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Posts Tagged ‘sdk’

SDK Released for Steam Link Based on Marvell ARMADA 1500 Mini Processor

January 27th, 2016 1 comment

Steam Link is a small $50 device that streams PC Games played from Steam PC or Steam Machine to your TV up to 1080p resolution through your home network, and Valve has recently released an SDK to allow developers creating their own apps.

Steam_LinkBut before getting into the SDK features, let’s check out the hardware. The company (Valve) did not provide many details, but some users torn it down, so the hardware specs are not a secret anymore.

  • SoC – Marvell DE3005-A1 ARMv7 processor @ 1.0 GHz with OpenGL ES2.0 capable GPU
  • System Memory –  512MB RAM (Micron MT41K256M16LY-107)
  • Storage – 4GB NAND flash (Micron MT29F32G08CBAC)
  • Video Output – HDMI up to 1080p60
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet, WiFi 802.11 b/g/n/ac and Bluetooth 4.0 LE via Marvell 88W8897 wireless chip
  • USB – 3x USB 2.0 host ports
  • Power Supply – 5V via power barrel
  • Dimensions – N/A

Marvell DE3005-A1 is also known as Marvell ARMADA 1500 mini used in the first ChromeCast.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Steam Link SDK is available on github, and includes support for OpenGL ES 2.0, Qt 5.4, and SDL 2.0, some samples, Linux kernel 3.18 source code, a rootfs, a GCC toolchain, and some scripts. There’s about 256MB RAM and 500 MB storage available for custom applications. So it’s some ways Steam Link is an ARM Linux board with limited resources, a little bit like a Raspberry Pi 1 board.

One developer (Slouken) has already ported Kodi to the device with the code available on Github. It is said to be running, but rather slowly, and with software decode through ffmpeg only, and it’s not clear whether hardware video decoding APIs are available for the platform.

Thanks to Harley for the tip.

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Categories: Hardware, Linux, Marvell Armada Tags: games, kodi, Linux, sdk, valve

Intel RealSense Devkit and Lenovo Smartphone to Feature Project Tango 3D Mapping Technology

January 13th, 2016 No comments

Project Tango is a project launched in 2014 by Google ATAP that aims at creating 3D map of your environment using 3D motion tracking with depth sensing for tracking your movements in 3D, precise and quick measurements, augmented reality and more. The first Project Tango development kit was a tablet based on Nvidia TegraK1, but Google recently announced that Lenovo planned to launch the first consumer smartphone with the technology.

Renderings only, not the actual product

Renderings only, not the actual product

Beside the announcement that there are going to make a phone, the company did not provide many other details so far, but it should feature a screen smaller than 6.5″ and cost less than $500. The main reason Google posted about this before CES 2016 was probably to reach out to developers who can submit the app idea to be features on the first Tango phone by February 16, 2015 with the following materials:

  • Project schedule including milestones for development
  • Visual mockups of your idea including concept art
  • Smartphone app screenshots and videos, such as captured app footage
  • Appropriate narrative including storyboards, etc.
  • Breakdown of your team and its members
  • One pager introducing your past app portfolio and your company profile

Selected developers will be contacted by March 15, 2016. You can submit your proposal on Project Tango’s App Incubator. Eventually, more details should become available on Lenovo’s Project Tango smartphone page.

Intel also unveiled a smartphone development kit featuring a RealSense camera with support for RealSense and Project Tango SDKs.

Intel_RealSense_Devit_Project_TangoIntel RealSense Smartphone developer kit specifications:

  • SoC – Intel Atom x7-Z8700 quad core processor with Intel HD graphics
  • System Memory – 2GB RAM
  • Storage – 64GB flash
  • Display – 6″ touschscreen QHD Display (2560×1440)
  • Cameras
    • Intel RealSense Camera ZR300 with a VGA@60fps depth camera and wide FOV Camera(VGA with >160o FOV) & high precision IMU for feature tracking
    • 2MP front facing and 8MP rear facing RGB cameras
  • Connectivity – Bluetooth 4.0, GPS, 802.11 WIFI, and 3G
  • Video Output – HDMI
  • USB – USB 3.0
  • Dimensions 83.9mm x 164.8mm x 8.9mm

The smartphone will run  a recent version of Android operating system.

The development kit can be reserved now with a credit card (United States only), and will be billed for $399 once the kit is ready to ship. When that is Intel does not say.

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Intrinsyc Introduces Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 Cortex-A72-Class Development Board, SoM and MDPs

December 17th, 2015 2 comments

While there’s already an healthy choice of ARMv8 development board such as LeMaker Hikey, or Qualcomm DragonBoard 410c, all those platforms are based on the lower end Cortex A53 64-bit ARM core, and ARM Cortex A57, let alone Cortex A72, boards are much more difficult to find, as they are much pricier and/or have limited availability. Intrinsyc may have released the first (somewhat) affordable and accessible Cortex-A72-class development board with Open-Q 820 development kit comprised of a SoM and a baseboard, as well as smartphone and tablet mobile development platforms (MDPs) based on Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 quad core Kryo processor. While Kryo is a custom ARMv8 designed by Qualcomm, and not exactly a Cortex A72 core, both have similar performance, as shown in Snapdragon 820 Antutu and Kirin 950 Antutu results.

Open-Q_820_Cortex_A72_Development_Board

Open-Q 820 Development Kit (Display Optional)

Open-Q 820 board specifications:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 quad core Kryo cores with 2x cores @ up to 2.2GHz, and 2x cores @ up to 1.6GHz, an Adreno 530GPU, an Hexagon 680 DSP, and a 14-bit Spectra ISP.
  • System Memory – 3GB LPDDR4 @ 1866 MHz (PoP)
  • Storage – 32GB UFS 2.0 Flash, micro SD slot
  • Display/Video Out
    • 1x HDMI 2.0 up to 4086×2160 @ 60 fps
    • 2x MIPI-DSU 4-lane up to 2560×1600 (single port), or 4096×2160 (dual port) @ 60 fps
    • Optional 4.5″ FWVGA (854×480) touch display
  • Audio
    • 1x 3.5mm ANC jack for headset
    • 20-pin audio input header with 3x analog in, 3x digital in
    • 20-pin audio output header with 5x analog out 1x digital out
    • Qualcomm WCD9335 audio codec
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n/ac 2×2 MU-MIMO, Bluetooth 4.1 (QCA6174), Qualcomm IZat Gen 8C GPS (WGR7640)
  • Camera – 3x MIPI-CSI  4-lane, dual ISP, up to 25MP. Optional 13MP camera module
  • USB – 1x micro USB 3.0 host, 1x micro USB 2.0 OTG, 2x USB 2.0 host ports.
  • Debugging – 1x UART debug via USB micro-B port
  • Expansion
    • 8x DIO with pins configurable as I2C, SPI, UART, or GPIO
    • 1x mini-PCIe v1.2, 1x PCIe X1 slot v2.1
  • Power Supply – 12V DC
  • Dimension – Baseboard: 170 x 170mm; SoM: 82 x 42mm

Open-Q_820_Devkit_DescriptionThe company provides support for Android 6.0 Marshmallow for the board. Documentation is quite limited right now with only product briefs for the board and the SoM, but the company claims users will receive product documentation and access to complimentary tools and software updates.

Beside Open-Q 820 development kit, Intrinsyc also offers a smartphone MDP with a 6.2″ QHD display, and a tablet MDP with a 10.1″ 4K UHD (3840 × 2160) multi-touch display. Both will support 802.11ac with Qualcomm MU | EFX MU-MIMO technology, Blueooth 4.1, USB 3.0, and Qualcomm IZat location service. The tablet MDP has also has tri-band support, and supports multi-gigabit 802.11ad (11ad) Wi-Fi.

Intrinsyc Open-Q 820 development kit appears to be available now for $599 plus tax and shipping, the Tablet MDP for $999,  and the smartphone MDP will be $799, but it’s not quite ready for sale yet, and shipping is scheduled for December 31, 2015.

Via Linux Gizmos

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Light Biz OS Firmware, Android and Ubuntu Image, and Android SDK Released for GeekBox (RK3368)

December 11th, 2015 4 comments

GeekBox is an upcoming Android TV box based on Rockchip RK3368 octa-core processor that doubles as a system-on-module and development board. The company has now uploaded the Android 5.1 SDK, including Linux 3.10.79 kernel, on github. It’s not for the Android SDK for RK3368, but at least it’s not just an outdated tarball, and will hopefully be regularly updated directly on github.

Geebox_Android_Linux_Ubuntu

Beside the source code, the company also released three firmware image including Rockchip’s Light Biz OS desktop operating system based on Lollipop:

It’s quite possible those images will also work on other Rockchip RK3368 platform with some modifications, e.g. an updated device tree file for a given hardware. I’ve downloaded Biz OS adn the dual boot image, and the firmware files are of “update.img” type, so they are not bootable from SD card.

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Allwinner A64 Android 5.1 SDK and Linux Source Code

December 10th, 2015 11 comments

Allwinner A64 is likely to become quite popular as it will be used in PINE A64 board, Olimex open source hardware laptop featuring A64-OLinuXino board, and some low cost tablets. We’ve already got some documentation such as Allwinner A64 datasheet and user’s manual, but AFAIK, there was no source code released for the board.

Allwinner_A64_SDK_LinuxThe good news is that you can now download Android 5.1 SDK and Linux source code on Baidu with four files available:

  • lichee_A64_A5.1_V1.0.tar.gz – Linux source code
  • android_A64_A5.1_V1.0.tar.gz– Android 5.1 SDK
  • android_prebuilts_A64_A5.1_V1.0.tar.gz – Some pre-built binaries for Android
  • A64硬件资料.zip – Documentation including the datasheet, product brief, and user’s manual which we’ve already got, but also some hardware with reference schematics, PCB layout files, and BoM for an Allwinner A64 tablet.

Allwinner_A64_Tablet_SchematicsThat’s about 7.4GB to download, and apart from the documentation, the download is not quite complete yet, so I could not look into the details of the release yet.

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Quick Start Guide for LinkIt Smart 7688 (Duo) Board

December 1st, 2015 No comments

Mediatek Labs has announced LinkIt Smart 7688 development boards powered by Mediatek MT7688 WiSoC earlier today, but I was selected for a close beta several weeks before the launch, and I’ve had time to play a little with the boards, so today I’ll report my experience getting started with LinkIt Smart 7688 amd 7688 Duo by writing a Quick Start Guide showing how to setup the boards, upgrade firmware, access the serial console, run “Blink LED” sample applications with Python and JavaScript, as well as the Arduino IDE, and connect to the Internet.

Initial Setup

You’ll only need a micro USB cable and a computer with WiFi and USB ports to get started with the board. The green LED (top) for the MCU will turn on immediately, while the red LED (bottom) for WiFI will blink once, and only turn on continuously after 5 seconds, and within 30 seconds after that you should get WiFi connectivity.

LinkIt_Smart_7688_USB_Power

Since you just need a web browser any operating system will do, and at first I used a desktop computer running Ubuntu 14.04 without WiFi (and not working WiFi dongle left), so I wondered if I could access the serial console via the USB connection, and ran dmesg:

The device is recognized as a USB modem, so it was not an option, and instead I fired up my Ubuntu laptop instead. You can still access the serial console over UART with your own USB to serial debug board by connecting TX and Rx to P8 and P9 pins of Smart Link 7688 (DUO) board. I’ll show that a little later in this guide.

The next step is to connect to LinkIt_Smart_7688_XXXXXX access point with your computer, where XXXXXX is your board’s MAC address suffix. Once you’ve connected to this open WiFi network, simply open a web browser, and type mylinkit.local to access LinkIt Smart 7688 webUI and input a root password of your choice.

linkit_smart_7688_setup

Click to Enlarge

This step will work out of the box with Linux, Windows 8.1/10 and Mac OS X operating systems, but you’ll need to install Bonjour Print Service in Windows 7. If you don’t want mDNS, you can also use the default address: 192.168.100.1.

SDK and Firmware Upgrade

Before upgrading the firmware, you’ll need to download the SDK, which Mediatek calls “LinkIt Smart 7688 SDT” from MediaTek Labs website which will contains the bootloader and firmware directories, documentation including a Getting Stated Guide and a developer’s guide, as well as the toolchain.

After signing to the web UI, you should find the “Software information” section where you can see the bootloader and firmware version, and an “Upgrade firmware” button.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Once you click Upgrade Firmware button, you’ll be able to browse for the lks7688.img file in firmware directory of the SDT, and click on Upgrade & Restart to complete the installation.

If for some reasons you can’t access your board anymore, you can also perform the upgrade by copying lks7688.img file to a USB flash drive and connect it via a USB OTG adapter.

LinkIt_Smart_7688_Serial_Console_USB_OTG

LinkIt Smart 7688 Board with USB Flash and USB to TTL Board (Click to Enlarge)

While the board is running, keep pressing the WiFi button, while pressing the MPU button for a short time, and only release the WiFi button after it becomes solid after around 5 seconds, and the firmware update should start with the red WiFi LED blinking slowly until the update is complete (2 to 3 minutes).

Serial Console on LinkIt Smart 7688 (DUO)

If you don’t get any issues, the easiest way to connect to the board is via SSH:

or

But in case you encounter some problems with the configuration, and want to find out what’s going on you’ll need to connect a USB to TTL board as shown in the picture above. You’ll need to connect GND, Tx to P9 pin and Tx to P8 pin, and configure you favorite console program be it minicom, screen or putty to 57600 8N1.

Here’s the full boot log in LinkIt Smart 7688 board:

Running Sample Code in LinkIt Smart 7688

So now that you should have access the terminal either via SSH or UART, you can run some pre-loaded JavaScripts or Python sample in /IOT/examples/ directory:

Let’s blink the WiFi LED with the Python script:

The red LED should blink around twice per second. Press Ctrl+C to interrupt the program. So what’s the code like?

If Python is not your thing, but you’re quite happy coding with JavaScript (node.js), you can blink the LED too:

The program takes a little longer to start, but it works, and the LED blinks once a second. Here’s the code:

Running Sample Code in LinkIt Smart 7688 DUO

If you have a LinkIt Smart 7688 DUO, you’ll have want to install Arduino IDE. I could not perform this step fully, as I had troubles to connect and upgrade the firmware to the beta board. But here are the main steps:

  1. Download and install Arduino 1.6.5
  2. Start Arduino, and go to File->Preferences and add http://download.labs.mediatek.com/package_mtk_linkit_smart_7688_test_index.json to Additional Boards Manager URLs.
    LinkIt_Smart_7688_DUO_Arduino_BSP
  3. Click OK, and go to Tools->Boards->Board Manager, and scroll down to install Mediatek LinkIT Smart Boards by Seeed Studio and MediaTek Labs.

    Click to Enlarge

    Click to Enlarge

  4. Now select LinkIt Smart 7688 Duo in Tools->Boards, and the serial interface for LinkIt Smart 7688 in Tools->Serial. (It was /dev/ttyACM0 with my old firmware)
  5. Write a short sketch to blink D13 LED on the board:
  6. Click on verify, click on upload, but it’s not done yet as you have to run a python program to send command over the serial interface between MediaTek MT7688 and the Atmel AVR MCU. So connect to the board and write blink_on_duo.py Python script using vi / vim:
  7. And now you can blink the LED with the script:

So LinkIt Smart 7688 Duo is more versatile thanks to its MCU, but it takes some efforts to blink a simple LED.

Connecting to the Internet and OpenWRT Configuration

So far we’ve done everything in the local network using the board as an access point, but many application will require some connection to the Internet. To connect your board to your WiFi router login to the webUI again, and select Network.

Mediatek_LinkIt_Smart_7688_AP_Configuration

Now switch to Station mode, and click refresh.Mediatek_LinkIt_Smart_7688_Station_ConfigurationNothing will happen, but if you click again on the zone right above the Refresh button a list of access point will show up. LinkIt_Smart_7688 is listed here, as I had a LinkIt Smart 7688 DUO running at the same time. Select the access point you want to use, input the password, and click on Configure & Restart.

Now make you sure computer is connected to the same access point or at least is one the same subnet, and go again to linkit.local in your browser to access the webUI, or SSH to the board. In my case I had changed the device name to CNXSoft_linkit and neither mylinkit.local or CNXSoft_linkit.local, or cnxsoft_linkit.local would work, so there may still be a bug here… So instead I check the new IP address via the serial terminal: 192.168.0.105 to make sure the connection was fine, but you can do so with your WiFi router client list too. I also pinged the Internet from the serial console:

Success!

If you want more control of your network configuration you can click on OpenWRT in the webUI, or go directly to http://IP_address/cgi-bin/luci to access LuCI’s web interface for OpenWRT.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

That concludes this getting started guide for LinkIt Smart 7688 and Linkit Smart 7688 Duo boards, to go further you may want to read LinkIt Smart 7688 Developer’s Guide, and tutorials found in the SDT, and build your own OpenWRT image from source code. You can purchase the LinkIt Smart 7688 and 7688 DUO boards for respectively $12.90 and $15.90 on Seeed Studio.

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Inforce 6309 micro SBC is Software Compatible with DragonBoard 410c Board, Includes an Ethernet Port

November 26th, 2015 3 comments

I’ve recently written a review of DragonBoard 410c with Android, one of the first board part of Linaro’s 96Boards initiative that’s supposed to get Android and Debian distributions with recent Linux kernel & U-Boot, together with full source code. Inforce Computing has now launched Inforce 6309 micro Single Board Computer (SBC) with the same footprint, albeit different connectors’ placements, and software compatible with DragonBoard 410c development board powered by the same Qualcomm Snapdragon 410 processor. The board targets applications such as industrial automation, “sophisticated” IoE devices, medical devices, augmented reality computing, and robotics and drones.

Inforce_6309_micro_SBCInforce 6309 micro single board computer specifications:

  • SoC- Qualcomm Snapdragon 410 (APQ8016) quad-core ARM CortexA53 @ 1.2 GHz with Adreno 306 GPU and Hexagon QDSP6 @ 700 MHz
  • System Memory – 1GB LPDDR3 @ 533MHz, Single-channel 32-bit (4.2GBps)
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC flash (eMCP package with RAM) + micro SD slot
  • Video Output / Display IF – micro HDMI up to 1080p30; LVDS and touch screen up to 1920×1200 (24-bit) or 2048×1536
  • Audio – HDMI, combo jack for headphone and microphone, PMM8916 audio codec
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet (USB 2.0 to GbE bridge), 802.11 b/g/n WiFi, Bluetooth 4.1 LE, and GPS/GLONASS
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB OTG port
  • Camera – Dual MIPI-CSI2 (4/2 lanes) for dual camera support up to 13MP
  • Serial – Optional RS-485 port via interface card
  • Expansion – 26-pin header with I2C, SPI, I2S, UART and GPIOs
  • Power Supply – 12V/1.5A DC input; optional PoE
  • Dimensions – 85×54 mm
  • Temperature Range – Operating & Storage: -30ºC to +85ºC
Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

The board size and specifications are similar to DragonBoard 410c, but the board gains Gigabit Ethernet (limited to the USB 2.0 bandwidth), and replaced LS and HS connectors by MIPI-CSI, LVDS and a 26-pin I/O header. The company provides Android Lollipop, Linaro Ubuntu, and ROS operating systems for the board, as well as Qualcomm SDKs (Vuforia, Alljoyn, FastCV, MARE…), and Dronecode open-source UAV. As usual with Inforce Computing, public documentation is limited to the product brief and a short explanation about the SDK, and all other downloads (datasheets, application notes, software released, and reference manuals) are only available to customers.

A development kit based Inforce 6309 micro SBC will soon be available for pre-order for $120 via the product page. Price for the SBC will start at $99 for small quantities.

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RedBear Duo is a Breadboard-friendly Wi-Fi + BLE IoT Board Based on Ampak AP6212 Module (Crowdfunding)

November 18th, 2015 2 comments

I’ve taken apart lots of TV boxes and together with Realtek, Ampak are by far the most popular wireless modules to provide WiFi and Bluetooth connectivity in those devices. One startup decided to use Ampak AP6212 module, also found in NanoPi 2 board, to create a breadboard-friendly IoT board with Bluetooth 4.0 and 802.11b/g/n connectivity.
RedBear_Duo
Redboard Duo has been designed with the same form factor as many other IoT boards such as NodeMCU or Spark Photon, and features the following:

  • Ampak AP6212 module:
    • STMicroelectronics STM32F205 ARM Cortex-M3 @120MHz, 128 KB SRAM and 1MB Flash
    • Broadcom BCM43438 Wi-Fi 802.11n (2.4GHz only) + Bluetooth 4.1 (Dual Mode) combo chip
  • Storage – On-board 16 Mbit (2 MB) SPI Flash
  • Integrated chip antenna with the option to connect external antenna
  • Expansion – Headers with 18 I/O pins
  • Misc – RGB status LED
  • Dimensions – 20.5mm x 39mm

The company also made a small baseboard called RBLink with  ST-LINK/V2 for programming the board, and 8 connectors compatible with Seeed Studio grove modules.

RBLink

RBLink

Developers will have a decent choice of programming language and tools for the board:

  • Arduino IDE
  • Particle Web IDE, Dev and CLI – A development platform that allows you to program your Duo online and wirelessly.
  • Broadcom WICED SDK – C programming. Support Classic Bluetooth for audio or streaming data devices, and Apple HomeKit (provided you have Apple MFi license)
  • JavaScript – Open source JavaScript interpreter for micro-controller port in progress.

RedBear, previously known as RedBearLab, has previously developed 9 IoT boards, so the technical and manufacturing risks should limited it you decided to contribute to their Kickstarter campaign. RedBear Duo early bird pledge is $19, but if you want to use Broadcom WICED SDK, or develop HomeKit applications, you’ll want to go with RedBear Duo + RBLink combo that’s $29 (early bird). There are also other rewards such as kits including some grove modules, as well as packs with multiple RedBear Duo and so on. Shipping is not included, but they’ve kept it affordable, and simple, since $5 is required whatever country you reside in, and whatever rewards you chose.

RedBear Duo official product page should be where you’ll eventually get all the details.

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