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Posts Tagged ‘bay trail’

Colorful C.J1900A-BTX Plus V20 Bay Trail Motherboard Takes 8 Graphics Cards for Cryptocurrency Mining

November 13th, 2017 10 comments

Intel Bay Trail processors are mostly found in tablets, 2-in-1 hybrid laptops, and mini PCs, and they’ve often give placed to Cherry Trail processors, and in some cases Apollo Lake ones. x86 compatibility, low cost and low power are the main selling points of the Bay Trail processor family.

Colorful has found a different use case, as they designed a motherboard with 9 PCIe x16 slots, one for a card powered by an Intel Celeron J1900 processor, and 8 to add graphics card in order to mine cryptocurrencies.

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The blue PCI slot takes a PCI CPU card with an the following specifications:

  • SoC –  Intel BayTrail J1900 quad core processor @ up to 2.42 GHz with 2M Cache, integrated Intel HD graphics; 10W TDP
  • Memory – 1×DDR3L SO-DIMM, DDR3L 1333MHz/1066MHz
  • Storage – 1x mSATA slot, 1x SATA 3.0 connector, 1x 4-pin SATA connector
  • Video Output – HDMI
  • Connectivity – Dual Gigabit Ethernet via RTL8111E
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 ports
  • PCIe connector to manage graphics cards
  • Power Supply – 4-pin header for 12V input

The main motherboard is equipped with 16x 6-pin PCIe power connectors with eight located on one side of the board, and eight placed close to each GPU PCIe slots. To complete the setup connect eight mining graphics cards, and you should be good to go.

Anandtech reports that pricing and availability information is unknown at this stage, and they expect the solution to become available to Colorful customers in the next few months. The product page only has some limited details for now.

Linux Benchmarks – Intel J3455 Apollo Lake vs Z3735F Bay Trail vs RK3399 and Other ARM Platforms

October 26th, 2017 68 comments

Since I’ve just installed Ubuntu 17.10 on MeLE PCG35 Apo, I decided I should also run some benchmarks comparing with other ARM and x86 Linux platforms I’ve tested in the past.I was particularly interested to compare the performance of Intel Apollo Lake processors (Celeron J3455 in this case) against higher end ARM processors like Rockchip RK3399 (2x A72, 4x A53) since systems have a similar price (~$150+), as well as against the older Bay Trail processor to see the progress achieved over the last 2 to 3 years.

To do so, I used Phoronix Benchmark Suite against Videostrong VS-RK3399 results (RK3399 development board):

The benchmark first issued a warning about “powersave” governor, but I still went ahead, and once completed I change it to “performance” governor:

…and ran the tests again. All results are available on OpenBenchmarking.

Let’s address the governor results first. cpufreq-info reports that powersave governor can also switch between 800 MHz and 2.30 GHz (turbo freq).

As we’ll see from the results below pitting “MeLE PCG35 Apo – Ubuntu 17.10” (with powersave) and “MeLE PCG35 Apo- Ubuntu 17.10 Performance” that the governor settings did not matter one bit on the results, at least for the six benchmarks I ran.

Note that “MeUbuntu 14.04.3” represents MeLE PCG02U TV stick running Ubuntu 14.04.3. Every platform runs a different OS and kernel, so keep in mind the results may differ slightly (up or down) with different version. But as we’ll see the differences in performance are large enough that it likely does not matter that much.
John the Ripper password cracker, a multi-threaded benchmark, shows the Apollo Lake processor is clearly ahead of Rockchip RK3399 hexa-core processor, and the fastest ARM platform, Banana Pi M3, is equipped with an Allwinner A83T octa-core Cortex A7 processor @ 2.0 GHz. The Bay Trail system is over  twice as slow as the Apollo Lake one, also note the larg-ish standard deviation (+/- 83.72) due to some cooling problem in the small form factor.

C-Ray is another multi-threaded benchmark, and here Rockchip RK3399 SoC does fairly well, but still but quite as well as the Celeron J3455.

Smallpt, yet another multi-threaded benchmark, does not really change the order with MeLE PCG35 Apo well ahead.

Himeno, a linear solver of pressure Poisson, must be using some x86 specific instructions or optimizations, as Intel platforms are well ahead, with Celeron J3455 about 2.5x faster than Rockchip RK3399 board.

OpenSSL is the domain of Intel platforms likely benefiting from Advanced Encryption Standard instruction set (AES-NI). Performance improvement between Bay Trail and Apollo Lake is also impressive here. You’d need 10 Raspberry Pi 3 to match MeLE PCG35 Apo in this particular test.


Intel is normally better with SIMD accelerated multimedia application, and FLAC audio encoding (single threaded) confirms that.

I was expecting a close fight between Rockchip RK3399 and Celeron J3455, but RK3399 only has two fast Cortex A72 cores against four x86 cores in the Intel Apollo Lake SoC.

 

Axiomtek tBOX100-838-FL Fanless Transportation Computer Features BNC Video & Audio Inputs for DVR Function

June 16th, 2017 No comments

Axiomtel tBOX100-838-FL is a fanless Bay Trail rugged embedded computer powered by an Intel Bay Trail-I E3845 processor with 5 BNC input ports for video and audio, and targeting vehicle, railway and marine markets.

Axiomtek tBOX100-838-FL rugged mini PC’s specifications:

  • SoC –  Intel Atom E3845 quad core Bay Trail-I processor @ up to 1.91 GHz with Intel HD graphics
  • System Memory – 4 GB DDR3L-1333
  • Storage – 1x 2.5” SATA slot up to 9.5mm, 1x mSATA connector, flash for AMI BIOS
  • Video Output – 1x VGA port
  • Video / Audio Input – 4x video in BNC connector, 1x audio in BNC connector
  • Connectivity – 2x M12 A-coded GbE LAN or 2x RJ-45 GbE LAN (via Intel i210)
  • Serial – 1x RS-232/422/485 (DB9)
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 port
  • Expansion – 1x Full-size PCIe Mini Card with mSATA; 1x SIM card slot
  • Misc – 1x remote switch; 1x reset button; watchdog timer; 6x status LEDs
  • Power Supply – 9 to 36 VDC via 1x M12 DC power input or 1x Phoenix DC power input; typical: 12/24VDC
  • Enclosure
    • Dimensions – 163.8 x 108 x 44 mm
    • Aluminum extrusion and heavy-duty steel
    • 4x antenna opening
  • Weight – 770 grams
  • Temperature Range
    • -40°C ~ +70°C with SSD
    • -25°C ~ +55°C with HDD
  • Relative Humidity – 5% ~ 95%, non-condensing
  • Vibration
    • 3 Grms w/ SSD (5-500Hz, X, Y, Z direction; random)
    • 1 Grms w/ HDD (5-500Hz, X, Y, Z direction; random)
  • Shock – Complies with EN 61373 section 10 table 3 category 1 class A and class B up to 5 Grms (30ms, ±X/Y/Z direction)
  • Certifications – CE (Class A), E-Mark, ISO 7637 certified; EN 50155, EN 50121, and DNV 2.4, IEC 60945 compliance

The mini PC supports Windows 10, WE8S, WES 7, Linux, and VxWorks7 operating systems, and can be mounted to a wall or a DIN rail.

The picture above shows Ethernet and power connector option with waterproof M12 connectors (option 1) better suited for marine application, or in any situation where you’d need some waterproofness. The company also mentions a mini PCIe DVR capture card without much details likely to be used with the BNC connectors.

The computer is expected to become available in mid August 2017. More details may be found in the product page.

MinnowBoard Turbot Quad Core Open Source Hardware Board is now Shipping for $190

May 24th, 2017 2 comments

MinnowBoard Turbot Quad Core board was announced last autumn, with shipping expected in December 2016, but there may have been delays as the MinnowBoard foundation has just announced that the Intel open source hardware board is now shipping.

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MinnowBoard Turbot Quad “MBT-4220” board specifications:

  • SoC – Intel Atom E3845 quad core Bay Trail-I processor @ up to 1.92 GHz with Intel HD graphics @ 542 / 792 MHz (10W TDP)
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3L 1067 MT/s (Soldered)
  • Storage – 1x SATA2 3Gbps, 1x micro SD card slot, 8 MB SPI Flash for firmware (Tianocore UEFI, Coreboot, SeaBIOS)
  • Video & Audio Output – 1x micro HDMI connector
  • Connectivity – 10/100/1000M Ethernet RJ-45 connector (with Intel i211 instead of Realtek NIC on dual core MinnowBoard)
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 host, 1x USB 2.0 host
  • Debugging – Serial debug header
  • Expansion headers
    • Low-speed expansion (LSE) port – 2×13 (26-pin) male 0.1″ pin header with access to SPI, I2C, I2S Audio, 2x UARTs (TTL-level), 8x GPIO (including 2x supporting PWM), +5V, and GND
    • High-speed expansion (HSE) port –  60-pin high-density connector with access to 1x PCIe Gen 2.0 Lane, 1x SATA2, 1x USB 2.0 host, I2C, GPIO, JTAG, +5V, and GND
  • Power Supply – 5V/4A DC input via 2.5mm center pin positive power jack; 5V DC output via  2-pin header
  • Dimensions – 99 x 74mm
  • Temperature Range –  0 to 40 °C; wider range possible with larger heatsink.
  • Certifications – FCC Part 15 Class A, CE Class A, IEC-60950, RoHS/WEEE

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The board can run Debian GNU/Linux, Windows 10 IoT, Windows 8.1, Android 4.4, Ubuntu, and Yocto Project Custom Linux with source, firmware image, documentation, and hard design files available via the tutorials and github.

The board can be purchase for around $190 on Mouser or Netgate.

 

isorespin.sh Script Updates Ubuntu ISO Files with Mainline Linux Kernel

March 29th, 2017 13 comments

Devices based on Intel Bay Trail and Cherry Trail processors have been popular due to their integration into low cost system (for an Intel platform), but Intel did not prioritize Linux development for those processors, so while Linux could run, you’d have various problems with HDMI audio, system freezes, and wireless drivers, unless you used a custom kernel. The goods news is that Linux 4.11 will feature fixes for HDMI audio and system freeze, and so you won’t need a custom kernel anymore. Ian Morrison (Linuxium), who has been working on improving Linux for those devices since they were first released, has now released isorespin.sh script to automatically update any Ubuntu ISO image to the latest mainline Linux RC kernel built by Canonical, but not integrated by default in the ISO.

Once you’ve downloaded isorepin.sh and your ISO of choice, e.g. ubuntu-16.04.2-desktop-amd64.iso, you can update the ISO with mainline Linux using the following command:

The script will update the ISO with the latest Linux-4.11-RC4 kernel, but as new Ubuntu mainline Linux kernel versions become available, you’ll be able to update two lines in the script to match the latest version:

If you run this image on Bay Trail or Cherry Trail mini PC, you should get HDMI audio and no problem with the “frequent freezes” bug, but if you also need WiFi and Bluetooth support, you may have to run a few more scripts for Broadcom or Realtek wireless modules, and analog audio (headphone jack) support.

Intel Atom Z3735F (Bay Trail) vs Intel Celeron N4200 (Apollo Lake) Benchmarks Comparison

February 14th, 2017 3 comments

Intel introduced new processors every year, but in most cases the performance improvement from new processor with a similar power profile is only incrementally better, as we’ve seen in our Atom X7-Z8700 vs Pentium N4200 benchmarks comparison, which means it’s not really worthwhile to upgrade performance-wise, unless you really a specific feature or interface found in the new processor. But what if we compare to processor from 2 to 3 years ago? Intel Atom Z3735F was a popular choice two years ago, and if you’re looking for a cheap Intel mini PC or TV box, that’s still the cheapest option with prices under $80. So I’ve decided to compare Intel Atom Z3735F (Bay Trail) processor with 2W TDP to the latest Pentium Celeron N4200 (Apollo Lake) with 6W TDP.

To do so, I gathered benchmarks results from MeLE PCG03 mini PC (PCMark 8) and PCG01 TV stick (Passmark + 3Dmark) for the Atom processor, as well as Voyo VMac Mini for the Apollo Lake processor. Please note that I only have PCMark 8 Home Baseline for PCG03, and not the Accelerated benchmark with OpenCL, but based on my results with K3 Wintel Keyboard PC, and reviews from Anandtech and IXBT, there’s no difference between PCMark Home Baseline and Accelerated for Atom Z3735F processor as it seems OpenCL is not supported in Atom Z3735F SoC (at least by PCMark), so I used PCMark 8 Home Baseline results for MeLE PCG03, and PCMark8 Home Accelerated for Voyo Vmac Mini. Unsurprisingly, the Pentium processors is faster in all tasks, and I highlighted the tests where it is at least twice as fast in green.

Benchmark MeLE PCG03 / PCG01
Intel Atom Z3735F @ 1.33 / 1.83 GHz (2W TDP)
Voyo V1 Vmac Mini
Intel Pentium N4200 @ 1.1 / 2.5 GHz (6W TDP)
Ratio
PCMark 8
Overall Score 1,105 1,846 1.67
Web Browsing – JunglePin 0.58064s 0.52267s 1.11
Web Browsing – Amazonia 0.19591s 0.18459s 1.06
Writing 11s 6.89837s 1.59
Casual Gaming 6.7 fps 10.38 fps 1.55
Video Chat playback 30 fps 30.02 fps 1.00
Video Chat encoding 318 ms 196.66667ms 1.62
Photo Editing 2.7s 0.45915s 5.88
Passmark 8
Passmark Rating 466 1,052.1 2.26
3DMark
Ice Storm 1.2 14,069 2,3511 1.67
Cloud Gate 1.1 1,156 2,347 2.03
Sky Diver 1.0 439 1,384 3.15
Fire Strike 0 (Driver failure) 267 N/A

The main surprise here is how little difference there is for PCMark 8 web browsing benchmarks. Video chat is the same because the video was already rendered at 30 fps previously, and Photo editing is much faster, simply because of OpenCL support, and not because the processor is about 6 times  faster. Passmark 8 and 3DMark benchmark show a clear boost of 2 to 3 times between an Atom Z3735F mini PC/Stick and a Pentium N4200 processor for the overall system and 3D gaming. If you own an Atom Z3735F mini PC, you’ll clearly feel a performance difference if you upgrade to an Apollo Lake processor. Beside the system performance, you’ll also benefit from faster interfaces like USB 3.0, Gigabit Ethernet, and potentially SATA, as well as better multimedia capabilities with for example H.265 video decoding. You’ll have to pay 2 or 3 times more for an Apollo Lake mini PC, but contrary to most Bay trail mini PCs, it will be usable as an entry-level computer.

BioDigitalPC Credit Card Sized Pluggable Computer Fits into Desktop Docks, AIO Monitors, Datacenters-in-a-Suitcase, and More

January 12th, 2017 No comments

We’ve seen in the past at last two projects development CPU cards aimed for easy upgrade a replacement, starting with EOMA-68 standard currently with products based on ARM processors and mostly targeting the consumer market, followed more recently by Intel Compute Card that focuses on the smart devices and enterprise markets. But I’ve recently found out a third company has been doing pluggable CPU cards for a little while: Arnouse Digital Device Corporation (ADDC) with their BioDigitalPC cards designed for the military and small businesses, and pluggable into desktop docks, phones, all-in-one monitors, and even portable datacenters that fit into a suitcase. The company also has “reader boards” that you can integrate into your own products / enclosures. Everything is shown in the diagram below.

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The latest generation (Gen 9) of BioDigitalPC cards are based on Intel Atom Bay Trail-I single, dual or quad core processors with 2 to 8 GB DDR3, 32 to 128 GB SSD, four USB 2.0 interface, one USB 3.0 interface, two PCIe interface, and DisplayPort++ video output through a custom connector.

BioDigitalPC-Gen9The cards have roughly the dimensions of a business card (84×54 mm) and 6.5mm thickness. The cards can run any x86 operating system including Windows, Windows Server, LINUX, CentOS, RHEL, Ubuntu and others, and are hot pluggable. They also have a waterproof, dustproof, fire-resistant and rugged epoxy coating, can be purchased in commercial and industrial operating temperatures, and can withstand about 3,000G.

Mobyl Data Center 22 Supports Up to 22 BioDigitalPC Cards

Mobyl Data Center 22 Supports Up to 22 BioDigitalPC Cards

Pricing makes it 100% clear the solutions are not designed for the consumer market, as BioDigitalPC Gen 9 cards sell for $580 and up starting with the single core version, and the Mobyl Data Center 22 shown above goes for $88,000 with four military grade batteries, a 9.7″ display, 22 GbE cards, and a rugged Pelican Storm case, but without any BioDigitalPC cards. You’ll find the full details and price list on ADDC website.

ADLE3800SEC is a Compact Intel Bay Trail-I Board with Dual Gigabit Ethernet, HDMI or DisplayPort, and More

December 27th, 2016 No comments

ADL Embedded Solutions, a US company specializing in… embedded solutions, has unveiled ADLE3800SEC embedded single board computer (SBC) optimized for size, weight and power (SWAP), based on an Intel Atom E3800 Bay Trail-I processor with HDMI, SATA dual Gigabit Ethernet, etc… The board is the first one part of the company’s Edge-Connect architecture defined a 75x75mm form factor with an edge connector exposing additional I/Os for breakout boards.

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ADLE3800SEC board specifications:

  • SoC
    • Intel Atom E3827 dual core Bay Trail-I processor @ up to 1.75GHz with 1MB cache, Intel Gen7 graphics (8W TDP) OR
    • Intel Atom E3845 quad core Bay Trail-I [email protected] up to 1.91GHz with 2MB cache, Intel Gen 7 Graphics (10W TDP)
  • System Memory – Up to 4GB DDR3-1333MHz (soldered on-board)
  • Storage – 1x M.2 socket(Key B, 2242); 1x SATA 2.0 (6GB/s) via edge connector
  • Video Output
    • 1x HDMI up to 1920 x 1200 or 1x DisplayPort up to 2560×1600
    • 1x DisplayPort via edge connector
  • Connectivity – 2x Gigabit Ethernet ports (RJ45)
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 ports, 1x USB 2.0 port, 2x USB 2.0 interfaces via edge connector
  • Other Expansion via edge connector – 2x PCIe, SM-Bus
  • Misc – Optional low profile heat spreader; optional conformal coating of CPU board & underfill of BGA components
  • Power Supply – 20 to 30V DC
  • Dimensions – 75 x 75 mm
  • Temperature Range — Optional for extended temperature screen -40 to 85°C

The board can run Linux or Windows 7/8/10. Typical applications would include UAV and UUV unmanned systems, industrial control systems, government and defense, video surveillance, small scale robotics, remote data-logging, man-wearable computing, etc…

The company did not disclose pricing info,  but you should be able to find more info and if needed, inquire ADL Embedded Solutions via ADLE3800SEC SBC product page.

Via HackerBoards