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Posts Tagged ‘arm’

MNT Reform DIY Modular ARM Linux Portable Computer To Feature NXP i.MX 6/8 SoC

October 20th, 2017 6 comments

The first usable DIY ARM Linux laptop that I can remember is Novena, unveiled in 2014, based on Freescale i.MX 6Quad processor, and fairly expensive at close to $2,000 since it was a nice product. Recently, we’ve had more affordable options with products such as Olimex TERES-I laptop (Allwinner A64), and the second version of Pi-Top laptop shell for Raspberry Pi 3.

There may soon be another option as MNT Media and Technology (Lukas F. Hartmann) partnered with an industrial designer (Ana Dantas) to work on “Reform”, a DIY and modular laptop / portable computer powered by NXP i.MX 6QuadPlus quad core ARM Cortex A9 processor, and eventually i.MX 8 hexa core Cortex A72/A53 processor.

Click to Enlarge

They are the prototype stage right now, and mostly looking for feedback. The preliminary specifications and features of the Reform portable computer include:

  • SoC – NXP i.MX 6QuadPlus quad core Cortex A9 processor @ up to 1.2 GHz, with Vivante GC2000 GPU . Update planned to NXP i.MX8 hexa core processor
  • System Memory – At least 4 GB of RAM (4GB in prototype)
  • Storage – micro SD card slot (for uboot), SATA SSD slot (120 GB in prototype)
  • Detachable display housing with standard screws
    • 10″ 1920×1200 color panel with HDMI to dual LVDS adapter
    • Future E-Ink option
  • Custom designed keyboard with Cherry ML switch,  swappable keyboard PCB, 3D printed key caps. Currently based on Teensy LC Cortex M0+ Arduino compatible board.
  • Exchangeable pointing device (trackball / trackpad). Currently also based on Teensy LC board
  • USB – USB 2.0 ports
  • Expansion – PCIe slot (tested with Penguin Wireless N Mini PCIe card)
  • Battery – 3,000 mAh @ 7.4V LiPo battery good for about 2.5 hours
  • Modular Chassis for motherboard, battery, SSD storage, input device controllers
  • Dimensions – 28cm x 17.5cm x 5.5cm
  • Weight – 1.5 kg

Note than some not-so-flattering features like 5.5cm thickness and short battery life are just for the prototype, and will be optimized if the computer gets manufactured. They used TinyRex Ultra development kit in the prototype, and will likely use the system-on-module found in the kit in the final product, especially VoiPAC has plans to make an i.MX 8 version.

Lukas could run Debian Linux, and successfully tested LibreOffice, Blender, GIMP, Inkscape and Audacity. GPU acceleration and hardware video decoding also work, as tested with respectively Quake 3 Arena and mplayer (H.264).

Going forward they’ll work on improving the design with a slimmed-down baseboard, an integrated charger/power brick, and better modularity management. Once everything is ready they’ll either launch a crowdfunding campaign, or take pre-orders with price likely in the 500 to 700 Euros range. All details can be found on Reform product page.

Via ARM Netbook Mailing List and Liliputing

Olimex TERES-I DIY OSHW Laptop Now Up for Sale for 240 Euros

October 12th, 2017 14 comments

Olimex has been working on their open source hardware TERES-I DIY laptop since last year. The laptop is supposed to come in kit form, so that you can build it yourself. Every board and most parts are open source to let your easily repair it, or improve it by adapting the part to your own needs.

The company has now launched the laptop kit for 240 Euros in black or white.

Olimex TERES-I laptop updated specifications:

  • SoC – Allwinner A64 quad core ARM Cortex-A53 processor @ 1.2 GHz with Mali-400MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3L
  • Storage – 16 GB eMMC Flash, micro SD slot
  • Display – 11.6″ LCD display with 1366×768 resolution
  • Video Output – 1x HDMI 1.4 port
  • Audio – Via mini HDMI, 3.5mm audio jack, 2x speakers, microphone
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n WiFi up to 150Mbps, Bluetooth 4.0 LE
  • USB – 2x USB port ports
  • Front camera
  • QWERTY keyboard + touchpad with 2 buttons
  • Debugging – Serial debug via header or 3.5mm audio jack
  • Power Supply – 5V/3A
  • Battery – 9,500mAh capacity
  • Weight – ~1 kg

The laptop will ship with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS with Mate, Firefox browser, Video player, Open Office, Arduino IDE and IceStorm for FPGA development (an FPGA add-on board is planned).

Mainboard

The build instructions can be downloaded here. Hardware design files for all 5 boards for the laptop, and software will soon be all found on Github. Note that the laptop is intended for engineering development and evaluation only, should not be considered a finished product, and may not comply with FCC, CE or UL directives. Olimex had quite a lot of people registered their interests before, so they only expect to be able to fulfill new order within 2 or 3 weeks.

MACCHIATOBin based DIY ARM Desktop, DragonBoard 820c based DIY ARM Laptop (Video)

October 3rd, 2017 22 comments

2017 may be the year of the (ARM based) Linux desktop, sort of. We’ve already seen GIGABYTE ARM development PC powered by a Socionext SC2A11 Synquacer 24-core ARM Cortex A53 processor that will be available in December, and apparently working fairly well already.

But there are even more options, as Bernhard Rosenkränzer (Bero) from the Linaro Mobile Group, and unofficial Linaro superstar, has decided to create his own ARM based desktop and laptop, based on respectively MACCHIATOBin board with a Marvell ARMADA 8040 quad core Cortex  A72 processor, and DragonBoard 820c board with a Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 quad core Krait processor.

Since MACCHIATOBin board complies with mini-ITX form factor, he could simply use off the shelf parts with a standard desktop case with power supply, NVIDIA or AMD Radeon graphics card, 16GB memory modules, and a 2 TB SSD drive. The AMD Radeon card fried due to overheating, so the demo was made with an NVIDIA card driven by Nouveau open source driver. The complete system was actually run on fully open source drivers and firmware, and Linux 4.14 mainline with 2 extra patches.

The laptop leverages Pi-Top modular laptop, but replaced Raspberry Pi 3 board with a much faster DragonBoard 820c board that also includes 3GB RAM, and had an SSD connected over PCIe. I ran OpenMandriva with KDE + Linux 4.11 using fully open source drivers.

Bero mentioned that while it’s quite easy to make an ARM desktop as described above, a way would have to be figured to make it more easily reproducible. I got all the information above from Charbax’s video below.

;

The first 8 minutes are about the DIY ARM desktop and laptop, and after they talk about his work with Android (Project Treble and others), the importance of open source drivers, and his political (non-) future 🙂

Short Demo with 96Boards SynQuacer 64-bit ARM Developer Box

September 27th, 2017 17 comments

Even if you are working on ARM platforms,  you are still likely using an Intel or AMD x86 build machine, since there’s not really a good alternative in the ARM world. Linaro talked about plans to change that at Linaro Connect Budapest 2017 in March, and a few days ago, GIGABYTE SynQuacer software development platform was unveiled with a Socionext SynQuacer SC2A11 24-core Cortex-A53 processor, and everything you’d expect from a PC tower with compartment for SATA drives, PCIe slots, memory slots, multiple USB 3.0 ports, and so on.

Click to Enlarge

The platform was just demonstrated a Linaro Connect San Francisco right after Linaro High Performance Computing keynotes by Kanta Vekaria, Technology Strategist, Linaro, and Yasuo Nishiguchi, Socionext’s Chairman & CEO.

If you have never used a system with more than 14 cores, you’d sadly learn that the tux logos at boot times will only be shown on the first line, skipping the remaining 10 cores, of the 24-core system. It was hard to stomach, but I’m recovering… 🙂

The demo showed a system with an NVIDIA graphics card connected to the PCIe x16 port and leveraging Nouveau open drivers, but it’s also possible to use it as an headless “developer box”. The demo system booted quickly into Debian + Linux 4.13. They then played a YouTube video, and ran top in the developer box showing all 24-cores and 32GB RAM. That’s it. They also took questions from the audience. We learned that the system can build the Linux kernel in less than 10 minutes, they are working on SBSA compliance, and the system will be available through 96Boards website, with a complete build with memory and storage expected to cost less than $1,000. The idea is to use any off-the-shelves peripherals typically found in x86 PC towers. We still don’t know if they take MasterCard though… The video below is the full keynote with the demo starting at the 52:30 mark.

Arm Research Summit 2017 Streamed Live on September 11-13

September 11th, 2017 2 comments

The Arm Research Summit is “an academic summit to discuss future trends and disruptive technologies across all sectors of computing”, with the second edition of the even taking place now in Cambridge, UK until September 13, 2017.

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The Agenda includes various subjects such as architecture and memory, IoT, HPC, computer vision, machine learning, security, servers, biotechnology and others. You can find the full detailed schedule for each day on Arm website, and the good news is that the talks are streamed live in YouTube, so you can follow the talks that interest you from the comfort of your home/office.

Note that you can switch between rooms in the stream above by clicking on <-> icon. Audio volume is a little low…

Thanks to Nobe for the tip.

Linux 4.13 Release – Main Changes, ARM & MIPS Architectures

September 4th, 2017 6 comments

Linus Torvalds has just announced the release of Linux 4.13 and a kidney stone…:

So last week was actually somewhat eventful, but not enough to push me to delay 4.13.

Most of the changes since rc7 are actually networking fixes, the bulk of them to various drivers. With apologies to the authors of said patches, they don’t look all that interesting (which is definitely exactly what you want just before a release). Details in the appended shortlog.

Note that the shortlog below is obviously only since rc7 – the _full_4.13 log is much too big to post and nobody sane would read it. So if you’re interested in all the rest of it, get the git tree and limit the logs to the files you are interested in if you crave details.

No, the excitement was largely in the mmu notification layer, where we had a fairly last-minute regression and some discussion about the problem. Lots of kudos to Jérôme Glisse for jumping on it, and implementing the fix.

What’s nice to see is that the regression pointed out a nasty and not very well documented (or thought out) part of the mmu notifiers, and the fix not only fixed the problem, but did so by cleaning up and documenting what the right behavior should be, and furthermore did so by getting rid of the problematic notifier and actually removing almost two hundred lines in the process.

I love seeing those kinds of fixes. Better, smaller, code.

The other excitement this week was purely personal, consisting of seven hours of pure agony due to a kidney stone. I’m all good, but it sure _felt_ a lot longer than seven hours, and I don’t even want to imagine what it is for people that have had the experience drag out for longer. Ugh.

Anyway, on to actual 4.13 issues.

While we’ve had lots of changes all over (4.13 was not particularly big, but even a “solidly average” release is not exactly small), one very _small_ change merits some extra attention, because it’s one of those very rare changes where we change behavior due to security issues, and where people may need to be aware of that behavior change when upgrading.

This time it’s not really a kernel security issue, but a generic protocol security issue.

The change in question is simply changing the default cifs behavior: instead of defaulting to SMB 1.0 (which you really should not use: just google for “stop using SMB1” or similar), the default cifs mount now defaults to a rather more modern SMB 3.0.

Now, because you shouldn’t have been using SMB1 anyway, this shouldn’t affect anybody. But guess what? It almost certainly does affect some people, because they blithely continued using SMB1 without really thinking about it.

And you certainly _can_ continue to use SMB1, but due to the default change, now you need to be *aware* of it. You may need to add an explicit “vers=1.0” to your mount options in /etc/fstab or similar if you *really* want SMB1.

But if the new default of 3.0 doesn’t work (because you still use a pterodactyl as a windshield wiper), before you go all the way back to the bad old days and use that “vers=1.0”, you might want to try “vers=2.1”. Because let’s face it, SMB1 is just bad, bad, bad.

Anyway, most people won’t notice at all. And the ones that do notice can check their current situation (just look at the output of “mount” and see if you have any cifs things there), and you really should update from the default even if you are *not* upgrading kernels.

Ok, enough about that. It was literally a two-liner change top defaults – out of the million or so lines of the full 4.13 patch changing real code.

Go get the new kernel,

Linus

Two months ago, Linux 4.12 was released with initial support for AMD Radeon RX Vega GPU, BFQ (Budget Fair Queuing) and Kyber block I/O schedulers, AnalyzeBoot tool for the kernel, “hybrid consistency model” implementation for live kernel patching, but disabled the Open Sound System, and removed AVR32 support, among many other changes.

Some interesting changes in Linux 4.13 – mostly based on LWN 4.13 Merge Window part 1 & part 2 – include:

  • Support for non-blocking buffered I/O operations added at the block level, which should also improve asynchronous I/O support when used with buffered I/O.
  • AppArmor security module’s “domain labeling” code has been merged into the mainline. It was maintained by Ubuntu out of tree previously.
  • Kernel-based TLS implementation that should deliver better performance for HTTPS, and other protocol relying on TLS.
  • CIFS/SAMBA now defaults to v3.0 instead of v1.0 due to security issues
  • File System Changes – EXT-4: support for to ~2 billion files per directory with largedir option, extended attributes up to 64KB, new deduplication feature; f2fs: supports disk quotas; overlayfs union: new “index directory” feature that makes copy-up operations work without breaking hard links.

Changes specific to ARM include:

  • Rockchip:
    • Added support for RV1108 SoC for camera applications
    • Rockchip IOMMU driver is now available on ARM64
    • PCIe – configure Rockchip MPS and reorganize + use normal register bank
    • Clock driver for Rockchip RK3128 SoC
    • Rockchip pinctrl driver now supports iomux-route switching for RK3228, RK3328 and RK3399
    • Sound driver – Support for Rockchip PDM controllers
    • Device tree
      • Added RK3399-Firefly SBC
      • Added ARM Mali GPU
      • Added cru
      • Added sdmmc, sdio, emmc nodes for Rockchip RK3328
  • Amlogic
    • Updated CEC EE clock support
    • Enabled clock controller for 32-bit Meson8
    • Device tree changes
      • Meson UARTs
      • new SPI controller driver
      • HDMI & CVBS for multiple boards
      • new pinctrl pins for SPI, HDMI CEC, PWM
      • Ethernet Link and Activity LEDs pin nodes
      • SAR ADC support for Meson8 & Meson8b
    • Defconfig changes – Meson SPICC enabled as module; IR core, decoders and Meson IR device enabled;
    • New boards & devices: NanoPi K2, Libre Computer SBC, R-Box Pro
  • Samsung
    • Clock driver updated for Samsung Exynos 5420 audio clocks, and converted code to clk_hw registration APIs
    • Pinctrl drivers split per ARMv7 and ARMv8 since there’s no need to compile everything on each of them
    • ARM DT updates:
      • Add HDMI CEC to Exynos5 SoCs + needed property for CEC on Odroid U3
      • Fix reset GPIO polarity on Rinato
      • Minor cleanups and readability improvements.
    • ARM64 DT updates:
      • Remove unneeded TE interrupt gpio property
    • Defconfig changes – Some cleanups, enabled Exynos PRNG along with user-space crypto API.
  • Qualcomm
    • Clock & pinctrl drivers for Qualcomm IPQ8074
    • Add debug UART addresses for IPQ4019
    • Improve QCOM SMSM error handling
    • Defconfig
      • Enable HWSPINLOCK & RPMSG_QCOM_SMD to get some Qualcomm boards to work out of the box/again
      • Enable IPQ4019 clock and pinctrl
    • Mailbox – New controller driver for Qualcomm’s APCS IPC
    • RPMsg – Qualcomm GLINK protocol driver and DeviceTree-based modalias support, as well as a number of smaller fixes
    • Qualcomm Device Tree Changes
      • Fix IPQ4019 i2c0 node
      •  Add GSBI7 on IPQ8064
      • Add misc APQ8060 devices
      • Fixup USB related devices on APQ8064 and MSM8974
    • Qualcomm ARM64 Updates for v4.12
      • Fix APQ8016 SBC WLAN LED
      • Add MSM8996 CPU node
      • Add MSM8992 SMEM and fixed regulator
      • Fixup MSM8916 USB support
  • Mediatek
    • CPU clks for Mediatek MT8173/MT2701/MT7623 SoCs
    • Pinctrl – Serious code size cut for MT7623
    • Mediatek “scpsys” system controller support for MT6797
    • Device tree
      • Added support for MT6797 (Helio X20) mobile SoC and evaluation board
      • Extended MT7623 support significantly
      • Added MT2701 i2c device & JPEG decoder nodes
  • Other new ARM hardware platforms and SoCs:
    • STM32 – stm32h743-disco, stm32f746-disco, and stm32f769-disco boards; Drivers for digital audio interfaces, S/PDIF receiver, digital camera interfaces, HDMI CEC, watchdog timer
    • NXP – Gateworks Ventana GW5600 SBC;  Technexion Pico i.MX7D board; i.MX5/6 image processing units & camera sensor interfaces
    • Realtek – Initial support for Realtek RTD1295 SoC and Zidoo X9S set-top-box
    • Actions Semi – Initial support for Actions Semi S900 / S500, and corresponding LeMaker Guitar & Bubblegum-96 SBCs
    • Renesas – Salvator-XS and H3ULCB automotive development systems; GR-Peach board, iWave G20D-Q7 System-on-Module plus
    • Socionext- Support for Uniphier board support for LD11-global and LD20-global
    • Broadcom – Stingray communication processor and two reference boards;
    • Marvell – Linksys WRT3200ACM router
    • Texas Instruments – BeagleBone Blue
    • Microchip / Atmel – MMU-less ARM Cortex-M7 SoCs (SAME70/V71/S70/V70)

Some of the changes specific to MIPS include:

  • Boston platform support – Document DT bindings; Add CLK driver for board clocks
  • CM – Avoid per-core locking with CM3 & higher; WARN on attempt to lock invalid VP, not BUG
  • CPS – Select CONFIG_SYS_SUPPORTS_SCHED_SMT for MIPSr6; Prevent multi-core with dcache aliasing; Handle cores not powering down more gracefully; Handle spurious VP starts more gracefully
  • DSP – Add lwx & lhx missaligned access support
  • eBPF – Add MIPS support along with many supporting change to add the required infrastructure
  • Generic arch code:
    • Misc sysmips MIPS_ATOMIC_SET fixes
    • Drop duplicate HAVE_SYSCALL_TRACEPOINTS
    • Negate error syscall return in trace
    • Correct forced syscall errors
    • Traced negative syscalls should return -ENOSYS
    • Allow samples/bpf/tracex5 to access syscall arguments for sane
      traces
    • Cleanup from old Kconfig options in defconfigs
    • Fix PREF instruction usage by memcpy for MIPS R6
    • Fix various special cases in the FPU eulation
    • Fix some special cases in MIPS16e2 support
    • Fix MIPS I ISA /proc/cpuinfo reporting
    • Sort MIPS Kconfig alphabetically
    • Fix minimum alignment requirement of IRQ stack as required by ABI / GCC
    • Fix special cases in the module loader
    • Perform post-DMA cache flushes on systems with MAARs
    • Probe the I6500 CPU
    • Cleanup cmpxchg and add support for 1 and 2 byte operations
    • Use queued read/write locks (qrwlock)
    • Use queued spinlocks (qspinlock)
    • Add CPU shared FTLB feature detection
    • Handle tlbex-tlbp race condition
    • Allow storing pgd in C0_CONTEXT for MIPSr6
    • Use current_cpu_type() in m4kc_tlbp_war()
    • Support Boston in the generic kernel
  • Generic platform:
    • yamon-dt: Pull YAMON DT shim code out of SEAD-3 board;  Support > 256MB of RAM;  Use serial* rather than uart* aliases
    • Abstract FDT fixup application
    • Set RTC_ALWAYS_BCD to 0
    • Add a MAINTAINERS entry
  • core kernel – qspinlock.c: include linux/prefetch.h
  • Add support for Loongson 3
  • Perf – Add I6500 support
  • SEAD-3 – Remove GIC timer from DT; set interrupt-parent per-device, not at root node; fix GIC interrupt specifiers
  • SMP – Skip IPI setup if we only have a single CPU
  • VDSO – Make comment match reality; improvements to time code in VDSO”
  • Various fixes:
    • compressed boot: Ignore a generated .c file
    • VDSO: Fix a register clobber list
    • DECstation: Fix an int-handler.S CPU_DADDI_WORKAROUNDS regression
    • Octeon: Fix recent cleanups that cleaned away a bit too much thus breaking the arch side of the EDAC and USB drivers.
    • uasm: Fix duplicate const in “const struct foo const bar[]” which GCC 7.1 no longer accepts.
    • Fix race on setting and getting cpu_online_mask
    • Fix preemption issue. To do so cleanly introduce macro to get the size of L3 cache line.
    • Revert include cleanup that sometimes results in build error
    • MicroMIPS uses bit 0 of the PC to indicate microMIPS mode. Make sure this bit is set for kernel entry as well.
    • Prevent configuring the kernel for both microMIPS and MT. There are no such CPUs currently and thus the combination is unsupported and results in build errors.
    • ralink: mt7620: Add missing header

You can read the full Linux 4.13 changelog – with comments only – generated using git log v4.12..v4.13 --stat for the full details, and eventually kernelnewsbies’s Linux 4.13 changelog will be updated with an extensive list of chances.

The Stress Terminal UI (s-tui) is a Pretty CPU and Temperature Monitoring Terminal App

August 30th, 2017 12 comments

While it’s possible to do monitoring with tools like RPI-Monitor on headless or remote systems, top and htop are likely the commonly used tools to monitor CPU and process usage in the terminal. There’s now a new and different option with the Stress Terminal UI that display pretty charts for frequency, CPU usage, and temperature in the terminal, and as its name implies it can also stress the system.

I’ve first installed it in my main computer running Ubuntu 16.04.2 as follows:

and then just started it

It took the screenshot above after enabling stress operation for a few seconds, and while frequency and CPU utilization in percent are updated properly, temperature is not, at least on my system. I had to enable “Smooth Graph” option to see any changes in the first two charts. I tried to run the app again with sudo, but still no temperature update, and that’s because the program is confused since I have two “temp1” values in my machine, one for “it8720” that will always show a constant temperature (45 °C) and one for “AMD CPU” that will vary depending on the load.

Click to Enlarge

A good solution would have to have an option to select the sensor, but there’s no such option for s-tui right now:

I switched to an ARM platform, namely NanoPi NEO board:

So it does not work with Python 3, and requires Python 2.7. Let’s give it another try:

I could install it and run it, but only CPU and temperature charts would be drawn.

The temperature sensor may have not been detected due to the following error:

msr appears to be be something called “model-specific registers”, and only used for x86 CPU, so ARM detection did not work or was not performed here. The developers did test the program successfully with a Raspberry Pi 3 board however. He’s also aware of issues with temperature sensors:

If the temperature does not show up, your sensor might not be supported. Try opening an issue on github and we can look into it

So overall, it’s still work in progress. Support for showing info for multiple cores would be nice, but probably only suitable in a full screen terminal.

Via It’s FOSS

Categories: Linux, Testing, Ubuntu Tags: arm, how-to, Linux, tool, ubuntu, x86

Embedded Linux Conference & Open Source Summit Europe 2017 Schedule

August 27th, 2017 3 comments

The Embedded Linux Conference & IoT summit 2017 took place in the US earlier this year in February, but there will soon be a similar event with the Embedded Linux Conference *& Open Source Summit Europe 2017 to take up in Europe on October 23 – 25 in Prague, Czech Republic, and the Linux Foundation has just published the schedule. It’s always useful to find out what is being discussed during such events, even if you are not going to attend, so I went through the different sessions, and compose my own virtual schedule with some of the ones I find the most interesting.

Monday, October 23

  • 11:15 – 11:55 – An Introduction to SPI-NOR Subsystem – Vignesh Raghavendra, Texas Instruments India

Modern day embedded systems have dedicated SPI controllers to support NOR flashes. They have many hardware level features to increase the ease and efficiency of accessing SPI NOR flashes and also support different SPI bus widths and speeds.

In order to support such advanced SPI NOR controllers, SPI-NOR framework was introduced under Memory Technology Devices (MTD). This presentation aims at providing an overview of SPI-NOR framework, different types of NOR flashes supported (like SPI/QSPI/OSPI) and interaction with SPI framework. It also provides an overview of how to write a new controller driver or add support for a new flash device.

The presentation then covers generic improvements done and proposed while working on improving QSPI performance on a TI SoC, challenges associated when using DMA with these controllers and other limitations of the framework.

  • 12:05 – 12:45 – Free and Open Source Software Tools for Making Open Source Hardware – Leon Anavi, Konsulko Group

The open source hardware movement is becoming more and more popular. But is it worth making open source hardware if it has been designed with expensive proprietary software? In this presentation, Leon Anavi will share his experience how to use free and open source software for making high-quality entirely open source devices: from the designing the PCB with KiCAD through making a case with OpenSCAD or FreeCAD to slicing with Cura and 3D printing. The talk will also provide information about open source hardware licenses, getting started guidelines, tips for avoiding common pitfalls and mistakes. The challenges of prototyping and low-volume manufacturing with both SMT and THT will be also discussed.

  • 14:20 – 15:00 – Introduction to SoC+FPGA – Marek Vašut, DENX Software Engineering GmbH

In this talk, Marek introduces the increasingly popular single-chip SoC+FPGA solutions. At the beginning, the diverse chip offerings from multiple vendors are introduced, ranging from the smallest IoT-grade solutions all the way to large industrial-level chips with focus on their software support. Mainline U-Boot and Linux support for such chips is quite complete, and already deployed in production. Marek demonstrates how to load and operate the FPGA part in both U-Boot and Linux, which recently gained FPGA manager support. Yet to fully leverage the potential of the FPGA manager in combination with Device Tree (DT) Overlays, patches are still needed. Marek explains how the FPGA manager and the DT Overlays work, how they fit together and how to use them to obtain a great experience on SoC+FPGA, while pointing out various pitfalls.

  • 15:10 – 15:50 – Cheap Complex Cameras – Pavel Machek, DENX Software Engineering GmbH

Cameras in phones are different from webcams: their main purpose is to take high-resolution still pictures. Running preview in high resolution is not feasible, so resolution switch is needed just before taking final picture. There are currently no applications for still photography that work with mainline kernel. (Pavel is working on… two, but both have some limitations). libv4l2 is doing internal processing in 8-bit, which is not enough for digital photography. Cell phones have 10 to 12-bit sensors, some DSLRs do 14-bit depth.

Differences do not end here. Cell phone camera can produce reasonable picture, but it needs complex software support. Auto-exposure / auto-gain is a must for producing anything but completely black or completely white frames. Users expect auto-focus, and it is necessary for reasonable pictures in macro range, requiring real-time processing.

  • 16:20 – 17:00 – Bluetooth Mesh with Zephyr OS and Linux – Johan Hedberg, Open Source Technology Center, Intel

Bluetooth Mesh is a new standard that opens a whole new wave of low-power wireless use cases. It extends the range of communication from a single peer-to-peer connection to a true mesh topology covering large areas, such as an entire building. This paves the way for both home and industrial automation applications. Typical home scenarios include things like controlling the lights in your apartment or adjusting the thermostat. Although Bluetooth 5 was released end of last year, Bluetooth Mesh can be implemented on any device supporting Bluetooth 4.0 or later. This means that we’ll likely see very rapid market adoption of the feature.

The presentation will give an introduction to Bluetooth Mesh, covering how it works and what kind of features it provides. The talk will also give an overview of Bluetooth Mesh support in Zephyr OS and Linux and how to create wireless solutions with them.

  • 17:10 – 17:50 – printk() – The Most Useful Tool is Now Showing its Age – Steven Rostedt, VMware

printk() has been the tool for debugging the Linux kernel and for being the display mechanism for Linux as long as Linux has been around. It’s the first thing one sees as the life of the kernel begins, from the kernel banner and the last message at shutdown. It’s critical as people take pictures of a kernel oops to send to the kernel developers to fix a bug, or to display on social media when that oops happens on the monitor on the back of an airplane seat in front of you.

But printk() is not a trivial utility. It serves many functionalities and some of them can be conflicting. Today with Linux running on machines with hundreds of CPUs, printk() can actually be the cause of live locks. This talk will discuss all the issues that printk() has today, and some of the possible solutions that may be discussed at Kernel Summit.

  • 18:00 – 18:45 – BoF: Embedded Linux Size – Michael Opdenacker, Free Electrons

This “Birds of a Feather” session will start by a quick update on available resources and recent efforts to reduce the size of the Linux kernel and the filesystem it uses.

An ARM based system running the mainline kernel with about 3 MB of RAM will also be demonstrated. If you are interested in the size topic, please join this BoF and share your experience, the resources you have found and your ideas for further size reduction techniques!

Tuesday, October 24

  • 10:55 – 11:35 – Introducing the “Lab in a Box” Concept – Patrick Titiano & Kevin Hilman, BayLibre

Continuous Integration (CI) has been a hot topic for long time. With the growing number of architectures and boards, it becomes impossible for maintainers to validate a patch on all configurations, making it harder and harder to keep the same quality level without leveraging CI and test automation. Recent initiatives like LAVA, KernelCI.org, Fuego, (…) started providing a first answer, however the learning curve remains high, and the HW setup part is not covered.

Baylibre, already involved in KernelCI.org, decided, as part of the AGL project, to go one step further in CI automation and has developed a turnkey solution for developers and companies willing to instantiate a LAVA lab; called “Lab in a Box”, it aims at simplifying the configuration of a board farm (HW, SW).

Motivations, challenges, benefits and results will be discussed, with a demo of a first “Lab in a Box” instantiation.

  • 11:45 – 12:25 – Protecting Your System from the Scum of the Universe – Gilad Ben-Yossef, Arm Holdings

Linux based systems have a plethora of security related mechanisms: DM-Crypt, DM-Verity, Secure Boot, the new TEE sub-system, FScrypt and IMA are just a few examples. This talk will describe these the various systems and provide a practical walk through of how to mix and match these mechanisms and design them into a Linux based embedded system in order to strengthen the system resilience to various nefarious attacks, whether the system discussed is a mobile phone, a tablet, a network attached DVR, a router, or an IOT hub in a way that makes maximum use of the sometime limited hardware resources of such systems.

  • 14:05 – 14:45 – Open Source Neuroimaging: Developing a State-of-the-Art Brain Scanner with Linux and FPGAs – Danny Abukalam, Codethink

Neuroimaging is an established medical field which is helping us to learn more about how the human brain works, the most complex human organ. This talk aims to cover neuroimaging systems, from hobbyist to professional, and how open source has been used to build state-of-the-art systems. We’ll have a look the general problem area, why open source was a good fit, and some examples of solutions including a commercial effort that we have been involved in bringing to market. Typically these solutions consist of specialist hardware, a bespoke software solutions stack, and a suite to manage and process the vast amounts of data generated during the scan. Other points of interest include how we approached building a maintainable and upgradeable system from the outset. We’ll also talk about future plans for neuroimaging, future ideas for hardware & discuss areas lacking good open source solutions.

  • 14:55 – 15:35 – More Robust I2C Designs with a New Fault-Injection Driver – Wolfram Sang, Renesas

It has its challenges to write code for certain error paths for I2C bus drivers because these errors usually don’t happen on the bus. And special I2C bus testers are expensive. In this talk, a new GPIO based driver will be presented which acts on the same bus as the bus master driver under inspection. A live demonstration will be given as well as hints how to handle bugs which might have been found. The scope and limitations of this driver will be discussed. Since it will also be analyzed what actually happens on the wires, this talk also serves as a case study how to snoop busses with only Free Software and OpenHardware (i.e. sigrok).

  • 16:05 – 16:45 – GStreamer for Tiny Devices – Olivier Crête, Collabora

GStreamer is a complete Open Source multimedia framework, and it includes hundreds of plugins, including modern formats like DASH, HLS or the first ever RTSP 2.0 implementation. The whole framework is almost 150MB on my computer, but what if you only have 5 megs of flash available? Is it a viable choice? Yes it is, and I will show you how.

Starting with simple tricks like only including the necessary plugins, all the way to statically compiling only the functions that are actually used to produce the smaller possible footprint.

  • 16:55 – 17:35 – Maintaining a Linux Kernel for 13 Years? You Must be Kidding Me. We Need at Least 30? – Agustin Benito Bethencourt, Codethink Ltd

Industrial grade solutions have a life expectancy of 30+ years. Maintaining a Linux kernel for such a long time in the open has not been done. Many claim that is not sustainable, but corporations that build power plants, railway systems, etc. are willing to tackle this challenge. This talk will describe the work done so far on the kernel maintenance and testing front at the CIP initiative.

During the talk it will be explained how we decide which parts of the kernel to cover – reducing the amount of work to be done and the risk of being unable to maintain the claimed support. The process of reviewing and backporting fixes that might be needed on an older branch will be briefly described. CIP is taking a different approach from many other projects when it comes to testing the kernel. The talk will go over it as well as the coming steps. and the future steps.

Wednesday, October 24

  • 11:05 – 11:45 – HDMI 4k Video: Lessons Learned – Hans Verkuil, Cisco Systems Norway

So you want to support HDMI 4k (3840×2160) video output and/or video capture for your new product? Then this is the presentation for you! I will describe the challenges involved in 4k video from the hardware level, the HDMI protocol level and up to the kernel driver level. Special attention will be given to what to watch out for when buying 4k capable equipment and accessories such as cables and adapters since it is a Wild, Wild West out there.

  • 11:55 – 12:35 – Linux Powered Autonomous Arctic Buoys – Satish Chetty, Hera Systems 

In my talk/presentation, I cover the technical, and design challenges in developing an autonomous Linux powered Arctic buoy. This system is a low cost, COTS based, extreme/harsh environment, autonomous sensor data gathering platform. It measures albedo, weather, water temperature and other parameters. It runs on a custom embedded Linux and is optimized for efficient use of solar & battery power. It uses a variety of low cost, high accuracy/precision sensors and satellite/terrestrial wireless communications.

I talk about using Linux in this embedded environment, and how I address and solve various issues including building a custom kernel, Linux drivers, frame grabbing issues and results from cameras, limited power challenges, clock drifts due to low temperature, summer melt challenges, failure of sensors, intermittent communication issues and various other h/w & s/w challenges.

  • 14:15 – 14:55 – Linux Storage System Bottleneck for eMMC/UFS – Bean Huo & Zoltan Szubbocsev, Micron

The storage device is considered a bottleneck to the system I/O performance. This thinking drives the need for faster storage device interfaces. Commonly used flash based storage interfaces support high throughputs, eg. eMMC 400MB/s, UFS 1GB/s. Traditionally, advanced embedded systems were focusing on CPU and memory speeds and these outpaced advances in storage speed improvements. In this presentation, we explore the parameters that impact I/O performance. We describe at a high level how Linux manages I/O requests coming from user space. Specifically, we look into system performance limitations in the Linux eMMC/UFS subsystem and expose bottlenecks caused by the software through Ftrace. We show existing challenges in getting maximum performance of flash-based high-speed storage device. by this presentation, we want to motivate future optimization work on the existing storage stack.

  • 15:05 – 15:45 – New GPIO Interface for User Space – Bartosz Golaszewski

Since Linux 4.8 the GPIO sysfs interface is deprecated. Due to its many drawbacks and bad design decisions a new user space interface has been implemented in the form of the GPIO character device which is now the preferred method of interaction with GPIOs which can’t otherwise be serviced by a kernel driver. The character device brings in many new interesting features such as: polling for line events, finding GPIO chips and lines by name, changing & reading the values of multiple lines with a single ioctl (one context switch) and many more. In this presentation, Bartosz will showcase the new features of the GPIO UAPI, discuss the current state of libgpiod (user space tools for using the character device) and tell you why it’s beneficial to switch to the new interface.

  • 16:15 – 16:55 – Replace Your Exploit-Ridden Firmware with Linux – Ronald Minnich, Google

With the WikiLeaks release of the vault7 material, the security of the UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) firmware used in most PCs and laptops is once again a concern. UEFI is a proprietary and closed-source operating system, with a codebase almost as large as the Linux kernel, that runs when the system is powered on and continues to run after it boots the OS (hence its designation as a “Ring -2 hypervisor”). It is a great place to hide exploits since it never stops running, and these exploits are undetectable by kernels and programs.

Our answer to this is NERF (Non-Extensible Reduced Firmware), an open source software system developed at Google to replace almost all of UEFI firmware with a tiny Linux kernel and initramfs. The initramfs file system contains an init and command line utilities from the u-root project, which are written in the Go language.

  • 17:05 – 17:45 – Unikernelized Real Time Linux & IoT – Tiejun Chen, Vmware

Unikernel is a novel software technology that links an application with OS in the form of a library and packages them into a specialized image that facilitates direct deployment on a hypervisor. But why these existing unikernels have yet to gain large popularity broadly? I’ll talk what challenges Unikernels are facing, and discuss exploration of if-how we could convert Linux as Unikernel, and IoT could be a valuable one of use cases because the feature of smaller size & footprint are good for those resource-strained IoT platforms. Those existing unikernels are not designed to address those IoT characters like power consumption and real time requirement, and they also doesn’t support versatile architectures. Most existing Unikernels just focus on X86/ARM. As a paravirtualized unikenelized Linux, especially Unikernelized Real Time Linux, really makes Unikernels to succeed.


If you’d like to attend the real thing, you’ll need to register and pay a registration fee:

  • Early Registration Fee: US$800 (through August 27, 2017)
  • Standard Registration Fee: US$950 (August 28, 2017 – September 17, 2017)
  • Late Registration Fee: US$1100 (September 18, 2017 – Event)
  • Academic Registration Fee: US$200 (Student/Faculty attendees will be required to show a valid student/faculty ID at registration.)
  • Hobbyist Registration Fee: US$200 (only if you are paying for yourself to attend this event and are currently active in the community)

There’s also another option with the Hall Pass Registration ($150) if you just want to network on visit with sponsors onsite, but do not plan to attend any sessions or keynotes.