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Posts Tagged ‘sensor’

Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE Selects Two Winners for Commercial Medical Tricorders

April 18th, 2017 No comments

Healthcare takes around 10% of worldwide GDP, and while in some cases an increase in the healthcare to GDP ratio means better care for people, in other cases it may  lead to a decrease in the population’s living standards. There are political, business, and legal issues involved in the costs, but overtime I’m confident that technology can both improve care and lower the costs, in some instances dramatically, especially if open source designs become more common, and there’s some work in that respect with open source projects for prosthetics, opthalmoscope, and even surgical robots. Some commercial projects also aim(ed) to lower the costs of diagnosis tools such as Sia Lab’s medical lab dongle or Scanadu medical tricorder. The latter project sadly did not manage to pass FDA approval, and the company will stop supporting it on May 15, 2017, but that does not mean others have given up on developing a Star Trek like tricorder project, and Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE – which aims at diagnosing 13 disease states – selected two winners for the competition: Final Frontier Medical Devices and Dynamical Biomarkers Group.

Final Frontier Medical Devices DxtER Tricorder

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Final Frontier Medical Devices is a US based team of engineers and medical professionals that realized 90% of patients going to emergency services just wanted a diagnostics for their problem, and decided to work on a DxtER tricorder, which “includes a group of non-invasive sensors that are designed to collect data about vital signs, body chemistry and biological functions. This information is then synthesized in the device’s diagnostic engine to make a quick and accurate assessment”.

Final Frontier Mediacal Devices got $2.5 million for their achievements, not bad considering they worked part-time on the project. The video below explains a little more about the team, their work, and the problem they try to solve, but does not give much details about the actual product and different sensors used.

DxtER cannot identify all 13 conditions from the XPRIZE challenge, but their algorithms are said to be able to diagnose 34 health conditions including diabetes, atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, urinary tract infection, sleep apnea, leukocytosis, pertussis, stroke, tuberculosis, and pneumonia.

That aren’t much more details in DxtER’s product page for now.

Dynamical Biomarkers Group Tricorder

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Dynamical Biomarkers Group is a 39 persons team based in Taiwan, supported by HTC Research, and  led by Harvard Medical School Associate Professor Chung-Kang Peng. The team got the second prize, still a cool $1 million, for their tricorder prototype comprised of three modules:

  • Smart Vital-Sense Monitor – Temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, respiration, and oxygen saturation.
  • Smart Blood-Urine-Breath Test Kit – Analyze fluids or breath dynamics to diagnose conditions such as urinary tract infection, diabetes, and COPD
  • Smart Scope Module – Bluetooth enabled magnifying camera to obtain high-resolution images of the skin and tympanic (ear) membrane. Used for diseases such as melanoma or otitis media.

These modules allow “physiologic signal analysis, image processing, biomarker detection”, and have been designed to be easy to use through a smartphone with an app that guide the patient through specific tests to generate a diagnosis.

The video below, again does not give much details about the product itself, but present the team, and explain the motivations such as controlling the cost of medical resources in Taiwan, and especially providing quality healthcare in rural areas of Greater China.

From the video, they seem to have greater resources for development than the US based team. Some more details about the tricoder can be found in the Center for Dynamical Biomarkers’ (DBIOM) XPRIZE page.

Via Liliputing

MatchX LoRaWAN Solution Supports up to 65,535 Sensor Nodes per Gateway

April 14th, 2017 4 comments

MatchX is a startup with offices in Chicago, Shenzhen, and Berlin, that provides a complete LoRaWAN solution with their MatchBox gateway based on SX1301 concentrator and Mediatek MT7628N processor, as well as MatchStick, MatchModule, and MatchCore sensors with up to 65,535 of those connecting to a single  gateway.

MatchBox LoRaWAN/WiFi/GPRS/GPS Gateway

Outdoor and Indoor Enclosures for MatchBox – Click to Enlarge

MatchBox specifications:

  • Processor – Mediatek MT7628AN MIPS WiSoC @ up to 580 MHz
  • System Memory – 128MB DDR2 RAM
  • Storage – 16MB FLASH
  • Connectivity
    • LoRa – Semtech SX1301 + 2x SX1257@+27dbm  Output Power; 470/868/915Mhz frequency range, -146dBm sensitivity
    • 10/100M Ethernet
    • 802.11n 2×2 WiFi @ 300 MHz
    • Optional GPRS via SIM800H, 85.6 kbps (downlink/uplink) + micro SIM card slot
    • GPS via UBlox Max 7C
    • Antennas – 2x u.FL antennas for WiFi, u.FL or chip antenna for LoRa, GPS and GPRS modules
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 port, 1x USB type C exposing 4 or 6 GPIOs and UART
  • Misc – RGB LED, 8x GPIO, on/off switch, reset button
  • Power Supply – Passive 24V POE, or  5V/2A via USB-C port
  • Power Consumption – 5W on average, 10W max.
  • Dimensions – 140 x 78 x 30mm
  • Temperature Range – -20°C to 85°C
  • Certification: CE, FCC, LoraWAN

The gateway runs OpenWrt or LEDE operating system. The company can receive packets from nodes up to 20km away in ideal conditions (line of sight, good weather…), and the company claims 4 gateways can cover Berlin’s RingBahn, and 17 gateways cover Silicon Valley Area, of course provided there’s not a very large number of nodes, exceeding the capacity of the gateways.

MatchStick & MatchCore LoRa Sensor Nodes

MatchStick

The company has two main products to connect sensors to the gateway with MatchStick and MatchCore sharing most of the same specifications, except the MatchStick is larger, supports many more sensors, and offers longer battery life:

  • MCU – Dialog SmartBond DA14680 ARM Cortex M0 micro-controller with 18 Mbit flash, 64 kB OTP memory, 128 kB Data SRAM, 128 kB ROM, and BLE 4.2 support
  • Connectivity
    • LoRa – Semtech SX1276 @+20dbm output power; 470/868/915Mhz; -146dBm Sensitivity; LoraWAN V1.0.2, Class A/B/C; on-board antenna
    • Bluetooth 4.2 LE @ +3dBm with on-board antenna
    • SIMCOM SM28L GPS module (MatchStick only)
  • Sensors
    • Inertial Sensor – Accelerometer, Magnetometer and Gyroscope
    • MatchStick only, selection of:
      • Air Sensor – CO, CO2, Methane
      • Fire Sensor – Smoke, and IR fire detection
      • Flood Sensor – Water leak detection
      • Movement Sensor – Human movement detection
      • Light Sensor – Gesture, color and ambient light detection
      • Agricultural Sensor – Soil moisture detection
      • Electricity Sensor – Relay control or power consumption
  • USB – 1x USB interface with 6 flexible GPIOs, SWD, Reset and power
  • Misc – RGB LED, reset & user buttons
  • Power Supply – 5V/1A via USB-C connector for charging the battery
  • Battery
    • MatchStick – Panasonic 18650 @ 3000mAh good for up to 10 years on a charge
    • MatchBox – CR2032 battery (300 mAh) good for up to 3 years on a charge
  • Power Consumption
    • Sleep Power – 30-50 uA
    • BLE Power – TX: 3.4 mA, RX: 3.7mA
    • LoRa Power – TX: 120mA @ 20dBm, RX: 9.9mA
  • Dimensions
    • MatchStick – 147 x 32 x 32 mm
    • MatchCore – 52 x 34 x 18 mm
  • Temperature Range – -20°C to 85°C
  • Certification: CE, FCC, LoraWAN

MatchCore

Both models can be programmed using Dialog DA1468X SDK, a community has been setup, as well as a developer’s blog, but so far I’ve been pretty quite, as the company works on completing development. There’s very little info about MatchModule , which will be a 25x25mm LoRa module that can be integrated into your own project. The only info I’ve got about is in the table below.

The MatchBox gateway should sell for around $299, while MatchStick and MatchCore should go for $28 and $16 respectively, I assume in their minimal configuration, as final price will depend on the choice of sensors.

You may be able to find some more details on Matchx.io website.

ESP8266, Mongoose OS & Grove Sensors – An Alternative Solution for Hackathons

April 12th, 2017 5 comments

CNXSoft: This is a guest post by Cesanta

If you walked into any Hardware hackathon over the last year, you would see they are about innovation and bringing new ideas to this world and most of them are centered around the connected devices nowadays. However, just walk the floor, talk to the teams and you can quickly see an elephant in the room. The Hackathons are about connected devices, but with the ‘recommended’ and frequently sponsored hardware distributed to the teams such as Intel Galileo, Raspberry Pi, etc…. developers may struggle for a long time to even connect it to the cloud!

Not to mention the innovation is usually hindered by a tedious environment setup which takes hours, things to learn about the specific hardware and how it can be programmed using low level languages. So many teams spent most of the time fighting with those issues and oftentimes still do not have their prototype ready and connected by the end of hackathon.

This situation can be improved by using ESP8266 boards with Mongoose OS and SeeedStudio Grove Sensors. The solution brings the following benefits:

  1. Low price:
    • ESP8266 development board is $4-15 depending on the board;
    • Seeed Studio Sensors are priced  $3 to $15 each, but you can also save by purchase them as a part of Grove Starter Kit for $39.
  2. The solution is solderless & plug and play – so anyone can actually use it fast.
  3. With Mongoose OS the firmware logic can be coded within few minutes using JavaScript code
  4. The data can be pushed to any cloud or public MQTT server such as Mosquitto, HiveMQ, AWS IoT, etc…

Let’s jump into the action and get ESP8266 & Seeed Light Sensor up and running with Mongoose OS in a few minutes. This example below shows how to get the hardware (sensor) data and send it to the cloud.

  1. Get your ESP8266 (e.g. NodeMCU) and Seeedstudio Light Sensor and Button ready.
  2. Download and install mOS tool for Mongoose OS. This works in Linux, Mac OS X, or Windows operating systems
  3. Connect the hardware
    • Power the Grove base shield: connect GND and VCC pins to the NodeMCU GND and VCC pins
    • Connect light sensor to slot 7 on the Grove base shield
    • Connect slot 7 to the ADC pin on the NodeMCU board
    • Connect NodeMCU board to your computer
  4. Program the board to retrieve the light sensor data and send it to the cloud (HiveMQ in this example)
    • Start mos tool, switch to the prototyping mode, edit init.js file
    • Click ‘Save and reboot device”
  5. Go to http://www.hivemq.com/demos/websocket-client/, connect and subscribe to the topic “my/topic”
  6. Press a button and see how light sensor reading is sent to the MQTT server

Light Sensor Data Shown on HiveMQ Dashboard – Click to Enlarge

Now you can see how easy it was! Want to play with other Seedstudio sensors from Grove Kits? Check video tutorials for button, motion sensor, moisture sensor, UV sensor, relay, buzzer, etc… including the one below with the light sensor.

Hornbill ESP32 Development Boards Come with an Optional IP67 Rated Enclosure (Crowdfunding)

April 7th, 2017 1 comment

While there are plenty of ESP32 development boards, and prices have recently plummeted, getting a case for your project can still be a problem especially if you plan to use it outdoor, as you need to protect your hardware from rain and dust. Hornbill project offers two ESP-WROOM-32 based boards, a prototype board, and an IP67 certified case that could be useful for outdoor use.

Hornbill ESP32 Development Boards

Let’s start by checking the boards available starting with ” Hornbill ESP32 Dev” board with the following specs:

  • ESP-WROOM-32 module with WiFi, Bluetooth LE,  FCC, CE, IC, MIC (Telec), KCC, and NCC certifications
  • I/O headers
    • 2x 19-pin headers with GPIOs, I2C, UART, SPI, ADC, DAC, touch interface, VN/VP, 5V, 3.3V and GND
    • Breadboard-friendly
  • Debug – Built-in CP21XX USB-to-serial
  • Power Supply – 5V via micro USB port, battery header + single cell LiPo charger
  • Dimensions – TBD

ESP32 Dev (left) and ESP32 Minima (right)

ESP32 Minima is also based on ESP-WROOM-ESP32 module, but is designed for wearables with its round PCB, it only includes a header for battery power, and is limited to 16 large pads with through holes for I/Os, as well as 6 pins for programming and debugging the board.

Hornbill ESP32 Dev Pinout Diagram – Click to Enlarge

Finally, the company has also designed Hornbill ESP32 Proto board where you can solder ESP32 Dev board, and add whatever components you may need for your project. The Proto board also includes a microSD card slot, an RGB LED, an SHT 31 humidity and temperature sensor, as well as footprints for 6x IR transmitters and 1x IR Receiver.

Hornbill Weather Proof Case and Kits

Beside the boards, the developers also provide an IP67 case for it, as well as kits leveraging the case:

  • Hornbill OUR (Open Remote Control) – Bluetooth (BLE) to Infrared (IR) bridge to control IR devices with your smartphone
  • Hornbill Lights – Control RGB LED strips over Bluetooth Smart
  • Hornbill IDL (Industrial Data Logger) – Logs power and temperature values, and upload them securely to the cloud.

There’s also Hornbill Makers Kit without the case, but with Hornbill ESP32 Dev and plenty of modules to play with, such as relays, various sensors, LEDs, a buzzer, an OLED display, a mini breadboard and so on… You’ll find ESP32 firmware and Android app source code for all kits on ExploreEmbedded github account.

 

Hornbill project has just launched on CrowdSupply with the goal of raising at least $2,000. A $12 pledge is asked for Hornbill ESP32 Dev or Hornbill Minima, $15 for the case, and the kits go from $39 (Hornbill ESP32 Dev + Proto board + Case) to $79 for Hornbill Lights with a WS2812 LED strip. Worldwide shipping is included in the price, and delivery is scheduled for June 2017. Noe that this is not the first project from ExploreEmbedded, as they previously launched Explorer M3 board based on NXP LPC microcontroller. However, since CrowdSupply do not show backers’ comments, I could not check whether backers are happy, or the project shipped on time.

Samsung Galaxy S8 & S8+ Smartphones Launched with Infinity Screen, Samsung DeX Desktop Mode, Bixby Assistant

March 30th, 2017 2 comments

Samsung has finally launched their latest Galaxy S8 and S8+ smartphones powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 or Exynos 8895 processor, 5.8″ and 6.2″ screens , and some of the most interesting features include the “infinity screen” with ultra thin bezels, Samsung DeX allowing for a desktop experience on a large monitor when the phone is docked, as well as Bixby assistant.

Samsung Galaxy S8/S8+ specifications:

  • SoC (one or the other depending on markets)
    • Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 octa-core processor with four Kryo 280 cores @ 2.3 GHz, four Kryo 280 cores @ 1.7 Ghz;; Adreno 540 GPU; 10nm process
    • Samsung Exynos 8895 octa-core processor with four M2+ cores @ 2.35 GHz, four Cortex A53 cores @ 1.9 GHz, ARM Mali-G71 GPU; 10nm process
  • System Memory – 4GB LPDDR4
  • Storage – 64GB UFS 2.0 flash; micro SD up to 256 GB
  • Display
    • Galaxy S8 – 5.8” quad HD+ (2960×1440), (570ppi)
    • Galaxy S8+ – 6.2” quad HD+ (2960×1440), (529ppi)
  • Audio – 3.5mm audio jack, speakers
  • Cellular Connectivity – LTE Cat.16
  • Connectivity – Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac (2.4/5GHz), Bluetooth v 5.0 (LE up to 2Mbps), ANT+, NFC, GPS, Galileo, Glonass, BeiDou
  • Camera – Dual Pixel 12MP OIS (F1.7) rear camera; 8MP AF (F1 .7) front-facing camera
  • USB – USB Type-C
  • Sensors – Accelerometer, Barometer, Fingerprint Sensor, Gyro Sensor, Geomagnetic Sensor, Hall Sensor, HR Sensor, Proximity Sensor, RGB Light Sensor, Iris Sensor, Pressure Sensor
  • Battery – S8: 3,000 mAh; S8+: 3,500 mAh; fast charging; wireless charging compatible with WPC and PMA7
  • Dimensions & Weight
    • Galaxy S8 – 148.9 x 68.1 x 8.0 mm, 155g
    • Galaxy S8+ – 159.5 x 73.4 x 8.1 mm, 173g
  • IP Rating – IP68 water and dust resistance

Both phones will run Android 7.0, and support payment by NFC or MST. The main innovation from the hardware perspective is the Iris scanner that allows you login to the phone by just looking at it.

Let’s see what this “infinity screen” is all about:

Samsung calls is that way because the bezel on the left & right sides are barely visible, and very thin on the bottom and top of the phone, where they still managed to cram a camera and a few sensors.

The company has also decided to start working on convergence with Samsung DeX, a desktop mode triggered when you connect the phone to a dock – called DeX Station – itself connected to a big screen. You’ll get a start menu and multi-window support a bit like in Windows Continuum, and other Android phone desktop initiatives like Remix Singularity or Auxens OXI.

Samsung’s Bixby Assistant is described as “an intelligent interface that will help users get more out of their phone. With the new Bixby button, you will be able to conveniently access Bixby and navigate through services and apps with simple voice, touch and text commands. Contextual awareness capabilities enable Bixby to offer personalized help based on what it continues to learn about the user’s interests, situation and location. Users can easily shop, search for images and get details about nearby places with Bixby’s image recognition technology”. So it’s not only a voice assistant, but also learns about the user’s habit, and can leverage image recognition for example to translate signs written in a foreign language.

The phones can also be used for virtual reality using Gear VR with Controller powered by Oculus, or to capture 4K 360-degree videos, 15MP photos, or stream 2K live videos with Gear 360.

Samsung Galaxy S8 & S8+ pre-orders will begin on March 30, 2017, for respectively $750 & $850 (MSRP) with a free GearVR headset with controller. The phones will also be found in shop – in the US – starting on April 21, 2017, where you’ll also be able to buy Gear VR with Controller for $129.99,  or just the controller for $39.99. Visit Samsung S8/S8+ product page for further details.

Karl’s Home Automation Project – Part 3: Adding Light Detection to a Motion Sensor

March 27th, 2017 No comments

This is the 3rd part of my Home Automation light project. In the first part, I wrote about basic setup with basic Sonoff Wifi MQTT switches and setting them up. In the second one, we added some 433 MHz motion sensors and a 433 MHz to MQTT bridge. And finally in part 3, we are going to modify the 433 MHz motion sensors to only work when it is dark in the room.

Motion Sensor

Click to Enlarge

The motion sensor I linked in part 2 is run by a common chip called a BISS0001. We are interested in pin 9. If voltage is below .2v it will not trigger a motion. This solves the problem discussed in part 2, when we have a gloomy day or if blinds are closed etc.

By adding an GL5537 LDR (Light Dependent Resistor) shown as R3 in the diagram above, you will achieve the desired effect. Extend the LDR with some wires and solder between ground and pin 9.

The GL5537 is extremely sensitive. You can adjust your sensitivity by placement. I put mine right next to the PIR sensor so it sees outside the window. It works perfectly. If you wanted it to get a little darker you can use the mounting hole on the back or make a new on the top or sides. Direct access to the outside light would mean it would need to be darker in the room for it to trigger. You have to be careful with the motion sensor placement or your light being triggered might cause the motion sensor not to trigger because there is too much light. I get this if the motion sensor is too close to the lamps I am triggering.

Home Assistant

Before modifying we had 2 automations one for before sunrise and one for after sunset:

Now that we’ve added the logic for light and dark at the motion sensor itself, we can simplify these 2 down to one automation, and only specify the time. The rest of the home assistant configuration can be found in 2nd article here.

That is all I have for now. If you have an idea or a product that you feel that meets the cheap and DIY criteria leave a comment below. I will test it out. I know you can do a ton of things with Home Assistant and a lot seem over the top. I want to focus on mundane things like turning off lights. I am also going to get some 433 MHz moisture sensors for my house to place in crawl spaces, and under the sink but that is pretty basic.

Continue reading “Part 4: MQTT Bridge Updated to Use YS-IRTM IR Receiver & Transmitter with NodeMCU“.

NanoPi NEO 2 Board, NanoHats, and BakeBit Starter Kit Review – Part 1: Hardware Overview & Assembly

March 26th, 2017 28 comments

NanoPi NEO 2 development board is an update of NanoPi NEO with a quad core 64-bit Allwinner H5 processor + 512 MB RAM, Gigabit Ethernet, and an extra audio header, which can be a great little board for headless application since there’s no video output. FriendlyELEC ask me whether I wanted to review to board with some of their NanoHATs add-on boards, and while I asked for NanoHat PCM5102A audio board and NEO Hub which I intended to use with Grove modules from my Wio Link Started Kit, I get a bit more than expected, as the company included sets of NEO 2 boards and accessories, NanoHATs, two serial debug board, and their BakeBit Starter Kit with several Grove modules to play with.

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Since I have so many things to look at in this first post, I’ll just describe the hardware, assemble it, quickly check the paper documentation, and give some of my impressions about the kit I receive.

Let’s start with NanoPi NEO 2. It’s super tiny, as exactly the same forum factor as NanoPi NEO, except for the low profile Ethernet jack.

The bottom side comes with Allwinner H5 processor SoC, and Samsung K4B4G1646E-BYK0 DDR3L memory (512MB), while the top of the board features Realtek RTL8211E Gigabit Ethernet Transceiver. The board just has four ports/connectors: a micro SD slot, a micro USB port for power, a USB 2.0 host port, and an RJ45 connector.

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There are also two headers (2x 12 pin + 12x pin) for I/O just like for the first NEO board, as well as an extra 5-pin header for audio on the right of the 4-pin UART header. The audio header is also present on NanoPi NEO v1.3 board, but not the older boards. See pinout table for details.

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Each package with the board also includes a Quick Start Guide describing the board, and explaining how to use the company’ Ubuntu Core + Qt image. As you can see from the photo above, the boards also make great paper weights, but I’m sure you’ll find something more interesting to do with them… 🙂

I also get a heatsink + thermal pads + screws and nuts kit, not included by default. Installation is very easy. First remove the two protective plastic sheets on the blue thermal pad, place it on Allwinner H5 processor, and then add the heatsink on top and secure it with the screws and nuts. Just make sure you orientate properly without covering the IO pins.

I did that for both, and checked possible combinations for those who want to build NanoPi NEO (2) farms. The first combination is to place the boards in opposite direction, and then use some spacers (mine were not suitable) to hold both boards in place as shown here.

The configuration above takes the less space, however, you may want to have all Ethernet ports on the same side, and the low profile Ethernet jack allows for a more compact design compared to what was possible with NanoPi NEO.

This takes about 5 x 4.5 x 4 cm, so if we round that up you could have 1 meter x 1 meter x 4.5 cm deep cluster with 800 NanoPi boards (3,200 cores). You’d just have to find out how to power and cool it down… The 512MB memory might limit use cases for clusters. FriendlyELEC also sells an acrylic case for 8 board clusters.

The main use case for NanoPi NEO (2) board is probably IoT and electronics projects, so I soldered the two headers which are provided with the board (inside the package).

First I thought I made a mistake when I installed the heatsink first, but actually the nuts help keep the headers in place while soldering, so I did not have to use a sponge to push the headers while soldering, as I normally do.


NanoPi NEO 2 boards are now ready. So let’s checkout the two add-on board I got: NanoHAT PCM5102A audio board with Texas Instruments PCM5102A audio stereo DAC,  stereo audio output via RCA connectors, and an IR receiver, as well as NEO Hub (aka NanoHAT Hub) with 12 Grove connectors (I2C, Digital I/O, Analog Inputs, UART)  compatible with Seeed Studio offerings.

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NEO Hub also includes an unpopulated SPI header.

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The NanoHats sit on top of NEO (2) board, and you can still connect the UART to TTL debug board if you need to access the serial console. NanoHat PCM5102A also comes with 2x RCA to 3.5mm female jack to connect headphones or speakers.

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Since NanoHats includes male headers, it’s also possible to stack them.

In some ways, NanoPi NEO (2) and NanoHAT are the more powerful equivalent of Wemos D1 Mini and shields based on ESP8266, and I really like the design of both solutions.

If you already own some Seeed Studio grove modules, you just need the NEO Hub, but Bakebit Starter Kit appears to be a nice way to expereriment with all sorts of sensors, LEDs, and servo.

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There are twelve modules in total: 2 LED modules, an LED bar, on OLED display, a button, a joystick, a buzzer, an ultrasonic sensor, a servo, a potentiometer, a light sensor, and a sound sensors. The kit includes two detailed user manuals: one in good English, one in Chinese.

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The first part explains the features and interface for each module with a Wiki link, and latter on you have some easy projects with source code leveraging the NEO hub and some of the modules.

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You can also access the documentation online.

FriendlyELEC boards may be slightly more expensive than Shenzhen Xunlong’s Orange Pi boards, but documentation appears to be clearly a step or two ahead, and they have an ecosystem of modules that’s currently lacking on Orange Pi boards.

Some price info about the kit I’ve received:

  • NanoPi Neo 2 board – $14.99
  • Heatsink set – $2.97
  • NanoHat PCM5102A – $9.99
  • NEO Hub – $12.99 (Not needed if you buy Bakebit Starter Kit)
  • BakeBit Starter Kit – $29.99

You’ll need to add shipping, but it’s normally only a few dollars extra for registered airmail. You’ll find additional accessories by scrolling down on NanoPi Neo 2 page on FriendlyARM store. The next step will be to install an operating system, which will be FriendlyELEC’s Ubuntu Core + Qt image, or Armbian nightly build, in order to do some basic tests and run benchmarks like I did for NanoPi NEO, and following up on that I plan to write an extra post reporting on my experience playing with NanoHat PCM5102A and Bakebit Starter Kit.

Xiaomi 6-in-1 WiFi & Zigbee Smart Home Kit Works with Domoticz Home Automation Software

March 24th, 2017 11 comments

Xiaomi “Mijia” 6-in-1 smart home (security) kit is an home automation set with a WiFi & Zigbee multi-functional gateway with RGB light and speaker, a wireless switch, a window/door sensor, a  human body sensor, temperature & humidity sensor, and a smart socket.

The key features of each item are as follows:

  • Multifunctional Gateway Remote Control
    • WiFI and Bluetooth connectivity
    • Built-in speaker
    • Light sensor and 18x RGB LED for notifications potentially trigerred by connected sensors: body sensor, door sensor, IP camera…
    • Online radio support
  • Window / Door Sensor Set
    • Light and rings the gateway when opened or closed
    • Away from home mode: can trigger IP camera recording
    • Power – CR2032 cell battery that should last for 2 years
  • Smart Wireless Switch
    • Programmable one key switch to turn off all lights/applicance, turn on one light at night, etc…
  • Human Body Sensor
    • Motion sensor allowing you to control other devices through the gateway
    • Power – CR1632 battery
  • Smart Socket
    • Zigbee connectivity to gateway
    • Reports actual power consumption
    • Overload protection
    • Set timing turn on and turn off
  • Temperature Humidity Sensor
    • Triggers alarm if the temperature and/or humidity are out of normal range
    • Log data over time via Gateway
    • Power – CR2032 battery

You’d normally use this kit using MiHome app from the Apple Store or Google Play, but if the rather mixed user reviews scare you off, the good news is that the Xiaomi gateway (Aqara) is now supported by Domoticz (Beta). Note that there appears to be multiple hardware versions of the gateway, and Domoticz will only work with version 2.0 or greater.

Domoticz integration still requires you to install MiHome app, as you need to enable developer options, specifically “LAN functions” to set a fixed IP address. Once this is done you’ll be able to select “Xiaomi Gateway” in Domoticz web interface, and input the IP address. After getting back to the Android / iOS app again to setup the sensors, Domoticz should automatically detect them.

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Once this is done, you should not need to access Xiaomi’s mobile app anymore, and can manage and control your devices with Domoticz web interface or/and Android app.

Support for Xiaomi Smart Home gateway was merged on Github last December, and if you want to find others experiences, there’s a long thread about it on Domoticz forums. The kit described above can be purchased from GearBest for $74.5 shipped. You’ll also find the kit on other shops such as DealExtreme with various options  (4-in-1, 6-in-1, gateway only, etc…), as well as Aliexpress.

Thanks to Harley for the tip.