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Posts Tagged ‘qualcomm’

Intel Atom Z3580 MooreField SoC Shown to Outperform Qualcomm Snapdragon 801 in Graphics Benchmark

June 6th, 2014 1 comment

This is not exactly an independent benchmark, as Intel provided the results showing an Intel Atom Z3580 SoC with PowerVR G6430  @ 533 MHz outperform a Snapdragon 801 with Adreno 330 GPU @ 578 MHz (Galaxy S5) in FutureMark’s 3DMark benchmark by 20997 to 18144, or a little over 15%.  We’ve seen several CPU benchmarks before where Intel often has a edge over ARM based solution, but the previous generation with Intel Graphics was a bit weak on the graphics side, and this test seems to confirm, the new Intel smartphone SoC should provide very good graphics performance.

Intel_MooreField_Snapdragon_801

It appears Atom Z3580 might have also outperformed Snapdragon 805 with Adreno 420, as Anandtech reported an overall score of 19,698 in 3Dmarks with Qualcomm Snpadragon S805 mobile development platform (MDP), and noticed it was not the most GPU intensive test there is. So it’s still possible the higher score found on Intel’s smartphone reference design may be highly CPU bound, and more graphics benchmark are needed to really get a grasp on the upcoming Intel Moorefield 3D graphics performance.

Part of the setup at Intel’s booth at Computer 2014, was also an Intel Z3480 SoC (Merrifield) with a PowerVR G6400 GPU @ 533 MHz getting 16,407 points in the same benchmark.

Actual products based on Intel Merrifield and Moorefild SoC are expected to start shipping later this month. You can find more details and benchmarks results, released by Intel, for CPU and GPU on an earlier post about Intel Atom Z3460 & Z3480 (Merrifield) and Z3560 & Z3580 (Moorefield) Mobile SoCs.

Via Liliputing and Mobile Geeks

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Meetion MT-WF910 Wi-Fi Player Streams Audio from your Mobile Device to your Hi-Fi System

June 2nd, 2014 4 comments

There are several ways to play music wirelessly from your devices on decent speakers. One the best way might be one of the Sonos Wi-Fi speakers, but they costs a few hundred dollars. You could also use a ChromeCast or EZCast / Miracast / DLNA dongle, both of which are very cheap ($20 to $35), and would allow you to stream music to your TV from your Android or iOS mobile device, Windows PC or Mac OS computers, but these require you leave your TV on, unless you use a DLNA dongle with an AV port. Another option would be to use a dedicated Wi-Fi player such as Meetion MT-WF910 which can receive audio from mobile devices or computers via Wi-Fi, and output it to a 3.5 mm stereo jack or S/PDIF port.
Meetion_WiFi_Player Meetion Wi-Fi player specifications and key features:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Atheros AR9331 processor for Wi-Fi and audio processing
  • System Memory – 32MB DDR2
  • Storage – 8MB Internal Flash + micro SD card
  • Audio Output – 3.5mm stereo jack, optical S/PDIF
  • Connectivity – 802.11b/g/n standard (Max 150Mbps) with WPA/WPA2 encryption
  • Wireless Standards – DLNA and Airplay
  • USB – 1x USB port for mass storage or 3G dongle, 1x micro USB for power
  • Misc – Power and Wi-Fi LEDs, reset button
  • Power – 5V DC, 0.5 to 2.1A
  • Dimensions – 85mm x 85mm x 24.7mm.
  • Weight – 40 grams

Devices running iOS such as iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, you simply stream audio using Airplay, but Android devices require WiFiPlayer app from Meetion, although I’d assume other DLNA apps might just work. To stream audio files using a Mac or PC, simply install iTunes, and select “WiFiPlayer” as external equipment. You can connect to the device either via Wi-Fi Direct or through your home’s Wi-Fi router, and both local and online music are supported. The device can also play music directly from a micro SD card or a USB flash drive.

Charbax interviewed the company, and they showcased their device in the video below.

Meetion sells the device for $15 in quantities (1K), but the retail price including shipping is close to $40 on Aliexpress [Update: $35 here]. You can find instructions explaining how to use the device on the Aliexpress link, or visit Meetion MT-WF910 for more details.

Thanks to Oliveira for the tip. Via armdevices.net.

[Update: More technical details are available on OpenWRT forums]

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Prpl Non-Profit Organization to Work on Linux, Android, and OpenWRT for MIPS based Processors

May 28th, 2014 5 comments

prplIn what looks like an answer, albeit fairly late, to Linaro, the non-profit organization working on open source software for ARM based SoCs, a consortium of companies composed of Imagination Technologies, Broadcom, Cavium, Lantiq, Qualcomm, Ingenic, and a few others, has funded Prpl (pronounced Purple), “an open-source, community-driven, collaborative, non-profit foundation targeting and supporting the MIPS architecture—and open to others—with a focus on enabling next-generation datacenter-to-device portable software and virtualized architectures”.

The Prpl foundation will focus on three key objectives:

  • Portability – To create ISA agnostic software for rapid deployment across multiple architecture
  • Virtualization & security – To enable multi-tenant, secure, software, environments in datacenter, networking & storage, home, mobile and embedded
  • Heterogeneous Computing – To leverage compute resources enabling next generation big data analytics and mining

Initially there will PEG (Prpl Engineering Group) to take of the following projects for 4 market segments (datacenter, network & storage, connected consumers, and Embedded & IoT):

  • Linux -  Optimizations for enterprise, home and embedded Linux.
  • Android – Getting started with Android, and Android source code
  • Developer Tools – Used in conjunction with Android and Linux OS
  • Virtualization & Secure Supervisor – Secure multi-container frameworks
  • OpenWRT – Enabling carrier-grade features to complement OpenWRT
Arduino Yun

Arduino Yun

It also appears some low cost MIPS32 & MIPS64 development board and reference designs will be supported such as Newton wearable platform, Microchip chipKit WF32 board, and Arduino Yun.

Companies can join Prpl as Board Members or Contributors Members, and individuals can join the foundation for free to engage with the community and access source code and tools.

Since the the Prpl foundation has just been launched, there aren’t any tools or software available right now, but if you are interested in MIPS development, and possibly other architecture which may be part of Prpl later on, you can get more information and/or join the foundation on Prpl Foundation Website.

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Snapdragon 600 based IFC6410 Development Board is Available for $75 For a Limited Time

May 9th, 2014 12 comments

Despite their popularity with tablets and smartphones, I don’t see much developer community around Qualcomm Snapdragon processor, and only a few low cost development boards. One of them is Inforce Computing IF6410 pico-ITX board powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 (APQ8064) quad core processor with 2GB RAM, 4GB eMMC flash, Gb Ethernet, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, SATA,  micro HDMI and LVDS video outputs, etc.., that normally sells for just $149.

IFC6410 Single Board Computer (Click to Enlarge)

IFC6410 Single Board Computer (Click to Enlarge)

But the company is having a promotion for $75 with the coupon code “makerfaire” until May 18, or until the 500 units they’ve reserved are sold out. Shipping is not included in the price, and you’ll have to add about $50 for Fedex delivery (It may be cheaper in the US) for a total of about $125, which still probably makes it the cheapest “Cortex A15 class” board that you can get. The board appears to only officially support Android, and if you want to run a Linux distribution you may need to so so within Android (TBC).

Thanks to adem for the tip.

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Qualcomm Snapdragon 808 & 810 ARM Cortex A57/A53 SoCs

April 8th, 2014 2 comments

Qualcomm has already announced the Snapdragon 410, then Snapdragon 610 & 615, all three 64-bit SoCs featuring an ARM Cortex A53 targeting mid-range smartphones and tablets. Anandtech has reported that the company will launch their first 64-bit ARM SoCs for high-end devices in 2015. Snapdragon 808 and 810 will respectively feature 6 and 8 cores using 2 or 4 high performance Cortex A57 cores, and 4 low power Cortex A53 cores in big.LITTLE configuration.

Snapdragon_810

Both processor shares the same 9×35 core, LTE Category 6/7 integrated modem, an eMMC 5.0 interface, and be manufactured using 20nm process. Snapdragon 810 (MSM8994) will also come with an Adreno 430 GPU, support H.265 harware encode and decode, feature a dual 32-bit LPDDR4-1600 memory interface, and a 14-bit dual ISP camera interface. Snapdragon 808 (MSM8992) will have an Adreno 418 GPU, support H.265 hardware decode, feature a dual 32-bit LPDDR3-933 memory interface, and a 12-bit dual ISP camera interface.

Snapdragon 808 and 810 are expected to ship in devices in H1 2015.

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Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 & 801 SoCs Come in Six Flavors

March 12th, 2014 2 comments

Qualcomm usually does a poor job providing details about their SoC when they put out press releases or even in their website. It’s only thanks to a recent post on Anandtech that I’ve found out there are six different versions of Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 & 801. So two devices powered by Snapdragon 800 SoC may not have the same performance, although the differences are minor, I’d still consider this misleading.
Snapdragon_800_vs_801Snapdragon 801, for instance found in the Galaxy S5 (MSM8974AC), is just a revision (v3) from Snapdragon 800, so all 6 versions are MSM8974 processors, and the differences between models are modifications of the frequency for the CPU, GPU, ISP and memory interface, as well as the eMMC version (4.5 vs 5.0) and support for dual SIM (DSDA = Dual SIM Dual Active). All MSM8974 processors come with four Krait 400 CPU cores, an Adreno 330 GPU, dual ISP, a 64-bit wide memory interface and a Cat 4 LTE modem.

The frequency improvements may lead to some performance gains that may not be easy “felt” by the end users, but the most important upgrade maybe eMMC 5.0 which adds some new features and increases the maximum interface speed to 400 MBs, instead of the maximum 200MB/s achievable with eMMC 4.5. Of course the actual performance gain will heavily depend on the eMMC used in a given device.

Note: In case you are not familiar with acronyms or terms used in some of my articles, such as DSDA, you can refer to the technical glossary I’ve posted over the week-end. I plan to add terms I don’t know over time. Suggestions are also welcome.

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Categories: Qualcomm Snapdragon Tags: qualcomm

Nvidia Tegra K1 32-bit and 64-bit Benchmarked with Antutu

March 6th, 2014 3 comments

Nvidia announced their latest Tegra applications processors at CES 2014 with the Tegra K1 32-bit and 64-bit ARM SoCs, as well as Tegra K1 MVC for automotive application. The 32-bit version comes with four Cortex A15 cores up to 2.3 GHz plus a companion core, and the 64-bit version with 2 ARMv8 cores (Cortex A53?) clocked up to 3 GHz. Both SoC features a 192-core Kepler GPU, and we’ve been shown some high-end graphics demo (OpenGL, OpenGL ES, OpenCL…) with in the reference tablet. Some charts has surface showing both 32- and 64-bit Tegra K1 scoring well over 40,000 and with an excellent 3D graphics score.

Tegra_K1_AntutuThe benchmark was run in reference platform with 32-bit or 64-bit Tegra K1, as well as the Tegra Note P1761 tablet with a 32-bit quad core Tegra K1 processor apparently clocked at a lower frequency, and with a not-that-good flash. The dual core, 64-bit version of the Tegra K1 scored 43,617 points (@ 3 GHz), whereas the quad core, 32-bit version achieved 43,851 points in Antutu 4.0. The tablet however just got 38,323, which is still a pretty good, and possibly more relevant to what we’ve see in retail devices. The 64-bit reference platform runs Android 4.4.2 with Nvidia Tegra K1 ARMv8 dual core processor clocked between 510 MHz and 3,000 MHz, a display with 1920×1080 resolution, 2GB RAM and 32 GB RAM (Source screenshot). Tegra_K1_vs_Snapgradon_805

The chart above shows Tegra K1 clearly outperforming Qualcomm Snapdragon 801, which is the best processor available (almost) right now, as it is part of the Samsung Galaxy S5.  Please note, I could not trace the origin of the different charts, and I just know it was posted on some Chinese website, and I do not know exactly which hardware was used to test each processors. This is important because benchmark results may be smaller in a smartphone or tablet, compared to a development board as you can’t just put a huge heatsink in a mobile device. But the results are interesting nonetheless to get a rough idea of the likely performance.

I usually prefer more detailed comparisons, and Sam Mobile posted the benchmark for both the Qualcomm 801 (SM-G900R4) and Exynos 5422 (SM-G900H) version of the Galaxy S5. We only have the benchmark details for Exynos 5422 version which is compared to the Galaxy Note 3 in the chart below.

Qualcomm 801 vs Exynos 5422

Qualcomm 801 vs Exynos 5422

The summarize all this in a table.

Total DB  I/O Storage I/O 3D Graph. 2D Graph. RAM Speed RAM Op. CPU Float CPU Integer Dalvik Multitask
Tegra K1 (2x ARMv8) 43617 645 2534 10997 1585 5078 3059 2291 4207 3875 9349
Tegra K1 (4x A15) 43851 645 2402 10939 1594 2229 2285 5461 4929 3775 9592
Exynos 5422 (4x A15, 4x A7) 35445 540 780 10401 1642 459 2680 4839 5339 1065 7700

According to these results. A dual core ARMv8 processor will perform just as well as a quad core Cortex A15, except with tests relying on more cores (CPU tests). RAM performance is way better with a 64-bit processor as expected. The biggest surprise is that the ARM Mali-T628 in Exynos 5422 appears to be just as good as the Kepler GPU found in Tegra K1.  The things that kill the Galaxy S5 is poor database I/O, RAM speed, and dalvik performance. For some reasons it does not score very well with multitasking despite having 8 cores. maybe the current big.LITTLE implementation and/or Antutu do not leverage the eight cores yet.

As mentioned above, the Tegra K1 scores have been done on a reference platform, and such scores may not be achieve on mobile devices due to heat dissipation issues. SemiAccurate has published several articles about Nvidia Tegra K1 saying the numbers released by the company were deceitful, and their latest article claims a 12V/5A (60 Watt) was used by Nvidia for their Tegra K1 demo at CES 2014, the only problem, if the picture is correct, is that it was for Tegra K1 MVC for automotive applications which certainly does not have the same power requirements as mobile devices. Even though, for now, the numbers looks promising, albeit not amazing, we’ll have to wait and see actual retail hardware to get a proper idea of the performance and power consumption of Tegra K1.

Via PadHZ

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