonBoard 410c  appears more or less as expected.

Qualcomm_Snapdragon_410_VellamoVellamo 3.x should not run with Firefox at all, and only partially with Webview, so ignore the Browser scores. The board got 1,114 points in the multicore benchmark, or 786 points in the metal benchmark, which compares to respectively 1,572 and 763 with Amlogic S905 benchmark results.

DragonBoard_410c_3DMark_Ice_Storm_Extreme

Qualcomm DragonBoard 410c achieved 2,304 points in 3DMark Ice Storm Extreme compared to around 4,200 to 4,300 points in both Rockchip RK3368 and Amlogic S905 devices at the same 1920×1080 resolution.

Conclusion

As you can see from this initial review, 96Boards project is still very much work in progress on the software side, and I had wished some more common decision were made with regards to the specs (e.g. power supply, serial voltage, Ethernet…),  but at least the DragonBoard 410c platform should be interesting over time for people who want recent versions of U-boot, Linux and Android / Debian firmware, and source code, as well as an open source GPU drivers (Freedreno).

The next step should be to run Debian 8.2, but since the firmware is at the alpha stage with some issues like no HDMI audio, I may decide to take my time, and wait for the December release.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Qualcomm DragonBoard 410c Board Now Supports Windows 10 IoT Core

October 30th, 2015 3 comments

Microsoft announced Windows 10 IoT Core for Raspberry Pi 2 and Minnowboard MAX boards a few months, and now the company has added a new ARM board to their Windows 10 IoT program with the soon-to-be-available Qualcomm DragonBoard 410c development board compliant with 96Boards specifications.

Dragonboard_410c

Windows 10 IoT Core for DragonBoard 410c adds support for onboard WiFi and Bluetooth, as well as DirectX graphics on top of features already supported on the Raspberry Pi 2. To get started, you’ll need a computer running Windows 10, and follow DragonBoard’s Winfows 10 IoT Core guide.

I assume most people familiar with Linux operating systems won’t suddenly jump ship to run a Windows operating systems, but Windows developers who got used to work with Visual Studio may be more comfortable with Microsoft’s environment. Out of curiosity, I’ve checked out if anybody had done any project with Windows 10 IoT core, and was surprised to find 186 projects on haskster.io.

As a side note, Microsoft and Arduino also announced further collaboration including support for Arduino Wiring, Windows Virtual Shields, and Windows Remote Arduino Experience.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Qualcomm Unveils Octa-core Cortex A53 Snapdragon 430 and 617 Processors

September 21st, 2015 2 comments

Qualcomm has unveiled two new octacore 64-bit ARM processors for mid-range smartphones with Snapdragon 430 and Snapdragon 617 Cortex A53 SoCs, both of which support the recently announced Quick Charge 3.0 standard and embed LTE connectivity.

Snapdragon_ARMv8_LTE

Snapdragon 430

Snapdragon 430 key features and specifications:

  • CPU – 8x ARM Cortex A53 up to 1.2 GHz
  • GPU – Qualcomm Adreno 505 GPU supporting up to OpenGL ES 3.1+
  • DSP – Qualcomm Hexagon 536 DSP
  • Memory –  LPDDR3 800MHz
  • Storage –  eMMC 5.1, SD 3.0 (UHS-I)
  • Modem – Snapdragon X6 LTE – LTE Cat 4 (up to 150 Mbps DL/75 Mbps UL)
  • Wireless Connectivity – WiFi 802.11n/ac  (Qualcomm VIVE 2-stream with MU-MIMO),  Bluetooth 4.1 + BLE, GPS (Qualcomm IZat Gen8C)
  • Display – Up to 1080p on device and output
  • Video – Up to 1080p at 30 FPS; Codecs: H.264 (AVC), H.265 (HEVC)
  • Audio – Fluence HD noise cancellation technology
  • Camera – Up to 21 MP camera; Dual Image Signal Processor (ISP)
  • USB – USB 2.0 support
  • Charging – Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0
  • Security –  Qualcomm Haven security suite: Snapdragon StudioAccess Content Protection &  SecureMSM hardware and software foundation
  • Process Technology – 28 nm

More details about Snapdragon 430 may be found on the product page.

Snapdragon 617

Snapdragon 617 has the same CPU cores but clocked at higher speeds (at least for the CPU),  different GPU and DSP, and a faster Cat7 LTE modem:

  • CPU – 8x ARM Cortex A53 up to 1.5 GHz
  • GPU – Qualcomm Adreno 405 GPU supporting up to OpenGL ES 3.1+
  • DSP – Qualcomm Hexagon 546 DSP
  • Memory –  LPDDR3 933MHz
  • Storage –  eMMC 5.1, SD 3.0 (UHS-I)
  • Modem – Snapdragon X8 LTE – LTE Cat 7 (up to 300 Mbps DL/100 Mbps UL)
  • Wireless Connectivity – WiFi 802.11n/ac (Qualcomm VIVE 2-stream with MU-MIMO),  Bluetooth 4.1 + BLE, GPS (Qualcomm IZat Gen8C)
  • Display – Up to 1080p on device and output
  • Video – Up to 1080p at 60 FPS; Codecs: H.264 (AVC), H.265 (HEVC)
  • Audio – Fluence HD noise cancellation technology
  • Camera – Up to 21 MP camera; Dual Image Signal Processor (ISP)
  • USB – USB 2.0 support
  • Charging – Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0
  • Security –  Qualcomm Haven security suite: Snapdragon StudioAccess Content Protection, SecureMSM hardware and software foundation & Qualcomm SafeSwitch technology
  • Process Technology – 28 nm

You may find further information on Snapdragon 617 product page. There’s little information about Adreno 505 GPU used in Snapdragon 430, so it’s unclear how it will perform against Adreno 405 GPU used in the new Snapdragon 617 and existing Snapdragon 615 processor.

Smartphones based on Snapdragon 430 should start selling in Q2 2016, while devices featuring Snapdragon 617 are expected to be in commercial devices before the end of 2015.

Via Liliputing

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0 Promises to Charge Phones About 3x Faster Than Conventional Devices

September 20th, 2015 No comments

Qualcomm has recently announced the latest version of its Quick Charge technology that allows to charge supported smartphones much faster than typical smartphones using a 5V charger. The company claims that Quick Charge 3.0 enabled smartphones can typicallly charge from zero to 80 percent in about 35 minutes compared to almost 90 minutes with conventional devices.
Quick_charge_3.0
Quick Charge 3.0 adds support for Intelligent Negotiation for Optimum Voltage (INOV), a new algorithm developed by Qualcomm Technologies that allows mobile devices to request optimal power transfer (3.6V to 20V in 200mV increments), while maximizing efficiency, which – together with other improvements – increases power efficient by 38% compared to Quick Charge 2.0, and allows charging the device twice as fast as possible with Quick Charge 1.0. That means the voltage and amperage will change during charging between 3.6V to 20V by 200mV increments, instead of 5V, 9V, 12V, and 20V for QC 2.0. Tronsmart reports that when using their Quick Charge 3.0 adapter on a supported phone, the charge starts at 9V/2A, and then the voltage will slowly decrease to 5V until the battery is fully charged. The current will also vary from 2A to 3A during charge.

Quick Charge 3.0 Adapter by Tronsmart

WC1T Quick Charge 3.0 Adapter by Tronsmart (Under Development)

Quick Charge 3.0 will be supported in Snapdragon 820, 620, 618, 617 and 430, but it is an optional feature, so even if your phone features one of these processors, it may or may not come with Quick Charge 3.0. So far about 40 mobile devices and 100 accessories support Quick Charge 2.0, and QC 3.0 should be found in devices next year.

Via Liliputing

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Inforce 6410Plus Single Board Computer with Snapdragon 600 SoC Sells for $98 (Promo)

September 12th, 2015 15 comments

Inforce 6410Plus SBC is the successor of Inforce 6410 board, also based on Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 processor (APQ8064), but compared to the first version of the board, it adds GPS/Glonass, some MIPI CSI and DSI interface,and a few others changes. The normal price is $143, but it is currently selling for $98 for a limited period.

Inforce_6410PlusI’ve reproduced the specifications below as a reminder:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 (APQ8064) Quad Core Krait 300 processor  @ 1.7GHz + Adreno 320 GPU
  • System Memory – 2GB on-board PCDDR3, up to 533MHz
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC + μSD card connector + SATA interface
  • Connectivity:
    • 802.11 b/g/n WiFi (Atheros QCA6234)
    • Bluetooth 4.0 (Atheros QCA6234)
    • 10/100/1000bps Ethernet (Atheros 8151)
    • GPS/GLONASS
  • Video and Audio Interfaces:
    • μHDMI (1080p)
    • 2x MIPI-CSI2 (4-lane, up to 20MP camera @ 15 fps)
    • Dual MIPI-DSI (4 lane) – Primary : up to QWXGA (2048 × 1536), 60 Hz refresh rate; Secondary:  up to QHD (960 × 540), 60 Hz refresh rate
    • HD Audio and compact combo jack for headphone and mic-in
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0, 1x micro USB OTG
  • Misc I/O
    • 1x I2C, 1x SPI, 1x UART, UIM, 12x GPIO
    • On-board 34-pin expansion header to connect to Peripheral Abstraction Core (PAC) mezzanine adapter card
  • Debugging – via serial console on 3-pin header
  • Power – 12V/1.5A power supply
  • Dimensions – 10cm x 7cm x 1.6 cm (Pico-ITX)
  • Temperature Range – Operating: 0 to 70 C | Storage: -20 to 80 C
  • Relative Humidity – 5 to 95% non-condensing
The board can run Android 4.4 or Ubuntu Linaro, and support various software packages such as Vuforia, FastCV, Alljoyn, etc… Documentation including datasheets, user’s manuals, application notes and reference manuals can also be accessed, but only once you’ve got your board and can register an account with its serial number.
So how to you get the board for $98? Follow these simple steps:
  • Visit IFC6410Plus ordering page
  • Choose your operating system: Android or Linaro Ubuntu
  • Select “Without the starter kit” option if you don’t need the 12V power supply, micro USB cable and acrylic base. Adding this option will cost $6 extra, [Update: Despite the coupon apparently working with the $6 kit, the company informed the offer is only valid without the kit]
  • Click “Add to cart”
  • In the Discount codes section, type 6410Plus98 and click “Apply Coupon” to get a $45 discount.
  • Only one board per order.

You may also have to pay extra for tax and/or shipping. More information about the board itself can be found on Inforce IFC6410Plus product page.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 Promises Twice the Performance & Power Efficiency of Snapdragon 810

September 3rd, 2015 1 comment

Qualcomm has provided more details about Snapdragon 820 processor featuring custom-designed 64-bit ARM Kryo cores, an Adreno 530 GPU and an Hexagan 680 DSP, with claims that it should be twice as fast and consume half the power of Snapdragon 810 processor with Cortex A57 and A53 cores. Based on the chart below, it will also be faster than Snapdragon 620 with Cortex A72 and A53 cores.

Qualcomm_Snapdragon_820Snapdragon 820 will feature four Kryo cores (succeeding Krait cores) clocked at up to 2.2 GHz and be manufactured using 14nm FinFET process technology. Adreno 530 GPU is expected to deliver over 40% performance improvement over Adreno 430 GPU while also keeping power consumption 40% lower, a new Spectra camera dual ISP will support 14-bit sensors, and Hexagon 680 DSP adds a separate low power DSP for always-on sensor processing, and support for HVX (Hexagon Vector eXtensions) to be used for advanced imaging and computer vision. This will for example greatly accelerate low light image processing and drastically reduce power consumption for such task since it can be handled by the DSP instead of the CPU.

Low Light Shot (Left) Processed by Hexagon 680 DSP (Right)

Low Light Shot (Left) Processed by Hexagon 680 DSP (Right)

Qualcomm also introduced the Symphony System Manager that will make sure the CPU, GPU, DSP or ISP work together as best as possible in order to further improve performance and efficiency.

Snapdragon 820 should be found in devices in H1 2016, and not only in mobile devices, as the company expects the new processor to be used in automotive and embedded applications.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Linux 4.2 Release – Main Changes, ARM and MIPS Architectures

September 2nd, 2015 No comments

Linus Torvalds released Linux Kernel 4.2 last Sunday:

So judging by how little happened this week, it wouldn’t have been a mistake to release 4.2 last week after all, but hey, there’s certainly a few fixes here, and it’s not like delaying 4.2 for a week should have caused any problems either.

So here it is, and the merge window for 4.3 is now open. I already have a few pending early pull requests, but as usual I’ll start processing them tomorrow and give the release some time to actually sit.

The shortlog from rc8 is tiny, and appended. The patch is pretty tiny too.

Go get it,

Linus

Some notable changes made to Linux 4.2 include:

  • File systems
    • New features for F2FS including per file encryption
    • CIFS support SMB 3.1.1 (experimental)
  • Cryptography – Jitter Entropy Random Number Generator, Chacha20 stream cipher and Poly1305 authentication (RFC7539),New RSA implementation. See lwn.net for details.
  • AMD GPU driver added support for AMD “Tonga,” “Iceland,” and “Carrizo” systems. That driver has now over 400,000 lines of code…
  • Networking

Some of the new features and improvements specific to the ARM architecture include (With a focus on Allwinner/Rockchip/Amlogic/Mediatek processors often discussed in this blog):

  • Allwinner:
    • A10/A10s/A13/A20/A31/A23 – SRAM Controller
    • A23 – SMP support, architected timer support
    • A31/A31s – CPUFreq support
    • A33 – Machine support, Bring-up sharing most drivers with A23, pinctl driver, PIO controller
    • A80 – Architected timer support, USB support
    • AXP221 PMIC driver
    • New boards and devices: LinkSprite pcDuino3 Nano, Cubietech Cubieboard4, Gemei G9, Auxtek T004, Utoo P66, Wexler TAB 7200, MK808C, Jesurun Q5, Xunlong Orange Pi, Xunlong Orange Pi Mini, Sinlinx SinA33
  • Rockchip
    • Fixes for GPU DRM driver
    • RK3368 – Added pinctrl and Ethernet (dwmac) support
    • Device tree – Files relicensed under GPLv2/X11 dual-license, Enable A12 HW PMU events in RK3288 boards, and TSADC for Firefly and PopMetal boards
    • Fixed IR receiver bug and modify some GPIO code in RK3288
  • Amlogic – Added documentation to the clock controller… nothing else.
  • Mediatek
    • Fixed clock registration in MT8135
    • Small changes and fixes to pinctrl driver
    • Added driver for Mediatek MT8173 I2C controller
    • Some fixes for PMIC
    • MT7601U driver (WiFi device)
    • Pinctrl driver for MT8127, MT6397,
  • Qualcomm
    • Added SPMI PMIC Arbiter device tree node for MSM8916
    • Added 8×16 chipset SPMI PMIC’s nodes
    • Added MSM8916 restart device node
    • Added initial set of PMIC and SoC pins for APQ8016 SBC board
  • Samsung
    • Fix exynos3250 MIPI DSI display and MIPI CSIS-2 camera sensor
    • Bring back cpufreq for exynos4210
  •  ARM64
    • New processors: Hisilicon ARM64 SoCs (e.g. Hi6220)
    • Various fixes for ARM64 for ACPI, MMU, SMP, perf, and more.
    • Enabled EDAC on ARM64
    • Support for Hikey board, ARM Juno r1 board
  • Various changes to some Atmel and Marvell processors, see Free Electrons blog post for details.
  • Other new ARM SoCs & hardware platforms – Freescale i.MX 7Dual, ZTE ZX29670, Buffalo WXR-1900DHP, ASUS RT-AC87U, SmartRG SR400ac, Compulab CM-A510, and more

There has also been some interesting changes for the MIPS architecture:

  • many bug fixes: LLVM build issue, KVM fixes, fix seccomp MIPS64, fix for oprofile (get_c0_perfcount_int), Fix JR emulation for R6, etc…
  • Some code cleanups (fixed misspellings, removes some code)
  • Added support for appended DTP
  • Improvements for R12000, R3000, Broadcom BCM47xx and BCM63xx,  ATH79
  • Large patchset for Ingenic JZ4740 SoC
  • Added support to Pistachio SoC
  • New MIPS platforms: MIPS Creator CI20 board and XWR-1750 board

A complete changelog for Linux 4.2 should soon be published on Kernelnewbies.org, and you’ll probably also want to look at their ARM architecture and drivers sections for more details about to various platforms including ARM and MIPS. I’ve also generated a complete Linux 4.2 Changelog with comments only (13.9MB) using git (git log v4.1..v4.2 --stat)

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter