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Posts Tagged ‘sdk’

Freescale i.MX6 Development Boards (Wandboard, Cubox-i and HummingBoard) Get Android Kitkat Firmware and SDK

August 20th, 2014 1 comment

Several Freescale i.MX6 development boards have gotten a KitKat treat this month with the release of Android 4.4 firmware and SDK. The boards involved include Wandboard Solo/Dual/Quad, as well as Solidrun Cubox-i boards, and the Raspberry Pi like HummingBoard.

Wandboard_Android_4.4Thanks to the “magic” of device tree, a single firmware image is now provided for all the boards provided by a given company.

For Wandboard Solo, Dual, and Quad:

For CuBox-i and HummingBoard:

Thanks to … Harley!

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AllWinner A31 Android & Linux SDKs, and Documentation Leaked

August 20th, 2014 12 comments

AllWinner A31 software development kits (SDK) for Android 4.2 / 4.4 and Linux can now be downloaded, and relevant documentation has also been made available, including HummingBird A31 system brief and system manual. Part of the documentation is in English, but lots of it, is in Chinese only.

AllWinner_A31_SDK_Android_LinuxDownload links to AllWinner A31 SDKs for HummingBird A31 development board, but they may be useful for other hardware platforms based on AllWinner A31:

  • Android 4.4 SDK (password: 5ck9) – a31_v4.5_hummingbird_kfb_ok.tar.gz (6.04 GB)
  • Android 4.2 SDK (password: tz17) – a31_hummbingbird_V3.3_v2_kfb_0k.tar.gz (3.99 GB)
  • Linux SDK (password: kdcw) – A31_MerriiLinux_V3.3_v1.tar.gz (1.17 GB)

There are also links to firmware files specific to HummingBird:

It takes a very long time to download the SDKs, so I haven’t checked the files, and hopefully there’s also some documentation inside. But if you want a quicker look at the documentation including AlLWinner A31 datasheet, AllWinner A31 tablet and STB schematics, and more, you may want to have a look at http://wens.csie.org/a31/, but soon these may become available on linux-sunxi.org.. [Update: The SDK can now downloaded @ http://dl.linux-sunxi.org/SDK/A31/ and the documentation @ http://dl.linux-sunxi.org/A31/]

On a related note, there will be soon another AllWinner A31 development board and systems-on-module (A31-SOM-EVB + A31-SOM) made by Olimex.

Thanks to Domingos!

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MYIR ARM9 Linux Development Boards & Computer-on-Modules Powered by Freescale i.MX28 Processor

August 14th, 2014 No comments

MYIR MYD-IMX28X development boards and MYC-IMX28X CPU modules had been announced in May 2014, but I’ve just found out about them via the company’s newsletter. The CoMs are powered by Freescale i.MX28 ARM9 processors (i.MX283 or i.MX287), feature 128 MB RAM, 256 MB Flash, and connect to a baseboard to make the development boards. Target applications include smart gateways, human-machine interfaces (HMIs), handheld devices, scanners, portable medical, experimental education as well as other industrial applications.

MYC-IMX28X CoMs

MYIR_MYC-iMX28X_ARM9_CoMMYC-IMX28X computer-on-module specifications:

  • Processor – Freescale i.MX283 or i.MX287 ARM926EJ-STM processor up to 454MHz with 128KB SRAM, 128KB ROM, 1280 bits of OCOTP ROM, 16KB/32KB I and D Cache
  • System Memory – 128MB DDR2 SDRAM
  • Storage – 256MB NAND flash, 128KB SPI flash
  • Connectivity – On-board Ethernet PHY
  • Connectors – 2x 1.27mm pitch 2 x 40-pin SMT male expansion connectors with access to
    • Ethernet – Up to 2 Ethernet (two for i.MX287, one for i.MX283)
    • USB – 2x USB2.0 High-speed ports
    • Serial – Up to 6x Serial ports (including one Debug port)
    • 1x I2C, 2x SPI
    • Up to 8x ADC (one high-speed ADC, seven low-resolution ADC)
    • Up to 5x PWM
    • 1x SDIO
    • 2x CAN (i.MX287 only)
  • Misc – Power and user LEDs
  • Power Supply – 5V
  • Dimensions – 62mm x 38mm
  • Operating Temperature Range – Commercial: -20~70 Celsius; Industrial: -40 to +85 Celsius

The main differences between i.MX283 and i.MX287, are support for only 1 Ethernet port against 2 for i.MX287, and the latter features 2 CAN buses. The company provides an SDK with u-boot, Linux 2.6.35, and relevant drivers for the module.

MYD-IMX28X Boards

Click To Enlarge

MYD-IMX28X Development Board (Click To Enlarge)

The development boards have the following hardware specifications:

  • SoC/Memory/Storage – Based on MYC-IMX283 or MYC-IMX287 modules as described above: Freescale i.MX28 @ 454 MHz, 128 MB DDR2, 256 NAND flash, and 128KB SPI flash
  • External Storage – micro SD card slot
  • Display I/F – 1x LCD interface (16-bit true color, supports optional 4.3-inch and 7-inch TFT LCD), 1x 4-wire resistive touch screen interface
  • Audio – 3.5mm jacks for Audio IN and OUT, and headphone output, digital audio out (RCA), MIC IN interface, Buzzer
  • Serial ports – 1x 3-wire RS232 Debug serial port (DB9), 1x 5-wire RS232 serial port (UART0), 1x RS485
  • USB – 1x USB2.0 Host port, 1x USB2.0 OTG
  • Connectivity – 10/100Mbps Ethernet (two for i.MX287, one for i.MX283)
  • CAN – 2 x CAN interfaces (only for i.MX287)
  • Expansion connector – 2x 20-pin headers with access to 3x ADC (one high-speed ADC, two low-resolution ADC), 1x SPI, 2x I2C, 3x UART, 3x PWM
  • Debugging – 20-pin JTAG interface
  • Misc – 4 x Buttons (1 x Reset button, 3 x User buttons), 2 x User LEDs (Blue)
  • Power Supply – 5V barrel connector
  • Dimensions – 140mm x 90mm

MYD-IMX28X_Block_DiagramPublicly available documentation is limited with only Freescale i.MX28 datasheet, and MYD-IMX28X board and MYC-IMX28X module simplified datasheets with overview of the boards, header pinout, and a list of document and software packages available for the board. U-boot, Linux 2.6.35, and drivers will be provided with source code, as well as some code samples to control various peripherals (SPI. I2C, touchscreen, LCD…) and a Qt demo. MYIR also provides 4.3″ and 7″ resistive or capacitive touchscreen as option for $60 to $99.

The modules and development kits appears to be available now, MYC-IMX28X module starts at $39 for the commercial version, $59 for the industrial version, and the development board, probably excluding the CPU module, sells for $99 and $119, respectively for the commercial and industrial versions. You can find more details on MYIR’s MYC-IMX28X module page.

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Toshiba TZ5000 ApP Lite Media Player Development Kits Run Android 4.4 and Ubuntu Linux

August 13th, 2014 4 comments

Toshiba has recently announced two development kits powered by their TZ5000 ApP Lite SoC featuring two ARM Cortex A9 cores, PowerVR SGX540 GPU, PowerVR VXD395 GPU, an optional 4GB MLC NAND, and Ensigma C4500 Wi-Fi baseband engine into a single chip solution that targets Over-The-Top (OTT) tuners and IP media boxes, wearable devices, digital signage, thin clients, and more. The first development kit, RBTZ5000-6MA-A1, is a full size board that supports Ubuntu, the other one, RBTZ5000-6MA-A1, is an HDMI stick form factor board running Android 4.4.

Toshiba RBTZ5000-2MA-A1 Board (Ubuntu)

RBTZ5000-2MA-A1 Ubuntu Development Kit

RBTZ5000-2MA-A1 Ubuntu Development Kit

RBTZ5000-2MA-A1 Starter Kit specifications:

  • SoC – Toshiba TZ5011XBG dual core Cortex A9 processor @ 1.0 GHz with PowerVR VPU and GPU, and Ensigma C4500 Wi-Fi baseband engine
  • System Memory – DDR3L-1600
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC (external) + MicroSDXC
  • Connectivity – Wi-Fi 802.11a/b/g/n/ac 2×2 MIMO  (via Ensigma C4500), Bluetooth 4.0. Ethernet is available via a daughter board connected to ADB.
  • USB -  2x micro USB 2.0 host ports (via expansion board), and 1x micro USB device port
  • Video Output – HDMI 1.4b, MIPI DSI LCD screen connector (via expansion board)
  • Camera -  MIPI® CSI-2  camera connector
  • Audio – I2S, S/PDIF
  • Debugging – UART and JTAG
  • Expansions – Various headers with peripherals such as cameras or microphones.
  • Dimensions – 90mm x 55mm

The Linux SDK includes Ubuntu rootfs, U-Boot, and drivers for Ethernet/Wi-Fi/Bluetooth, USB, UART, GPIO, e・MMC/SD/SDIO, I2S, and TIMER/DMA/PWM/PMU.

Toshiba RBTZ5000-6MA-A1 Board (Android)

RBTZ5000-6MA-A1 Android Development Kit

RBTZ5000-6MA-A1 Android Development Kit

Starter Kit specifications:

  • SoC – Toshiba TZ5001MBG dual core Cortex A9 processor @ 800 MHz with PowerVR VPU and GPU, and Ensigma C4500 Wi-Fi baseband engine, and 4GB on-chip NAND flash.
  • System Memory – DDR3L-1600
  • Storage – 4GB on-chip NAND flash
  • Connectivity – Wi-Fi 802.11a/b/g/n/ac 2×2 MIMO  (via Ensigma C4500), Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB -  1x micro USB OTG port
  • Video Output – HDMI 1.4b
  • Debugging – UART and JTAG
  • Dimensions – 24mm x 57mm

The board has been mainly developed for transmission of audio, video and other media for streaming delivery. The Android 4.4 SDK also comes with the same driver as for the Linux SDK.

Toshiba TZ5000 ApP Lite SoC

Toshiba ZP500 Block Diagram

Toshiba ZP500 Block Diagram

Toshiba is an interesting SoC in that it embeds Wi-Fi and internal Storage, on top of the CPU, GPU and VPU combo usually found in most application processors.

Key features includes:

  • Embedded IEEE802.11a/b/g/n/ac 2×2 MIMO Baseband Engine (Ensigma™ C4500)
  • Flash Memory – Embedded 32Gbit MLC NAND (Optional, depends on model)
  • CPU – Dual-core ARM Cortex-A9 MPCore / NEON @ up to 1.2GHz with 256KB L2 cache
  • GPU – PowerVR SGX540
  • VPU – PowerVR VXD395
  • Graphics/Video Engine – 1080p@60fps Multi Format Decoder, IPC, Scalar, Rotator, Composer
  • High-Speed I/O – DDR3/3L/LP-DDR3, USB OTG, SDIO 3.0, HDMI, MIPI CSI and DSI
  • Peripherals I/Os – 3x I2C, 32x GPIO, 2x I2S, 3x UART, 6x PWM, SPDIF

Toshiba ZP5000 was first unveiled in February 2014, and TZ5000 ApP Lite starter kit samples will begin shipping in October 2014. Pricing has not been disclosed. Further information can be found on ZP5000 product page. I could not find any pages for the starter kits at this time.

Via LinuxGizmos

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Jolla Releases Sailfish OS Hardware Adaptation Development Kit for Android (CyanogenMod)

July 19th, 2014 1 comment

If you don’t quite have the spare cash to buy a Jolla Phone, or don’t own a Nexus 4, but still want to try Jolla’s Sailfish OS on your smartphone, here’s your chance, as Jolla has just released their “Sailfish OS Hardware Adaptation Development Kit”, which allows you to install Sailfish OS on any Android phone that supports CyanogenMod 10.1.

Sailfish_OS_CyanogenMod

The development kit is comprised of:

  • Mer core – The Linux userspace core
  • Android Hardware Adaptation (HA/HAL), consisting of:
    • Device-specific Android Kernel
    • Binary device drivers taken from an Android ROM (e.g. CyanogenMod)
    • The libhybris interface built against the binary drivers
    • Middleware packages depending on hardware-specific plugins
    • A Qt/Wayland QPA plugin utilizing the Android hwcomposer
    • Sailfish OS component

You’ll a smartphone and a build machine matching the following hardware and software pre-requisites:

Smartphone

  • ARMv7 Android device officially supported by CyanogenMod 10.1.x
  • Means to do backup and restore of the device contents (e.g. SD card or USB cable to host computer), as well as flash recovery images to the device
Build Machine

  • A 64-bit X86 machine with a 64-bit Linux kernel
  • Mer Platform SDK
  • Sailfish OS Target
  • At least 16 GiB of free disk space (10 GiB source download + more for building) for a complete Android build; a minimal download and HADK build (only hardware adaptation-related components) requires slightly less space
  • At least 4 GiB of RAM (the more the better

If you’ve got all that, you’ll need to follow the build instructions found in a 57-page PDF explaining how to prepare the device, setup the SDK, setting up a scratchbox2 target, packaging the droid HAL, creating the sailfish OS rootfs, flashing the rootfs image, and more… So it’s not really an easy “three steps solution” at this stage, and you may want to do this on a “spare” phone…

This is all new, and things may not work as expected, hence the following warning can be found in the document:

Modifying or replacing your device’s software may void your device’s warranty, lead to data loss, hair loss, financial loss, privacy loss, security breaches, or other damage, and therefore must be done entirely at your own risk. No one affiliated with this project is responsible for your actions but yourself. Good luck.

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$70 MicroNFCBoard Brings NFC Connectivity to Any Board or Device (Crowdfunding)

July 11th, 2014 No comments

AppNearMe MicroNFCBoard is a development platform for Near Field Communication (NFC) comprised of an NFC transceiver, an NXP MCU, and all software stack and tools you need for development. This board also exposes various I/Os that allows you to connect to external hardware or devices, and it can be used with an Arduino, Raspberry Pi, mbed or PC/Mac.

microNFCBoardLet’s go through the board specifications first:

  • MCU – NXP LPC11U34FHN33/421 Cortex M0 MCU @ 48MHz, with 10KB RAM, 48KB FLASH, 4KB EEPROM
  • NFC
    • Transceiver – NXP PN512. Reader/Writer and card operation modes supporting ISO14443A/Mifare and FeliCa schemes.  NFCIP-1 mode
    • Splittable antenna
  • USB – 1x micro USB port for power and programming
  • I/O – 20x through holes with access to serial (UART), I2C, SPI, 4x ADC inputs, IRQ, Boot and Reset, and power pins. (2x pin header that you can solder are provided)
  • Misc – Reset and bootloader enable push-buttons, 2x LEDs.
  • Power Supply – 5V USB, 3.6-6V or 3.3V supply
  • Dimensions – 35x100mm

The board can be programmed using mbed.org online compiler, high level C/C++ SDK, as well as libraries and projects. I’d like to point out that AppNearMe has been working on NFC and mbed for a while, as I wrote about an mbed platform using their uNFC stack back in 2012.

micronfcboard_smartphone

The three main NFC modes can be handled with the board using the provided API:

  • Tag reading/writing (types 1, 2, 3 and 4) – Used to communicate with passive NFC tags
  • Peer-to-peer (Android Beam/SNEP) – To send and receive messages over NFC.
  • Tag emulation (type 4) – Emulates a NFC tag that you can read with your NFC enabled smartphone for example.

The software also allows you to decode in NDEF (NFC Data Exchange Format) including URL/URI, text, Bluetooth pairing info, and MIME Type + data.

MicroNFCBoard can be used in standalone mode, or can be connected to Arduino via SPI, and other platforms (ARM development boards, PC/Mac) via USB using a Python library for programming. The board will be fully open source with the company releasing the board firmware, and hardware designed files.

Some practical examples include a robot piloted with NFC tags, a Youtube video transferred from an Android phone to a Raspberry Pi via NFC, a mood lamp demo, or light and temperature data in real-time with an Android phone. The video below shows how it’s possible to have different users login to the Raspberry Pi board with their own NFC tag, or their smartphone.

The company has launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund mass production of the board with 20,000 GBP. The early bird perk start at 30 GBP (~$51.5) to get MicroNFCBoard, after which it will be 40 GBP (~$68.5). Other perks with NFC tags, sensors, multiple MicroNFCBoards, the mood lamp, etc.. are also available. The boards are expected to ship on October 2014.

Via Intorobotics

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Texas Instruments Announces Sitara AM437x Cortex A9 SoCs and Evaluation Modules

July 2nd, 2014 5 comments

Texas_Instruments_Sitara_AM437xThe first time I heard about Texas Instruments Sitara AM437x was via a TechNexion EDM-CT-AM437x system-on-module back in 2012, but Texas Instruments Sitara Cortex A9 processors development seems to have dragged a little longer than expected. Nevertheless, the company has now formally announced their Sitara AM437x ARM Cortex A9 SoC targeting automation, IoT gateways, and other industrial applications, and featuring four PRUs (Programmable Real-time Units), and support for dual camera for terminals with bar code scanning.

At launch there will be four AM437xprocessors: AM4376, AM4377, AM4378, and AM4379. The processors will all be based on a single Cortex A9 core  @ 800 to 1000 MHz with 64KB SRAM shared with 32KB data cache and 32KB programmable cache, 256 KB L2 and L3 caches, a 32-bit memory interface supporting LPDDR2, DDR3, and DDR3L, a 2-port Gigabit Ethernet switch , two USB 2.0 OTG + PHY and the following other interfaces:

  • Serial Ports – 6x UART, 5x SPI, 3x I2C, 2x McASP, 2x CAN, HDQ, QSPI
  • System – EDMA, Debug, Counter (SyncTimer32K), WDT, RTC, 3x eQEP, 3x eCAP, JTAG, 12x Timers, 6x PWM
  • Parallel – 3x MMC/SD/SDIO, GPIO, 2x Camera, 2×12-bit ADCs, NAND/NOR (16bit ECC)

Some interfaces (HDQ, McASP, eQEP..) seem specific to Texas Instruments, and if you’d like to get a short explanation of these, I’ve updated my technical glossary.

The main differences between the four SoCs are related to the presence of a PowerVR GPU and EtherCat support as shown in the table below.

AM4376 AM4377 AM4378 AM4379
Graphics N/A PowerVR SGX530
PRU-ICSS 4x 32-bit Programmable Real Time Unit (PRU) 4x 32-bit Programmable Real Time Unit (PRU) + EtherCAT slave support 4x 32-bit Programmable Real Time Unit (PRU) 4x 32-bit Programmable Real Time Unit (PRU) + EtherCAT slave support

Total power consumption will be less than one watt in active mode, about 5mW in deep sleep, and less than 0.03mW in RTC-only mode. AM437x processors are available in 17x17mm, 0.65mm VCA packages.
AM437x_Block_Diagram
Texas Instruments already have a software development kit based on Linux 3.x mainline and with a GUI launcher, as well as graphics and other demos. Adeneo Embedded also announced a Windows Embedded Compact 7 (WEC7) BSP for AM437x processors, SYS/BIOS RTOS with support for real-time industrial protocols will be available in Q3 2014, Android 4.3 or greater support will be released by a third-party in the fall of 2014. Other various RTOS solutions by Mentor Graphicsm, QNX, Wind River, Green Hills Software and Ittiam are also planned, but no timeline has been provided.

Texas Instrument AM437x Evaluation and Development Kits

The company has already readied an evaluation module based on AM4378 with a 7″ touch screen.

AM437x Evaluation Module (TMDXEVM437X)

AM437x Evaluation Module (TMDXEVM437X)

TMDXEVM437X Kit has the following key features:

  • Sitara AM4378 ARM Cortex-A9 Processor
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3
  • Storage – On board 4GB NAND and 4GB eMMC memory, 1x Micro SD/MMC
  • Vido Output / Display – 7″ capacitive touch screen LCD, HDMI output
  • Audio – Audio in/out
  • Camera – 2 camera modules
  • Connectivity – 1x Gigabit Ethernet
  • USB – 1x USB2.0 OTG, 1x USB 2.0 host
  • Other I/O – 1x UART, 2x CAN, 1x JTAG
  • Misc – Connector for Wilink8 (Wi+Fi + Bluetooth module)
  • Power – TPS65218 Power management IC

The development kit currently supports the Linux SDK, and sells for $599. You can find more information on AM437x evaluation modules page. Two other evaluation modules are schedule for later this year: TMDXIDK437X Industrial Development Kit based on AM4379 with 1 GB RAM, and no display but with industrial protocols support thanks to SYS/BIOS RTOS (Q3 2014 – $329), and TMDXSK437X based on AM4378 with 1GB RAM, a 4.3″ capacitive touchscreen (Q4 2014 for less than $300). Eventually, I suspect there may also be a low cost platform for hobbyists… Beaglebone Green anyone?

You can watch the introduction video below for an overview about TI Sitara AM437x SoCs, evaluation modules, and software solutions.

LinuxGizmos reports Sitara AM437x processors will start sampling later this month, mass production is expected to begin Q4 2014, and pricing will be around $15 per unit for 1k orders. You can find more information on Texas Instruments’ Sitara AM437x page, as well as TI Wiki.

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