Archive

Posts Tagged ‘compute card’

Intel Compute Card and Dock Hands On, Windows 10 and Ubuntu Benchmarks

September 29th, 2017 9 comments

We’ve recently seen Intel introduced Dock DK132EPJ for their Compute Cards, and released some pricing info. Ian Morrison (Linuxium) got sent a full kit by Intel with the dock and Compute Card CD1M3128MK powered by a dual core / quad Core m3-7Y30 processor with 4GB RAM, 128GB PCIe SSD, and Intel Wireless-AC 8265 module. You can get the full details in Ian’s post, but I’ll provide a summary of the key points here.

While the compute card and dock are thinner than most product, the computer card is quite wider than TV sticks, and the dock larger than an Intel NUC. It also comes with a fan, and cooling works well with maximum CPU temperature under being 70°C.

The Compute Cards do not come with any operating system, but you get to the BIOS easily, and install Windows or Linux distributions. Ian’s started with Windows 10 Enterprise Evaluation, and ran several benchmarks including PCMark 8 Home Accelerated 3.0.

Click to Enlarge – Full results here.

As expected, performance is quite good on this 4.5W TDP Core m processor, as the best results I got so far on sub 10W TDP processors was 1,846 points with Voyo VMac Mini Celeron N4200 mini PC. The NVMe SSD also helps with performance as shown in CrystalDiskMark Results.

The processor was apparently powerful enough to play 4320p / 8K videos in YouTube.

He then installed Ubuntu 17.04 for a dual boot setup, and it worked after tweaking Ubuntu NVRAM entry. Apart from that, everything seems to work out of the box.

Phoronix Suite benchmarks showed a jump in performance compared to the Intel Compute sticks, even against the Core-m3 one (STK2M364CC) as shown below.

Click to Enlarge

The iozone results are particularly striking, but easily explained as a 64GB eMMC flash was pitted against a 128GB NVMe SSD.

In conclusion, Ian explains that overall the Card and Dock combination works well, and while there may be use cases for the enterprise market, it might be a different story for the consumer market, but it might be worth it eventually if more docks come to market, for example Laptop docks, so you can switch the card between two or more types of docks. Since the solution is rather expensive, standard mini PCs will likely prevail in the consumer market.

Intel Compute Card Dock DK132EPJ Specifications and User Manual Published

September 14th, 2017 6 comments

Intel unveiled the Compute Card at the very beginning of the this year, without that many details, except it would included a 7th Gen Intel Core, memory, storage and wireless connectivity, and connect compliant dock with a new standard connector featuring USB-C and extra I/Os. Later this year, we learned more details about some Apollo Lake and Kaby Lake Compute Cards including specifications and block diagram. However those cards won’t be of any use without docks, and while NexDock promised a laptop dock for the cards, I have not seen any other announcements, but we now have some info about Intel’s own Compute Card dock that looks like a mini PC as the company released technical specifications and user manuals for DK132EPJ dock, and three Compute Card SKUs.

 

Click to Enlarge

Intel Compute Card Dock DK132EPJ specifications:

  • CPU, Memory, Storage, Wireless – Via slot supporting certified Intel Compute Cards
  • Video Output – HDMI and mini DisplayPort
  • USB – 3x USB 3.0 ports
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet (via Intel I211-AT); Built-in compute card: 802.11ac WiFi and Bluetooth 4.2
  • Misc – Lock indicator; eject button+indicator; power button; security lock
  • Power Supply – 19V via power barrel jack
  • Dimensions – 151.76 mm x 145 mm x 20.5 mm

Click to Enlarge

The enclosure also supports 75 x 75 and 100 x 100 VESA mount so it can be mounted on the back of compatible monitors or televisions. The dock comes with a 19 power adapter with plug adapter for various countries and a 2-meter power cord. The operating system is not pre-installed in the Compute Card, but Windows 10 Home, Windows 10 Pro, Windows 10 Enterprise, Windows 10 Education, and Windows 10 IoT Enterprise are supported, and some Linux operating systems may be supported. The cards requires software support at least for authentication and the eject function.

Compute Card Dock Block Diagram – Click to Enlarge

The compute cards & dock should be available for purchase now, but they do not seem broadly available online, as I could just find the dock listed for $111.19 on Provantage (with the wrong product photo), and CD1C64GK Compute Card with Celeron N3350/4GB/64GB configuration for 641 AED (~$175 US) on “Gear Up Me” website with stock expected in 9 days. Alzashop has all four Compute Card SKUs with prices ranging from 143 to 527 Euros depending on model.

Via Ian Morrison in Mini PCs and TV Boxes G+ Community

Intel Compute Card Apollo Lake and Kaby Lake SKUs, Block Diagrams, and Specifications

May 29th, 2017 2 comments

Intel Compute cards are the latest ultra-thin CPU cards introduced by Intel at the beginning of the year, with a concept similar to EOMA68 CPU cards, that it to allow  CPU card upgrades or replacements, and interoperability across compatible devices such as smart kiosks, IoT gateways, and so on. But at the time, Intel did not reveal that many details about the different cards, although we know NexDock is working on laptop dock compatible with Intel Compute Cards. But I’ve recently received some block diagrams for Apollo Lake Pentium/Celeron, and Kaby Lake Core M/Core i5 compute cards.There will two SKUs for Apollo Lake compute cards sharing the same specifications, except for the processor:

  • SoC
    • CD1C64GK SKU – Intel Celeron N3450 quad core processor @ 1.1 / 2.2 GHz (base/turbo) with 12EU Intel HD Graphics Gen9; 7.5W TDP
    • CD1P64GK SKU – Intel Pentium N4200 quad core processor @ 1.1 / 2.5 GHz with 18 EU Intel Gen9 HD graphics; 6W TDP
  • System Memory – 4GB dual channel LPDDR3-1866
  • Storage – 64 eMMC flash, SPI flash for BIOS
  • Connectivity – Intel Wireless-AC 7265 (2×2 802.11ac & Bluetooth 4.2)
  • Compute Card connector:
    • USB type C part with  USB 3.x, USB CC (Configuration Channel), DisplayPort 1.2 and USB 2.0 signals
    • Extended part with USB 2.0, DisplayPort 1.2, USB 3.x, 2x multiplexed SATA & PCIe x1 interfaces
  • Others – PMIC, Embedded Controller, and Crypto Element Device

There will also be two more powerful and expensive Kabe Lake compute card with the following specifications:

  • SoC
    • CD1M3128MK SKU – Intel Core m3-7Y30 dual core / quad thread processor @ 1.0 / 2.6 GHz (base/turbo) with Intel HD Graphics 615; 4.5W TDP
    • CD1IV128MK SKU – Intel Core i5-7Y57 dual core / quad thread processor @ 1.2 / 3.3 GHz with Intel HD Graphics 615; 4.5W TDP; Support Intel vPro
  • System Memory – 4GB dual channel LPDDR3-1866
  • Storage – 128GB PCIe SSD, SPI flash for BIOS
  • Connectivity – Intel Wireless-AC 8265 (2×2 802.11ac & Bluetooth 4.2)
  • Compute Card connector:
    • USB type C part with  USB 3.x, USB CC (Configuration Channel), DisplayPort 1.2 and USB 2.0 signals
    • Extended part with USB 2.0, DisplayPort 1.2, USB 3.x,  1x multiplex Gigabit Ethernet / PCIe x1, and 1x PCIe x1
  • Others – Voltage regulators (VRs), Embedded Controller, and Crypto Element Device; CD1IV128MK only: TPM

I was not aware of any Core i5 processors with such a low TDP, which can also be tuned up to 7W, and down to just 3.5W. The processor was just launched in January, a few devices are equipped with the processor, but I still managed to find Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet 20JB ( $1,450), as well as some benchmarks for reference.

NexDock is Working on a Hybrid Laptop Dock for Intel Compute Cards

January 18th, 2017 5 comments

NexDock first launched a 14″ laptop dock for smartphones, tablets, and development boards via a Indiegogo campaign in 2016, where they successfully raised over $350,000, and delivered rewards to backers last September and October. With the recent introduction of the Intel Compute Card, the company has now decided to work on a new NexDock that will take Intel’s cards.

We don’t have much details right now, but the company said that beside the Intel Compute Card, it will come support interchangeable USB type-C modules, and will still support Windows 10 smartphones with continuum feature, Raspberry Pi and other devices that can be connected through a USB-C port. The second drawing also suggests the keyboard will be detachable, and you’ll be able to use NexDock as a Windows tablet.

It could be nice to have an Intel laptop with Linux or Windows, and an ARM tablet with Android, but this won’t be possible, since Intel Compute Card are unlikely to be fitted with ARM processors.

Nevertheless, it’s an interesting development, as Intel appeared to target smart devices and business applications for their Compute Card when the announced it as CES 2017, but if the NexDock becomes reality, we will also find it in consumer devices, possibly around mid-2017 when the new NexDock is supposed to launch.

Intel Compute Card is a Business Card Sized Platform for Modular & Upgradeable Computers & Devices

January 6th, 2017 5 comments

Intel has just introduced their Compute Card, the name likely originating from their Compute Stick & Module series, integrating all main components you’d find in a computer such as a processor, memory, storage, and wireless connectivity into an standardized ultra thin business card sized module that can be used in compatible devices from smart kiosks to security cameras and IoT gateways, as well as computers and laptops.

intel-compute-cardIntel has some demos at CES 2017, but has not announced any specific models yet. We still have some of the key features for the Compute Cards:

  • Processor up to 7th Gen Intel Core, memory, storage and wireless connectivity are all included in the card
  • Intel Compute Card-based device will provide the power, cooling and the optimized user I/O for that particularly solution
  • Connection to devices will be done via an Intel Compute Card slot with a new standard connector (USB-C plus extension)
  • USB-C plus extension connector will provide USB, PCIe, HDMI, DP and additional signals between the card and the device
  • Dimensions – 94.5 mm x 55 mm x 5 mm

It’s not the first time company have created compute module for upgradeability and modularity, as with, for example, EOMA68 CPU card going into a mini computer and laptop, just like BBC demo of Intel Compute Card below featuring Core-M processor.

Intel is now working with early partners such as Dell, HP, Lenovo, Sharp, and InFocus to develop products taking Compute Card. More details, including pricing, will be made available in Q2 2017 just before the Compute Card and compatible devices should start to hit the shelves around the middle of the year. You’ll find a few more details on Intel’s Compute Card product page and press release.