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Posts Tagged ‘bsp’

Renesas RZ/G Linux Platform features CIP Super Long-Term Support (SLTS) Linux kernel

October 18th, 2017 7 comments

In the consumer space, some devices never get updated, and you can consider yourself lucky if the manufacturer provides updates for several years, often just two as Linux LTS (Long Term Support) kernels had been supported that long so far. Google and the Linux Foundation realized that was not enough, so they recently announced 6-year LTS kernels at Linaro Connect SFO 2017, starting with Linux 4.4 released on January 2016, meaning it will keeping being maintained until January 2022 with security patchsets and bug fixes.

But in the industrial/embedded space, they need even longer periods of support due to the longer equipment’s lifespan. I first heard about the Linux Foundation’s  Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) project last year, when I covered the schedule for the Embedded Linux Conference Europe 2016. The project aims at providing a super long-term supported (STLS) open source “base layer” for industrial grade software.

Several companies are partners of the project including Hitachi, Renesas, Siemens, Toshiba, and others, and Renesas appears to be the first to announce a product – Renesas RZ/G Linux Platform – featuring the industrial-grade CIP Super Long-Term Support (SLTS) Linux kernel enabling Linux-based embedded systems to be maintained for more than 10 years.

Key features of the RZ/G Linux Platform:

  • Verified Linux package – Supports the CIP SLTS kernel with BSP, multimedia functionality (H.264, 3D graphics), Qt/HTML5 GUI framework, and security.
  • Development tools – Cloud development environment within Renesas’ e² studio integrated software development tool, code validation and analysis tools
  • Third-party ecosystem and marketplace – The Renesas Marketplace provides access to software and hardware solutions, and users can buy and download security tools, embedded vision libraries, and other software.
  • Support for RZ/G1M MPU now, with other Renesas RZ/G1 MPU series coming later.

You can find more details about the RZ/G Linux platform, and supported hardware on the product page.  The RZ/G Linux Platform will also be demonstrated at upcoming event including Arm TechCon, (US – October 24-26, 2017), the Embedded Linux Conference Europe (Czech Republic – October 23-25, 2017), SPS IPC Drives (Germany,  November 28-30), and CIIF 2017 (China, November 7-11, 2017).

Via ElectronicsWeekly and LinuxGizmos.

Categories: Linux, Renesas MCU Tags: bsp, industrial, Linux, renesas

Compulab’s Miniature “Bend & Fold” UCM-iMX7 System-on-Module Could Fit into a Watch

June 2nd, 2017 2 comments

Many companies are still releasing NXP – soon to be Qualcomm – i.MX 6/7 system-on-modules, but I don’t cover all of them, since we have already many to choose from. But Compulab’s latest UCM-iMX7 SoM differentiates itself by it size, using the company’s “Ultra-compact Multilevel Module” (UCMM) technology, to pack NXP i.MX7 processor, 2GB RAM, 64 GB eMMC flash, and a wireless module into a 30 x 27 x 8 mm volume that could potentially fit into something as small as a watch.

Click to Enlarge

The picture above clearly shows how UCMM technology works with the module comprised of two rigid PCBs and one flexible layer routing signals between the two allowing to bend and fold the rigid parts together to form a vertical stack. The principle could be extended to more PCBs and flexible layers, sof for example you could have four PCBs with three flexible layers in future / custom designs.

The rest of the specifications of UCM-iMX7 module are pretty standard:

  • SoC – NXP i.MX7 Dual or Solo with ARM Cortex-A7 core(s) @ up to 1GHz, ARM Cortex-M4 co-processor @ 200MHz
  • System Memory – Up to 2GB DDR3L-1066
  • Storage – Up to 64GB eMMC flash or up to 1GB SLC NAND flash, SPI flash for bootloader, EEPROM
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet PHY, WiFi 802.11b/g/n + Bluetooth 4.1 BLE via BCM4343W module
  • Audio – WM8731L audio codec
  • Other On-module ICs – SPI resistive touch controller, USB 2.0 hub, PF3000 PMIC
  • 2x 100-pin board-to-board connector with the following signals

    Block Diagram – Click to Enlarge

    • Display
      • Parallel 24-bit display interface up to 1920 x 1080
      • MIPI-DSI up to 1400 x 1050
      • Touchscreen 4-wire resistive touch-screen support
    • Camera
      • Parallel camera interface up to 24-bit
      • MIPI-CSI with 2 data lanes
      • Audio Audio codec with stereo line-out, line-in, mic
    • Networking – Gigabit Ethernet
    • PCI Express – PCIe x1 Gen. 2.1
    • USB – 1x USB2.0 OTG + 4x USB2.0 host ports
    • Up to 7x UART ports, up to 3x I2C, 3x SPI, 2x CAN, 6x Timer, 112x GPIO
    • Up to 4x general-purpose ADC inputs
    • Up to 2x MMC/SD/SDIO interface
  • Power Supply – 3.2V to 4.5V / Li-Ion battery
  • Dimensions – 30 x 27 x 8 mm
  • Temperature Range – -40 to 85°C

The specifications above are about the same as the ones for Compulab’s CL-SOM-iMX7 SO-DIMM module, but in a much smaller form factor, at the costs of a thicker design.

UCM-iMX7 module currently supports Linux kernel 4.1.15, Yocto Project file system, and U-Boot bootloader, with the company working on mainline Linux and upstream Yocto Project. The company expects the module to be used for autonomous drones, smart glasses, healthcare monitors / medical devices, industrial handhelds, and smart IoT cameras.

While the module is not directly aimed at the smartwatch market, the company demonstrated their module with a tiny smartwatch like gadget equipped with UCM-i>MX7, a lithium battery, a 1.5″ LCD display, and an interconnect board.

Click to Enlarge

UCM-iMX7 will be available later this month through Compulab and their distributors with prices starting at $39 for volume orders. EVAL-UCM-iMX7 evaluation kit will be offered at $475 with SB-UCM carrier board,WiFi antenna and cable, a serial port cable, HDMI to DVI cable, a USB cable and adapter, an LCD panel, adapters & cables for generic LCD panel interface, and a 12V power supply. You’ll find more details about the module and pricing options on UCM-iMX7 product page.

Categories: Hardware, Linux, NXP i.MX Tags: bsp, compulab, Linux, som, uboot, yocto

FOSDEM 2017 Open Source Meeting Schedule

January 31st, 2017 4 comments

FOSDEM (Free and Open Source Software Developers’ European Meeting) is a 2-day free event for software developers to meet, share ideas and collaborate that happens on the first week-end of February, meaning it will take place on February 4 & 5, 2017 this year. FOSDEM 2017 will features 608 speakers, 653 events, and 54 tracks, with 6 main tracks namely: Architectures, Building, Cloud, Documentation, Miscellaneous, and Security & Encryption.
I won’t be there, but it’s always interesting to look at the schedule, and I made my own virtual schedule focusing especially on talks from “Embedded, mobile and automotive” and “Internet of Things” devrooms.

Saturday 4, 2017

  • 11:00 – 11:25 – Does your coffee machine speaks Bocce; Teach your IoT thing to speak Modbus and it will not stop talking, by Yaacov Zamir

There are many IoT dashboards out on the web, most will require network connection to a server far far away, and use non standard protocols. We will show how to combine free software tools and protocols from the worlds of IT monitoring, Industrial control and IoT to create simple yet robust dashboards.

Modbus is a serial communication protocol developed in 1979 for use with programmable logic controllers (PLCs). In simple terms, it is a method used for transmitting information over serial lines between electronic devices., it’s openly published, royalty-free, simple and robust.

Many industrial controllers can speak Modbus, we can also teach “hobby” devices like Arduino boards and ESP8266 to speak Modbus. Reliable, robust and simple free software Modbus client will be used to acquire the metrics from our device, then the metrics will be collected and sent to Hawkular and Grafana to store and visualize our data.

  • 11:30 – 11:55 – Playing with the lights; Control LIFX WiFi-enabled light bulbs, by Louis Opter

In this talk we’ll take a close look at a one of the “smart” (WiFi-connected) light-bulbs available on the market today. The bulbs expose a small API over UDP that I used to run an interface on a programmable buttons array. We will see how topics like reverse engineering, security, licensing, “self-hosting” and user experience came into play.

monolight is an user interface to control LIFX WiFi-enabled light bulbs. monolight runs on a programmable button array; it is written in Python 3.6 (to have type annotations and asyncio), and it interfaces with the bulbs through a more complex daemon written in C: lightsd.

This talk will start with a live demo of the button grid remotely controlling the light bulbs. We will then explore how it works and some of the motivations behind it (network isolation, trying to not depend on the “cloud”, reliability, user-experience). Finally, we will look into what kind of opportunities even more open IoT products could bring, and open leave the place to Q&A and discussion.

  • 12:00 – 12:30 – Creating the open connected car with GENIVI, by Zeeshan Ali, GENIVI Development Platform (GDP) technical lead

A number of new components have matured in GENIVI to provide a true connected car experience. A couple of them are key connectivity components; namely SOTA (Software Over the Air) and RVI (Remote Vehicle Interface). This talk will discuss both these components, how they work together, the security work done on them and their integration into the GENIVI Development Platform.

This talk will also run down the overall status of GENIVI’s development platform and how it can enable an automotive stack to speak not just with the cloud, but with IoT devices via Iotivity interface.

  • 12:30 – 13:00 – Making Your Own Open Source Raspberry Pi HAT; A Story About Open Source Harware and Open Source Software, by Leon Anavi

This presentation will provide guidelines how to create an open source hardware add-on board for the most popular single board computer Raspberry Pi using free and open source tools from scratch. Specifications of Raspberry Pi Foundation for HAT (Hardware Attached on Top) will be revealed in details. Leon Anavi has been developing an open source Raspberry Pi HAT for IoT for more than a year and now he will share his experience, including the common mistakes for a software engineer getting involved in hardware design and manufacturing. The presentation is appropriate for anyone interested in building entirely open source products that feature open source hardware and open source software. No previous experience or hardware knowledge is required. The main audience are developers, hobbyists, makers, and students. Hopefully the presentation will encourage them to grab a soldering iron and start prototyping their DIY open source device.

  • 13:00 – 13:25 – Building distributed systems with Msgflo; Flow-based-programming over message queues, by Jon Nordby

MsgFlo is a tool to build systems that span multiple processes and devices, for instance IoT sensor networks. Each device acts as a black-box component with input and output ports, mapped to MQTT message queues. One then constructs a system by binding the queues of the components together. Focus on components exchanging data gives good composability and testability, both important in IoT. We will program a system with MsgFlo using Flowhub, a visual live-programming IDE, and test using fbp-spec.

In MsgFlo each process/device is an independent participant, receiving data on input queues, and sending data on output queues. A participant do not know where the data comes from, nor where (if anywhere) the data will go. This strong encapsulation gives good composability and testability. MsgFlo uses a standard message queue protocol (MQTT or AMQP). This makes it easy to use with existing software. As each participant is its own process and communicate over networks, they can be implemented in any programming language. Convenience libraries exist for C++, Python, Arduino, Node.js and Rust. On top of the message queue protocol, a simple discovery mechanism is added. For existing devices without native Msgflo support, the discovery messages can be sent by a dedicated tool.

  • 13:30 – 13:55 – 6LoWPAN in picoTCP, and how to support new Link Layer types, by Jelle De Vleeschouwer

6LoWPAN enables, as the name implies, IPv6-communication over Low-power Wireless Personal Area Networks, e.g. IEEE802.15.4. A lot of resources are available to allow 6LoWPAN over IEEE802.15.4, but how can one extend the 6LoWPAN feature-set for the use with other link layer types? This talk will cover the details about a generic implementation that should work with every link layer type and how one can provide support for ones own custom wireless network. The goal is to give quite a technical and detailed talk with finally a discussion about when 6LoWPAN is actually useful and when is it not.

Last year, as a summer project, a generic 6LoWPAN adaption layer was implemented into picoTCP, an open source embedded TCP/IP-stack developed by Altran Intelligent Systems, with an eye on the IoT. The layer should also be able to allow multiple link-layer extensions, for post-network-layer processing. This could be used for mesh-under routing, link layer security, whatever you want. This talk will cover how one can take advantage of these features and caveats that come with it.

  • 14:00 – 15:00 – Groking the Linux SPI Subsystem by Matt Porter

The Serial Peripheral Interconnect (SPI) bus is a ubiquitous de facto standard found in many embedded systems produced today. The Linux kernel has long supported this bus via a comprehensive framework which supports both SPI master and slave devices. The session will explore the abstractions that the framework provides to expose this hardware to both kernel and userspace clients. The talk will cover which classes of hardware supported and use cases outside the scope of the subsystem today. In addition, we will discuss subtle features of the SPI subsystem that may be used to satisfy hardware and performance requirements in an embedded Linux system.

  • 15:00 – 15:25 – Frosted Embedded POSIX OS; a free POSIX OS for Cortex-M embedded systems, by Brabo Silvius

FROSTED is an acronym that means “FRee Operating System for Tiny Embedded Devices”. The goal of this project is to provide a free kernel for embedded systems, which exposes a POSIX-compliant system call API. In this talk I aim to explain why we started this project, the approach we took to separate the kernel and user-space on Cortex-M CPU’s without MMU, and showcase the latest improvements on networking and supported applications.

  • 15:30 – 16:00 – How to Build an Open Source Embedded Video Player, by Michael Tretter

Video playback for embedded devices such as infotainment systems and media centers demands hardware accelerators to achieve reasonable performance. Unfortunately, vendors provide the drivers for the accelerators only as binary blobs. We demonstrate how we built a video playback system that uses hardware acceleration on i.MX6 by using solely open source software including Gstreamer, Qt QML, the etnaviv GPU driver, and the coda video decoder driver.

The Qt application receives the video streams from a Gstreamer pipeline (using playbin). The Gstreamer pipeline contains a v4l2 decoder element, which uses the coda v4l2 driver for the CODA 960 video encoder and decoder IP core (VPU in the Freescale/NXP Reference Manual), and a sink element to make the frames available to the Qt application. The entire pipeline including the Gstreamer to Qt handover uses dma_bufs to avoid copies in software.This example shows how to use open source drivers to ease the development of video and graphics applications on embedded systems.

  • 16:00 – 16:25 – Project Lighthouse: a low-cost device to help blind people live independently, by David Teller

The Word Health Organization estimates that more than 250 million people suffer from vision impairment, 36 millions of them being entirely blind. In many cases, their impairment prevents them from living independently. To complicate things further, about 90% of them are estimated to live in low-income situations.

Project Lighthouse was started by Mozilla to try and find low-cost technological solutions that can help vision-impaired people live and function on their own. To this date, we have produced several prototypes designed to aid users in a variety of situations. Let’s look at some of them. This will be a relatively low-tech presentation.

  • 16:30 – 16:55 – Scientific MicroPython for Microcontrollers and IoT, IoT programming with Python, by Roberto Colistete Jr

MicroPython is a implementation of Python 3 optimised to run on a microcontroller, created in 2013 by the Physicist Damien P. George. The MicroPython boards runs MicroPython on the bare metal and gives a low-level Python operating system running interactive prompt or scripts.

The MicroPython boards currently use 32 bit microcontrollers clocked at MHz and with RAM limited to tens or hundreds of Kbytes. These are the microcontroller boards with official MicroPython support currently in the beginning 2017 : Pyboard, Pyboard Lite, WiPy 1/2, ESP8266, BBC Micro:bit, LoPy, SiPy, FiPy. They cost between USD3-40, are very small and light, about some to tens of mm in each dimension and about 5-10 g, have low power consumption, so MicroPython boards are affordable and can be embedded in almost anything, almost anywhere.

Some hints will be given to the FOSS community to be open minded about MicroPython : be aware that MicroPython exists, MicroPython is a better programming option than Arduino in many ways, MicroPython boards are available and affordable, porting more Python 3 scientific modules to MicroPython, MicroPython combines well with IoT.

  • 17:00 – 17:25 – Iotivity from devices to cloud; how to make IoT ideas to real using FLOSS, by Philippe Coval & Ziran Sun (Samsung)

The OCF/IoTivity project aims to answer interoperability issues in the IoT world from many different contexts to accommodate a huge range devices from microcontrollers, to consumer electronics such as Tizen wearables or your powerful GNU/Linux system The vision of Iotivity is not restricted to ad hoc environment but also can be connected to Internet and make the service easily accessible by other parties. With cloud access in place, usage scenarios for IoT devices can be enriched immensely.

In this talk we walk through the steps on how to practically handle IoT use cases that tailored towards various topologies. To introduce the approach used in IoTivity, we first give a detailed background introduction on IoTivity framework. Then we will present a demo that shows a few examples, from setting up a basic smart home network to accessing the IoT resource via a third party online service. Challenges and solutions will be addressed from development and implementation aspects for each step of the demo.

We hope this talk will inspire developers to create new IoT prototypes using FLOSS.

  • 17:30 – 17:55 – Open Smart Grid Platform presentation, an Open source IoT platform for large infrastructures, by Jonas van den Bogaard

The Open Smart Grid Platform is an open source IoT platform. The open smart grid platform is a generic IoT platform, built for organizations that manage and/or control large-scale infrastructures. The following use cases are now readily available: smart lighting, smart metering, tariff switching, and microgrids. Furthermore the following use-cases are in development: distribution automation, load management and smart device management. The architecture of the open smart grid platform is modular and consists multiple layers.

The open smart grid platform is highly unique for embracing the open source approach and the following key features:

  • Suitable for scalable environments delivering high performance
  • High availability and multitenant architectures
  • Built with security by design and regularly tested.
  • It has a generic architecture. More use cases and domains are easily added to the platform.
  • The open smart grid platform is based on open standards where possible.

We believe the platform is interesting for developers who have interest in working on use-cases for Smart Cities, Utility Companies and other large-scale infrastructure companies.

  • 18:00 – 19:00 – AGL as a generic secured industrial embedded Linux; factory production line controllers requirements are not that special, by Dominig ar Foll

There is no de facto secured embedded Linux distro while the requirement is becoming more and more critical with the rise of IoT in Industrial domains. When looking under the hood of the Yocto built AGL project (Automotive Linux), it is obvious that it can fit 95% of the most common requirements as a Secured Embedded Linux. We will look how non Automotive industries can easily reuse the AGL code and tools to build their own industrial product and why it’s a safer bet than to build it internally.

Industrial IoT cannot be successful without a serious improvement of the security coverage. Unfortunately there is as today, no of-the-shelves offer and the skills required to create such solution, are at best rare, more often out of reach. AGL as created a customizable embedded Linux distro which is nicely designed for reuse in many domains outside of Automotive. During the presentation we will see how to: – start your development with boards readily available on the Net, – change the BSP and add peripherals using Yocto layers or project like MRAA, – integrate a secure boot in your platform, – add your middleware and your application without breaking the maintained Core OS – develop a UI on the integrated screen and/or an HTML remote browser – update the core OS and your add-ons. – get support and influence the project.

Sunday 5, 2017

  • 10:00 11:00 – How I survived to a SoC with a terrible Linux BSP, Working with jurassic vendor kernels, missing pieces and buggy code, by Luca Ceresoli

In this talk Luca will share some of his experiences with such vendor BSPs, featuring jurassic kernels, non-working drivers, non-existing bootloaders, code of appallingly bad quality, ineffective customer support and Windows-only tools. You will discover why he spent weeks in understanding, fixing and working around BSPs instead of just using them. The effects on the final product quality will be described as well. Luca will also discuss what the options are when you face such a BSP, and what both hackers and vendors can do to improve the situation for everybody’s benefit.

  • 11:00-12:00 – Open Source Car Control, by Josh Hartung

This fall my team launched the Open Source Car Control (OSCC) project, a by-wire control kit that makes autonomous vehicle development accessible and collaborative to developers at every level. In this presentation, we discuss the project and its implications on the development of autonomous cars in a vertically integrated and traditionally closed industry.

A primary barrier to entry in autonomous vehicle development is gaining access to a car that can be controlled with an off-the-shelf computer. Purchasing from an integrator can cost upwards of $100K, and DIY endeavors can result in unreliable and unsafe solutions. The OSCC project acts as a solution to these problems. OSCC is a kit of open hardware and software (based on Arduino) that can be used to take control of the throttle, brake, and steering in modern cars. The result is a fully by-wire test car that can be built for about $10K (USD), including the vehicle. In this discussion, we unpack the impetus and development of the OSCC project, challenges we encountered during development, and the role projects like OSCC have in a necessary “flattening” of the automotive industry.

  • 12:00 – 13:00 – Kernel DLC Metrics, Statistic Analysis and Bug-Patterns, by Nicholas Mc Guire

SIL2LinuxMP strives to qualify a defined GNU/Linux subset for the use in safety-related systems by “assessment of non-compliant development”. To demonstrate that the kernel has achieved suitable reliability and correctness properties basic metrics of such properties and their statistic analysis can be used as part of the argument. Linux has a wealth of analytical tools built-in to it which allow to extract information on compliance, robustness of development, as well as basic metrics on complexity or correctness with respect to defined properties. While IEC 61508 Ed 2 always pairs testing and analysis, we believe that for a high complexity system traditional testing is of relatively low effectiveness and analytical methods need to be the primary path. To this ends we outline some approaches taken:

  • Bug-age analysis
  • Bug-rates and trend analysis
  • Code-complexity/bug relationship
  • Brain-dead correctness analysis
  • Interface and type-correctness analysis
  • API compliance analysis
  • Analysis of build-bot data

While much of the data points to robust and mature code there also are some areas where problems popped up. In this talk we outline the used methods and give examples as well as key findings. FLOSS development has reached a quite impressive maturity, to substantially go beyond we think it will need the use of quantitative process and code metrics – these results from SIL2LinuxMP may be a starting point.

  • 13:00 – 14:00 – Loco Positioning: An OpenSource Local Positioning System for robotics, presentation with a demo of autonomous Crazyflie 2.0 quadcopter, by Arnaud Taffanel

Positioning in robotics has alway been a challenge. For outdoor, robots GPS is solving most of the practical problems, but indoor, precise localization is still done using expensive proprietary systems mainly based on an array of cameras.

In this talk, I will present the loco positioning system: an open source Ultra Wide Band radio-based local positioning system, why we need it and how it works. I will also speak about its usage with the Crazyflie 2.0 open source nano quadcopter, of course ending with an autonomous flying demo.

  • 14:00 14:50 – Free Software For The Machine, by Keith Packard

The Machine is a hardware project at Hewlett Packard Enterprise which takes a new look at computer architecture. With many processors and large amounts of directly addressable storage, The Machine program has offered an equally large opportunity for developing new system software. Our team at HPE has spent the better part of two years writing new software and adapting existing software to expose the capabilities of the hardware to application developers.

As directly addressable storage is such a large part of the new hardware, this presentation will focus on a couple of important bits of free software which expose that to applications, including our Librarian File System and Managed Data Structures libraries. Managed Data Structures introduces a new application programming paradigm where the application works directly on the stable storage form for data structures, eliminating serialization and de-serialization operations.

Finally, the presentation will describe how the hardware is managed, from sequencing power to a rack full of high-performance computing hardware, through constructing custom Linux operating systems for each processor and managing all of them as parts of a single computing platform.

  • 15:00 – 15:25 – Diving into the KiCad source code, by Maciej Sumiński

Let’s be sincere, all of us would love to change something in KiCad. I bet you have an idea for a new tool or another killer feature that would make your life so much easier.

You know what? You are free to do so! Even more, you are welcome to contribute to the project, and it is not that difficult as one may think. Those who have browsed the source code might find it overwhelming at first, but the truth is: you do not have to know everything to create useful extensions.

I would like to invite you for a walk through the KiCad source code to demonstrate how easy it is to add this tool you have always been dreaming about.

  • 15:30 – 16:00 – Testing with volcanoes – Fuego+LAVA, embedded testing going distributed, by Jan-Simon Möller

LAVA and Fuego are great tools individually already. Combining and extending them allows for a much broader test coverage than each tool alone can provide.

The focus of this talk is to share the experiences made and lessons learned so people can integrate such tools better in their own environment. It also raises the pain-points and open issues when setting up a distributed environment.

Especially for Automotive, Long-Term-Support, CIP or Consumer Electronics, advancing the Test-harness is essential to raise the bar and strengthen the confidence in our embedded platforms. Automated testing can improve our ecosystem from two sides: during development (feature does work and does not break things) and during maintenance (no regressions through backports).

  • 16:00 – 16:30 – Adding IEEE 802.15.4 and 6LoWPAN to an Embedded Linux Device, by Stefan Schmidt

Adding support for IEEE 802.15.4 and 6LoWPAN to an embedded Linux board opens up new possibilities to communicate with tiny, IoT type of, devices.

Bringing IP connectivity to devices, like sensors, with just a few kilobytes of RAM and limited battery power is an interesting IoT challenge. With the Linux-wpan and 6LoWPAN subsystems we get Linux ready to support the needed wireless standards as well as protocols that connect these tiny devices into the wider Internet. To make Linux a practical border router or smart home hub for such networks.

This talk will show how to add the needed transceiver hardware to an existing hardware and how to enable and configure the Linux-wpan and 6LoWPAN mainline subsystems to use it. The demonstration will include setting up the communication between Linux and other popular IoT operating systems like RIOT or Contiki as well.

  • 16:30 – 17:00 – OpenPowerlink over Xenomai, by Pierre Ficheux

Industrial Ethernet is a successor of classic field bus such as CAN, MODBUS or PROFIBUS. POWERLINK was created by B&R Automation and provides performance and real­-time capabilities based on standard Ethernet hardware. openPOWERLINK is open source and runs on lots of platforms such as Linux, Windows, various RTOS and dedicated hardware (FPGA). We will explain how to use openPOWERLINK on top of Xenomai 3, a powerful real-time extension for Linux kernel based on co-­kernel technology.

FOSDEM 2017 will take place at the ULB Solbosch Campus in Brussels, Belgium, and no registration is required, you just need to show up in order to attend the event.

MYIR Tech Latest SoM and Development Board Feature Xilinx Zynq-7015 ARM + FPGA SoC with 4 High Speed Transceivers

November 8th, 2016 No comments
MYIR Tech launched the low cost Z-Turn board powered by Xilinx Zynq-7010/7020 ARM+FPGA SoC last year, and the company has now introduced a new system-on-module powered by Xilinx Zynq-7015 SoC as well as a corresponding development kit.
zynq-7015-somMYC-C7Z015 CPU Module specifications:
  • SoC – Xilinx XC7Z015-1CLG485C (Zynq-7015) dual core ARM Cortex-A9 processor @ 667 MHz (up to 866MHz) with Artix-7 class FPGA subsystem with 74K logic cells, 46,200 LUTs, 160 DSP slices, 4x high-speed SerDes transceivers up to 6.25 Gbps, 4x four PCIe Gen2 hardened, integrated IP blocks
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR3 SDRAM
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC flash, 32MB QSPI Flash (16MB optional)
  • Connectivity – 1x Ethernet PHY, 1x USB PHY
  • I/Os and peripherals via 2x 140-pin board-to-board connectors:
    • 1x Gigabit Ethernet
    • 1x USB OTG 2.0
    • Up to 2x serial ports, up to 2x I2C, up to 2x CAN BUS, 1x SPI
    • 1x independent differential ADC, 16-channel ADC
    • 1x SDIO
    • Bank 13  – PL I/O configurable as up to 18 LVDS pairs and 1 single-ended I/O or 37 single-ended I/O
    • Bank 34 – PL I/O configurable as up to 24 LVDS pairs and 2 single-ended I/O or 50 single-ended I/O
    • Bank 35 – PL I/O configurable as up to 24 LVDS pairs and 2 single-ended I/O or 50 single-ended I/O)
  • Misc – External watchdog,  3x LEDs for power, FPGA programming, and user.
  • Power supply – 5V/0.5A
  • Dimensions – 75mm x 55mm (12-layer PCB design)
  • Temperature Range – 0~70 deg. Celsius (commercial grade)
MYC-C7Z015 CPU Module Block Diagram

MYC-C7Z015 CPU Module Block Diagram

One of the extra features brought by Zynq-7015, compared to Zynq-7010/7020 SoCs, is the presence of four high speed transceivers. The company will provide a BSP to customers with Linux 3.15.0, all drivers, gcc toolchain, bootloader, a ramdisk and a rootfs.

In order to speed up development for your project, the company can also offers MYD-C7Z015 baseboard for the module with the following interfaces:

  • Connected to ARM Cortex A9 processor (Processing System = PS):
    • 4x USB 2.0 host ports (through USB Hub)
    • 1x RS232 DB9 port
    • 1x micro card slot to boot the system
    • 1x CAN terminal block
    • 1x 10/100/1000M Ethernet port
    • 1x 2.54mm pitch 14-pin JTAG interface used by both PL & PS
    • 1x battery backed RTC
    • 1x User Button
    • 1x I2C for LCD and resistive touch screen
    • Jumpers
  • Connected to FPGA fabric (Programmable Logic = PL):
    • 1x XADC interface
    • 1x Xilinx standard LPFMC interface
    • 3x PMoD connectors
    • 1x HDMI port: 16-bit YCrCb, up to 1080p display, no audio
    • 1x LCD/Touch screen interface: 16-bit RGB, signals multiplexed with HDMI, supports resistive and capacitive touch screen
    • 1x SFP optical transceiver module interface
    • 1x PCIe slot
    • 2x LEDs: 1x for FMC module detection, 1x for power
Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

MYC-C7Z015 computer-on-module sells for $189 in single unit, MYD-C7Z015 development board and accessories – such as cables and power supply – goes for $369. 4.3″ and 7″ resistive or capacitive LCD Modules are also available for respectively $60 and $99.

You find all the details, including documentation, and purchase links via Paypal on MYIR Tech MYC-C7Z015 CPU module product page.

Inforce Computing Introduces 6301 SoM and Devkit Powered by Snapdragon 410E SoC with Long Term Availability

November 4th, 2016 3 comments

Qualcomm launched Snapdragon 410E and 600E processors for the embedded market at the end of September, meaning the processors were easy to source by any company, not matter how small they are, and the company would now offer long term availability often required for embedded systems. Inforce Computing is now leveraging the new Snapdragon 410E processor with their Inforce 6301 micro SoM, and corresponding development kit.

snapdragon-400e-system-on-module-somInforce 6301 micro SoM specifications:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Snapdragon 410E (APQ8016 SoC) quad core ARM Cortex A53 processor @ 1.2GHz, Adreno 306 GPU, and Hexagon DSP @ 700MHz
  • Memory – 1GB LPDDR3 @ 533MHz  (Option: 2GB)
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC v4.5 flash (Option up to 64GB) NAND, 1x micro SD card interface with support up to HS200
  • Connectivity – Bluetooth 4.1 LE, Wi-Fi dual stream 802.11 b/g/n @ 2.4GHz (WC3620), on-board GPS/GNSS/BeiDou/Galileo (WGR7640)
  • Video – H.264/263 playback and capture @1080p; H.265 playback @720p;
  • Interfaces via 2x 100-pin board-to-board connectors
    • HDMI v1.3a up to 1080p30 and 720p60
    • 4-lane MIPI-DSI up to 1080p30 and 720p60
    • Audio – 1x stereo headphone, 4x line out, 3x microphone inputs; Hi-Fi Audio with 24bit/192Khz playback support HD 5.1 Audio
    • Camera – 2x MIPI CSI: up to 13MP Camera on CSI0 and up to 8MP camera on CSI1
    • I2C, GPIO, UART
    • SDIO 3.0
    • USB 2.0
    • JTAG
  • Power Supply – +3.3V/5A Input
  • Dimensions – 50 x 28 mm
  • Temperature Range –  -30 to 85 Degrees C (Operating)
  • Humidity – 5 to 95% RH non-condensing
  • Certifications – RoHS and WEEE compliant
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The module can be either pre-loaded with Android Lollipop or Ubuntu/Debian Linux, with board support packages (BSP) provided for development. In order to get started as fast as possible, the company also offers a 60×55 mm carrier board for the module with a micro SD slot, HDMI output, USB 2.0 host ports, and headers with I2C, SPI, UART, GPIOs,…

Inforce 6301™ Development Kit

Inforce 6301 Development Kit with ACC-1C10 carrier board and Inforce 6301 micro SoM

Inforce 6301 can be purchased for $85 in single quantity with a 10-year availability commitment, while the development kit goes for $185 with 7-year availability. You’ll find more details including software and hardware documentation in the previous links to the store, as well as an overview on Inforce Computing 6301 SoM page.

Fujitsu Launches F-Cue 96Boards Compliant Board Powered by SocioNext MB86S71 Processor

October 28th, 2016 1 comment

While 96Boards platforms may not be selling like Raspberry Pi boards, the form factor is quite popular with vendors, as there are now around 10 development board either directly supported by 96Boards, or at least compliant for the form factor. Fujitsu has also made their own 96Boards compliant F-Cue board powered by SocioNext MB86S71 quad core Cortex A15/A7 processor, as well as F-Cue extension board
with Ethernet & PCIe interfaces.

fujitsu-f-cue-96boards-boardF-Cue board specifications:

  • SoC – Socionext MB86S71 big.LITTLE quad core processor with 2x Cortex-A15 cores @ 1.2GHz, 2x Cortex-A7 cores @ 800MHz, and Mali-T624 GPU
  • System Memory – 2GB LPDDR3 1333MHz
  • Storage – 16GB eMMC 4.51 flash, micro SD 3.0 UHS-I slot
  • Video & Audio Output – HDMI 1.4b
  • Multimedia Capabilities – [email protected] encode/decode, 4 stream H.264 decode; 32k x 32k JPEG codec
  • Connectivity – 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac WiFi , Bluetooth 4.2
  • USB –  1x USB 3.0 host port, 1x USB 2.0 host port, 1x Micro-USB 2.0 device port
  • Expansion Headers
    • 40-pin Low speed connector with UART, SPI, I2C, PCM/I2S, GPIO
    • 60-pin High speed connector with MIPI-DSI, USB 2.0, SPI, I2C
    • 60-pin Giga speed connector – Gigabit Ethernet, PCIe Gen2
  • Power Supply -12V/3.5A
  • Dimensions — 85 x 54 x 19.7mm (with expansion board?) as per 96Boards CE specifications
  • Temperature Range – 0 to 70 ℃
socionext-mb86s71-block-diagram

SocioNext MB86S71 Block Diagram

Fujitsu can provide a Linux BSP with the Linux Kernel, U-boot, and device Drivers, as well as middleware libraries for Video & JPEG Codecs, OpenCL and OpenGL. As mentioned in the introduction, F-Cue comes with an optional MSB7701-E01 expansion/mezzanine board adding Gigabit Ethernet and a 4-Lane PCIe slot.

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Most Japanese silicon vendors don’t seem to be that interested in the maker/hobbyist market, and F-Cue is no exception as the board will sell for 30,000 JPY (~$285), and the expansion board for 5,000 JPY (~$47.5) starting November 14. Potential applications include home & factory automation, connected office equipment like multi-function printers, robotics, security systems, IoT gateways, digital signage, and more. You’ll find more details on F-Cue board product page (Japanese only), and if you attend Embedded Technology 2016 conference on November 16-18 in Yokohama, Japan.

Via HackerBoards

Gateworks Ventana GW5530 SBC is Designed for Drones, Robots, and Digital Signage

July 21st, 2016 No comments

Gateworks Ventana is a family of boards based on NXP i.MX6 processor designed for embedded applications, and often include one or more mini PCIe ports for expansion. Their latest single board computer – Ventana GW5530 –  is powered by an NXP i.MX 6Dual processor coupled with 512MB RAM, 256MB storage, a mini PCIe port, a micro SD / SIM card slot, micro HDMI output, and some I/Os.

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Ventana GW5530 specifications:

  • SoC – NXP i.MX6 Dual Core ARM Cortex-A9 processor @ 800MHz with Vivante 2D and 3D GPUs
  • System Memory – 512MB DDR3 (Up to 2GB as option)
  • Storage – 256MB flash (Up to 2GB as option), micro SD/SIM card slot, serial configuration EEPROM
  • Video & Audio Output – micro HDMI 1.4 port
  • Connectivity – Optional u-blox EVA-M8M GPS Receiver with MMCX or u.FL Antenna Connector
  • USB – 1x micro USB 2.0 OTG Port
  • Sensors – 9-axis inertial module (accelerometer/gyro/magnetometer)
  • Expansion
    • High-Power Gen 2.0 mini-PCIe Socket with USB 2.0 Support
    • SIM socket (shared with micro SD card)
    • Video input header for CVBS, Y/C, YPrPb
    • Digital and serial I/O header
  • Debugging – JTAG connector
  • Misc – RTC with battery backup, voltage and temperature monitor, programmable watchdog timer, reset header, LED header
  • Power Supply – 8 to 60V DC input via 2-pin header; Reverse voltage protection
  • Power Consumption – [email protected]°C (typical); 7W Available for mini-PCIe socket
  • Dimensions – 100x35x13 mm
  • Weight – 28 grams
  • Temperature Range – -40°C to +85°C

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The company can provide OpenWrt, Android, Yocto Linux, and OpenEmbedded board support packages (BSP) for the board. Some documentation can be found on Ventana wiki. The boards targets “small embedded applications such as Man Portable Units (MPUs), Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) equipment, digital signage, and robotics”.

Block Diagram

Block Diagram

The board is available now, with pricing not disclosed, and 1 year warranty. Gateworks GW11038 development kit with GW5530 SBC, OpenWrt BSP, USB and video cables, power supply, and a JTAG programmer can also be purchased for evaluation. More details can be found on Gateworks Ventana GW5530 product page.

SD 600eval Development Board Compliant with 96Boards CE Extended To Sell for $279

June 6th, 2016 7 comments

Last month, we found out that Arrows Electronics was working on DragonBoard 600c development board featuring Qualcomm Snapragon 600 processor and based on 96Boards CE Extended version which allows for extra features such as SATA and Ethernet ports. At the time, the complete specifications were not available, and neither pricing. We do now have more details, as the board designed by Elinfochips is (also) called SD 600eval, and is available on back order for $279.

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SD 600eval specifications:

  • SoC- Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 (APQ8064) quad-core Krait 300 processor  @ up to 1.7 GHz with Adreno 320 GPU @ 400MHz supporting OpenGL ES 1.1/2.0, OpenCL 1.1, WebGL 1.0, and DirectX 9.3
  • System Memory – 2GB PoP LPDDR2 @ 533 MHz
  • Storage – 16GB eMMC Flash + micro SD 3.0 (UHS-1) slot + SATA port
  • Video Output – HDMI up to 1080p
  • Video – [email protected] HD video playback and capture (h.264/AVC)
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet via AR8151 PCIe chip, 802.11n/g/n/ac WiFi 2×2 and Bluetooth 4.0 LE, GPS/GLONASS with external GPS antenna
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB OTG port
  • Expansion:
    • 1x 40 pin low speed expansion connector – 2x UART, SPI, PCM, 2x I2C, 12x GPIO, DC power
    • 1x 60 pin high speed expansion connector – 4L-MIPI DSI, USB, HSIC, 2x I2C, 2L+4L MIPI CSI
    • 1x 16-pin & 40-pin audio expansion connector – Stereo headset/Line OUT, speaker, analog/digital microphones
  • Sensors – On-board magnetometer, gyro meter, and accelerometer
  • Misc – Volume, power & reset buttons. 6 LEDS (4x user, 1x Wifi, 1x Bluetooth), RTC battery slot
  • Power Supply – +6.5 – 18V DC input
  • Dimensions – 100 x 100 mm (96Boards Consumer Edition Extended dimensions specifications)
  • Operating Temperature Range – 0 to 50 deg. C
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The company provides Android 5.1 with Linux 3.4 support for the board, and Linaro will provide the Linux BSP for D 600eval/Dragonboard 600c, so hopefully a more recent Linux kernel will be supported. There are several links to software and hardware documentation, source code and binaries on the “Resources” section of the product page, including schematics (PDF) and hardware user manual.