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Posts Tagged ‘samsung’

Samsung Officially Announces Exynos 7 Octa big.LITTLE ARM Cortex A53/A57 Processor

October 16th, 2014 7 comments

Samsung started to commit code related to Exynos 7 processor to mainline kernel in August, but at the time details were scarce, and many tech websites referred to a Exynos 5433 64-bit processor from Samsung. Exynos 5433 for a Cortex A53/A57 SoC did not make much sense as the company recently announced Exynos 5430 based on Cortex A15 and A7 cores, so finally Exynos 5433 has been renamed to Exynos 7 Octa.

Exynos_7_OctaHere’s what we know about Exynos 7 Octa from information on Exynos 7 Octa page and an older Anandtech article about Exynos 5433:

  • CPU – 4x Cortex A57 cores @ 1.9 GHz , 4x Cortex A53 cores @ 1.3 GHz
  • GPU – Mali-T760 @ 700 MHz
  • Memory Controller – 2x 32-bit @ 825MHz (13.2GB/s b/w)
  • Display – Up to WQHD (2560 x 1440) / WQXGA (2560 x 1600) resolutions
  • Video – Advanced multimedia format codec (MFC) including support for H.265/HEVC @ 60 fps
  • Camera – Up to 16 MP 30fps rear camera, Up to 5MP / 30 fps front-facing camera, with dual ISP allowing for simultaneous video recording.
  • Process – 20 nm HKMG

A57 cores are said to provide 57% more performance than the A15 cores found in Exynos 5 Octa processors, whereas. Mali-T760 GPU should deliver up to 74% enhanced graphics performance over Mali-T628 used in Exynos 5 Octa.

Samsung Exynos 7 is used in the international version of the Galaxy Note 4 smartphone.

Via G for Games.

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Samsung Gear S SmartWatch and Tizen SDK for Wearables

September 11th, 2014 2 comments

Albeit Tizen struggle in the smartphone market widely reported by the tech press, devices from cameras to smartwatches, all made by Samsung, are currently selling with the new mobile operating system. Announced about two weeks ago, Samsung Gear S is the latest Tizen product launched by the company. The smartwatch features a 2″ curved display (Samsung likes curved displays), Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, etc.. and it can also make phone calls and access the internet over 2G/3G cellular networks.

Samsung_Gear_SSamsung Gear S specifications:

  • SoC – Dual core processor @ 1.0 GHz (Maybe Exynos 3250 like in Gear 2?)
  • System Memory – 512MB

    Samsung Gear S Description (Click to Enlarge)

    Samsung Gear S Description (Click to Enlarge)

  • Storage – 4GB internal storage
  • Display –  2.0” Super AMOLED touchscreen display with 360×480 resolution
  • Connectivity – WiFi 802.11 b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.1, A-GPS/Glonass
  • Cellular Network
    • 900/2100 or 850/1900 (3G)
    • 900/1800 or 850/1900 (2G)
  • USB – micro USB 2.0
  • Audio Codecs – MP3/AAC/AAC+/eAAC+
  • Audio Formats – MP3, M4A, WMA, AAC, OGG
  • Sensors – Accelerometer, Gyroscope, Compass, Heart Rate, Ambient Light, UV, Barometer
  • IP Rating – IP67 Certified Dust and Water Resistant
  • Battery – 300mAh Li-ion (good for about 2 days on a charge)
  • Dimensions – 39.9 x 58.1 x 12.5mm
  • Weight – 67g (Blue Black), 84g (White)

Contrary to most other (Western) smartwatches, Gear S can be used standalone to access the internet, make calls, send SMS, etc.. so it’s not only designed as a smartphone companion. The screen is larger than the previous Gear models, and apparently large enough to fit a QWERTY keyboard (Flesky), but you can always use voice recognition (S Voice) if typing on a tiny screen is not your thing. With GPS, an heart rate monitor, and other sensors, it should also be a decent platform for fitness applications, and the watch indeed  includes S Health and Nike+ Running apps for Tizen.

Engadget (and others) could try out the smartwatch at IFA 2014.

The watch should become available later this year, but the price has not been disclosed yet.

Samsung and Tizen have also recently released the Tizen SDK for Wearables 1.0.0 Beta3, which includes a set of tools for developing Tizen wearable applications, namely the Tizen wearable IDE, Emulator, tool-chain, sample applications, and documentation. The Tizen SDK for Wearable runs on Windows®, Ubuntu, and Mac OS X.

Tizen_Wearables_Architecture

Tizen Host & Wearable S/W Architecture

But if you want to develop and publish apps specifically for Samsung devices, you can visit Samsung Gear developer site for details, where you’ll also find Samsung Accessories SDK, documentation and tutorials. Host side (smartphone / tablet) apps can be developed using the standard Android development tools (e.g. Android Studio), and only Wearables  apps require the Tizen SDK for wearables.

The Tizen SDK provides the following API and features:

  • Enhanced Standalone Features - Network, call and location-based APIs to take advantage of the fact that the Samsung Gear S can connect directly to 3G networks without the need for a separate mobile device.
  • New Sensor APIs – Magnetic, Ambient Light, Barometer, and UV sensor APIs as well as Accelerometer and Gyroscope APIs.
  • Rich Notifications - Create a variety of notifications for the Samsung Gear S.

The Accessories SDK is used to transfer data between devices, for example for messages, data, and files transfers between a GALAXY device and a Gear device.

You can read Samsung’s Tizen SDK announcement for some details, a non-exhaustive list of apps already ported to Tizen for wearables.

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Samsung Unveils Galaxy Note 4 and Note Edge with Curved Display

September 4th, 2014 1 comment

IFA 2014 tradeshow is just starting today, and will last until the 9th of September, but several companies have made announcements just before the show. One of them is Samsung which announced Gear VR virtual reality kit, Tizen based Gear S smartwatch, as well as two new smarthones, Galaxy Note 4 and Note Edge, which will be the subject of this post.

Samsung Galaxy Note Edge

Samsung_Galaxy_Edge_Note_Note_4

Samsung Edge Note (Front), and Samsung Note 4 (Back)

Galaxy Note Edge is much different from most other phones thanks to its curved display on one side of the phone. Other specifications:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Snapdragon S805 quad core Krait 400 processor @ 2.7 GHz with Adreno 420 GPU
  • System Memory – 3GB RAM
  • Storage – 32 or 64 GB internal memory + micro SD slot (up to 64GB)
  • Display – 5.6″ Quad HD+ Super AMOLED (2560 x 1440 + 160)
  • Cellular Networking:
    • 2.5G (GSM/ GPRS/ EDGE): 850 / 900 / 1800 / 1900 MHz
    • 3G (HSPA+ 42Mbps): 850 / 900 / 1900 / 2100 MHz
    • 4G (LTE Cat 4 150/50Mbps) or 4G (LTE Cat 6 300/50Mbps)
  • Connectivity
    • WiFi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac (HT80) MIMO PCIe
    • Bluetooth 4.1 (BLE, ANT+)
    • GPS / GLONASS / Baidou
    • NFC
  • USB – micro USB 2.0 with MHL 3.0 support (HDMI output)
  • Camera – 16MP rear facing camera with auto focus and Smart OIS, 3.7MP front facing camera
  • Video Codec – H.264, MPEG-4, H.263, VC-1, WMV7, WMV8, Sorenson Spark, MP43, VP8, Recording & Playback: up to UHD
  • Audio Codec – MP3, AAC/AAC+/eAAC+, WMA, AMR-NB/WB, Vorbis, and FLAC with ~192KHz, 24 bit support
  • Sensors – Gesture, Accelerometer, Geo-magnetic, Gyroscope, RGB, IR-LED Proximity, Barometer, Hall Sensor, Finger Scanner, UV, Heart Rate Monitoring, SpO2 (Dependent on market)
  • Misc – IR LED for remote control feature
  • Battery – 3,000 mAh Li-ion battery, support for adaptive fast charging and QC 2.0
  • Dimensions – 151.3 x 82.4 x 8.3mm
  • Weight – 174 grams.

The phone will run Android 4.4 (KitKat), come with Samsung “S Pen”. The 160 pixel edge screen provides access to “Revolving Interaction, Immersive apps (Camera, Video, S Note), Ticker board, Express me, Quick Tools, Night Clock, etc..”. Other innovations include support for multiple windows, a front camera providing 90 to 120 degree shooting angle,  faster charging via Qualcomm Quick Charge 2.0, multiple microphones allowing for better noise cancellation, a voice recorder offering eight different directional voice tagging and a selective playback capability that allows users to isolate and listen to specific voices in a group conversation. Samsung also claims it’s the first time a UV sensor has been integrated into a mobile device.

You may want to watch the video below to better understand what’s possible with the curved display, for example having video control keys, while playing a video.

Samsung Galaxy Note 4

Samsung Edge Note (Front), and Samsung Note 4 (Back)

Samsung Galaxy Note 4

Let’s compare Note Edge to Samsung Galaxy Note 4:

  • SoC (depends on market)
    • Qualcomm Snapdragon S805 quad core Krait 400 processor @ 2.7 GHz with Adreno 420 GPU
    • Samsung Exynos 5430 with four ARM Cortex A15 cores @ 1.9 GHz, four ARM Cortex A7 cores @ 1.3 GHz and Mali-T628MP6 GPU
    • Samsung Exynos 7 Octa with four ARM Cortex A57 cores @ 1.9 GHz, four ARM Cortex A53 cores @ 1.3 GHz and Mali-T760MP? GPU
  • System Memory – 3GB RAM
  • Storage – 32 GB internal memory + micro SD slot (up to 64GB)
  • Display – 5.7″ Quad HD Super AMOLED (2560 x 1440)
  • Cellular Networking:
    • 2.5G (GSM/ GPRS/ EDGE): 850 / 900 / 1800 / 1900 MHz
    • 3G (HSPA+ 42Mbps): 850 / 900 / 1900 / 2100 MHz
    • 4G (LTE Cat 4 150/50Mbps) or 4G (LTE Cat 6 300/50Mbps)
  • Connectivity
    • WiFi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac (HT80) MIMO PCIe
    • Bluetooth 4.1 (BLE, ANT+)
    • GPS / GLONASS / Baidou
    • NFC
  • USB – micro USB 2.0 with MHL 3.0 support (HDMI output)
  • Camera – 16MP rear facing camera with auto focus and Smart OIS, 3.7MP front facing camera
  • Video Codec – H.264, MPEG-4, H.263, VC-1, WMV7, WMV8, Sorenson Spark, MP43, VP8, Recording & Playback: up to UHD
  • Audio Codec – MP3, AAC/AAC+/eAAC+, WMA, AMR-NB/WB, Vorbis, and FLAC with ~192KHz, 24 bit support
  • Sensors – Gesture, Accelerometer, Geo-magnetic, Gyroscope, RGB, IR-LED Proximity, Barometer, Hall Sensor, Finger Scanner, UV, Heart Rate Monitoring, SpO2 (Dependent on market)
  • Misc – IR LED for remote control feature
  • Battery – 3,200 mAh Li-ion battery, support for adaptive fast charging and QC 2.0
  • Dimensions – 153.5 x 78.6 x 8.5 mm
  • Weight – 176 grams.

The specs are very similar. Beside the obvious difference with displays, Note 4 will be sold with different SoCs depending on the market, and it comes with a slightly larger 3,200 mAh battery. The rest of the features, including innovations, listed for the Note Edge appears to be the same.

The Galaxy Note 4 will be available in worldwide starting in October, and the Galaxy Note Edge will be available select markets. Pricing have not been disclosed for either phones.

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Samsung Exynos 7 ARM Cortex A57 Processor Linux Code Submitted

August 28th, 2014 6 comments

Samsung has not announced any 64-bit processor yet, but according to a recent patchset Exynos 7 may be their first 64-bit ARM SoC, and it will be based on the faster Cortex A57 cores. A quick way to learn a little more is to check the device tree file (exynos7.dtsi).

Samsung_Exynos_7Here’s an interesting snippet:

+	cpus {
+		#address-cells = ;
+		#size-cells = ;
+
+		cpu@0 {
+			device_type = "cpu";
+			compatible = "arm,cortex-a57", "arm,armv8";
+			reg = ;
+		};
+	};

As it stands, Exynos7 would be a single core Cortex A57 processor. This sounds unlikely that a company would launch a single core processor at this stage, so it’s probably early code that may not support all cores just yet.  We also know Samsung uses ESPRESSO board for development with Samsung Exynos 7 processor and 3 GB RAM.

Thanks to David for the tips.

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Embedded Linux Conference Europe 2014 Schedule – IoT, ARM vs x86, Optimization, Power Management, Debugging…

August 21st, 2014 2 comments

The Embedded Linux Conference Europe (ELC 2014), CloudOpen, and LinuxCon Europe will jointly take place at the Congress Centre Düsseldorf, in Germany on October 13 – 15, 2014. The 3-day events will consists of keynotes, presentations, and tutorials. Each day will open with two or three keynotes by speakers including  Jim Zemlin (Executive Director, Linux Foundation), and Jono Bacon (XPRIZE), followed by presentation and tutorials. There will be 45 presentations for ELCE, 58 for LinuxCon, and 47 for CloudOpen, I’ll make a virtual schedule with a few sessions part of the Embedded Linux Conference Europe “track”.

ELCE_2014

Monday, October 13

When faced with a performance problem, the initial steps towards a solution include identifying the sections of code responsible and the precise reasons they are time-consuming. To this end, the ‘perf’ profiling tools provide valuable insight into the characteristics of a program. The presentation will show, using real-world examples, how the ‘perf’ tools can be used to pinpoint the parts of a program in need of optimization.

It’s not uncommon to produce embedded Linux based devices that end up with long and inconvenient boot times – yet eliminating boot time delays can be difficult and time consuming. Furthermore once a minimal boot time has been achieved it’s often just as difficult to maintain it through subsequent software development.

In this presentation, Andrew unfolds 12 keys lessons learned in his experience of boot time reduction. These lessons provide an insight into the common causes of boot time delays, why they are present and how they can be overcome. In describing these lessons Andrew will also take you on a journey that indicates why file system benchmarks should probably be ignored (with respect to boot time reduction) and a journey that illustrates that the Linux kernel is rarely the worst offender for boot delays.

With the introduction of Bluetooth Smart (aka Low Energy), the ubiquity of Bluetooth is more and more present. Millions of devices support Bluetooth Low Energy and with Bluetooth 4.1 specification, they are ready for the Internet of Things. This presentation will give an overview of Bluetooth Low Energy, and its usage for the Internet of Things. It will also introduce 6loWPAN over Bluetooth and show the possibilities this opens for Linux.

With experience developing community based open hardware for both the ARM based PandaBoard project and the x86 based MinnowBoard project, this presentation will provide a detailed comparison of the pros and cons of each platform with highlights of what each platform can learn from the other. Not only limited to the hardware aspect of the platforms, but also discuss community, software, corporate and general embedded aspects.

For almost as long as there have been deployments of Linux, there has been someone wondering “how can I get the device started quicker?” and “how do I configure some redundancy, easily, in case something goes wrong?”. And for the longest time, the answer has been “hack this and this and that” or “hire these consultants, they have done it before”. In this presentation, Tom will show what you need to turn on and the prep work required for, getting a lot of those items out of the box in U-Boot, what the hardware (and/or ROM) needs to do, and the what works is left going forward.

Got a question, comment, gripe, praise, or other communication for the Yocto Project and/or OpenEmbedded? Or maybe you’d just like to learn more about these projects and their influence on the world of embedded Linux? Feel free to join us for an informal BoF.

Tuesday, October 14

While user experiences are increasingly moving to 3D, rendering of 2D content remains at the core of how we interact with computer applications today. Skia is an open-source project maintained by Google whose goal is to bring the best 2D graphics library to a variety of targets, from mobile to desktop and embedded. Skia is used in highly popular projects like Mozilla Firefox, the Chromium browser and Android.

This talk will introduce Skia to developers and users, giving an overview of its design, architecture and features. It will also discuss briefly how hardware acceleration improves performance of Skia in the context of new devices, form-factors and the industry shift to mobile; with focus set on Linux and Android platforms.

The 4.4 KitKat release includes the results of “Project Svelte”: a set of tweaks to the operating system to make it run more easily on devices with around 512 MB RAM. This is especially important for people working with Android Wearables and “Embedded Android”, that is, implementing Android on devices at the lower end of the Android ecosystem. A large part of the problem is knowing how much RAM is really being used. Android offers a variety of tools for the purpose: procrank, procmem, meminfo and procstats, which Chris covers in the first part of the talk. In the second part, he takes a real-world example and show the practical steps you can take to optimize memory use including tuning the size of the Dalvik heap, enabling KSM (Kernel samepage merging) and swap to zRAM.

Android has relied from its early days on the Linux kernel for sandboxing the processes it runs. Yet, the permission model presented to app developers is significantly different from the Unix permission model. What’s the relationship between those two models? How is Android’s app security framework tied to the Linux kernel’s security model? More recently, Android has started using SELinux and has been extended by SEAndroid to support similar functionality. How is SELinux used by Android and what is SEAndroid about? Furthermore, how does Android provide support for multiple users?

This talk will explore Android’s security model in great detail and explain how the functionality found in the kernel is used to isolate user processes and the SE enhancements are leveraged by Android. As we’ll see, there are quite a few moving parts in Android’s security model.

Since last year, Free Electrons has been working on supporting the SoCs from Allwinner, a Chinese SoC vendor, in the mainline kernel. These SoCs are cheap, wide-spread, backed by a strong community and, until last year, only supported by an out-of-tree kernel. Through this talk, Maxime will share the status of this effort: the status a year ago, what solutions were in place, where we are currently, and what to expect from the future. He will also focus on the community around these SoCs, the work that is done there, etc.

Enlightenment Foundation Library is a set of libraries designed to use the full potential of any hardware to do great UI. It has been designed with the embedded devices in mind, but it is a desktop class toolkit. Being done in C, it is providing a stable API/ABI, high efficiency, low memory and low battery usage for all kind of Linux devices. Enabling development of modern UI adapted to any hardware that run Linux. These are the reason why Samsung uses it in its Tizen devices. This talk, after a short overview of what this libraries cover, will focus on this year improvement, and where it is heading. It will also be an opportunity to learn about project around EFL that will help people develop product with it. And it would also be a good opportunity to see where EFL are used with some real use case.

Wednesday, October 15

A major issue the community faces is the lack of power measurement (PM) instrumentation, coupled with poor integration: development boards not designed for it, expensive high-precision lab equipment not accessible to hobbyists (plus limited Linux support), limited low-cost solutions (precision, sampling rate) to monitor high-performance SoC (System On Chips) platforms (e.g. smartphones, tablets, IoT, …). After a brief introduction to the problematic (PM techniques, sense resistor / ADC selection, …) and a comparative study of existing solutions, this presentation will focus on a new upcoming initiative to close these gaps and bring a full-blown multi-channel but low-cost power (and temperature) measurement equipment to the community, including the definition of an open standard PM connector. After having covered motivations, challenges, key decisions, a live demo will close the talk.

In 2013, at the Embedded Linux Conference in Europe in Edinburgh, there was a race between a dog and a blimp. It was said that despite the dogs win, that the blimp had participated in the miracle of flight. In 2014, John wants to show that the brains of that dog can be transplanted and that it too, can participate in the miracle of flight. The talk is mainly targeting taking an off the shelf embedded platform, Minnowboard Max, and it’s use in UAVs, specifically quad-copters. With the ability to do real time computer vision, as well as various GPIO capabilities he will explore the directions that significantly more autonomous UAVs can take with Linux and embedded platforms using, mostly, off the shelf components.

There have been many presentations on what a device tree looks like and how to create a device tree. This talk instead examines how the Linux kernel uses a device tree. Topics include the kernel device tree framework, device creation, resource allocation, driver binding, and connecting objects. Troubleshooting will consider initialization, allocation, and binding ordering; kernel configuration; and driver problems.

Providing real-time capabilities to a general purpose operating system is an outstanding technical problem, and Linux Preempt-RT has been developed for 10 years for this goal. In this presentation, Jim proposes a lightweight open source para-virtualization layer, called “rtmux”, using resource-multiplexing techniques to provide a highly deterministic RT environment for Linux/ARM. Typically, less than 500 lines modification against Linux kernel are required to enable rtmux accompanied by POSIX/PSE51 compatible runtime.

During the last 2.5 years, a team of engineers at Free Electrons has been involved in mainlining the support for several ARM processors from Marvell, converting the not-so-great vendor-specific BSP into mainline quality code progressively merged upstream. This effort of several hundreds working days, has led to the integration of hundreds of patches in the kernel. Through this talk, Thomas will share some lessons learned regarding this mainlining effort, which could be useful to other engineers involved in ARM SoC support, as well as detail the steps Free Electrons engineers have gone through, the mistakes made and how they’ve been solved, as well as their overall experience on this project.

To make your own schedule matching your interests, you can check out the events’ program.

To attend the conference, you can register online.

The fees are listed as follows:

  • All-access Registration Fee – $600 until August 22 (tomorrow), $750 until October 2, and $850 afterwards
  • Attendee Networking Pass Registration – No access to conference sessions. $250 until August 22, $300 afterwards.
  • Student Registration Fee – $200 (valid student id required).
  • Registration Discount Scholar – $300. For active open source community members who can’t be sponsored by their company. .

Fees are significantly higher than last year, because there are only all-in-one (ELCE, CloudOpen and LinuxCon )options, and you can’t simply register to one single event.

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Samsung Announces Exynos 5430 SoC, Manufactured with 20nm Process

August 14th, 2014 4 comments

Samsung already have a few octa-core big.LITTLE SoCs part of Exynos 5 Octa family with Exynos 5410, Exynos 5420, and Exynos 5422/5800, all based on 28nm process. The company has just announced a new Exynos 5 Octa processors with Exynos 5430, but this time manufactured using 20nm High-K Metal Gate (HKMG) process technology providing 25% less power consumption compared to 28nm Exynos SoCs.

Samsung_Exynos_5430

Exynos 5430 SoC will feature four ARM Cortex A15 cores at 1.8 GHz, four Cortex A7 cores at 1.3 GHz, supports WQHD (2560×1440) and WQXGA (2560 x 1600) displays using hibernation display and Mobile Image compression (MIC) in order to lower power consumption. It also said to support HDMI, come with a Multi Format Codec (MFC) supporting HEVC/H.265 decoding, as well as an enhanced dual ISP, and up to 17GB/s of memory bandwidth. That’s about all the information I could get at this point. The CPU core frequencies are lower than Exynos 5422, but the maximum memory bandwidth appears to be higher (17GB/s vs 14.9GB/s), and of course the power consumption is significantly lower. It will also be found in the recently announced Galaxy Alpha smartphone.

More details should eventually surface on Samsung Exynos 5430 page.

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Linaro 14.07 Release with Linux Kernel 3.16 and Android 4.4

August 1st, 2014 No comments

Linaro 14.07 has just been released with Linux Kernel 3.16-rc6 (baseline), Linux Kernel 3.10.50 (LSK), and Android 4.4.4.

This month, Linaro has continued development on Juno 64-bit ARM development board, as well as other member boards from Broadcom (Capri), Qualcomm (IFC6410), Hisilicon D01, Samsung (Arndale / Arndale Octa), etc.. Android have been upgraded to version 4.4.4 with images released for Pandaboard, Arndale, Nexus 10, and Nexus 7, built with Linaro GCC 4.9.

Here are the highlights of this release:

  • Linux Linaro 3.16-rc6-2014.07 released
    • GATOR version 5.18 (same version as in 2014.04)
    • updated basic Capri board support from Broadcom LT. Good progress in upstreaming the code: now the topic has 21 patch on top of v3.16-rc4 vs 53 patches on top of v3.15 in 2014.06 cycle
    • removed cortex-strings-arm64 topic as the code is accepted into the mainline
    • new topic from Qualcomm LT to add IFC6410 board support
    • updated Versatile Express ARM64 support (FVP Base and Foundation models, Juno) from ARM LT. cpufreq support for Juno has been added.
    • updated Versatile Express patches from ARM LT
    • more HiP0x Cortex A15 family updates from HiSilicon LT
    • switched to mainline support for Arndale and Arndale-octa boards
    • updated llvm topic (follows the community llvmlinux-latest branch)
    • Big endian support (the 2014.05 topic version rebased to 3.16 kernel)
    • removed ftrace_audit topic as the code is accepted into the mainline
    • config fragments changes – added ifc6410.conf
  • Linaro Toolchain Binaries 2014.07 released – Based on GCC 4.9 and updated to latest Linaro TCWG releases:  Linaro GCC 4.9-2014.07 & Linaro binutils 2.24.0-2014.07
  • Linaro Android 14.07 released
    • built with Linaro GCC 4.9-2014.07
    • Pandaboard, Arndale, Nexus 10, Nexus 7 upgraded to Android 4.4.4.
    • LSK Engineering build moved back to 4.4.2.
    • Android LSK v3.14 CI loop added
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2014.07
    • Integrated Linaro GCC 4.9-2014.07
    • Integrated Linaro EGLIBC 2.19-2014.07
    • Integrated Linaro binutils 2.24.0-2014.07
    • Upstreaming:
      • fixes recipes related to oe-core autotools update
      • cleaned up overlayed recipes
      • updated PM QA to 0.4.12
  • Linaro Ubuntu 14.07 released
    • added gstreamer 1.0
    • updated packages: ARM trusted firmware (support latest FVP models), PM QA (0.4.12), LSK 3.10.49/3.14.13 and linux-linaro 3.16-rc6 kernels.
  • Integrate ARMv8 Big endian systems into LAVA and CI
  • Migrate Linaro Android builds to 4.9 Linaro toolchain
  • LSK: add ARMv8 kernel + arm32 rootfs CI loop
  • Package rt-app
  • LSK: enable member kernel configs for build testing

You can visit https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1407/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB, LMB (Linaro Member Builds), and community builds, as well as Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain components.

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