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Posts Tagged ‘tizen’

Samsung Starts Mass-Production of Exynos 7 Dual (7270) Processor used in Galaxy Gear S3 Smartwatch

October 11th, 2016 4 comments

Samsung has just issued a press release announcing the Korean company had just started mass-production of the first SoC for Wearables using 14-nm FinFET process with their Exynos 7 Dual (7270) dual Cortex A53 processor. Exynos 7270 is also said to be the first such SoC to embed full connectivity and LTE modem integration.

samsung-exynos-7-dualExynos 7270 specifications:

  • CPU – Dual-core ARM CortexA53 processor  @ up to 1.0 GHz
  • GPU – ARM Mali-T720
  • Memory – LPDDR3 support
  • Storage – eMMC 5.0, SD card interfaces
  • Display – Up to 960×540 (qHD) resolution
  • Camera – Up to 5MP pixel sensor support
  • Multimedia – HD ([email protected]) video with HEVC, H.264, VP8 Codec
  • LTE Modem – LTE Category 4 non-CA
  • Connectivity – WiFi, Bluetooth 4.2, FM Radio
  • GNSS – GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou
  • PMIC – Integrated in SiP-ePoP package
  • Package – SiP-ePoP, 10x10mm (SiP: System-in-Package; ePoP: embedded Package-on-Package)

The SoC will be packaged inside a SiP-ePOP package with DRAM, eMMC, and a power management IC, which will allow for a much smaller board, and more space for the battery for example, which combined with the more power efficient 14-nm FinFET process should allow for longer battery life for wearables.

galaxy-gear-s3

Samsung Galaxy Gear S3 Running Tizen OS on Exynos 7 Dual Processor

Samsung can also provide a reference platform with display, NFC, audio codec, diverse sensors and a sensor hub to help companies getting started with their product design.

More information can be found on Exynos 7 Dual product page.

DIGMA Plane 8501 3G is the First Tizen 3.0 Tablet

September 26th, 2016 2 comments

Back in 2013, we saw a Tizen 2.0 tablet prototype by Systena, but for whatever reason, it never came to market. Over three years later, a Russian company called DIGMA is about to launch the first Tizen tablet that you should be able to buy (provided you are based in Russia) with DIGMA Plane 8501 3G tablet running Tizen 3.0.

digma-tizen-tabletDIGMA Plane 8501 3G specifications:

  • SoC – Spreadtrum SC7731(G) quad core Cortex A7 processor @ 1.2 GHz with Mali 400MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – 1GB RAM
  • Storage – 8GB flash + micro SD slot up to 32 GB
  • Display – 8″ IPS touchscreen display with 1280×800 resolution
  • Cellular Connectivity – 3G connectivity with dual SIM card support
  • Connectivity – WiFi 802.11 b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.0, GPS/A-GPS
  • Camera – 2MP rear camera with LED flash, 0.3MP front camera
  • USB – micro USB port
  • Battery – 3,800 mAh battery good for about 8 hours
  • Dimensions – 209.8 x 120 x 8.8 mm
  • Weight – 365 grams

This entry-level tablet runs Tizen 3.0 operating system with a new “architecture designed for the Internet of Things”, and targets both businesses and governmental organizations requiring data security and device stability.

digma-plane-8501-3g

There’s no availability nor pricing information for the tablet, but like most devices running an alternative mobile OS, there’s already an Android version selling for 6260 to 6790 Rubles (~$100), so the Tizen tablet should likely be in that price range too.

Via Tizen Experts

Categories: Hardware, Spreadtrum, Tizen Tags: digma, tablet, tizen

Tizen Studio 1.0 Replaces Tizen SDK for Smartphones, Wearables and TVs

September 5th, 2016 No comments

Tizen has converged all Tizen SDK for mobile, wearables, and TV to Tizen Studio since the beginning of the month, and released Tizen Studio 1.0 for developers interested in developing app for Tizen smartphones, TVs and/or smartwatches such as the latest Samsung Gear S3.

Tizen_Studio_1.0So instead, you’ll now be able to select the targets platform and profiles within Tizen Studio. Some of the key changes made to the development environment in Tizen Studio 1.0 include:

  1. Launching tools: Installer, Uninstaller, and Package Manager
  2. Developing tools: IDE perspective theme, Project Wizard, Certificate Manager, and Menu and tool icons
  3. UI tools: UI Builder, Component Designer, and EDC Editor
  4. Testing tools: Emulator
  5. Testing tools: Dynamic Analyzer for memory and CPU profiling
  6. Other improvements in Tizen application development environment
Dynamic Analyzer in Tizen Studio 1.0

Dynamic Analyzer in Tizen Studio 1.0

Tizen Studio is available for the 32-bit and 64-bit version of Windows,  and Ubuntu, as well as for Mac OS with one version with the graphics IDE, and a smaller command line interface only version.

You can find a few more details about Tizen Studio on a Samsung newsroom post.

The First 4G Tizen Smartphone, Samsung Z2, To Launch in India for $68

August 24th, 2016 3 comments

After Samsung Z1, and Samsung Z3, Samsung defied “mathematical incrementation wisdom”, and launched Samsung Z2 Tizen smartphone, which happens to be the very first Tizen phone supporting 4G networks.

Samsung_Z3

Tizen Z2 is definitely an entry level smartphone as the specification show:

  • SoC – Spreadtrum SC9830i quad core Cortex A7 processor @ 1.5 GHz with Mali 400MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – 1GB RAM
  • Storage – 8GB flash + micro SD slot up to 128GB
  • Display – 4″ WVGA TFT display
  • Cellular Connectivity – 4G LTE Cat.4
  • Camera – 5MP rear camera with LED flash, 0.3MP front camera
  • Battery – 1,500 mAh battery

The device caters to the Indian market with Samsung’s ‘Make for India’ features such as the “Ultra Data Saving mode, S bike mode and the new My Money Transfer”. The phone also includes a preview version of Jio services to access music and videos on demand.

Samsung Z3 will be sold for 4,590 INR (~$68) in India starting on August 29th. More details may be found on Samsung Z2 product page.

Via Tizen Experts

Samsung Artik IoT Boards and Devkits with WiFi, Bluetooth LE, and Zigbee Available, Partners Announced

February 19th, 2016 12 comments

Samsung Artik IoT boards will finally start selling on February 22 via Digikey. With the many fascinating developments in the IoT space over the year, you’d be forgiven if you completely forgot about Samsung Artik boards. So let’s have a quick recap.

Samsung_Artik

The Korean company previously announced three boards all supporting Bluetooth LE:

  • Artik 1 – Ineda Systems Dual Core microAptiv MIPS32 processor with 1MB on-chip RAM, no GPU, and 4MB SPI flash
  • Artik 5 – Dual core Exynos ARM processor @ 1GHz with ARM Mali 400 MP2 GPU, 512MB RAM and 4GB eMMC flash (both on-chip), with WiFi & Zigbee/Thread connectivity
  • Artik 10 – Octa core Exynos processor with 4x ARM Cortex A15 @ 1.3GHz, 4x ARM Cortex A7 @ 1.0 GHz with ARM Mali-T628 GPU, 2GB LPDDR3 (on-chip), 16GB eMMC flash, and WiFi & Zigbee/Thread connectivity

Samsung also partnered with multiple companies working on:

  • Operating Systems – Tizen, Nucleus Real Time OS (for Artik 1), Fedora Linux, and Snappy Ubuntu Core.
  • Tools and Services
    • Arduino web-based development environment
    • Temboo for cloud connectivity and automatic code generation.
    • Medium One’s workflow tools for analytics and visualization
    • Sensory’s speaker-independent on-device TrulyHandsfree Voice Control technology
    • Soundhound’s contextual natural language and voice recognition engine
    • Vayyar’s 3D imaging sensor technology.
  • Cloud – Microsoft Azure IoT Suite and IoT Hub;  Samsung SAMIIO + the Open Data Exchange platform
  • Security – TEE support (Trusted Execution Environment) with Trustonic

You can find the SDK, documentation, and community forum on  Artik developer’s page.

Artik 5 Development Kit

Artik 5 Development Kit

Artik 1 and Artik 10 prices are not unavailable, 4 days from the launch… however Artik 5 kit is already sold for $99.99, and includes a baseboard, Artik 5 modules, three antennas for WiFi, Bluetooth and Zigbee, as well as a power supply and a USB cable.

Samsung Gear S2 Classic 3G Smartwatch Features an eSIM for Cellular Connectivity, Runs Tizen

February 19th, 2016 1 comment

Samsung has announced that Gear S2 classic 3G smartwatch would be first device in the market to be equipped with a GSMA compliant eSIM (Embedded SIM) The round watch is also powered by a dual core processor coupled with 512MB RAM and 4GB flash to run Tizen based wearable platform.

Samsung_Gear_S2_Classic_3GGalaxy Gear S2 Classic 3G specifications:

  • SoC – Dual core processor @ 1.0 GHz
  • System Memory – 512MB
  • Storage – 4GB RAM
  • Display – 1.2” circular super AMOLED display, 360×360 resolution, 302ppi
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n/e, Bluetooth 4.1, NFC, 3G/4G (HSPA+ voice and data networks)
  • Audio Codec – MP3/AAC/AAC+/eAAC+
  • Audio Format – MP3, M4A, AAC, OGG
  • Sensors – Accelerometer, Gyroscope, Heart Rate, Ambient Light, Barometer
  • Dimension  – 44.0 x 46.9 x 13.4 (54g)
  • Battery – 300mAh Li-ion; Wireless Charging;  2~3days on a charge
  • IP Rating – IP68 Certified Dust and Water Resistant

The watch will run Tizen, and include a whole bunch of pre-installed apps including Contacts, Notifications, Messages, Email, Preset text, S Health, Nike+ Running
Maps & Navigation, Weather, Music Player, Gallery, and more others.

SIM_card_evolution

SIM Card Evolution – Edited from Understanding SIM Card Evolution (PDF)

This is all good, but what is an e-SIM? First it stands for embedded SIM, meaning it’s not simply the usual card that you can insert or remove from your phone, but it’s a chip soldered on the board. Does that mean you can’t change mobile operator? Actually you can because it supports remote provisioning. The concept was actually initiated for M2M / IoT application, as imagine you’ve got 100,000 “things” connected to cellular network, and for whatever reason you’d like to change mobile operator, you’d have to pay several people to replace all the SIM cards. With remote provisioning of eSIMs this can happen with one mouse click.

Back to the watch… Samsung Gear S2 classic 3G/4G will be available on March 11 onwards at a price that has yet to be disclosed.

Open Source Operating Systems News – Maru OS, Zephyr, ReactOS, Tizen 3.0, and Raspbian

February 18th, 2016 9 comments

There have been several news related to open source operating systems in the last couple of weeks including Maru OS to run Debian on Android, Zephyr Project real-time OS managed by the Linux Foundation, ReactOS an open source port of Windows XP, and Raspberry Pi boards are getting a Tizen 3.0 port, as well as a new Raspbian release.

Maru OS – Mobile <-> Desktop  Convergence

Maru_OS

Maru OS mobile operating system is supposed to do what Ubuntu convergence promised: it runs in mobile mode on the go with Android Lollipop mobile OS, once you connect the phone to an HDMI screen, and pair Bluetooth keyboard and/or mouse, it will switch to desktop mode running Debian Linux. The downside is that so far it a single developer (Preetam D’Souza) worked on it, and the beta version only works on Nexus 5 smartphone. However, since the project went viral, dozen of other people wanted to get involved and help, so Preetan decided to open source it, and a community may form around the project.

You can find more details on Maru OS website and blog.

Zephyr Real-time Operating System for IoT

Zephyr_RTOS

Zephyr Project is a lightweight real-time operating system (RTOS) design for IoT applications comprising of a microkernel for lower priority tasks, and a nanokernel to handle the real-time part. Zephyr memory footprint can be as low as 8KB, it supports x86, ARMv7-M, and ARC instructions sets, includes Bluetooth and 6LoWPAN stacks, as well as I/O drivers for GPIOs, ADC, I2C, and SPI, and supports Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) and Datagram Transport Layer Security (DTLS).

The main features are explained in the short video below.

You can get the source code for the first release as follows:

It will run with QEMU for x86 or ARM, as well as several development boards such as MinnowBoard MAX, Quark D2000 and SE boards, Arduino 101, Galileo, Arduino Due, and NXP Freedom development platform.

You can find more details, including full documentation and Zephyr SDK on Zephyr Project website, and the Linux Foundation announcement.

ReactOS 0.4.0 Release

ReactOS

ReactOS is an open source operating system written from scratch – i.e. not based on Linux – that looks like Windows XP, and runs Windows applications. The source code has over 9 millions lines of code contributed from over 100 developers, so it’s not exactly a small project. It can run on older computers with as low as 96MB RAM and 500MB storage.

The developers have been working on the project for many years, but the news is that ReactOS 0.4.0 has been released with some new features including ext2 read/write and NTFS read support, a new explorer shell and theme support, and on the hardware drives side SATA, sound, USB and wireless networking are now working. The operating system is still considered alpha, but if you want to give it a try, you can download the ISO to boot or install it from a USB drive.

Raspberry Pi Gets Tizen 3.0 Port, new Raspbian Release

Raspberry_Pi_2_Tizen_3.0Tizen adoption rate is relatively low, so the Samsung Open Source Group decided to leverage Raspberry Pi 2 reach, over 5 millions sold for far, to bring more people on board. Development is still in progress, so while Tizen 3.0 is booting fine on Raspberry Pi 2 board, supports 3D graphics acceleration, but still lacks some functionalities.

You can try it by downloading tizen.rpi-sdimg.LATEST, and dumping it into a micro SD card the usual way, i.e. Win32DiskImager or dd. If you’d rather build one of the minimal images by yourself, you can do so by following the build instructions.

If you are running the better known Raspbian distribution on your Raspberry Pi board(s), you may consider upgrading it, as the Raspberry Pi Foundation recently announced a new release of the Debian based operating system which mostly contains bug fixes and packages updates. There’s also a new experimental feature: an OpenGL driver for the desktop, only implemented for RPi 2. It is turned off my default, but can be enabled with raspi-config.

To update Raspbian to the latest version, simply run:

If you also want to tried OpenGL applications:

H5OS HTML5 based OS

H5OSOne quick update, as I’ve just seen Linaro member ACADINE Technologies released the first version of H5OS HTML5 based operating system designed for mobile devices and IoT and that has been forked from  Firefox OS.

FOSDEM 2016 Schedule – Open Source Hardware and Software Event in Europe

January 13th, 2016 3 comments

FOSDEM (Free and Open Source Software Developers’ European Meeting) is a 2-day event that usually takes place on the first week-end of February in Brussels, but this year it will be on January 30-31. The event brings thousands of developers, hackers, and other person interested in open source technology who present their projects and share ideas. FOSDEM 2016 schedule is now available, and There will be 557 speakers, 612 events, and 50 tracks this year including 7 main tracks: Distros, Enterprise, Hardware, Communications, Miscellaneous, Office, Systems Administration, and Virtualization.

FOSDEM_2016

So I’ve had a look at some of the talks, especially out of  “Embedded, Mobile and Automotive” and “IoT” devrooms, and prepared my own virtual schedule although I won’t be able to attend.

Saturday

For many years MIPS processors have been involved in the embedded market, particularly in areas related to networks and storage. With the success of the mobile market, and the great evolution of the world linked to the “makers”, other architectures (such as ARM), they have reached very large levels of diffusion.

Meanwhile, the MIPS architecture has evolved, introducing innovations and improvements to adapt to both the processor market from performance, both to the world of micro-controllers. The future of MIPS is a new family divided into several generations evolving.

During the presentation, after a brief and simplified introduction to architecture, will be shown the technologies available at the time and what will be the future developments.

The presentation will also show some reference platforms (ex. Imagination Creator CI20), and how to work to integrate and port on these platforms. Application examples with Yocto and buildroot, to switch to a full distribution (Debian). Finally it will also present a perspective on the use of MIPS in embedded designs.

AsteroidOS is a free and open-source smartwatch platform based on OpenEmbedded, libhybris, BlueZ5 and Qt5. The OS currently offers a basic user experience on the LG G Watch. This technical talk will briefly introduce the philosophical background of the project and more deeply its architecture’s details in order to attract developers, porters and curious.

This talk will successively be focused on how to boot an Android Wear watch, on how to gain hardware acceleration on that kind of hardware, on how Qt5 and OpenEmbedded are used and on the future of AsteroidOS.

AsteroidOS uses similar technological choices as those of projects like SailfishOS, NemoMobile, Mer, WebOS-Ports or Ubuntu Touch but adapted to the needs of smartwatches. The architecture of those project will briefly be compared during the presentation.

Based on Migen, MiSoC is a library of cores and a system-on-chip integration system to build gateware for various applications. MiSoC is lightweight (runs on FPGA devices as small as Spartan-6 LX9 with 32-bit RISC CPU and SDRAM), portable (demonstrated on Xilinx, Altera and Lattice devices) and high performance (e.g. contains the fastest open source DDR3 solution we are aware of). Designing and integrating cores is facilitated by Python and Migen features. Current MiSoC applications include LTE base stations, video processing (Numato Opsis) and experiment control system (ARTIQ).

Nemo Mobile is a long time FOSS operating system. Created in 2012 as continuation to Meego Community Edition, it has been actively developed since then. The newest iteration of it is to use Glacier UI as its renewed User Interface, along with its Qt Components. These components are now used in the NemoTablet adaptation using Raspberry Pi2 as underlying hardware and its plethora of possible peripherals to create a true DIY tablet derived from SailPi project.

With Raspberry Pi 2 introduction in February 2015, it was then possible to create an adaptation for it. This enables the myriad of functionality it offers, with its hardware provided. Initial adaptation was done originally for SailfishOS, but Nemo Mobile had the first run and checking that everything worked, before a closed system was installed. Nemo Mobile, however, was then not tried until later. The idea came once the official touchscreen by Raspberry Pi Foundation was released, so that a FOSS tablet could be built by anyone and used. Raspberry Pi 2 has non-free hardware, but Nemo Mobile itself is FOSS completely. As with all other adaptations, the questions regarding hardware freedom limitations rise for a good reason.

Libreboot is a free software BIOS replacement (boot firmware), based on coreboot, for Intel, AMD and ARM based systems. Backed by the Free Software Foundation, the aim of the Libreboot project is to provide individuals and companies with an escape from proprietary firmware in their computing. Libreboot is also being reviewed for entry as an official component of the GNU system.

Boot firmware is the low-level software that runs when you turn your computer on, which initializes the hardware and starts a bootloader for your operating system. Libreboot currently supports laptops and servers, on x86 (Intel and AMD) and ARM (Rockchip RK3288), with more hardware support on the horizon. The purpose of this talk is to describe the history of the project, why it started, why it’s important, where it’s going and, most importantly, to tell people how they can get involved.

Francis also runs the Minifree (formerly Gluglug), a company that sells computers with libreboot and Trisquel GNU/Linux pre-installed.

No abstract, but it’s clear about Olimex’s Allwinner A64 A64-OlinuXino board to be used in the company’s open source hardware laptop.

A brief discussion about the stable release branch 4 of KiCad as well as goals for the next development cycle and beyond.

The WPANKit is a ptxdist based Open-Source 6LoWPAN Board Support Package (BSP). The main focus is to provide a software development kit for the linux-wpan project. The linux-wpan project aims to implement a 6LoWPAN inside the mainline Linux kernel.

This talk will present the WPANKit: An Open-Source Linux BSP to develop 6LoWPAN IoT applications. It contains support for various common platforms such Raspberry Pi’s and Beaglebones. Additional components like the openlabs 802.15.4 transceiver SPI transceiver or BTLE USB dongles gives you a getting started platform into the Linux 6LoWPAN world.

The WPANKit will directly build a current mainline 6LoWPAN kernel, which is the official bluetooth-next tree. This is important, because the mainline 6LoWPAN development is still much in development. Additional the WPANKit offers a large of userspace IoT software collection e.g. tshark for sniffing network traffic, libcoap, etc. On top of this BSP you can develop your IoT application, setting up a Border-Router or help at the current mainline 6LoWPAN Linux-kernel development.

Through the power of ptxdist you can easily add new own packages for cross-compiling. As well we accept patches to integrate new software into the official WPANKit repository, so we getting more and more new IoT capable software into the WPANKit which can be used by other ptxdist users.

An AdaCore intern has rewritten the CrazyFlie drone software, originally in C, into SPARK. In addition to fixing some bugs, this allowed to prove absence of runtime errors. Various techniques used to achieve that result will be presented, as well as a live demo of free fall detection.

This talk will take us through the available FOSS software stacks that are available for automotive. This last year has produced a lot of working software from fiber-optic networking drivers in the Linux kernel, complete In-Vehicle Infotainment stacks, to a newly released Qt Automotive. There has also been a change in available hardware to run this software on, new boards like the Minnowboard Max, Renesas’ Porter board, and even the Raspberry Pi 2. This talk will try and cover the entire software ecosystem and how it matches to hardware, how you can get involved today, and what the future holds.

Turris Omnia aims to bring to the market affordable, powerful and secure SOHO router which is completely open-source and open-hardware. As a operating system it uses our own fork of OpenWrt which has some additional features such as automatic security updates. This talk will cover few topics such as motivation for starting this project and developing of our own hardware and software.

FROSTED is an acronym for “FRee Operating System for Tiny Embedded Devices”. The goal of this project is to provide a free kernel for embedded systems based on ARM Cortex-M CPU family, which exposes a POSIX-compliant system call API. Even if it runs on small systems with no MMU and limited resources, Frosted has a VFS, UNIX command line tools and a HW abstraction layer which makes it easy to support new platforms and device drivers.

This talk will cover why the project was started, the approach taken to separate the kernel and user-space on ARM Cortex-M CPU’s without MMU, the collaboration with the libopencm3 project to provide a high quality hardware abstraction layer and the future goals of the project. Of course there will a demo showing the latest developments: dynamic loading of applications and possibly TCP/IP communication.

Sunday

Yocto project has been used at Open-RnD for building a number of IoT related products. The talk will go though the details of integration of Poky build system and OpenEmbedded layers into 3 projects carried out at Open-RnD:

  • an autonomous parking space monitoring system
  • a distributed 3D steroscopic image acquisition system
  • a gadget for acquisition of metabolic parameters of professional athletes

The presentation will approach to building software, automation and upstreaming of fixes. Only widely available hardware platforms such as BeagleBone Black, Raspberry Pi, Wandboard or Gateworks GW5400 (not as widely used as the previous ones, but still fully supported) were used in the project, hence all the points made during presentation are directly applicable by professionals and hobbyists alike.

Tizen is an open source GNU/Linux based software platform for mobile, wearable and embedded devices as well as Internet of Things. Tizen:Common provides a generic development environment for Tizen 3 which key features include, Wayland, Weston, EFL UI/UX toolkit, and a web runtime for safely running standalone HTML5 apps. Yocto Project offers tools to easily expends features of Tizen:Common by creating layers for new profiles. This talk will focus the Tizen architecture and it will provide guidelines for creating and building new Tizen profiles, based on Tizen:Common, using the Yocto Project for devices with Intel or ARM processors. It will also provide information about hidden gems in Tizen on Yocto and practical examples for packaging and deploying HTML5 applications through Yocto recipes for the open source hardware development boards like Raspberry PI2 or HummingBoard (Freescale I.MX6 ARM SoC) or MinnowBoard Max (Intel).

Finally, since Tizen aims to because the OS of everything, we will illustrate this by extending Tizen Distro with new connectivity features provided by IoTivity library, the open source implementation of OpenInterConnect’s standard.

This session will show you how to build your own retro hand-held console that is powered by Java, runs on a Raspberry Pi, and is printed on a 3D printer. Some of the topics covered include:

  • Hacking Java on the Raspberry Pi
  • Rigging input devices with Pi4J
  • Insane performance tuning on the JVM
  • Why your boss [or SO] needs to buy you a 3D printer!

And of course your retro gaming mettle will be put to the test, so make sure to dust off your old 8 and 16 bit consoles to prepare.

How to roll your own build and extend the Fairphone 2 hardware

The kernelci.org project is currently doing hundreds of build and boot tests for upstream kernels on a wide variety of hardware. This session will provide an introduction to the kernelci.org system, some live demos and how to start consuming its results, and be a forum for further discussions.

Distributed boards farms across the world are working together to deliver unified build, boot, and test results for every merge of an upstream Linux kernel tree. A community based architecture agnostic effort, kernelci.org aims to detect regressions in a timely manner and report back to kernel developers with a concise summary of the issues found. On every merge, all defconfigs for x86, arm, and arm64 are built, booted, and tested on over 300 real or virtual hardware platforms. Come join in the discussion and help make Linux better!

Hardware is funny stuff. It is often documented to work one way when it actually works a slightly different way. Different revisions of the hardware may have different bugs that require different sets of work-arounds. Programming it even slightly incorrectly can lead to software crashes or system hangs. Sometimes some versions of the hardware work fine, but the version not on the developer’s desk crashes. Failure modes are often opaque and give no clues for fixing the problem. Writing robust, reliable software to run directly on hardware is hard.

Software simulation of hardware is a technique that, in many cases, can alleviate some of this pain. Teams that develop hardware will often create a simulator as a by-product of hardware synthesis. Not ever developer is fortunate to have access to such tools. Those who do have access often find them slow or difficult to use. After all, these simulators are generally created as an aid for the hardware developers themselves. Much of the benefit of a full hardware simulator can be attained by developing the simulator independently from the hardware development. When the correct techniques are applied, it’s not even that hard.

This talk will present a variety of techniques based on experience with several “home grown” simulation environments. Techniques for both developing and validating the simulator and techniques for integrating simulation in the regular development process will be described.

  • 16:00 – 17:00 – PHP7 by Derick Rethans

With PHP 7 having been released, it is time to show what’s in there. Speed, scalar type hints and spaceships.

These are just a few selection from the complete schedule. Last year, most FOSDEM 2015 videos were available in mid-March, so I’d expect FOSDEM 2016 videos to be available in about the same time frame.

As usual, the event will be free, and does not require registration, so you just need to show up at the Université libre de Bruxelles in order to attend.