Archive

Posts Tagged ‘snappy’

Dell Edge Gateway 3000 Series Are Powered by Intel Bay Trail-I SoCs for Automation, Transportation, and Digital Signage

March 17th, 2017 No comments

Dell has recently introduced Edge Gateway 3000 series with three models powered by Intel Bay Trail-I processor, running Ubuntu Core 16 or Windows 10 IoT, with each model targeting respectively general-purpose automation, transportation & logistics, and digital signage and retail.

The specifications for the three models can be found in the table below.

Dell Edge Gateway 3001
Model for General-Purpose Automation
Dell Edge Gateway 3002
Model for Transportation & Logistics
Dell Edge Gateway 3003
Model for Media & Retail Kiosks
SoC Intel Atom E3805 dual core processor  @ 1.33 GHz (3W TDP) Intel Atom E3815 single core processor @ 1.46 GHz with GPU @ 400 MHz (5W TDP)
System Memory 2 GB DDR3L-1066
Storage 8 or 32 GB eMMC flash
Industrial-grade Micro-SD card: 8GB / 16GB / 32 GB / 64 GB
Connectivity 1 x 10/100 Fast Ethernet (RJ-45)
with PoE (15.4W)
WiFi 802.11 b/g/n
Bluetooth 4.0 LE
Optional ZigBee module.
2x 10/100 Fast Ethernet (RJ-45), main port supports PoE (15.4W)
WiFi 802.11 b/g/n
Bluetooth 4.0 LE
Integrated Zigbee/802.15.4 module for mesh
networking.
2 x 10/100 Fast Ethernet (RJ-45).
Main port supports PoE (15.4W)
WiFi 802.11 b/g/n
Bluetooth 4.0 LE
Optional ZigBee module
Cellular Connectivity 3G or 4G LTE for select countries, US/Canada 4G LTE with AT&T or Verizon
Video & Audio DisplayPort 1.1 up to 2560×[email protected]
3.5mm Line Out/Line
In; RealTek codec
Serial Interfaces 2x RS-232/422/485.
GPIOs 8x channel, independently
programmable, DAC, ADC.
CAN Bus CAN2.0 A/B/FD 1Mbps (CAN2.0), 5Mbps (CAN-FD)
USB 1x USB 2.0, 1x USB 3.0
GNSS Integrated GPS
Sensors Accelerometer, Pressure, Temperature and Humidity
Power Supply 12V-57V wide DC input;
PoE compliant with IEEE 802.3.af standard up to 15.4 W, 48 V over existing Ethernet infrastructure, no
modifications required.
Dimensions 125 mm x 125 mm x 51 mm
Weight Around 1.1 kg

While all three models can run Ubuntu Core 16 and Windows 10 IoT Enterprise LTSB 2016, the latter requires a 32GB eMMC flash. Each gateway also comes with a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 2.0, secure boot, BIOS password and I/O port disablement, and a fleet of gateway can be managed via Dell Edge Device Manager (EDM) cloud-based manageability suite (sold separately).

Gateway 30001 used for Mining Operations – Click to Enlarge

The gateway can be used for all sort of applications from mining management systems as shown above, to 18-wheelers, and revenue generating city fountains.

Dell Edge Gateway 3000 series will start selling this May for $399 and up. More details can be found on Dell website.

Nextcloud Box is a $80 Private Cloud Server with 1TB HDD for Development Boards

September 17th, 2016 29 comments

While there are plenty of cloud services provided by companies such as Dropbox or Google, you may want to manage you own private cloud server instead for performance and/or privacy reasons. One typical way to do this is to install Owncloud or Nextcloud (a fork of Owncloud), on a Linux computer or board such as Raspberry Pi 3. The former is usually a little expensive for just this task, the latter often results in cable mess, and in both case, some people may not be comfortable with setting it all up. Nextcloud, Western Digital, and Canonical seems to have addressed most of those issues with Nextcloud Box including a 1TB USB 3.0 WDLabs harddrive, Nextcloud case with space for the drive and small ARM or x86 Linux development boards, and a micro USB power supply.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

The kit also include a micro SD card pre-loaded with Snappy Ubuntu Core, Apache, MySQL and Nextcloud 10 for the Raspberry Pi 2. They are also working on SD card images for ODROID-C2 and Raspberry Pi 3 boards, but readers of this blog should also be able to use the kit on any ARM or x86 Linux development boards that fit in the case, as all you need to do is install you favorite Linux distribution, and install & configure Nextcloud.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Some more information and links to purchase can be found on Nexcloud Box product page. Price is $79.99 in the US, 70 Euros in Europe including VAT, and 60 GBP in the United Kingdom. The kit is not available in the rest of the world for now. Remember than you’ll need to add your board, and with a Raspberry Pi 3 the total cost would end up being around $120, but with cheaper boards you should be able to keep the total price below $100 even once shipping is taken into account.

Minimal Ubuntu 16.04 Image for ODROID-C2, and C1/C1+ Boards, Ubuntu Core Image for Bubblegum-96 Board

August 5th, 2016 1 comment

If you’ve been wanting minimal Ubuntu distributions for your server, IoT, or other headless projects, there are some good news from Hardkernel with the release of a minimal Ubuntu 16.04 image for ODROID-C2 and ODROID-C1+ boards, and Canonical has recently announced Actions Semi S900 based BubbleGum-96 board was getting support for Ubuntu Core distribution.

Minimal_Ubuntu_16.04_Image_for_Raspberry_Pi

If you’re using an ODROID board you can download ubuntu64-16.04-minimal-odroid-c2-20160803.img.xz (196MB) firmware, which become 1.7 GB once uncompressed and flash it 2GB or greater micro SD card.

After Raspberry Pi 2 and Samsung Artik 5/10, Bubblegum-96 is the third officially supported board that can run Ubuntu Core. You can download the 3.63GB beta image and instructions to flash it from an Ubuntu 16.04 machine on Mega. Bugglegum-96 is a 96boards compliant development board based on an quad core Cortex A53 processor with 2GB RAM and 8GB flash manufactured and sold by ucRobotics for $89.

ucRobotics Bubblegum-96 Boards

ucRobotics Bubblegum-96 Boards

LimeSDR Open Source Hardware Software Defined Radio Goes for $199 and Up (Crowdfunding)

April 29th, 2016 14 comments

Canonical and Lime Micro showcased SoDeRa software defined radio (SDR) a couple of months ago, with a promise to launch a crowdfunding campaign later this year. They’ve fulfill their promise, and launched the open source SDR, renamed to LimeSDR, on Crowdsupply.
LimeSDR_BoardLimeSDR board specifications:

  • FPGA – Altera Cyclone IV EP4CE40F23 Altera FPGA compatible with EP4CE30F23
  • System Memory – 256 MB DDR2 SDRAM
  • RF
    • Lime Microsystems LMS7002M RF transceiver with continuous coverage of the frequency range between 100 kHz and 3.8 GHz; 61.44 MHz bandwidth
    • 4 x TxOut and 6 x RxIn U.FL connectors
    • Power Output (CW): up to 10 dBm
    • Wi-Fi, GSM, UMTS, LTE, LoRa, Bluetooth, Zigbee, RFID, Digital Broadcasting, configurable through apps.
  • USB – 1x micro USB3 via CYUSB3014-BZXC Cypress Microcontroller  for control, data transfer and power
  • Misc – Status LEDs, RGB LEDs, 4x switches
  • Power – USB or external power supply
  • Dimensions –  100 mm x 60 mm

The board interfaces with systems running Snappy Ubuntu Core, and you can enable wireless protocols the easy way by simply installing the required app with snappy. If you implement a new protocol, it can also be easily shared through snappy apps.

LimeSDR with Aluminium ENclosure with 4 Antennas

LimeSDR with Aluminum Enclosure with 4 Antennas

Potential applications include radio astronomy,RADAR, 2G to 4G cellular basestation, media streaming (DVB, ATSC, ISDB-T), IoT gateway, HAM radio, wireless keyboard and mice emulation and detection, tyre pressure monitoring systems, aviation transponders, utility meters, drone command and control, test and measurement, and more.

It’s not the first FPGA based SDR system that’s available to hobbyist, so the company compared it to other platform such as HackRF One, BladeRF, and others, include ultra-low cost solution based on RTL-SDR.

HackRF One Ettus B200 Ettus B210 BladeRF x40 RTL-SDR LimeSDR
Frequency Range 1MHz-6GHz 70MHz-6GHz 70MHz-6GHz 300MHz-3.8GHz 22MHz-2.2GHz 100kHz-3.8GHz
RF Bandwidth 20MHz 61.44MHz 61.44MHz 40MHz 3.2MHz 61.44MHz
Sample Depth 8 bits 12 bits 12 bits 12 bits 8 bits 12 bits
Sample Rate 20MSPS 61.44MSPS 61.44MSPS 40MSPS 3.2MSPS 61.44MSPS (Limited by USB 3.0 data rate)
Transmitter Channels 1 1 2 1 0 2
Receivers 1 1 2 1 1 2
Duplex Half Full Full Full N/A Full
Interface USB 2.0 USB 3.0 USB 3.0 USB 3.0 USB 2.0 USB 3.0
Programmable Logic Gates 64 macrocell CPLD 75k 100k 40k (115k avail) N/A 40k
Chipset MAX5864, MAX2837, RFFC5072 AD9364 AD9361 LMS6002M RTL2832U LMS7002M
Open Source Full Schematic, Firmware Schematic, Firmware Schematic, Firmware No Full
Oscillator Precision +/-20ppm +/-2ppm +/-2ppm +/-1ppm ? +/-1ppm initial, +/-4ppm stable
Transmit Power -10dBm+ (15dBm @ 2.4GHz) 10dBm+ 10dBm+ 6dBm N/A 0 to 10dBm (depending on frequency)
Price $299 $686 $1,119 $420 ($650) ~$10 $299 ($199 early bird)

As mentioned in the comparison table, LimeSDR is open source hardware and you’ll find the Altium schematics & PCB layout, as well as the manufacturing files in LimeSDR-USB github repo, Altera Quartus FPGA project, Cypress FX3 firmware, source code for the drivers and GUI, and more in the various repo available on myriadrf github account.

So far, the project has raised close to $70,000 out of its $500,000 goal. A $199 early bird pledge should get you LimeSDR board, as long as you are part of the 500 backers (200 left), after which you’d need to pledge $299 for the board. Unless you provide your own antennas, you may want to add $85 to your pledge to get the four antennas and cables, or if you want a complete system with the board, antennas, enclosure, and “turnkey support”, go for the acrylic or aluminum kits for respectively $499 and $599. Shipping is free to the US, and between $15 to $35 to the rest of the world, with delivery scheduled for November or December 2016 depending on the pledge.

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS “Xenial Xerus” Release

April 21st, 2016 6 comments

Ubuntu 16.04 Long Term Support (LTS) release of the popular Linux distribution is scheduled for later today. The release codenamed Xenial Xerus will feature ‘snap’ package format, LXD pure-container hypervisor, and be the very first release with support for converge with IoT, phone, desktop and server versions running on the same base.

Ubuntu-16.04

Some of the key changes listed by Canonical include:

  • Introduces “snaps” for new robust, secure app format which can still be used along ‘deb’ packages
  • Introduces LXD pure-container hypervisor with OpenStack Mitaka
  • Supports IBM Z and LinuxONE systems with flat pricing
  • Steps towards converged Ubuntu across IoT, Phone, Desktop and Server
  • Introduces ZFS and CephFS for large-scale cloud storage

Ubuntu 16.04 will also run updated version of packages with Linux 4.4, Python 3.5, OpenSSH 2.0, PHP 7.0, MySQL 5.7, etc.. More details about the changes can be found on Xenial Xerus release notes. I’ve also noticed the system recommends apt instead of apt-get when a command is not installed.

Since an LTS release is now supported by 5 years, Ubuntu 16.04 will get updates at least until April 2021.  If as I do, you are Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, there’s no rush to update, as support will only end in April 2019, and you won’t actually be notified of the upgrade until Ubuntu 16.04.1 release in July. But if you want to upgrade manually later today, open a terminal and make sure the system is up-to-date.

and then run the update manager:

which should inform you if Ubuntu 16.04 is ready to be installed.

Update_Ubuntu_14.04_to_Ubuntu_16.04

If instead you’d like to install from scratch, you should be able to download the ISO and flash it to a USB drive or DVD drive. Canonical also used to sell Ubuntu installation DVDs, but OMG Ubuntu reports that Ubuntu 16.04 is the first release for which an official installation DVD won’t be sold, and instead the company is selling a bootable USB  drive with Ubuntu 16.04.

Ubuntu_16.04_USB_stick

Raspberry Pi 3, ODROID-C2 and Pine A64+ Development Boards Comparison

March 1st, 2016 71 comments

Raspberry Pi 3 and hardkernel ODROID-C2 launched the same day, and together with Pine A64/A64+, are the only ultra low cost (<$40) 64-bit ARM development boards available or soon-to-be available, so I’ve decided to make a comparison of the three boards the same way I did with ~$10 boards with a Raspberry Pi Zero, C.H.I.P, and Orange Pi One comparison.

Raspberry_Pi_3_ODROID-C2_Pine_A64

I’ve used features of Pine A64+ instead of Pine A64 since features and price are closer to the other two boards. Text highlighted in green means a board is clearly better than the other two for a given features, while a red highlight means it’s the weakest of the three.

Raspberry Pi 3 ODROID-C2 Pine A64 Plus
Processor Broadcom BCM2837 quad core Cortex A53 processor @ 1.2 GHz(4x ~2760 DMIPS) Amlogic S905 quad core Cortex A53 processor @ 2.0 GHz(4x ~4600 DMIPS) Allwinner A64 quad core Cortex A53 processor @ 1.2 GHz
(4x ~2760 DMIPS)
GPU VideoCore IV @ 300/400 MHz Penta core (3+2) ARM Mali-450 ARM Mali-400MP2
Video Decoding

1080p30 for H.264, MPEG2* and VC1*

* Extra licenses required

8-/10-bit H.265 up to 4K @ 60fps, H.264 up to 4K @ 30 fps, H.263, VC1, Mpeg1/2, AVS,  Realvideo up to 1080p60

H.265/HEVC @ up to 4K @ 30 fps, H.264, VP8, AVS/AVS+ & MPEG1/2/2 @ 1080p60 , VC1 and MJPEG up to 1080p @ 30 fps

Video Encoding Full HD H.264 video encoding

H.264 up to 1080p @ 60fps

H.264 up to 1080p @ 60fps

RAM 1GB LPDDR2 2GB DDR3
 1 or 2GB DDR3
Storage micro SD card slot micro SD card slot + eMMC socket micro SD card slot
Boot media micro SD card slot, USB or PXE (network boot) micro SD card slot or eMMC socket micro SD card slot
Ethernet

10/100M Ethernet via USB bridge

Gigabit Ethernet Gigabit Ethernet
Wireless Connectivity

WiFi 802.11 b/g/n (2.4GHz) and Bluetooth 4.1 LE

No, requires USB dongle Not included by default, but an optional WiFi 802.11 b/g/n & Bluetooth module can be added
USB 4x USB 2.0 host ports + 1x micro USB port for power only 4x USB 2.0 host ports + micro USB OTG port 2x USB 2.0 host ports
Video HDMI 1.4 with CEC and 3.5mm composite video jack

HDMI 2.0 with CEC

Composite video can be added via unpopulated 2-pin header

HDMI 1.4
Audio  HDMI and 3.5 mm audio jack (Shared with composite video) HDMI
HDMI,  3.5mm audio jack
I/Os and other peripherals

40-pin header with 26 –GPIOs, 1x UART (debugging), 1x SPI, 2x I2C, PCM/I2S, 2x PWM

CSI (camera serial interface)

DSI (display serial interface).

40-pin header with GPIO, I2C, UART, PWM, 1-wire, and ADC

7-pin I2S for audio

Built-in IR receiver

40-pin Raspberry Pi 2 compatible header with up to 27x GPIOs, 1x I2C, 1x SPI, 1x UART.

34-pin “Euler” header with IR, I2S, 1x SPI, 2x UART, S/PDIF

4-lane MIPI DSI connector and touch panel connector

MIPI CSI camera interface 
Power 5V via micro USB
Idle power consumption:
With UI (Raspbian?): 0.31A @ ~5V
Terminal only: 0.22A @ 5.19 V
5V via micro USB OTG port or power barrel
Idle power consumption: TBD
5V via power barrel or 3.7V LiPo battery
Idle power consumption: TBD
Dimensions 85 x 56 mm 85 x 56mm 127mm x 79mm
Linux Support

Official: Raspbian with recent Linux 4.x kernel.

 Many other community supported distros including OpenELEC, OSMC, Ubuntu Matte, Ubuntu Snappy Core, etc…

32-bit user space only (currently)

Mainline Linux support in progress.

Official: Ubuntu 16.04 64-bit images with Linux 3.14 kernel

Amlogic S905 Mainline Linux support in progress (but likely preliminary)

Community: Ubuntu 16.04 64-bit with Kernel 3.10 (No GPU and VPU support)

Mainline support in progress.

Android Support

No (at least not a usable version)

Android 5.1 Android 5.1
Windows 10 IoT Support Yes No Not yet, but maybe later
Community Largest community so far for a development board on Raspberry Pi Forums.

Monthly MagPi magazine

Active community on ODROID forums

Monthly ODROID magazine

Somewhat active Pine64 Forum, but frequency of post should increase once many of the 36,781 Kickstarter backers receive their board
Documentation,  and hardware files. Documentation is available via eLinux RPI Wiki, with little info about Raspberru Pi 3 specifically, but it’s not really an issue, as it’s software compatible with Raspberry Pi 2

Schematics are not available, even in PDF format, and the board hardware is closed source.

Broadcom BCM2837 datasheet is not available, however many of the peripherals will be similar to BCM2835 where the datasheet has been released.

Documentation can be found on ODROID-C2 Wiki.

Schematics (PDF), autocad files, and Amlogic S905 datasheet are not available (yet), but those files were provided for ODROID-C1.

No PCB layout or Gerber files are provided for ODROID boards, so the board is also closed source.

 

Documentation is available on Pine64 Wiki.

Schematics (PDF), and datasheet for all main chips including Allwinner A64 datasheet have been released.

PCB layout and Gerber files are not available, which makes the board closed source.

 

 Listed Price  $35  $40  $19 (1GB RAM) / $29 (2GB RAM) Kickstarter prices
Shipping to US address  $7.99 via MCM Electronics

Total: $42.99

$6.75 on Ameridroid.
Total: $48.70 (Board price is $41.95)
 $7
Total: $26 or $36
Distribution network and Availability Wide sales network, with most online retailers and some brick and mortar shops selling Raspberry Pi boards. Good availability as the foundation produces 300,000 boards before launch Available via Hardkernel, or distributors in US and Europe. Shipping may be costly to some other countries. Currently not available, and it’s not clear which distributions channels will be used. Kickstarter backer s are starting to receive their boards.

Since there’s quite a lot to go through, I may have made some mistakes, or missed some little known features, and corrections are welcome in the comments section. Please note that the prices for Pine A64 is likely to go up a little after the Kickstarter campaign.

Boards are likely to show similar performance in synthetic benchmark, except ODROID-C2 which should show a significant lead. However, I could not find benchmark for Pine A64 right now, and as we’ve seen this morning, Aarch64 improves performance significantly over Aarch32, so current benchmarks are likely to become invalid if/once Raspberry Pi 3 gets a 64-bit port. For example, Pine A64 is currently 15 times faster in sysbench CPU benchmark (prime numner computation) compared to Raspberry Pi 3, and it’s clearly not showing the true performance difference.

As usual there’s no board that is always better than the other two, and depending on your use case, technical ability, and other factors, one board may be better suited to you or your application.

Samsung Artik IoT Boards and Devkits with WiFi, Bluetooth LE, and Zigbee Available, Partners Announced

February 19th, 2016 12 comments

Samsung Artik IoT boards will finally start selling on February 22 via Digikey. With the many fascinating developments in the IoT space over the year, you’d be forgiven if you completely forgot about Samsung Artik boards. So let’s have a quick recap.

Samsung_Artik

The Korean company previously announced three boards all supporting Bluetooth LE:

  • Artik 1 – Ineda Systems Dual Core microAptiv MIPS32 processor with 1MB on-chip RAM, no GPU, and 4MB SPI flash
  • Artik 5 – Dual core Exynos ARM processor @ 1GHz with ARM Mali 400 MP2 GPU, 512MB RAM and 4GB eMMC flash (both on-chip), with WiFi & Zigbee/Thread connectivity
  • Artik 10 – Octa core Exynos processor with 4x ARM Cortex A15 @ 1.3GHz, 4x ARM Cortex A7 @ 1.0 GHz with ARM Mali-T628 GPU, 2GB LPDDR3 (on-chip), 16GB eMMC flash, and WiFi & Zigbee/Thread connectivity

Samsung also partnered with multiple companies working on:

  • Operating Systems – Tizen, Nucleus Real Time OS (for Artik 1), Fedora Linux, and Snappy Ubuntu Core.
  • Tools and Services
    • Arduino web-based development environment
    • Temboo for cloud connectivity and automatic code generation.
    • Medium One’s workflow tools for analytics and visualization
    • Sensory’s speaker-independent on-device TrulyHandsfree Voice Control technology
    • Soundhound’s contextual natural language and voice recognition engine
    • Vayyar’s 3D imaging sensor technology.
  • Cloud – Microsoft Azure IoT Suite and IoT Hub;  Samsung SAMIIO + the Open Data Exchange platform
  • Security – TEE support (Trusted Execution Environment) with Trustonic

You can find the SDK, documentation, and community forum on  Artik developer’s page.

Artik 5 Development Kit

Artik 5 Development Kit

Artik 1 and Artik 10 prices are not unavailable, 4 days from the launch… however Artik 5 kit is already sold for $99.99, and includes a baseboard, Artik 5 modules, three antennas for WiFi, Bluetooth and Zigbee, as well as a power supply and a USB cable.

$98 Geek Force Mediatek MT7623 Router Board Features 6 GbE Ports, 3 mPCIe Slots for WiFi, 3G, or LTE (Crowdfunding)

February 8th, 2016 24 comments

We’ve seen a few interesting and relatively powerful router board launched last year, with the likes of MQMaker WiTi or Turris Omnia, AsiaRF has now designed Geek Force board powered by Mediatek MT7623N/MT7623A quad core network processor combined with 2GB RAM, six Gigabit Ethernet ports, and optional 802.11ac and 3G connectivity via the three mPCIe slots available on the board. The board also features two HDMI ports, and supports multimedia capabilities such as H.264, MPEG-2, or VC-1 hardware video decoding.

Geek_Force_Board

Click to Enlarge

Geek Force board preliminary specifications:

  • SoC – MediaTek MT7623A or MT7623N quad-core ARM Cotex-A7 @ 1.3GHz with Mali-450MP GPU (MT7623N only)
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3
  • Storage – 2GB eMMC or NAND Flash + SD card slot up to 128 GB, and maybe SATA via the mPCIe slots
  • Connectivity – 6 Gigabit Ethernet ports (WAN / LAN behavior defined by firmware), 802.11 b/g/n WiFi & Bluetooth 4.0 via MT6625L with IPEX antenna connector for WiFi and Bluetooth, and optional 802.11ac WiFi, 3G an/or 4G via mPCIe slots.
  • Video – 2x HDMI (one input, one output), 1x RCA video output, MIPI DSI
  • Audio – HDMI, and optical S/PDIF input and output ports
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 port, 1x USB 2.0 host port, 1x micro USB OTG port
  • Expansion
    • 3x mini PCIe
    • 26-pin “Raspberry Pi” header,
    • 10-pin PCM header
    • 10-pin SPI0 header
    • 6-pin Apple Auth CP (I2C) connector
    • 10-pin I2C + I2S header
    • Power header
  • Debugging – 1x 20-pin JTAG connector, 4-pin UART1 connector for serial console
  • Misc – IR receiver, power switch, 1x user switch
  • Power – 12V
  • Dimensions – N/A

The board will support OpenWrt, Android, and Ubuntu Snappy operating systems, likely on top of Linux 3.10 kernel. The SoC also features hardware NAT, hardware QoS, and hard crypto engine, which should all be supported by the board. While the specs indicates either MT7623A or M7623N processor might be used, the pictures shows MT7623N used in combination with MT7530B Ethernet switch. MT7623A embeds the Ethernet switch on-chip, but lacks a GPU, and has less video interfaces.

Geek_Force_Board_BottomApart from the specifications however, the company has not shared much technical information so far, not shown any demos, but I’ve been told a video should come after Chinese New Year holidays. Some parts of the specs are also unclear, for example whether the video interfaces are only output, or if some are input, and it’s not 100% clear the mPCIe slots also support SATA.Potential applications include Internet router, enterprise access point, home security system, home automation gateway, NAS, switch control processor, etc…

AsiaRF has launched a flexible funding Indiegogo campaign to raise funds for production. A $98 pledge should get you a Geek Force board with a power adapter and a “pigtail plus” antenna. There are also various other rewards for 802.11ac, 3G or 4G LTE mini PCie cards add-ons with SIM card slot, up to $192 for a Geek Force board with 4G LTE worldwide, and 802.11ac WiFi. Shipping added $30 to the destinations I tried, and delivery is scheduled for June 2016.