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Posts Tagged ‘sdk’

Firefly introduces FireBLE Bluetooth Low Energy Board

March 23rd, 2015 1 comment

So just as today I wrote about XBAND BLE Sensor board, the makers of Firefly-RK3288 also announced their own Bluetooth Low Energy board aptly named FireBLE, and also integrating a 6-axis gyroscope and accelerometer, but instead of being based on Nordic or Cypress, the company went with an NXP BLE chip.

FireBLEFireBLE board specifications:

  • SoC – NXP QN9021 ARM Cortex M0 MCU @ 32MHz with 94KB ROM (protocol stack), 64 KB SRAM, 128KB flash
  • Bluetooth – BT 4.0 single mode. Central and peripheral mode with up to 8 simultaneous connections.
  • Sensors
    • MPU-6050 3-axis gyroscope and 3-axis accelerometer with an on-board Digital Motion Processor (DMP) capable of processing 9-axis motion fusion algorithms.
    • Battery and temperature sensor
  • USB – micro USB port for power and programming
  • Expansion – 3 expansion headers with access to SPI, UART, I2C, GPIO, and PWM, as well as OLED display interface.
  • Debugging – JTAG, support SWD online simulation on-board USB to serial.
  • Misc – Joystick, reset button, battery connector, 3x programmable LED
  • Power – 5V via micro USB port
  • Power Consumption – NXP MCU: Tx: 8.8 mA Rx: 9.25 mA; deep sleep: 1.8 uA
  • Dimensions – 80 x 45.5 mm

FireBLE_BatteryIt’s much bigger compared to XBAND, but at least it should be easier to power and program thanks to its micro USB connector. The board will support OTA firmware update via a smartphone, and targets various applications such as sport & health, smart home, PC device, smart TV, smart watch, automotive applications, and more. FireBLE SDK, schematics (PDF), CAD files, firmware, drivers, and tools are available in the Download section, and there’s also a Wiki (in construction) with some extra documentation and tutorials.

FireBLE is not available just yet, and price has not been disclosed. The board seems to be the first member of FireSmart family, which could be composed some boards targeting Internet of Things applications. Further details may be found on FireBLE product page.

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Mixtile LOFT-Q Allwinner A31 Board with SATA Can Now be Purchased for $90

March 4th, 2015 9 comments

Mixtile LOFT-Q and LOFT Kit were unveiled nearly a year ago, the first being a development board based on Allwinner A31 processor with 2GB RAM, 16GB RAM,  SATA connector, Gigabit Ethernet, etc.., while the second is a kit with an enclosure and power supply. The kit does not appear to be available yet, but the board has recently been listed on SeeedStudio for $90.

Mixtile_LOFT-Q

Mixtile LOFT-Q specifications:

  • SoC – Allwinner A31 quad core ARM Cortex-A7 processor with PowerVR SGX544 MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC, SATA III connector for 2.5″ drives, and SD card Slot
  • Video Output – HDMI 1.4 up to 1080p60
  • Video Decoding – H.264 4Kx2K video decoding, multi-format FHD video decoding, including Mpeg1/2, Mpeg4 SP/ASP GMC, H.263, H.264,etc
  • Audio I/O – HDMI, 1 S/PDIF, high definition microphone
  • Camera I/F
    • Integrated Parallel & MIPI I/F sensor
    • Integrated powerful ISP, supporting Raw Data CMOS sensor
    • Supports 5M/8M/12M CMOS sensor
    • Supports 8/10/12-bit YUV/Bayer sensor
  • Connectivity – 10/100/1000M Ethernet, dual band WiFi 802.11 a/g/n + Bluetooth 4.0 (AP6234), and Zigbee (NXP JNS168)
  • USB – 4x USB 2.0 host post
  • Debugging – UART debug connector, JTAG connector
  • Expansion header – 180-pin header with access to I2C, SPI, LCD, MIPI DSI, RGB/LVDS, CSI, MIPI CSI, ADC, CTP, RTP, SPDIF-OUT, SPDIF-IN, GPIO, etc…
  • Sensor – Acceleration sensor, IR receiver
  • Misc- Battery slot for RTC
  • Power – 12V/4A (48W)
  • Dimensions – N/A
Mixtile_LOFT-Q_SATA_USB_Dongles

SATA Connector and Wireless Dongles? are on the Back of Mixtile Board

You won’t find many details on Mixtile Hardare page, but there’s some recently updated documentation and software on Mixtile github account, with various repositories for documentation with a getting started guide, linux and u-boot source code, development tools, and BSPs for Android 4.4.2, Ubuntu Touch, and OpenWRT. What I failed to find however is a clear graphical description of the board and connectors.

Thanks to Embedded_Geek for the tip.
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MYiR Tech Announces Low Cost Rico and Z-turn Boards Powered by TI AM437x and Xilinx Zynq-7010 SoCs

March 3rd, 2015 3 comments

Shenzhen based MYIR Tech has just launched two new single board computers with Rico board featuring Texas Instruments Sitara AM437x ARM Cortex A9 industrial processor, and Z-Turn board based on Xilinx Zynq-7010 ARM Cortex A9 + FPGA SoC. Both boards sell for $99 in single quantity.

Rico Board

Rico_BoardSpecifications:

  • SoC – Texas Instruments AM4379 single core ARM Cortex A9 processor @ 1.0GHz with PowerVR SGX530 GPU, and 4x PRU @ 200 MHz. Other AM437x on request.
  • System Memory – 512MB DDR3 (Options: 256MB or 1GB)
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC, 256 or 512 MB NAND flash (reserved), 16MB QSPI flash, 32KB EEPROM, and micro SD slot
  • Video Output – HDMI and LCD interfaces (LCD connector located on bottom of the board).
  • Connectivity  – 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet
  • USB – 1x mini USB 2.0 device port, 1x USB 2.0 host post
  • Camera – 2x 30-pin camera interface
  • Debugging – 1x debug serial port, 1x 20-pin JTAG interface, 1x 14-pin JTAG interface
  • Expansion Headers – 2x 40-pin headers with access to 2x SPI, 2x I2C, 2x CAN, 4x UARTs, 1x MMC, and 8x ADC
  • Misc – 4x buttons (reset, power, and 2x user), 5x LEDs (reset, power, and 3x user), boot selection jumpers
  • Power Supply – 5V/2A power barrel
  • Dimensions – 100 x 65 x 1.6  mm (8-layer PCB)
  • Temperature Range – 0 to 70°C

Rico_Board_DescriptionThe company provides a Linux 3.14.0 SDK for the board with the source code for the bootloaders (SPL and U-boot), the kernel and relevant drivers, and buildroot build system, as well as a complete hardware development kit that includes a Rico Board, various cables, a 4GB micro SD card, a 5V/2A power adapter, and an optional 7-inch LCD Module with capacitive touch screen. Source code is provided with a CD that comes with the board.

You can find more information and order the board or kit on MYiR Tech Rico Board product page. The kit sells for $139, and you’ll need to add $99 for the 7″ touchscreen display.

Z-Turn Board

Z-Turn_Board
MYS-XC7010 / MYS-XC7020 boards specifications:

  • SoC – Xilinx XC7Z010-1CLG400C (Zynq-7010) with two ARM Cortex A9 cores @ 667 MHz, Artix-7 FPGA fabric with 28K logic cells, 17,600 LUTs, 80 DSP slices. Zilinx Zynq-7020 optional.
  • System Memory – 1 GB of DDR3 SDRAM (2 x 512MB, 32-bit)
  • Storage – 16MB SPI flash, 512 NAND flash (reserved), and a micro SD slot
  • Video Output – HDMI up to 1080p
  • Connectivity – 10/100/1000M Ethernet
  • USB – 1x mini USB 2.0 OTG port
  • Debugging – USB-UART debug interface, 14-pin JTAG interface
  • User I/O (via two SMT female connector on the bottom of the board) – 90/106 user I/O (7010/7020), configurable as up to 39 LVDS pairs, or I/Os such as SPI. I2C, LCD, camera, CAN, Ethernet, etc…
  • Sensors – 3-axis acceleration sensor and temperature sensor
  • Misc – CAN interface, 2x buttons (reset and user), boot selection jumpers, 5x LEDs, 1x Buzzer
  • Power – 5V via USB, or 5V/2V power barrel
  • Dimensions – 102 x 63 x 1.6 mm (8-layer PCB)

Z-Turn_Board_Description
A Linux 3.15.0 SDK is provided with gcc 4.6.1, a binary bootloader, the source code for the kernel and drivers, and a minimal ramdisk and Ubuntu Desktop 12.04 root file systems.

MYiR Tech newsletter claims the board sells for $99, but on the product page, you’ll only find a complete kit with the board, cables, a 4GB micro SD card, a power supply, and CD for source code and documentation for $139, the same price as the TI Sitara kit. Z-Turn board is somewhat similar to the $189 ($125 for education) ZYBO board, so it’s probably the most cost-effective Zynq board available to date.

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Spark Electron Cellular Module for M2M Projects Comes with a $3 Monthly Data Plan (Crowdfunding)

February 26th, 2015 1 comment

Spark IO started with Spark Core, a tiny Wi-Fi module, followed with Spark Photon is a cheaper, faster, and tinier Wi-Fi module, and now the company is launching Spark Electron to bring cellular connectivity to hobbyist projects at an affordable cost and small form factor.

Spark_Electron

Spark Electron specifications:

  • MCU – ST Micro STM32F205 ARM Cortex M3 microcontroller @ 120 MHz with  1MB Flash, 128K RAM
  • Cellular Connectivity – U-Blox SARA U-series (3G) or G-series (2G) modem + NanoSIM card slot + u.FL connector for Antenna
  • Headers – 36 pins with 28 GPIOs (D0-D13, A0-A13), plus TX/RX, 2 GNDs, VIN, VBAT, WKP, 3V3, RST
  • USB – micro USB port for power and programming
  • Misc – Setup and reset buttons, LED
  • Dimensions – 5.08 cm x 2.03 cm x 0.76 cm (1.27 cm including headers)

The board can be programmed with Wiring (Arduino’s programming language), C/C++, or ARM assembly. It’s longer than Spark Core/Photon, but still compatible with existing shields.

M2M_Number_SMS_Typical_UseOne problem individuals may have for M2M cellular projects is to find a low SIM card, so the company is also providing a SIM card with a no contract $2.99 monthly plan that currently works in the US, Canada and Europe. The carrier? Themselves, as they have become a Mobile Virtual Network Operator (MVNO) and manage towers and carrier relationship. The plan is good for 1MB data, or about 20,000 SMS with a 50 bytes size, and each additional megabyte cost $0.99.

Spark WebIDE

Spark Dev / Web IDE

Development can be done via the company Web IDE running in your browser, or Spark Dev IDE based on Atom project currently available for Windows and Mac, and Linux coming soon. So if you are using Linux, you’ll probably want to go with the Web IDE initially. As previously mentioning, if you’re used to developed on Arduino, Wiring is supported, and development will feel very similar. A REST API is also available, and you can control the module with SparkJS (JavaScript), webhooks, IFTTT, etc.. The core firmware use standards like HTTP, AES, RSA, and CoAP based on open source software.

If you’d like to add cellular connectivity to your objects (maybe your bicycle), but are not into programming, you can use Tinker mobile app for iOS and Android. Spark Electron firmware can be upgraded over the air (FOTA) without any cable.

The project is up on Kickstarter, and has already largely surpassed its $30,000 with $120,000 pledged so far. All early bird reward are gone, but you can still get  Spark Electron 2G with a SIM card for $39, and Spark Electron 3G with a SIM card for $59. They also have other kits adding GPS, battery, sensors and various quantities of Electron module. Shipping is free to the US and between $10 to $25 to the countries part of the campaign, and delivery is planned for October 2015. The company notes that 2G networks will be phased out in 2017 in the US, and recommends the 3G module to US residents.

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Ingenic Halley is a $20 Linux based IoT Board with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.1 Connectivity

February 10th, 2015 5 comments

Ingenic introduced Newton2 platform for wearables a few months ago, and the kit with an AMOLED display, camera board and other accessories should go on sale in March for $80. In the meantime, the company has also been working on a lower cost internet of things (IoT) module and development kit powered by Ingenic M150 with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.1 targeting smart appliances, Wi-Fi speakers, smart toys, industrial control applications, and other smart devices.

Ingenic_Halley

Halley IoT Module (Click to Enlarge)

Halley IoT module specifications:

  • SoC – Ingenic M150 XBurst (MIPS) single-core processor up to 1.0GHz with 128MB LPDDR on-chip, 2D graphics GPU, VPU supporintg 720p30 H.264 video decoding.
  • Storage – 8MP SPI NOR flash (GIGA GD25LQ64)
  • Connectivity – Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n and  Bluetooth 4.1 via Broadcom 43438 chip.
  • Expansion headers (2mm pitch)
    • 8-bit parallel LCD interface,
    • Audio – MIC, Line-In and headphone, 2x I2S,
    • SD card (MMC interface)
    • USB device 2.0, and USB host 1.1
    • 3x UART (2 with hardware flow control), 2x I2C, 1x SPI up to 50Mbps,
    • 5-pin JTAG
    • 2x 12-bit ADC,
    • 2x PWM
  • Power Supply – 3.3V
  • Power Consumption – 2mW (Standby, no radio); 10 mW (Standby, Wi-Fi)
  • Dimensions – 24 x 40 x 2.4 mm
Halley Module Block Diagram and Pinout

Halley Module Block Diagram and Pinout

The module is running Linux 3.10 with TCP/IP stack, and the company claims Android OS could also run on external storage. This would have to be a lightweight version of Android as only 128MB RAM is available. The development kit is comprised of the module, a baseboard, and a debug board.

Halley_Development_Kit

Ingenic Halley Devkit (Click to Enlarge)

The baseboard includes power circuitry to power the board with a micro USB port, reset and boot keys, some LEDs, a 14-pin male header, and UART connection to the debug board. It would have been good to have a micro SD slot on the back of the board, but none seems to have been included.

Even the board has not been formally launched, some documentation is already available for download including a product brief, a datasheet, and a developer’s guide. A Linux demo image and the SDK have also been released. The SDK includes a toolchain, source code for Linux and U-boot, drivers & tools, and a demo Android app (Airkiss).

M150 Block Diagram

M150 Block Diagram

It’s the first time I see details about Ingenic M150, so it might interesting to go through the specs:

  • CPU – XBurst core, 1.0GHz (MIPS-based). 32KB L1 cache, 256KB L2 cache.
  • GPU – X2D: Resizing, Rotating, Mirror, Color Convention and OSD etc.
  • VPU – Video encoder: H.264, D1@30fps. Video decoder: H.264, MPEG-1/2/4, VC-1, VP8, RV9, 720P@30fps.
  • Memory
    • On-chip 128MB LPDDR, up to 320Mbps.
    • 64-bit ECC NAND flash, 512B/2KB/4KB/8KB/16KB page size.
    • Conventional and toggle NAND flash.
  • Display
    • LCD controller with OSD: TFT, SLCD, up to 1280*720@60Hz(BPP24).
    • Embedded E-Ink controller with color engine.
  • Camera – DVP interface, up to 2048 x 2048.
  • Audio – Embedded audio CODEC; Digital DMIC controller; AC97/I2S/SPDIF interface for external audio codec; PCM interface, master and slave mode.
  • ADC – 7 channels SAR A/D controller, 12-bit resolution.
  • On-chip Peripherals
    • USB 2.0 OTG, USB 1.1 Host.
    • MMC/SD/SDIO controller.
    • Full-duplex UART port.
    • Synchronous serial interface.
    • Two-wire SMB serial interface.
  • Security – Total 256bits OTP memory.
  • Package – BGA261, 11 x 11 x 1.4 (mm), 0.5mm pitch.

That confirms it’s one of the rare SoC with enough built-in RAM to run Linux. Renesas RZ/A1 is another one, but with only 10MB RAM, and a Cortex A9 core.

Halley IoT module and development kit will be available around March 10, for respectively $20 and $50. You can find more information, and ordering information on Ingenic’s Halley module page.

Thanks to Victor for the tip.

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$129 Hikey Board Features a 64-bit ARM HiSilicon Processor, Complies with Linaro’s 96Boards Specifications

February 9th, 2015 16 comments

In my post about the Embedded Linux Conference 2015, I noticed a talk entitled “Generalizing Android for Low-Cost 64-Bit ARM-Based Community Boards” to be presented by Khasim Syed Mohammed, Linaro, mentioning that “Linaro is developing an open hardware platform specification to encourage software development on low-cost boards to lower the cost and accelerate the availability of maker and embedded products based on ARM SoCs”. But at the time, I had no details about the specifications themselves. As Linaro Connect HK 2015 is now taking place, the 96Boards Consumer Edition specifications have been released, and Hikey board have been unveiled with HiSilicon Kirin 620 octa core Cortex A53 processor, 1 GB RAM, and 4GB eMMC.

96Boards_Hikey

Hikey board specifications:

  • SoC – HiSilicon Kirin 620 octa core Cortex A53 processor @ 1.2 GHz (10,000 Dhrystone VAX MIPS) with ARM Mali-450MP4 GPU
  • System Memory – 1GB LPDDR3 @ 800 MHz
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC + micro SD v3 slot
  • Video Output / Display – HDMI 1.3 up to 1080p, DSI interface
  • Connectivity – 802.11 a/b/g/n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.1 LE (TI Wilink 8 – WL1835MOD) with on-board antenna. Solder pads for external antenna are also present (6)
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB OTG
  • Camera – CSI interface
  • Debugging – Unpopulated 4-pin UART header (1), unpopulated 10-pin JTAG header (19)
  • Expansion headers
    • 40-pin LS (Low Speed) Expansion connector (2) – 2x UART, 2x I2C, GPIOs, SPI, Audio, reset, 1.8V and GND, as wekk as 5V/12V cooling fan support
    • HS (High Speed) Expansion connector (9) – DSI, CSI, SDIO, USB, etc…
  • Misc – Power button (3), settings header for power/boot/user (1), power measurements through holes (Total / PMIC only / HDMI, USB) (4), LEDs for Wi-Fi/Bt (11), and 3x User LED (13)
  • Power Supply (5) – 8-18V / 2A as per 96Boards specs.
  • Dimensions – 85 x 54 mm

Hikey_BoardDocumentation is available on 96Boards.org, and currently includes a User’s Guide and schematics in PDF format. You can get support on 96Boards Forums, the source code is available on github, and binary images for Linux (Ubuntu?) and Android will soon be available at https://builds.96boards.org/.

Hikey board is available on backorder on Avnet and Arrow for $129 and up.

Let’s also have a quick look at 96Boards specifications.

Stated goals:

  • Low cost ($50-$100 retail for a a minimum configuration)
  • Easy to extend with off the shelf parts available to maker community and OEMs
  • Easy to purchase globally (for example, via Amazon, Alibaba, Farnell, Digikey, Mouser, etc…)
  • Enable a third party ecosystem to develop around expansion (mezzanine) boards/peripherals/displays, etc… that can be used on any 96Board CE compliant board.

Minimum hardware features:

  • Ultra-small low-profile form factor – 85x54x12 mm – Extended Version: 85x100x12mm
  • Design is SoC independent (targets 32- and 64-bit SoCs)
  • 0.5GB RAM (Minimum 1GB recommended for Android_
  • MicroSDHC Socket for up 64GB on-board or expansion flash storage
  • Wi-Fi 802.11g/n and Bluetooth 4.0 LE
  • On-board connectors and expansion I/O:
    • 2x USB Type A or Type C host ports (USB 2.x or 3.x)
    • USB micro-B USB or type C slave or OTG port (USB 2.x or USB 3.x) for PC connection
    • Display and Audio Output: HDMI, or MHL (micro USB), or DisplayPort (USB type C)
    • Low profile 40 way female header for maker/community use
    • Low profile 60 way high speed female module header for advanced maker/OEM use with high speed interface including MIPI-DSI, USB, and optional MIPI CSI-2
    • Board power from low profile DC jack connector

Other requirements and options include at least one current sense resistor, buttons, LEDs, UART, recommended JTAG, and so on.

Software requirements include bootloader (open source), accelerated graphics support (binary or open source), a Linux kernel buildable from source code based from mainline, or the latest Google-supported Android kernel version, or the last two LTS kernels, and one of more of the following operating systems: Android, Debian/Ubuntu, Fedora/Red Hat, or an OpenEmbedded/Yocto build of a Linux distribution.

[Update: Linaro blogged about this, with quotes by several companies including Actions Semiconductors and AMD, so we might expect 96Boards compliant board(s) by these two Silicon vendors too]

Via Mininodes.

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Android 5.0 Lollipop SDK for Amlogic Processors and Image for MK808B Plus

February 3rd, 2015 3 comments

Amlogic has just released Android 5.0 SDK for Amlogic S805, S802, and S812 processors on their OpenLinux website, but before you get too excited, this is only available people who have signed an SLA with the company, or somehow got a username/password to their git server. Although most people can’t access the SDK, it still means that popular Amlogic S8xx devices are likely to be upgraded to Android 5.0 in the weeks or months ahead.

Amlogic_Android_LollipopThe company has not released any Android 5.0 SDK for older AML-8726M? processors however, so apart from WeTek Play, I would not expect any other Amlogic single or dual core devices to get a Lollipop treat.

If you own a MK808B Plus TV dongle, you don’t even need to wait, as WeTek ported Android 5.0, more exactly CyanogenMod 12, to the cheap HDMI TV Stick for evaluation, and since finally they don’t intend to design a device with Amlogic S805 processor, they released the image and instructions on XDA Developer Forums a few days ago.

This image is booting, and installing Google Mobile Services for the Play Store and other sertvice is easy, but a few things are not working yet:

  • Widevine DRM is broken
  • Some precompiled libraries for stagefright (OMX) don’t work anymore, including HD audio passthrough and HEVC libraries. But somehow HDMI pass-through still seems possible via SPMC/XBMC, and H.264/AVC is working just fine.

Christian Troy, the developer who released the image, also mentioned “these two bugs won’t be fixed until AMLogic releases an updated SDK for Lollipop, where they will include the working libraries”. So that could be a new image for the fresh Amlogic SDK could be released soon and fix most issues on MK808B Plus Lollipop port.

Thanks to Stanislav for the tip about the new SDK.

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Categories: AMLogic, Android Tags: Android, amlogic, lollipop, mk808, sdk, wetek

H88 HummingBird Development Board Powered by Allwinner A80 Comes with 4GB RAM, Built-in GPS, 4G LTE Support

February 2nd, 2015 12 comments

Merrii Technology is having some fun churning out Allwinner A80 development boards, and after A80 OptimusBoard, H8 Hummingbird, here comes H88 HummingBird. The new board is somewhat similar to H8, but is quite larger, and features 4GB RAM, built-in GPS, and a few other goodies.

H88_HummingBirdH88 HummingBird specifications:

  • SoC – AllWinner A80 octa-core processor with 4x Cortex 15, 4x Cortex A7 cores in big.LITTLE configuration with Imagination Technologies PowerVR GC6230 GPU compliant with OpenGL ES 3.0/2.0/11, OpenCL 1.1, and DirectX 9.3
  • System Memory – 4GB DDR3
  • Storage – 8GB internal storage (Hynix H27UCG8T2BTRBC), micro SD slot up to 32 GB
  • Video Output/ Display Interfaces
    • HDMI 1.4 up to 4K UHD resolution
    • RGB/LVDS interface
    • EDP LCD + TP interface
    • MIPI LCD interface
    • VGA output
  • Audio – HDMI, headphone jack,LINE-IN,
  • Camera I/F – Parallel and MIPI CSI interface. Integrated 16MP camera
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet (Realtek RTL8211D/E), dual band Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n & Bluetooth 4.0, GPS with external antenna
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 OTG, 2x USB 2.0 host ports
  • Debugging – UART, JTAG
  • Expansion
    • mini PCIe slot for 4G module
    • Header with access to GPIOs, ADC, HSIC, UART, SPI, I2C and Power Signals
  • Misc – IR receiver, reset and power LEDs, power switch, Reset, power and u-boot buttons, 6x ADC keys, RTC with battery
  • Power Supply – 12V via power barrel, battery, or 4V via USB OTG port; PMIC: AXP806 + AXP809 PMIC
  • Dimensions – 188 x 155 x 35 mm

H88_HummingBoard_3D_ViewThe company provides support for Android 4.4.2 and Linux 3.4 for the board, including source code. However, based on past experience, support is not that good, especially for non-Chinese speakers. You can find some more details including headers’ pinout on Merrii H88 Hummingbird page. There’s no price information, but it looks like the board might be used in A80 Pro development kit that sells for $1,300 on Aliexpress….

Thanks to mininodes for the tip.

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