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Posts Tagged ‘robot’

Autonomous Deep Learning Robot Features Nvidia Jetson TK1 Board, a 3D Camera, and More

January 25th, 2016 No comments

Autonomous, a US company that makes smart products such as smart desks, virtual reality kits and autonomous robots, has recently introduced a deep learning robot that comes with a 3D camera, speaker and microphone, Jetson TK1 board, and a mobile base.

Autonomous_Deep_Learning_Robot

The robot appears to be mostly made of the shelves parts:

  • 3D Depth camera – Asus Xtion Pro 3D Depth Camera
  • Speaker & Microphone
  • Nvidia Jetson TK1 PM375 board – Nvidia Terra K1 quad-core Cortex A15 processor @ 2.3 GHz with a 192-core Kepler GPU, 2GB RAM, 16 GB flash
  • Kobuki Mobile Base –  Kobuki is the best mobile base designed for education and research on state of the art robotics. Kobuki provides power supplies for external computer power as well as additional sensors and actuators. Its highly accurate odometry, amended by calibrated gyroscope, enables precise navigation.

The robot is designed for research in deep learning and mobile robotics, and comes with Ubuntu, Caffe, Torch, Theano, cuDNN v2, and CUDA 7.0, as Robot Operating System (ROS) set of open source software libraries and tools.

Kobuki Base

Kobuki Base

While there’s virtually no documentation at all on the product page, I’ve been told that the robot was built on top of TurtleBot open source robot, and re-directed to tutorials available via TurtleBot Wiki, as well useful resources for deep learnings frameworks such as Caffe and Torch, and Google TensorFlow Tutorials.

Autonomous Deep Learning Robot sells for $999 with manual charging, or $1048 with a self-charging dock.

Thanks to Nanik for the tip!

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Reeman Playmate is a Robot for Kids Based on Rockchip RK3288 SoC

October 26th, 2015 2 comments

Rockchip processors are usually found in tablets and TV boxes, but one Shenzhen based company called Reeman has designed Playmate robot for kids powered by Rockchip RK3288 processor, which can take picture, sing, dance, tell stories, be used for video chat, and goes to recharge itself automatically when the batteries are low.

Reeman_PlaymateThe Rockchip processor takes care of a 10.1″ touchscreen display, stereo microphones, speakers, camera, and artificial intelligence which recognizes Chinese and to a lesser extend English language, and take relevant actions, while the motors and sensors are managed by a few ARM Cortex M3 micro-controllers. The robot is still in development, and the company is working on adding a 3D camera to recognize objects, which will allow the robot to find its charging dock among other things.

The Android 4.4 robot will be available for 2,999 RMB (~$473) in Q1 2016 in China. Charbax filmed the robot at the company, and also had a tour of the R&D department.

You can visit Reeman Playmate product page if you will, but currently there’s virtually no information.

Via ARMDevices.net

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GroBotz Interactive Robot Project is Made of Easy to Assemble Smart Blocks (Crowdfunding)

February 25th, 2015 No comments

GroBotz makes me think of Lego applied to robotics. The project consists of modules such as motors, sensors, buttons, switches, or cameras that snap together in order to create a robot on wheels, games, toys, a musical instrument, or whatever idea you may have, and the hardware is then programmed using a graphical user interface.

Grobie

GroBie is made for GroBotz Modules

A Raspberry Pi board is used for the brain of the robot, and Microchip PIC MCUs for the smart blocks. The software is programmed in C# using Xamarin, the user interface is based on Unity, OpenCV is used for image processing, and during development a plastic part where printed with Makerbot, and schematics and PCB layout designed with CadSoft EAGLE.

The company has now come up with a number of modules as shown in the picture below.

GroBotz_Smart_Blocks

Your robot can then be controlled over Wi-Fi with GroBotz app which works on Windows, Mac OS, iOs, Android and Linux devices. The software provide a “wire editor” to link up to 127 modules together, and define the robot’s behavior. For example, you can wire a motor module to a joystick module, and easily control the motor with the joystick.

Grobotz_AppGroBotz has just been launched on KickStarter, where the developers look to raise at least $300,000 to go ahead with production. The simplest kit is composed of Light Game Cube and battery with a GroBotz T-Shirt and builders cube (which must be the plastic enclosure for the module), and requires a $50 pledge, but if you want something a bit more fun like the GroBie shown on the first picture, you’ll need to pledge $100 in order to receive 2 DC Motors, a brain  (Raspberry Pi), a battery and charger, a caster, and 2 wheels, and there are other rewards with for example $500 for 30 building blocks. Delivery is scheduled for August to October 2015 depending on the chosen perk. You may also want to visit grobotz.com for a few more details.

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Robotics News – Hack-E-Bot and RiQ Educational Robots, and Maker Club 3D Printed Robots (Pre-Orders / Crowfunding)

November 6th, 2014 1 comment

I’ve come across several robotic projects this week, so instead of picking one up, or writing a post for each, I’ll summarize the three products into one post. Two of the projects are educational robots based on Arduino, with the sub $50 Hack-E-Bot, or the more advanced RiQ robot, and Maker Club is a company providing the electronics for robotics kit, and you print the plastic parts with your 3D printer.

Hack-E-Bot Robot

Hack-E_Robot

Hack-E-Bot is an affordable open source robot that hopes to encourage children to learn about engineering, electronics, and programming. The robot is powered by Adafruit’s Trinklet Arduino compatible board, connected to a breadboard, and some add-on boards sensors. The basic version comes with a Sonar sensor, but more add-on boards are on the way including bump sensors, a buzzer, colored lights, a claw, a servo scanner, and so on.

The project is listed on CrowdSupply, and has been funded. The campaign is closed, but you can pre-order a full Hack-E robot kit for $47 delivered in December 2014. Taking pre-orders after the campaign is completed is apparently an option on CrowdSupply that’s not found in Indieogo and Kickstarter.

RiQ Robot Kit

RiQ_Robot_Kit

RiQ is a robot powered by an Atmel MCU (ATmega328P), with a Bluetooth, ultrasonic/light.infrared/touch sensors, LEDs, a servo driver, and up to four DC motors. It’s programmed with PCS Cortex 5.0 drag-and-drop software that reminds me of Scratch, and that can also show the actual Arduino code help learn actual coding. iOS, Android, Mac OSX, and Windows are supported, and the connection to the “PCS BRAIN” is made via  USB or Bluetooth. The company provides tutorials for six robots: “Scaredy Bot” whose afraid of light, “Art” drawing bot, “Red Rover” which can follow “lines’ made of IR light, “Bounced Bot” to demonstrate the use of buttons, “Bat Bot” for obstacle avoidance with the ultrasonic sensor, and “Illumi Bot” which flashed bright LEDs.

You can find more information, and/or pre-order RiQ Robot Kit for $199 on Edventures Lab’s RiQ Robot page. Shipping is scheduled for mid-November.

Maker Club 3D Printed Robots

Carduino

Carduino 3D Printed Robot

Maker Club bots are also controlled by an Arduino compatible board called MakerConnect with Bluetooth Smart (BLE) connectivity. But instead of providing complete kits with all parts, the company will simply send you the electronics, and provide the CAD files so that you can 3D print your own robots. This saves on shipping (in theory), makes it more fun to build the robot, and easier to get replacement parts.

They’ve launched a flexible funding campaign on Indiegogo, where you can pledge for MakerConnect board only (29 GPB / $46), or one of the four robotics kit: “The Grabber” robotic arm (39 GBP / $62), “Quadmonster” with four servos (45 GBP / $72), “Carduino” (59 GBP / $94), or “Insectoid” some sort of spider with 18-servos (69 GBP / $110). If you don’t own a 3D printer, you can also add 20 GBP / $32 to get the 3D printed parts for the kit. Shipping is not included in the price, but “standard shipping costs” are expected to the UK, and between 20 and 35 GBP to the rest of the world. Delivery is scheduled for March or April 2015 depending on the perk.

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Arduino Compatible Microduino JoyPad with TFT Display Lets You Play Games, Control Devices, and More (Crowdfunding)

September 30th, 2014 No comments

Last year, Microduino successfully launched their tiny Arduino board and shields via Kickstarter, and they are now back on Kickstarter with Microduino Joypad, an other Arduino compatible board that also happens to be a gamepad with a small OLED display. It can be used in standalone to control games on the tiny display, as a gamepad for PC or game console, a control interface for quadcopters and robots etc…
Microduino_JoypadMicroduino Joypad (main board) specifications:

  • MCU – Atmel ATMega328p/1284p/644p or 32U4 via Microduino Core, Core+, CoreUSB boards. (Not part of board but included in all perks)
  • Display I/F – TFT and OLED headers. Separate TFT display board included in all perks.
  • Controls – Left and right joysticks, 4 buttons, and left and right switches.
  • Audio – Microphone
  • Sensors – Light sensor, temperature sensor
  • USB – 2x micro USB ports: one for power and one for charging
  • Expansions – 2x UPin27 headers for Microduino shields.
  • Misc – Buzzer, vibrator, reset key, power switch, charging and power LEDs
  • Power – 5V – 1x micro USB for power, 1x Micro USB for charging, battery header

Microduino_Joypad_Tetris
There’s very little information about programming the Joypad, but since it’s based on Microduino board, you should be able to use the same Microduino interface, and documentation. Microduino is also open source hardware, and files are already available, and the company also intends to make the Joypad open source hardware once it ships.

Arduino has already made an Arduino gamepad called Esplora, and if you wonder what the difference are between Esplora and Microduino Joypad, the company listed the differences in the following table.

Esplora_vs_JoypadIf you are interested you can checkout Microduino Joypad Kickstarter campaign, where you can still pledge $54 for an early bird Joypad with Microduino Core, USB2TLL board (required for programming), and a USB cable, after which the kit will be available for $60. They also have various perks including quadcopter and self-balancing robot kits going for $202 and $214 respectively. Shipping is free to the US, and $20 to the rest of the world, with delivery scheduled for October and November 2014.

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Some Projects on Nvidia Jetson TK1 Development Board: Nintendo Emulator, USB3 Webcam, and Robotics

August 4th, 2014 6 comments

Nvidia Jetson TK1 is a development board powered by the company’s Tegra K1 quado core Cortex A15 processor, and especially a Kepler GPU that allows for OpenGL 4.4. It has shipped to developers around April/May, and some of them have showcased their projects, or tested some hardware.

Dolphin Emulator on Nvidia Jetson TK1

Dolphin is an emulator for Nintendo GameCube and Wii console that supports full HD (1080p) rendering, and run on Android, Linux and Mac OS,  and there’s also an Alpha version for Android. Ryan Houdek (Sonicadvance1), one of Dolphin’s developers, has leveraged Kepler’s OpenGL support via Nvidia’s GPU drivers, to port the emulator to the platform running on Ubuntu, but it should work as well on Tegra K1 hardware running Android such as XiaoMi MiiPad tablet.  You can watch Mario Kart: Double Dash demo running at full speed on the Nvidia board below. According to the developer, such framerate would be not achievable on Qualcomm 800 because “Adreno Graphics Drivers are grossly inefficient compared to the TK1”.

The latest version of Dolphin for Android (Beta) dates December 7, 2013, so I’d assume the optimizations shown above are not available right now. You can find more demos on Ryan Houdek’s YouTube Channel.

USB3.0 Webcam @ 1080p30

Another developer, Korneliusz Jarzębski, has tested e-con Systems USB3 See3CAM_80 HD camera connected to the board’s USB 3.0 port, and using the camera’s “See3CAM” application. I understand that all that needed to be done was to enable hidraw for USB devices in the Linux kernel, and it just worked out of the box. The application can perform real-time video processing, applying videos filters (invert, particles, etc..), as well as changing image characteristics such as brightness, contrast and so on.

You can find a little more on his blog (Polish).

“Super-Computer-On-Legs” Robot

The last demo I’ll show today is a robot powered by Jetson TK1 board that can walk to the nearest person it can see. The robot detects person via a camera and GPU accelerated face detection (about 5 times faster than CPU-only face detection). Beside better performance, the robot is pretty power-efficient as it only draws about 7 watts, and last about 45 minutes powered by a small LiPo battery. The robot was showcased at the Robotics Science and Systems Conference last month, and while attendees were impressed by the performance and power consumption, they still noticed the board was a bit too big for most robots, especially quad copters. But the platform clearly has potential, and Shervin Emami, the person behind the project who happens to work for… Nvidia, mentioned work is being done on smaller Tegra K1 computer on modules that be installed in a custom motherboard of a robot without unnecessary ports.

If you are interested in seeing more projects running on Jetson TK1 development board, you can consider following “Embedded Tegra & Jetson TK1 Blog” on Google+.

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Inforce Computing IFC6540 Pico-ITX Board Features Qualcomm Snapdragon 805, High Speed Interfaces

July 6th, 2014 8 comments

Inforce Computing has been working the successor of their IF6410 development board based on Snapdragon S4 Pro SoC with IFC6540, another tiny board for Linux and Android, yet with interesting features such as 802.11ac, SATA III, USB 3.0 host and device connectors, and powered by the latest Snapdragon 805 quad core krait processor.
IFC6440_Development_Board
IFC6540 specifications:

  • SoC- Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 APQ8084 Quad core Krait 450 @ 2.5GHz with 2MB L2 cache, Adreno 420 GPU with OpenGL ES 2.0 and 3.0, OpenCL, and RenderScript support.
  • System Memory – 2 GB LPDDR3
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC 4.5 (eMMC 5.0 also supported), 1 micro SD slot, and 1x SATA 3 interface
  • Connectivity
    • 802.11ac WiFi /ac (2.4 GHz/5 GH) + Bluetooth 4.1 via QCA6174
    • 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet via AR8151
    • GPS via QCA1530 + GPS antenna connector
  • Video and Audio Interfaces
    • 1 x HDMI (Type D)
    • Dual MIPI-DSI and Touch Screen
    • 3.5mm headphone and Line In audio jacks
  • Camera – 3 x MIPI-CSI
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB OTG port,  1 x USB 3.0 micro B (device mode only), 1 x USB 3.0 type A (host mode only)
  • Sensor – LMS330 Accel/Gyro
  • Debugging – 1x JTAG, 1x RS-232
  • Expansion – 1x 40-pin header with access to I2C, SPI, UART, GPIOs, and MPPs
  • Misc – Power, and Vol+/- buttons.
  • Power Supply – +12V (3A recommended)
  • Dimensions –  10cm x 7cm (Pico-ITX)
  • Temperature Range – Operating: 0 to 70 C; Storage: -20 to 80 C
  • Relative Humidity –  5 to 95% non-condensing
  • RoHS and WEE compliant

IFC6540_Block_DiagramThe company will provide an Android 4.4 Kitkat BSP, but a Fedora port might also be expected, as there’s one for IFC6410 using Freedeno drivers. The board can be used for development and in actual products for applications such as gaming, robotics, video conferencing, medical products, high end video, and video analytics. Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 is one of the few SoCs that fully support 4K: 4K output, 4K video playback, and 4K video recording. It also supports HEVC/H.265 4K playback, but I don’t think it can do 4K HEVC recording (TBC).

The board will be available as a development kit in Q3 2014 for $249 according to the product brief. There’s also a product page, which seems work in progress (specs incomplete), and I haven’t been able to try to order, so it does not look quite ready for taking orders just yet. The board appears to be manufactured in the USA,  if the “MADE IN USA” marking at the back of the board is any indication…

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Embedded Linux Conference 2014 Schedule

April 19th, 2014 1 comment

The Tenth Embedded Linux Conference (ELC 2014) will take place on April 29 – May 1, 2014 at the San Jose Marriott in San Jose, California. The event will feature 90+ sessions on embedded Linux, Android and IoT with over 450 attendees expected to attend. It will also be co-located with Android Builders Summit and the AllSeen Alliance Hackfest. Even if you can’t attend it’s still interesting to see what will be discussed at the event to get a grasp of on-going developments, learn a few things about different optimization techniques, and so on. So I’ve gone through the sessions’ description, and I’ve designed my own virtual schedule with sessions that could be of interest.

Embedded_Linux_Conference_2014April 29

Linux has taken the embedded world by storm.  Billions (with a ‘B’) of devices have now shipped with a Linux kernel, and it seems unstoppable.  But will the next 10 billion devices ship with Linux or with something else?  How can Linux be specialized for deeply embedded projects, as characterized by the Internet of Things, while still maintaining the network effects of community cooperation and sharing?  Is this possible or even desirable?  The startling truth might be revealed at this keynote. Or, Tim might just rant a bit about device-tree… who knows?

The past year has seen a remarkable growth of interest in super-low-power and super-low-form-factor computing, in the form of ‘wearables’, the ‘Internet of Things’, and the release of exciting new hardware such as Intel’s Quark and Edison SoCs. Taking advantage of this super-small hardware also implies the need for super-small operating systems and applications to match. This talk will describe a super-small-footprint Linux distribution called ‘microYocto”. The main focus will be the kernel and how we achieved what we think is close to the minimal possible kernel footprint, both in terms of static text size and dynamic memory usage. We’ll talk about the tools and methodologies we used and developed to analyze the problem, such as tracing and machine simulation, and will describe the various technologies developed and applied to achieving this minimalistic system.

Many community resources exist about boot time reduction. However, few of them are up to date and share the exact time savings that can be achieved on recent systems. This talk will detail today’s most efficient techniques to reduce boot time. For each of them, figures will be shared, obtained from recent boot time reduction projects and from the preparation of Free Electrons new workshop on this topic. If you attend this talk, you will know which optimization techniques are worth using first, and will save time not exploring techniques that won’t make a significant difference in your project. Don’t tell your boss, and this will leave your more time to contribute to community projects!

In this talk, Chris will describe the internal workings of the Android graphics stack from the Application layer down through the stack to pixels on the screen. It is a fairly complex journey, taking in two different 2D rendering engines, applications calling OpenGL ES directory, passing buffers on to the system compositor, Surface Flinger, and then down to the display controller or frame buffer. All this requires careful synchronisation so that what appears on the screen is smooth, without jitter, and makes efficient use of memory, CPU, GPU and power resources.

Linux-based platforms such as the Beaglebone and Raspberry Pi are inexpensive powerhouses. But, beyond being cool on their own, what else can you do with them? This presentation will step you through the process of building a Wi-Fi enabled, Linux-based robot that you can build without breaking the bank and without special knowledge of robotics and robotic controls.

Since last year, we have been working on supporting the SoCs from Allwinner, a Chinese SoC vendor, in the mainline kernel. These SoCs are cheap, wide-spread, backed by a strong community and, until last year, only supported by an out-of-tree kernel. Through this talk, we would like to share the status of this effort: where we were a year ago, what solutions were in place, where we are currently, and what to expect from the future. We will also focus on the community around these SoCs, the work that is done there, etc.

April 30

GCC is an optimizing compiler, currently most common compiler to build software for Embedded Linux systems like Android, Yocto Project etc. This tutorial will introduce specific optimizations and features of GCC which are less known but could benefit optimizing software especially for embedded use while highlight the effect of common optimizations. While it will focus on squeezing most out of GCC, it will also cover some of “pessimizations” to avoid and will tip the developer to write code thats more conducive (compiler friendly) for general optimizations. They will also get some contrast with other compilers when needed.

Throughout the last two years, a team of engineers at Free Electrons has been involved in mainlining the support for several ARM processors from Marvell, converting the not-so-great vendor-specific BSP into mainline quality code progressively merged upstream. This effort of several hundreds working days, has led to the integration of hundreds of patches in the kernel. Through this talk we would like to share some lessons learned regarding this mainlining effort, which could be useful to other engineers involved in ARM SoC support, as well as detail the steps we have gone through, the mistakes we’ve made and how we solved them, and generally our experience on this project.

This BoFs is intended to bring together anybody that tests the Linux kernel to share best practices and brainstorm new ideas. Topics may range from .config testing, module/built-in drivers, test methods and tools for testing specific driver subsystems, VM/scheduler/interrupt stress testing, and beyond. The discussion is targeted at Linux kernel developers, test engineers, and embedded Linux product teams/consultants with the common task of testing Linux kernel integrity. Attendees should have a firm grasp of building and deploying the kernel as well as kernel/userspace kernel APIs.

Several vendors are getting ready to start enabling the upstream kernel for their upcoming 64-bit ARM platforms, and it opens up a few questions on things that are not quite sorted out yet, especially on the embedded and mobile platforms. This is an open discussion on the issues these maintainers are anticipating, and what we should do about it.

Communication between components is necessary for effective power management in mobile devices. The System Power Management Interface, also known as SPMI, is a standardized bus interface intended to provide power-management related connectivity between components. Josh Cartwright will provide a high-level architectural overview of SPMI and discuss how to leverage the Linux Kernel software interfaces (expected to land in 3.15) to communicate with devices on the bus.

May 1

While Android has been created for mobile devices — phones first and now tablets — it can, nonetheless, be used as the basis of any touch-screen system, whether it be mobile or not. Essentially, Android is a custom-built embedded Linux distribution with a very elaborate and rich set of user-space abstractions, APIs, services and virtual machine. This one-day workshop is aimed at embedded developers wanting to build embedded systems using Android. It will cover Android from the ground up, enabling developers to get a firm hold on the components that make up Android and how they need to be adapted to an embedded system. Specifically, we will start by introducing Android’s overall architecture and then proceed to peel Android’s layer one-by-one.

This half-day workshop is aimed at embedded developers that want to use Android in their embedded designs.

The MIPS processor cores are widely used in embedded platforms, including TVs and set-top-boxes. In most of those platforms dedicated graphics hardware exists but it may be specialized for its use in audio and video signal processing: rendering of web content has to be done in software. We implemented optimizations for the software-based QPainter renderer to improve the performance of Qt —including QtWebKit— in MIPS processors. The target platform was the modern 74kf cores, which include new SIMD instructions suitable for graphics operations (alpha blending, color space conversion and JPEG image decoding), and also for non-graphics operations: string functions were also improved. Our figures estimate that web pages are rendered up to 30% faster using hand-coded assembler fast-paths for those operations.

Software Freedom Conservancy announced last year a renewed effort for cross-project collaborative GPL compliance efforts, including copyright holders from BusyBox, Linux, and Samba. Conservancy uses an internal system of communication and collaboration to take input from stakeholders to discuss and engage in compliance activity to ensure compliance with the GPL throughout the technology industry and particularly in the embedded device market. Compliance with the GPL is the responsibility of copyright holders of the software, and Conservancy helps those copyright holders pursue the work, so those developers can focus on coding. In this talk, the President of Conservancy will discuss how Conservancy handles compliance matters, what matters it focuses on, and how the copyright holders that work with Conservancy engage in a collaborative effort to ensure compliance with the GPL.

Ubuntu Touch is the new Ubuntu-based OS for phones and tablets. Announced at the beginning of 2013, it gives a new UI and design proposal, but also a new way of developing and supporting many different devices, using either the Android HAL or the traditional Linux stack to build the platform. This talk will go over the Ubuntu Touch internals, presenting the technical decisions and also the work that was done to bootstrap this new platform (camera, radio, video decode, GLES and etc) and the future challenges to support a single stack across mobile and the traditional desktop.

These are just a few sessions out of the 90+ sessions available at the Embedded Linux Conference and Android Builder Summit. You can check the full schedule to find out which sessions are most interesting to you.

If you’d like to attend the event, you’ll need to register online.

The attendance fees have significantly gone up compared to last year, at least for hobbyists, but include entrance for both ELC and Android Builder Summit:

  • Professional Registration Fee US$600 (Was US$500 until March 29, 2014)
  • Hobbyist Fee – US$150
  • Student FeeUS$150

After the events, many videos are usually uploaded by the Linux Foundation, and you should be able to find the list of talks with links to presentation slides oneLinux.org.

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