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Posts Tagged ‘ros’

Gumstix Announces Solution Kits for their CPU Modules and Boards

November 20th, 2013 2 comments

Gumstix has recently unveiled several solution kits featuring their Overo and DuoVero Computer-on-Modules (CoMs), Pepper single board computer, and several expansions boards, together with required accessories, and software packages, in order to help their customers getting started more easily. All these solutions are based on Texas Instruments OMAP3, OMAP4, and/or Sitara processors, and run Linux (Ubuntu or Yocto), and sometimes Android for the kits with displays.

Robotics Kit

Robotics Development Kit

The solutions kits target 6 different types of applications and/or markets:

  • Robotics
    • Robotic Development Kit (Pictured above) with one Overo AirSTORM CoM (OMAP3703), and RoboVero expansion board. The kit is better suited for motor control applications.
    • Mobile Robotic Development Kit with one Overo AirSTORM CoM, and Turtlecore expansion board to be used with iRobot Create.

    The kits ship with a Linaro (Ubuntu for Overo) system card and Robot Operating System (ROS) pre-installed.

  • Handhelds
    • 3.5″ Handheld Development Kit featuring Overo AirSTORM CoM with Alto35 cutomizable LCD touchscreen.
    • 4.3″ Handheld Development Kit with Pepper SBC and a 4.3″ LCD touchscreen

    Both kits provide Wi-Fi/Bluetooth connectivity, and Pepper SBC support Yocto Project Linux or Android , and the kit with the Overo CoM support Ubuntu, with Android coming soon.

  • Network Appliances (for IoT)
    • Barebones Wireless Appliance Development Kit with Overo AirSTORM CoM and Alcatraz Breakout board which provides access to 140 signals and 802.11 b/g Wi-Fi.
    • Overo Network pack featuring Overo Water CoM and Tobi expansion board to provide DVI display, 10/100baseT Ethernet, USB Host, USB OTG, USB console and Stereo Audio.

    Both kits support Linux (Ubuntu or built with Yocto).

  • Digital Signage
    • Home Theater Demonstration Kit with DuoVero Zephyr CoM (OMAP4) and an HTPC expansion board to provide an HDMI connector. From the website, it’s not very is the micro SD card is pre-loaded with Yocto Linux, XBMC, or an XBMC image built with Yocto.
  • Remote Data Collection
    • Barebones Remote Data Collection Development Kit featuring Overo TidalSTORM CoM (OMAP3730) and PintoTH expansion board providing access to USB OTG, 3.3V supply and level shifters.
    • Overo EVM pack with Overo Fire CoM (OMAP3530), Chestnut43 expansion board (LCD Touchscreen, Ethernet, USB host and Stereo Audio), and a 4.3″ touchscreen LCD display.
    • Remote Data Collection Development Kit featuring Overo TidalSTORM CoM and Tobi expansion board.

    All 3 kits ship with an SD card pre-loaded with Ubuntu (Linaro)

  • Education
    • Overo Summit Pack featuring an Overo Earth CoM (OMAP3503), and Summit expansion board to provide DVI display, USB Host, USB OTG, USB console and Stereo Audio. This kit apparently ships with 2GB? micro SD pre-loaded with Ubuntu Linaro. I’m not quite sure how it relates to education more than the other kits.
Overo EVM Pack, One of the Remote Data Collection Kits.

Overo EVM Pack, One of the Remote Data Collection Kits.

I’ve only listed the main parts of the kits. i.e. CoM, expansion board, and display if any,  but all kits also come with power adapters, a bootable microSD or SD card and relevant cables. More kits will be added over time.

The kits are available now for prices ranging from $189 to $422. More information is available on Gumstix’s Development Kits page.

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Gumstix Alto35 Customizable Touchscreen Board

June 1st, 2013 No comments

A few months ago, Gumstix introduced Geppeto, a web platform that allows you to design and order your own baseboard for Gumstix Overo systems-on-module within minutes. The company has just announced Alto35, an expansion board built entirely with Geppetto. The Alto35 replaces Palo35 Overo-series expansion board with the same features, but adding the possibility of customizing the board via Geppetto.

Gumstix Alto35

Alto35 with Overo Module

Alto34 expansions board features the following:

  • 3.5″ LCD resistive touch screen
  • Stereo audio in/out jacks
  • 3D accelerometer (STMicro LIS33DE)
  • RC servo
  • USB – 2x USB mini-B ports, including console port (FT232RQ USB UART)
  • LEDs in 4 different colors, 2 tactile switches.
  • 2×70-pin AVX Headers compatible with Overo COMs.
  • Power – 3.5V-5V

All Overo computers-on-module are compatible with Alto35 board, so you can just use existing software solutions such as Linaro Ubuntu, Robot Operating System, and the Yocto Project.

3D Rendering of Alto35 board in Geppeto

3D Rendering of Alto35 board in Geppeto

Alto35 is available for $89 including the display (not the Overo module), but what makes it interesting is that you can just clone the design in your web browser (preferably Chrome), modify it to your own liking, save and order. Within 3 to 4 weeks, you should get your own custom board delivered to your door. There’s a $1,999 setup fee on top of the board price ($71.43 without display), so this is only interesting if you plan to order several boards. Geppetto licensing allows you to keep your design private, but you can also opt to release it to the Geppetto community.

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A Selection of FOSDEM 2013 Events

February 1st, 2013 No comments

FOSDEM is a 2-day (or 3 if you include Friday beer event) event where over 5,000 members of open source communities meet, share ideas and collaborate. It’s free to attend, and there’s no registration, so you just show up to attend. FOSDEM 2013 takes place on Feb 2-3 (yep, this week-end) in Brussels

There are 7 main tracks where sessions are organized:

  • fosdem logoOperating systems
  • Open source challenges
  • Security Janson
  • Beyond operating systems
  • Web development
  • Miscellaneous
  • Robotics

There are also keynotes and devroom for a total of 488 sessions. Developers rooms that may particularly be of interest to readers of this blog are:

All in all that’s a lot of sessions, and even though I won’t attend, I’m going to select a few from the main tracks:

This talk introduces the Fedora ARM Project and in particular the work we are doing to bring Fedora to emerging 64-bit ARM server systems.

Where are we today, one year after the unveiling of the Lima driver. This talk will cover the Lima driver (ARM Mali 200/400), but also other open source GPU driver projects such as the freedreno driver (Qualcomm Adreno), open source driver for Nvidia Tegra, etnaviv project (Vivante GC) and cover the status for Broadcoms Videocore and Imaginations PowerVR GPUs.

Based on the speaker’s experience of getting the support for the new Armada 370 and Armada XP ARM processors from Marvell into the mainline Linux kernel, this talk will detail the most important steps involved in this effort, and through this, give an overview of those changes and summarize the new rules for ARM Linux support.

  • Sunday 11:00 – 11:50 – Firefox OS by Jonas Sicking

Firefox OS is the next product being developed by Mozilla. It’s an open source OS based on the web and following the principals which have made the web a success. A phone running recent builds of Firefox OS (it’s not a finished product yet) will be demoed, and  the technologies and ideas behind Firefox OS will be discussed.

The systemd project is now two years old (almost three). It found adoption as the core of many big community and commercial Linux distributions. It’s time to look back what we achieved, what we didn’t achieve, how we dealt with the various controversies, and what’s to come next.

How Aldebaran Robotics is using open source on their NAO robot.

This talk will provide an overview of the Robot Operating System (ROS), an open software integration framework for robots.

This talk describes how the automotive industry has moved to embedded Linux and Open Source to develop the next generation of In-Vehicle Infotainment (IVI) and how it has met the challenges along the way.

What, why, when, where and how SecureBoot changes the way we build F/LOSS

 

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Gumstix TurtleCore Expansion Board for iRobot Create

July 21st, 2012 No comments

Last month, Gumstix announced the TurtleCore expansion board for iRobot Create Programmable Robot, featuring 3 USB ports, several male-header pins with GPIO access, as well as standoffs and screws to support the TurtleCore in the Create cargo bay.. The TurtleCore is a baseboard for TI OMAP3 and Sitara based Overo COMs or Overo STORM series of COMs that replaces the Command Module on iRobot Create to provide a more flexible and powerful solution.

Baseboard for Overo COMs on iRobot Create

Overo COMs have very good Linux support (OpenEmbedded) with source code, tools and documentation available, including support for the Robot Operating System (GumROS) for high level programming. They released the hardware early so that the community could work on the software, and there have been some good progress as you can see from the video below.

You can already download the schematics and PCB layout file, but the software and instructions do not appear to be available publicly yet.

The TurtleCore is available for $89, Gumstix Overo COMs prices start just above $100, and iRobot Create can be purchased for $130.

Further information can be found on Gumstix TurtleCore page.

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Willow Garage Launches The Open Source Robotics Foundation (OSRF)

May 31st, 2012 No comments

Open Source Robot Foundation LogoWillow Garage announces the formation of the Open Source Robotics Foundation (OSRF), an independent, non-profit organization founded by members of the global robotics community whose goal is to support the development, distribution, and adoption of open source software for use in robotics research, education, and product development.

The OSRF Board of Directors is composed of the following members:

  • Wolfram Burgard. Dr. Burgard, a professor at the University of Freiburg,  heading the Laboratory for Autonomous Intelligent Systems. His major research interests lie in mobile robotics, state estimation and control, as well as artificial intelligence.
  • Ryan Gariepy, co-founder and CTO of Clearpath Robotics. Clearpath Robotics is a company specializing in the design and manufacture of unmanned vehicle solutions for industrial R&D.
  • Brian Gerkey,  Director of Open Source Development at Willow Garage who has worked on the open source Robot Operating System (ROS) since 2008. Dr. Gerkey will be CEO of the OSRF.
  • Helen Greiner, co-founder of iRobot and currently CEO of CyPhyWorks.
  • Sam Park, executive vice president of Yujin Robot, a south Korean company designing and manufacturing robots.

The foundation currently sponsors 2 projects:

  • Robot Operating System (ROS), a project that provides libraries and tools to help software developers create robot applications. It provides hardware abstraction, device drivers, libraries, visualizers, message-passing, package management, and more. ROS is licensed under the BSD license.
  • Gazebo,  a 3D multi-robot simulator with dynamics. It is capable of simulating articulated robot in complex and realistic environments.

If you want to get involved, the foundation recommends to work on the 2 above projects, although you can also be indirectly involved by working on the Arduino platform and the Make database that are both used in open source robotics projects.

The OSRF will participate in the DARPA Robotics Challenge that will start in October 2012 and offers a $2 million prize “to whomever can help push the state-of-the-art in robotics beyond today’s capabilities in support of the DoD’s disaster recovery mission.” The DARPA Robotics Challenge is planned to end in December 2014.

You can find more information on the Open Source Robotics Foundation page.

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Categories: Hardware Tags: arduino, gazebo, open source, robot, ros