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Posts Tagged ‘automotive’

NVIDIA DRIVE PX Pegasus Platform is Designed for Fully Autonomous Vehicles

October 11th, 2017 1 comment

Many companies are now involved in the quest to develop self-driving cars, and getting there step by step with 6 levels of autonomous driving defined based on info from  Wikipedia:

  • Level 0 – Automated system issues warnings but has no vehicle control.
  • Level 1 (”hands on”) – Driver and automated system shares control over the vehicle. Examples include Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC), Parking Assistance, and Lane Keeping Assistance (LKA) Type II.
  • Level 2 (”hands off”) – The automated system takes full control of the vehicle (accelerating, braking, and steering), but the driver is still expected to monitor the driving, and be prepared to immediately intervene at any time. You’ll actually have your hands on the steering wheel, just in case…
  • Level 3 (”eyes off”) – The driver can safely turn their attention away from the driving tasks, e.g. the driver can text or watch a movie. The system may ask the driver to take over in some situations specified by the manufacturer such as traffic jams. So no sleeping while driving 🙂 . The Audi A8 Luxury Sedan was the first commercial car to claim to be able to do level 3 self driving.
  • Level 4 (”mind off”) – Similar to level 3, but no driver attention is ever required. You could sleep while the car is driving, or even send the car somewhere without your being in the driver seat. There’s a limitation at this level, as self-driving mode is limited to certain areas, or special circumstances. Outside of these areas or circumstances, the vehicle must be able to safely park the car, if the driver does not retake control.
  • Level 5 (”steering wheel optional”) – Fully autonomous car with no human intervention required, no other limitations

So the goal is obviously to reach level 5, which would allow robotaxis, or safely drive you home whatever your alcohol or THC blood levels. This however requires lots of redundant (for safety) computing power, and current autonomous vehicle prototypes have a trunk full of computing equipments.

NVIDIA has condensed the A.I processing power required  or level 5 autonomous driving into DRIVE PX Pegasus AI computer that’s roughly the size of a license plate, and capable of handling inputs from high-resolution 360-degree surround cameras and lidars, localizing the vehicle within centimeter accuracy, tracking vehicles and people around the car, and planning a safe and comfortable path to the destination.

The computer comes with four A.I processors said to be delivering 320 TOPS (trillion operations per second) of computing power, ten times faster than NVIDIA DRIVE PX 2, or about the performance of a 100-server data center according to Jensen Huang, NVIDIA founder and CEO. Specifically, the board combines two NVIDIA Xavier SoCs and two “next generation” GPUs with hardware accelerated deep learning and computer vision algorithms. Pegasus is designed for ASIL D certification with automotive inputs/outputs, including CAN bus, Flexray, 16 dedicated high-speed sensor inputs for camera, radar, lidar and ultrasonics, plus multiple 10Gbit Ethernet

Machine learning works in two steps with training on the most powerful hardware you can find, and inferencing done on cheaper hardware, and for autonomous driving, data scientists train their deep neural networks NVIDIA DGX-1 AI supercomputer, for example being able to simulate driving 300,000 miles in five hours by harnessing 8 NVIDIA DGX systems. Once trained is completed, the models can be updated over the air to NVIDIA DRIVE PX platforms where inferencing takes place. The process can be repeated regularly so that the system is always up to date.

NVIDIA DRIVE PX Pegasus will be available to NVIDIA automotive partners in H2 2018, together with NVIDIA DRIVE IX (intelligent experience) SDK, meaning level 5 autonomous driving cars, taxis and trucks based on the solution could become available in a few years.

Linaro Connect SF 2017 Welcome Keynote – New Members, Achievements, the Future of Open Source, and More…

September 26th, 2017 No comments

Linaro Connect San Francisco 2017 is now taking place until September 29, and it all started yesterday with the Welcome Keynote by George Grey, Linaro CEO discussing the various achievements since the last Linaro Connect in Budapest, and providing an insight to the future work to be done by the organization.

The video is available on YouTube (embedded below), and since I watched it, I’ll provide a summary of what was discussed:

  • Welcoming New Members – Kylin (China developed FreeBSD operating systems) joined LEG (Enterprise Group), NXP added LHG (Home Group) membership, and Xilinx joined LITE (IoT and Embedded).
  • Achievements
    • OPTEE open portable trusted environment execution more commonly integrated into products. Details at optee.org.
    • LEG 17.08 ERP release based on Linux 4.12, Debian 8.9 with UEFI, ACPI, DPDK, Bigtop, Hadoop, etc…
    • LITE group has been involved in Zephyr 1.9 release, notably contributing to LwM2M stack
    • More projects to be found on download page.
  • Open source future with many fields involved including artificial intelligence, security, automotive, automation, etc.
    • Security requires software/hardware combination, and with a single global standard such as OPTEE desirable
    • Artificial Intelligence / Machine Learning
      • Trend is to move out of the CPU to off-load tasks to GPU, FPGA, or NNA (Neural Network Accelerators)
      • Not single API, for example TensorFlow supports CPU and NVIVIA CUDA, using other platforms require heavy customization
      • Linaro to work abstraction layer/ common API for machine learning
      • A.I will bring many benefits, but also potential dangers/issues: privacy, military use, etc… Development in the open is better.
    • Automotive
      • Currently Intel and NVIDIA provides ADAS / autonomous driving platform, both closed sources
      • More open platform needed, maybe a 96Boards Automotive platform with 6x cameras, GPS, touch screen display, processing power good enough for ADAS and IVI (In Vehicle-Entertainment)
      • Linux now mostly handles non-safety critical code, will change in the future. Containers will help.
      • Currently working on proof-of-concept with StreetDrone One autonomous driving development platform, DragonBoard 410c and Gumstix AeroCore 2 mezzanine. More details, maybe demo, at next Linaro Connect
  • 96Boards
    • Recently (and soon to be) announced – Hikey 960, Orange Pi i96, Uranus (WiFi board based on TI CC3220, to run Zephyr OS)
    • Mezzanine boards – NeonKey with sensors and LEDs, Secure96 with crypto chips & TPM (used to play with OPTEE)
  • ARM Platforms for developers – Three types:
  • Microplatforms
    • Definition – open source, minimal, secure, OTA upgradeable distributions
    • Cortex M platforms will use Zephyr OS, Cortex A support will be based on OpenEmbedded with a unified multi-SoC kernel
    • Currently tested on Hikey, DragonBoard 410c, and Raspberry Pi 3, more platforms to be supported in the future
    • Demos with 6x Carbon + Nitrogen board with BLE running Zephyr OS, Raspberry Pi 3 IoT gateway:
      • 1. Use Linaro Developer Cloud (running LED Enterprise Reference Platform) + Hawkbit dash to monitor temperature sensors on the board
      • 2. Switch Raspberry Pi 3 gateway to use Softbank cloud using Alibaba infrastructure on-the-fly, and control lights from Japan severs.
      • The two demos above shows how a multi-standard automation gateway could be implemented solving the problem of incompatibility of devices from different manufacturers
      • BLE mesh demo with six board controlling lights
      • Source code for demos can be found on Github
    • Going forwards downstream microplatforms will be developed by a separate entity: Open Source Foundries, unrelated to Linaro which will keep on focusing on upstream work
  • Linaro also launched the Associate Program for OEMs, ODMs, service providers, startups, and university who want to join Linaro. No details were provided, only an email address [email protected]

You’ll also find the presentation slides on Slideshare.

Mictrack MT600 4G GPS Tracker Supports Traccar, OpenGTS, and Other GPS Tracking Platforms

September 19th, 2017 2 comments

Cellular GPS trackers have been around for a few years, but so far mostly 2G or 3G GPS trackers with products like Ping, Particle Asset tracker, and many other models selling on Aliexpress. 4G GPS tracker have been less common. However, recently we’ve seen platforms like Wio LTE and AutoPi that could handle GPS tracking over LTE connectivity, and another alternative would be Mictrack MT600 that ready-to-use solution to track your car or other vehicle with GPS and 4G.

Mictrack MT600 hardware specifications:

  • GNSS
    • U-BLOX7 GPS Chip
    • GPS sensitivity -162dBm
    • Channel – 56
    • Positioning Accuracy – 10m
    • Cold start: 30s; warm start: 15s; hot start: 1s
    • SMA antenna connector
  • Cellular Connectivity
    • Qualcomm 4G LTE chip
    • MT600-A model (North America):
      • 4G FDD LTE: 700/850/1700/1900MHz
      • 3G UMTS: 850/1700/1900MHz
      • GSM: 850/1900MHz
    • MT600-C model (Asia):
      • 4G FDD LTE: 900/1800/2100MHz
      • 4G TDD LTE: 1900/2300/2500/2600MHz
      • 3G UMTS: 900/2100MHz
      • GSM: 900/1800MHz
    • MT600-E (Australia/Asia/Europe)
      • 4G FDD LTE: 800/850/900/1800/2100/2600MHz
      • 3G UMTS: 850/900/2100MHz
      • GSM: 850/900/1800/1900MHz
    • MT600-J (Japan Only) – 4G FDD LTE: B1/ B3/ B8/ B18/ B19/ B26
    • MT600l-V (Verizon Only) – 4G FDD LTE: 700/1700MHz
    • MT600-AUT (Telstra Only)
      • 4G FDD LTE: 700/850//1800/2100/2600MHz
      • 4G UMTS: 850/2100MHz
    • SMA Antenna connector; SIM card slot
  • Sensors – 3-axis accelerometer sensor, temperature sensor
  • Misc – 4G, GPS and charging LEDs; micro USB port, microphone port, J2 “reserve” connector
  • Input voltage – DC 9V-36V via J1 connector
  • Battery – 700mAh/3.7V for backup
  • Power Consumption – 60mA standby current
  • Dimension – 90 x 70 x x 24 mm
  • Weight – 138g
  • Temperature Range –  -20°C to +70°C
  • Humidity – 5% to 95% non-condensing

MT600 GPS tracker ships with GPS and 4G antennas, a 6-pin power cable, and an SOS button by default, with an optional relay available. The 6-pin cable connected to the car’s battery, the SOS button, ACC (12V) power, and optional to the relay connected to the fuel pump. It’s unclear what the reserve connector, micro USB port, and headphone port are for, since they are not mentioned at all in the user manual, except for the diagram above.

6-pin cable connection diagram

It can be controlled / managed through SMS, computer programs, or Yi Tracker mobile app for Android or iOS which will allow you to monitor the real-time position of your car, trip history, alarms for SOS button, low car/backup battery level, towing, high temperature, speeding, and geo-fencing. The company also lists support for camera, door sensor, and fuel sensor but only for ODM partners, which might be the reason why J2 connector and micro USB port exist. The video below explains about the connections without actually showing how to connect it to an actual car, and shows to get started with the tracker using a mobile phone.

The manufacturer claims the “protocol is open” (but does not provide any details), and explains the device is also supported by various third party GPS platforms such as Gurtam, GPSGate, CoryUSGPS, Orange GPS,  OpenGTS and Traccar, with the last two being open source platforms.

Mictrack MT600 is sold on Aliexpress, often under other brands, for $108 shipped and higher. The company has also just released MT550 global 4G GPS tracker using LTE CAT M1/NB1. More info and products can be found on Mictrack website.

NXP RoadLink SAF5400 is a Single Chip Secure DSRC/802.11p V2X Platform

September 14th, 2017 No comments

Marvell unveiled 88W8987xA wireless SoC for V2X (Vehicle to Everything) applications supporting 802.11p WiFi, and DSRC (Dedicated Short Range Communications) last June, but NXP has recently launched Roadlink SAF5400 which it claims to be the world’s first “automotive qualified, high-performance single-chip DSRC modem”

Key features for Roadlink SAF5400:

  • Compliant with IEEE 802.11p, IEEE 1609.4
  • Compliant with:
    • ETSI EN 302663 – Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS); Access layer specification for Intelligent Transport Systems operating in the 5 GHz frequency band
    • ETSI EN 302571 – Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS); Radiocommunications equipment operating in the 5 855 MHz to 5 925 MHz frequency band; Harmonized EN covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the R&TTE Directive
  • Compliant with ARIB T-109M – 700 MHz Band Intelligent Transport Systems
  • Single channel handling for 802.11p reception/transmission. Includes Channel Switching
  • Optional ECDSA verification: 2000 messages/sec (Brainpool/NIST curves 256 bits)
  • Qualified in accordance with AEC-Q100 grade 2
  • Host interface – SPI, R(G)MII Ethernet, or SDIO

The solution will be used for vehicle to vehicle communication as illustrated below, and potentially other nodes along the road.  Roadlink SAF5400 can be combined with NXP i.MX processor, and security can be achieved by software in the i.MX processor, or via a dedicated SXF1800 hardware secure element based in similar technology used in electronic passports, and banking cards.

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The solution will support all global V2X standards in US, EU, JPN and KOR, with sampling to lead customers starting in December 2017. Further details may be found in the product page and the press release.

Categories: NXP i.MX Tags: 802.11p, automotive, nxp, v2x

UFS 3.0 Embedded Flash to Support Full-Duplex 2.4GB/s Transfer Speeds

September 10th, 2017 3 comments

All my devices still rely on eMMC flash for storage, but premium smartphones, for example, make use of UFS 2.0/UFS 2.1 flash storage with performance similar to SSD, with Samsung UFS 2.0 storage achieving up to 850MB/s read speed, 260 MB/s write speed, and 50K/30K R/W IOPS. UFS 3.0 promises to roughly double the performance of UFS 2.0/2.1 with transfer rates of up to 2.4 GB/s, and separately, the UFS Card v2.0 standard should deliver UFS 2.1 performance on removable storage.

Image Source: Next Generation of Mobile Storage : UFS and UFS Card – Click to Enlarge

Several Chinese and Taiwanese websites, including CTimes and Benchlife, have reported that companies have started getting UFS 3.0 & UFS Card v2.0 licenses from JEDEC, and Phison is working on a controller to support both new standards, and scheduled to launch in 2018.

Premium smartphone SoC are only expect to support UFS 3.0 in 2019 and beyond, and hopefully by that time eMMC will have been replaced by UFS 2.0/2.1 in entry level and mid range devices. The outlook for UFS cards is less clear, as I’ve yet to see a product equipped with a UFS slot.

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Based on a recent presentation at the Flash Memory Summit, (typical) embedded storage capacity will also increase to 32GB for IoT / multimedia applications, 256GB for smart home products and drones, 512GB for mobile devices, and over 1TB for automotive applications.

Via Liliputing

VIA Mobile360 ADAS System Includes a 4G Connected Rugged Computer, a 7″ Display and 4 to 6 Cameras

July 31st, 2017 2 comments

VIA Mobile360 ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistance System) System is a road safety-enhancing solution that supports Lane Departure Warning, Forward Collision Warning, Blind Spot Detection, Pedestrian Detection, Vehicle Detection and Classification for special vehicles, motorcycles, and bicycles, Speed Limit Detection, and Rear-end Collision Avoidance. The system is comprised of “Mobile360 System” rugged computer, 4 to 6 cameras, and an optional 7″ display.

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Mobile360 System computer specifications:

  • SoC – Unnamed Octa-core big.LITTLE processor with four ARM Cortex-A17 cores @ 1.8GHz, and four Cortex A7 cores @ 1.4GHz (Likely Zhaxin ZX-5880 SoC also including Elite 2000 GPU supporting OpenGL ES 3.1, OpenVG 1.1 and OpenCL EP 1.1)
  • System Memory – 2GB Mobile LPDDR3 1600MHz RAM (Package-on-Package with SoC)
  • Storage – 1x 512GB Transcend 2.5″ MLC SSD (-40°C-90°C); 16GB eMMC Flash memory; 1x Micro SD card slot; 1x full size SD card slot
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet, 1x 4G LTE module, 1x Wi-Fi 802.11b/g/n + Bluetooth 4.0 module, 1x GPS receiver; 3x antennas for 4G, GPS and Wi-Fi
  • Camera Interfaces – 6x FAKRA connectors
  • Video Output – 1x HDMI port
  • Audio I/F – Line-out and Mic-in audio jacks
  • USB – 3x USB 2.0 ports (1 lockable), 1x Mini USB 2.0 port (for debugging), 1xUSB 3.0 port
  • Other I/Os – 1x D-Sub connector for CAN Bus, 2x DIO ports (4 GPI + 4 GPO)
  • Power Supply – 9-36V DC-in with ACC/IGN
  • Temperature Range – Operating: -20°C ~ 65°C;  storage: -20°C ~ 70°C
  • Vibration Loading During Operation – With SSD: ISO-16750-3 Mechanical Loads, test VIII equipment mounted on decouple commercial vehicle Cab. Longitudinal (X) : 1.20Grms, Lateral (Y) : 1.34Grms, Vertical (Z) : 2.17Grms , 32hr/axis
  • Shock During Operation – With SSD: 50G, ISO-16750-1:2003, Half-sine wave, 6 directions, 6ms, 10 per direction
  • Dimensions –  215mm(W) x 48mm(H) x 282mm(D) (Metal chassis housing, aluminum top cover)
  • Weight – 3.5 kg

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VIA Mobile360 ADAS sample kit also includes four Sharp 1.3M FOV-50 automotive grade cameras with a 10 meter cable each, and a 7″ automotive grade HD resistive touch monitor with VESA mount support. The system runs Android 5.0 with software capable of handling features mentioned in the introduction, as well as VIA Mobile360 E-Track cloud portal that enables fleet owners to collect and organize vehicle and driver data for real-time vehicle tracking, event and data recording, and asset management. The software can also be customized to the requirements of the customer.

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VIA Mobile360 ADAS sample kit sells for $4,200 with VIA Mobile360 System ($1,800), four FOV-50 cameras (4x $500), and a 7″ automotive grade display ($400). You can also add up to two more cameras for example for license plate recognition, and/or driver or cargo monitoring. Last year, VIA started to sells a Surround View sample kit based on the same system but with instead four FOV-190 cameras for vehicle surveillance for a total of $3,500. More information is available on VIA Mobile360 Solutions page.

Axiomtek tBOX100-838-FL Fanless Transportation Computer Features BNC Video & Audio Inputs for DVR Function

June 16th, 2017 No comments

Axiomtel tBOX100-838-FL is a fanless Bay Trail rugged embedded computer powered by an Intel Bay Trail-I E3845 processor with 5 BNC input ports for video and audio, and targeting vehicle, railway and marine markets.

Axiomtek tBOX100-838-FL rugged mini PC’s specifications:

  • SoC –  Intel Atom E3845 quad core Bay Trail-I processor @ up to 1.91 GHz with Intel HD graphics
  • System Memory – 4 GB DDR3L-1333
  • Storage – 1x 2.5” SATA slot up to 9.5mm, 1x mSATA connector, flash for AMI BIOS
  • Video Output – 1x VGA port
  • Video / Audio Input – 4x video in BNC connector, 1x audio in BNC connector
  • Connectivity – 2x M12 A-coded GbE LAN or 2x RJ-45 GbE LAN (via Intel i210)
  • Serial – 1x RS-232/422/485 (DB9)
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 port
  • Expansion – 1x Full-size PCIe Mini Card with mSATA; 1x SIM card slot
  • Misc – 1x remote switch; 1x reset button; watchdog timer; 6x status LEDs
  • Power Supply – 9 to 36 VDC via 1x M12 DC power input or 1x Phoenix DC power input; typical: 12/24VDC
  • Enclosure
    • Dimensions – 163.8 x 108 x 44 mm
    • Aluminum extrusion and heavy-duty steel
    • 4x antenna opening
  • Weight – 770 grams
  • Temperature Range
    • -40°C ~ +70°C with SSD
    • -25°C ~ +55°C with HDD
  • Relative Humidity – 5% ~ 95%, non-condensing
  • Vibration
    • 3 Grms w/ SSD (5-500Hz, X, Y, Z direction; random)
    • 1 Grms w/ HDD (5-500Hz, X, Y, Z direction; random)
  • Shock – Complies with EN 61373 section 10 table 3 category 1 class A and class B up to 5 Grms (30ms, ±X/Y/Z direction)
  • Certifications – CE (Class A), E-Mark, ISO 7637 certified; EN 50155, EN 50121, and DNV 2.4, IEC 60945 compliance

The mini PC supports Windows 10, WE8S, WES 7, Linux, and VxWorks7 operating systems, and can be mounted to a wall or a DIN rail.

The picture above shows Ethernet and power connector option with waterproof M12 connectors (option 1) better suited for marine application, or in any situation where you’d need some waterproofness. The company also mentions a mini PCIe DVR capture card without much details likely to be used with the BNC connectors.

The computer is expected to become available in mid August 2017. More details may be found in the product page.

Marvell 88W8987xA Wireless SoC Supports 802.11ac & 802.11p WiFi, Bluetooth 5 for V2X & IVI Automotive Applications

June 15th, 2017 No comments

Marvell has introduced the new 88W8987xA wireless chip with 802.11ac, 802.11p and Bluetooth 5 Connectivity for V2X (Vehicle-to-Everything) and IVI (In-Vehicle Infotainment) automotive applications such as Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC) systems, and secure wireless Gateway systems.

Key features of Marvell 88W8987xA family:

  • Connectivity
    • WiFI – IEEE 802.11ac (wave2) up to 433 Mbps / IEEE 802.11p WAVE (Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments) / 1609.x
    • Bluetooth 5 including Bluetooth Low Energy Angle of Arrival and Departure (AoA/AoD)
    • 2x antenna configuration for Wi-Fi/Bluetooth coexistence
  • Host Interfaces – SDIO 3.0 interface (4-bit SDIO and 1-bit SDIO) @ up to 208 MHz;  high-Speed UART interface (for Bluetooth only)
  • Audio Interfaces – Digital audio interfaces (PCM)
  • Temperature Range – -40°C to +105°C (AEC-Q100 Grade 2 Qualification)
  • Package – pin 8×8 mm QFN with wettable flanks

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The family now includes three pin-to-pin compatible SoCs:

  • 88W8987A with 802.11ac + Qualified Bluetooth 5 Functionality
  • 88W8987PA with 802.11p + Qualified Bluetooth 5 Functionality
  • 88W8987SA with switchable 802.11ac/802.11p + Qualified Bluetooth 5 Functionality

The first time I read the SoC supported 802.11p, I though it might be a typo, but it’s just another WiFi standard specifically designed for automotive applications operating in the 5.9GHz range as explained on Wikipedia:

IEEE 802.11p is an approved amendment to the IEEE 802.11 standard to add wireless access in vehicular environments (WAVE), a vehicular communication system. It defines enhancements to 802.11 (the basis of products marketed as Wi-Fi) required to support Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) applications. This includes data exchange between high-speed vehicles and between the vehicles and the roadside infrastructure, so called V2X communication, in the licensed ITS band of 5.9 GHz (5.85-5.925 GHz). IEEE 1609 is a higher layer standard based on the IEEE 802.11p.[1] It is also the base of a European standard for vehicular communication known as ETSI ITS-G5.

88W8987xA drivers are readily available for the Android, Linux and QNX drivers are available for 88W8987xA, and the family of SoC is sampling today, with mass production starting in Q4 2017.

Via eeNews Europe