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How to Use 3G and GPS on Raspberry Pi with ThaiEasyElec 3G HAT Expansion Board

February 11th, 2018 11 comments

Venus Supply is an embedded systems company based in Bangkok, Thailand that sells products through their ThaiEasyElec website/brand, as well as a act as a local distributor for popular DIY electronics items. I previously tested their ESPino32 ESP32 board, and the company has now send me another of their new product called “3G HAT Expansion for Raspberry Pi” and based on Quectel UC20-G that support 3G and GPS/GLONASS connectivity globally, meaning it should work in any country with 2G or 3G coverage.

After listing the specifications, going through unboxing and assembly with a Raspberry Pi 2/3 board, I’ll write some quick start guide to show what I had to do to use GPS and connect to 3G with a Hologram SIM card.

3G HAT Expansion for Raspberry Pi Specifications

  • Quectel UC20-G wireless module supporting
    • Cellular
      • 3G – UMTS @ 800/850/900/1900/2100 MHz
      • 2G – GSM @ 850/900/1800/1900 MHz
      • Data – HSPA+ up to 14.4 Mbps Downlink, 5.76 Mbps Uplink, EDGE, GPRS
      • Push-Pull SIM Card with ESD protection
      • Main + Diversity RP-SMA antenna connectors
    • GNSS
      • Qualcomm gpsOne Gen8 engine
      • GPS, GLONASS
      • RP-SMA antenna connector
  • Host interface – USB and UART
  • Audio – Audio codec, and 3.5 audio jack with microphone and mono audio
  • Misc
    • Auto start jumper (J3)
    • Software start/stop via GPIO17 or GPIO18 pin configurable via Jumper “P8”
    • Power switch
    • LED – Status LED, network, power
    • Back-up battery to reduce GPS fix time
  • Raspberry Pi Hat Compatible with 40-pin Raspberry Pi header

Unboxing

I received the kit in a carton box with three zipped packages: one for the board and accessories, and two for the GPS/GLONASS and 3G antennas which are not included by default.

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The GPS antenna comes with a 3-meter cable which should make it suitable to install in most cars or trucks, and the HAT package includes an extra zip bag with spacers, screws, nuts, and a 40-pin female header. I’ve also been told a 25cm micro USB cable should be included, but it seems they forgot it for my package…

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Looking closer at the board we can see Quectel UC20GB module in the center of the board, the three RP-SMA antenna connectors clearly marked with DIV, GNSS, and MAIN, the micro USB port for power and data, the 3.5mm audio jack, and in the top right connector J3 2-pin header to enable autostart, 3-pin P8 header to select GPIO 17 or GPIO 18 for software on/off, and the power key to manually start or stop the the module.

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They’ve also given access the the 40-pin RPi header using male pins, as a 4-pin UART connector.

The other side of the battery comes the audio codec board based on Nuvoton NAU8814Y mono audio codec, the SIM card slot fitted with a black dummy SIM card, a CR1220 coincell battery for GPS fix backup, and a 40-pin female header used for connection to the Raspberry Pi.

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I’ve been told the battery supploes power to the internal clock engine of the module, which can calculate the new position of satellites and get GPS fix faster  from data used up to 3 days ago.

3G HAT Assembly and Configuration with Raspberry Pi 2/3

Assembly is pretty straightforward,  first install the four spacers  on the Raspberry Pi board and fasten them with the nuts underneath the board, instead of the 40-pin female header on Raspberry Pi board, place the 3G HAT on top, and fasten the remaining four screws.
Connect the cellular antenna to the MAIN connector, and the GPS antenna to the GNSS connector. You’ll also need to flash Raspbian to a micro SD card. I’ll run the same Raspbian Stretch Lite image as I used with ANAVI Light pHAT starter kit.
If you want to follow the instructions provided by ThaiEasyElec (in Thai only for now, but easy enough to follow, and an English version is coming), you’ll need a GUI, so I’d recommend you install the full Raspbian Stretch image and connect an HDMI display, although you may run VNC client as well. I’ll do something a little different as I’ll do an headless setup instead, using Ethernet and SSH most of the time, but to test 3G, I’ll also disable Ethernet, so I also connected a USB to serial cable as shown below in order to access the serial console.

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Find a (short) micro USB to USB cable to connect the micro USB port of the HAT expansion board to the one of the USB ports of the Raspberry Pi to power on the board. I also had to remove the dummy SIM card, and insert my own SIM card with the contacts facing the board. After installation, we’ll see around 3mm of the SIM card, but that’s normal. Finally, you’ll need to decide how you want to manage the power: either with the power button, J3 jumper to autostart, or with pin 17 or 18 from the Raspberry Pi. I decided to move the jumper to J3 to always power on the module, but if you run on batteries, you’ll probably want to use the GPIO pin instead.

Verify the 3G HAT is Recognized in Linux

Now we are ready to start our Raspberry Pi board, and login to a terminal via SSH, serial, or in the desktop. We should find Quectel UC20 module with 05c6:9003 VID:PID with lsusb:

If you don’t see it, make sure the USB cable is connected, and you’ve powered the module up. I recommend you move the jumper to J3 at first like I did. Then you should see four ttyUSB devices:

Each are used by the module as follows:

  • /dev/ttyUSB0 – DM interface – Diagnose port (no used in this review)
  • /dev/ttyUSB1 –  NMEA interface – For GPS NMEA sentence output (read-only)
  • /dev/ttyUSB2 – AT interface (for GPS)
  • /dev/ttyUSB3 – Modem interface for PPP connections and AT command

Controlling GPS and Handling GPS Data

ThaiEasyElec uses Putty for Linux, but since I’m doing this headless I’ll install picocom intead:

Now we can connect to /dev/ttyUSB2 using 115200 8N1 to send some AT commands to the module:

The first command (AT+QGPS=1) turns the GNSS module on, and the second one (AT+QGPSEND) turns it off.

Let’s keep it on for now, and connect to /dev/ttyUSB1 @ 9600 baud to check NMEA output which should be updated every second when GPS is enabled:

That’s the meaning for each field:

  • GPGGA – Global Positioning System Fix Data, Time, Position and related fix data
  • GPRMC – Recommended minimum data
  • GPGSV – Detailed satellite data
  • GPGSA – Overall satellite data
  • GPVTG – Vector track and speed over the ground

GPGSA does not have data in the output above, simply because the GPS fix did not occur yet.

If you just want to enable GNSS each time the module is powered on, run the following command:

To disable this option, simply run the same command with 0 instead of 1. You can also query “autogps” status but running the command without the second parameter:

You’ll find more details about the GNSS AT command set for GPS and GLONASS in  Quectel UC20 GNSS AT Commands Manual (pdf).

Reading NMEA sentences is possible, but not really user friendly, and if we want to see a nice representation of the data we can run the GPS Daemon (gspd) and client (cgps) instad. Let’s exit both picocom sessions with GPS still running, and install the necessary packages:

The daemon will automatically run after installation, so let’s stop it…

… in order to run it with our own parameters, i.e. using /dev/ttyUSB1 NMEA interface:

Now we can run the client as follows:

After a few seconds should get a fix with details information (left) and data about the satellites (right).

I previously played with GPS using NavSpark mini GPS Module (Arduino compatible), and at the time  I could manage to get a GPS fix inside my room, but in this case I had to move the antenna outdoor to get signal. If you want to integrate such capability into your own app, you may want to study cgps source code.

It’s also possible to get the coordinate through /dev/ttyUSB2 terminal using QGPSLOC AT command with one of the following three modes:

  • Mode 0 – format = ddmm.mmmmN/S, dddmm.mmmmE/W
  • Mode 1 – format = ddmm.mmmmmmN/S, dddmm.mmmmmmE/W
  • Mode 2 – format = (-d)dd.ddddd,(-)ddd.ddddd

The fields from left to right: <UTC time>,<latitude>,<longitude>,<hdop>,<altitude>,<fix>,<cog>,<spkm>,<spkn>,<UTC date>,<nsat>

Short explanation for the not-so-obvious fields:

  • <hdop> – Horizontal precision, 0.5-99.9 (quoted from GPGGA sentence)
  • <fix> – GNSS positioning mode (quoted from GNGSA/GPGSA): 2 = 2D positioning; 3 = 3D positioning
  • <cog> – Ground heading based on true north. Format: ddd.mm (quoted from GPVTG sentence)
  • <spkm> – Speed over ground. Format: xxxx.x, unit: Km/h, accurate to one decimal place (quoted from GPVTG sentence)
  • <spkn> – Speed over ground. Format: xxxx.x, unit: knots, accurate to one decimal place (quoted from GPVTG sentence)
  • <nsat> –  Number of satellites, from 00 to 24 (the first 0 will also be transferred, quoted from GPGGA sentence)

3G HAT with Hologram SIM Card

Let’s now move to the cellular part of the module. I’ll use Hologram developer IoT SIM card, but any 3G SIM card should do.

Connection Method 1 – Sakis3G and UMTSkeeper

ThaiEasyElec documentation uses the two following programs to establish a 3G PPP connection:

  • Sakis3G is a parameter and hardware controller for connecting to the Internet.
  • UMTSkeeper is reconnecting with Sakis3G when the connection is down.

Booth can be found in umtskeeper package that we can install from a tarball:

We then need to install some extra packages:

We’re then told to launch Sakis3G in interactive mode to configure the connection. The look of it will depend whether you launch it from the dekstop, a SSH terminal, or a serial terminal. The interface looks really ugly (and messy) from the serial console, so instead I launched it from an SSH terminal:

We need to select 1. Connect with 3G, then 3. Custom tty…, and input /dev/ttyUSB3 for CUSTOM_TTY variable.

The next step auto-detected the correct APN (HOLOGRAM), so I just selected OK, and then was asked about APN_USER and APN_PASS.

Those parameters will also depend on your specific connection. Hologram does not use user and password, but simply pressing Enter will abort the configuration, so I entered 0 for both. After that, Sakig3G will try to connect and it worked!

Pressing Enter will bring us back to the main menu, where we can select Connection Information to find a few more details.

Let’s go back in the top menu, disconnect, and exit Sakis3G. Now we can run umtskeeper with the same parameters:

But the output does not look so good the very first time, since it complains about “no modem connected”:

But eventually we do get a connection. If you connect later, the Internet status message changes to:

Connection Method 2 – PPP Creator Script

While I was eventually successful, the first time I tried Method 1 I failed for some reasons, so at the time I looked for alternatives way to connect, and found Sixfab also used Hologram SIM card with their own RPi 3G/4G shield – also based a a Quectel module, and instead wrote ppp-creator.sh script.

So I downloaded it to my Raspberry Pi board, and executed it which created some other connection scripts.

Now we can run pppd call gprs command to establish a connection:

All good, and even simpler than the first method, although you may have to change the script in case you need APN username and password.

Testing the Connection

Whether we use method 1 or 2, we can now verify ppp0 is indeed up and connected.

I did that with Ethernet connected, so now I’ll disconnect Ethernet, turn it down, and start the script from the serial connection as a background process:

Again we can see on ppp0 is an active connection:

I can test outboud traffic with ping.

All good, but then I tried to connect via SSH using

But it failed to connection, maybe because 10.170.40.106 is a “local IP address”, and the “remote IP address” set to 10.64.64.64 is just a default address as shown in the log while running pppd call gprs.

SSH Tunelling with Hologram SIM card

I’m not familiar enough with 3G/4G connectivity to know if it’s a common issue but in the case of Hologram service we need to setup tunnelling to access via SSH (or another port/service). This can be done via SpaceBrige program or the command line, as you’ll find both methods on the relevant page on Hologram website.

I used SpaceBridge program in this case. You can download the client for Windows, Linux, or Mac OS. This is what I had to do in Ubuntu 16.04:

Now you’ll need to enable Tunneling for your device in Hologram dashboard, and get your Hologram API key, which you can generate and copy from your account.

Click OK, select your device(s), input your device port (e.g. 22 for SSH), and the local port on the computer to remotely access your Raspberry Pi over 3G.Click Done, and within a few seconds the tunnerl should be up and running.

I was finally able to connect the Raspberry Pi over SSH using the following command:

I could also get the GPS coordinate from there using cgps client.

If you want to stop the connection manually started with pppd call gprs, find the PID, and kill it:

In your actual project, you’ll want to control the connection using initd scripts or systemd.

I’d like to thanks Venus Supply / ThaiEasyElec for sending the product for review, it’s been fun to try out. If you’re interested you can purchase the board for 2350 THB (~$75) on their website, and may also consider adding the GSM/3G antenna for 120 THB (~$4) as well as the GNSS antenna for 350 THB (~$12).

TECHBASE ModBerry​ M300 IoT Gateway Adds Support for NanoPi and Orange Pi Allwinner H5 Boards

February 8th, 2018 1 comment

Announced at the end of last year TECHBASE launched the ModBerry​ M300, a Linux IoT gateway powered by FriendlyELEC NanoPi NEO board equipped with Allwinner H3 Cortex A7 processor.

The company has now made four extra variants of the gateway with Allwinner H5 quad core Cortex A53 based development boards from FriendlyELEC and Shenzhen Xunlong:

  • Modberry M300 N2 – Based on NanoPi NEO2
  • Modberry M300 N2+ – Based on NanoPi NEO Plus2 adding 8GB eMMC flash, WiFi & Bluetooth 4.0, and an extra USB port over the N2 model
  • Modberry M300 O1 – Based on Orange Pi Zero Plus
  • Modberry M300 O2 – Based on Orange Pi Zero Plus2 adding 8GB eMMC flash, HDMI, one extra USB port, and Bluetooth 4.0 over the O1 model, but falling back to 10/100 Ethernet, while all three models above come with Gigabit Ethernet

To avoid confusion, the original NanoPi NEO model has changed name to ModBerry M300 N1. The specifications summary / comparison between the 5 models can be found in the table below.

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All Modberry gateways also support internal “ExCard” expansion modules and “modems” with the latest options including:

  • SuperCap​ expansion to provide constant power supply as a UPS option
  • OLED 0.96” & OLED 1.3″ screens
  • ESP32 module as a security chip, to add a firewall into control installation
  • Aluminum case​
  • Support for 2.5″ SATA drive or M.2 2242 SSD via JMS567 USB to SATA bridge

Existing options are listed below with RS485, M-Bus, analog output, digital output, Zigbee, GPS, 3D, LTE, and so on.

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The updated Modberry M300 models are available on demand with pricing depending on project requirements (options / volume). Datasheets and other documentation will be released mid February, at which time, you should also be able to get more details on Modberry microsite.

Nordic nRF91 Multimode LTE-M / NB-IoT SiP Embeds Arm Cortex-M33, Arm TrustZone, and Assisted GPS

January 23rd, 2018 5 comments

Nordic Semi will soon launch nRF19 series low power cellular IoT solution, that consists of a system-in-package (SiP) combining a global multimode LTE-M / NB-IoT modem, an Arm Cortex-M33 core, Arm TrustZone security solution, assisted GPS, and flash memory into a 16x10x1.2 mm package.

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Nordic Semi nRF91 specifications known to far:

  • CPU – Arm Cortex-M33 ARMv8-M host processor
  • Memory / Storage – Built-in RAM and flash Memory
  • Connectivity
    • Multimode LTE-M (eMTC) and NB-IoT modem by Nordic
    • SAW-less transceiver
    • Custom RF front-end solution from Qorvo.
  • Location – Optional assisted GPS combining cellular and GPS technology for fast and accurate positioning
  • Security – Arm TrustZone security via Arm CryptoCell-310 security IP
  • Power Management
  • Package – 16 x 10 x 1.2 mm

Nordic Semiconductor nRF91 Series is said to include a complete suite of software and development tools for product development, but no details were provided at this stage.

The solution has already been demonstrated on the Verizon Wireless Network in the U.S. and on the Telia network in Norway, and nRF91 samples are being send to select customers. However, we’ll have to wait a little longer before seeing products based on nRF91, as general samples is only planned for mid 2018, and mass production for the end of the year.

AcSiP S76G/S78G SiPs Integrate LoRa, GPS, and MCU into a Single 1.3×1.1 cm Package

January 5th, 2018 4 comments

LoRa has been combined with GPS in several products such as Rakwireless RAK811 LoRa tracker board, or Dragino LoRa/GPS HAT board among others, with all designed for far based on a LoRa module, plus a GPS module.

LoRa GPS tracker will soon even smaller as AcSiP has developed S76G and S78G systems-in-package (SiP) that combine LoRa, GPS and an MCU into a single 1.1 x 1.3cm package.


The two new modules are not listed on the company’s IoT-LoRa products page yet, but they appear to be an evolution of their S76S / S78S LoRa + MCU SiP released in 2016, so the new modules should have the following features:

  • MCU – STMicro STM32L073x Arm Cortex M0+ MCU with up to 192 KB of Flash memory and 20 KB of RAM
  • LoRa
    • AcSiP S76G – Semtech SX1276 supporting global 868 MHz or 915 MHz ISM-Bands.
    • AcSiP S78G – Semtech SX1278 supporting global 433 MHz or 470 MHz ISM-Bands
  • GPS
  • I/Os – I2C/SPI/UART/GPIO
  • Package – 1.3 x 1.1 cm

The company will offers a complete SDK / HDK suite with latter likely similar to EK-S78S board pictured below but with an extra GPS antenna or connector.

AcSiP S78S LoRa Development Kit

AcSiP S76G / 78G SiP are expecting to be found in wearables, children and pets tracking and other applications. Availability and pricing has not been disclosed, but for reference their previous generation S76S and S78S chips are sold for respectively $20 and $18 (sample price for online purchase).

Via China Times

Categories: Hardware, STMicro STM32 Tags: acsip, gps, IoT, lora, lpwan, sip, stm32

RAK Wireless Introduces LoRa + BLE Module, LoRa GPS Tracker, and NB-IoT/eMTC Arduino Shield

December 9th, 2017 1 comment

We’ve previously covered several products from RAK Wireless, including RAK WisCam Arduino compatible Linux camera, RAK CREATOR Pro Ameba RTL8711AM WiFi IoT board, and WisCore modular development kit for application leveraging voice assistants such as Amazon Alexa.

AFAIK, the company had not released any new products since their RAK831 LoRa gateway module launched last summer, but they just contact me with the release of three new wireless products, namely RAK813 BLE + LoRa module, RAK811 LoRa tracker board, and WisLTE NB-IoT/eMTC/eGPRS Arduino shield.

RAK813 BLE + LoRa module & Development Board

Main features and specifications:

  • Connectivity
    • LoraWAN via Semtech SX127x (LoRa) chipset
      • Frequency Ranges
        • 433MHz, 470MHz
        • FCC Frequency range 902~928MHz
        • CE Frequency range 863~870MHz
        • MIC Frequency range 920~928MHz
        • KCC Frequency range 920~923MHz
      • Receiver Sensitivity: LoRa down to -146 dBm
      • TX Power – adjustable up to +14 dBm, max PA boost up to 20dbm
      • Range – Up to 15 km in rural area, up to 5 km in urban area
      • u.FL antenna connector
    • Bluetooth 5 via Nordic Semi nRF52832 SoC, u.FL antenna connector
  • 33 castellated holes with up to 13x GPIO, 1x UART, 1x I2C, 1x SPI, 3x ADC, SWD, GND, VDD (LoRa/BLE), and antenna pins
  • Power – 3.3V DC input; consumption down to 2uA in sleep mode
  • Dimensions – 27.20 x 23 x 1.7 mm

Bear in mind that while nRF52832 SoC support Bluetooth 5, it does not support long range mode. The module is expected to be used  for environment monitoring, parking systems, smart cities, asset / personnel positioning, smoke alarms, industrial monitoring and control, and other remote battery powered applications.

In order to get you started before you design your own baseboard, the company also provide WisLoRaB-RAK813 Arduino compatible board with external antenna connectors, micro USB port for power programming, and a reset button. Documentation now is limited as we can only download the hardware datasheets for the module and board.

The module is sold for $14.90 on Aliexpress, with only 868MHz and 915 MHz models available right now, and the development board goes for $19.90 plus shipping, again with the same frequency range models.

RAK811 LoRa Tracker Board

Specifications:

  • Connectivity – LoRaWAN Version V1.0.2 via RAK811 module based on STM32L151 MCU and Semtech SX1276 LoRa chip; SMA connector for antenna
  • Location – GPS/GLONASS via Ublox MAX-7Q GPS Module, u.FL antenna connector
  • Expansion – 2x 10-pin with I2C, GPIOs, SWD, GND, VCC (3.3V)
  • USB – 1x micro USB port for charging and debugging
  • Battery – Optional 2200mAh rechargeable battery good for 2 years (depending on use)
  • Dimensions – 54mm x 22mm x17mm with antenna connector
  • Temperature Range – -20°C ~ 60°C

There’s also a RAK811 SensorNodeBoard with the same features minus GPS.

Documentation looks pretty good here, as beside the datasheet, we can download the user manual, schematics, etc.., and source can be found in Github with CoIDE  or Keil5 tools supported..

RAK811 TrackerBoard is sold with LoRa and GPS antennas, a micro USB port, some jumper cables, jumpers, and battery for $29.99 plus shipping on Aliexpress with two models for 868 MHz or 915 MHz bands.

WisLTE NB-IoT/eMTC/eGPRS Arduino Shield

Specifications:

  • Wireless Module – Quectel BG96 with Cat.M1 (eMTC) / Cat LTE NB1 (NB-IoT) & EGPRS connectivity, GNSS support (GPS)
  • Antennas – 2x u.FL antenna connector for LTE and GNSS
  • SIM card slot on back of the board
  • Expansion
    • Arduino UNO compatible headers with UART, 1x I2C, 2x ADC, etc…
    • UART switch pin (blue header)
  • USB – micro USB port for power and debugging, 1x USB host port
  • Misc – Reset and power buttons, USB boot jumper, serial voltage selection (3.3V or 5V)

I had heard about BC95 NB-IoT module before, but I think it may be the first time I come across BG96 module, and beside adding EGPRS and Cat M1, is also adds GPS positioning, a USB interface, I2C, one extra UART interface, and one extra ADC interface. NB-IoT uplink and download data rate are also a little higher than in BC95.

The company provides a getting started guide while connected to a PC, and BG96 AT command sets documentation on their website, but AFAICT there’s no code in their Github account, like Arduino libraries to easily use the shield. I did find another user, probably a beta tester, that wrote an Android Things driver for WisLTE.

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If you are interested in the board, WisLTE is sold for $39.90 plus shipping on Aliexpress.

Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 Octa Core Kryo 385 SoC to Power Premium Smartphones, XR Headsets, Windows Laptops

December 7th, 2017 9 comments

Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 processor was expected since May 2017 with four custom Cortex A75 cores, four Cortex A53 cores, Adreno 630 GPU, and X20 LTE modem. with the launch planned for Q1 2018. At least, that what the leaks said.

Qualcomm has now formally launched Snapdragon 845 Mobile Platform and rumors were mostly right, as the the octa-core processor comes with four Kryo 385 Gold cores (custom Cortex A75), four Kryo 385 Silver cores (custom Cortex A55) leveraging DynamIQ technology, an Adreno 630 “Visual Processing System”, and Snapdragon X20 modem supporting LTE Cat18/13.

The processor is said to use more advanced artificial intelligence (AI) allowing what the company calls “extended reality (XR)” applications, and will soon be found in flagship smartphones, XR headsets, mobile PCs, and more.

Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 (SDM845) specifications:

  • Processor
    • 4x Kryo 385 Gold performance cores @ up to 2.80 GHz (custom ARM Cortex A75 cores)
    • 4x Kryo 385 Silver efficiency cores @ up to 1.80 GHz (custom ARM Cortex A55 cores)
    • DynamIQ technology
  • GPU (Visual Processing Subsystem) – Adreno 630 supporting OpenGL ES 3.2, OpenCL 2.0,Vulkan 1.x, DxNext
  • DSP
    • Hexagon 685 with 3rd Gen Vector Extensions, Qualcomm All-Ways Aware Sensor Hub.
    • Supports Snapdragon Neural Processing Engine (NPE) SDK, Caffe, Caffe2, and Tensorflow
  • Memory I/F – LPDDR4x, 4×16 bit up to 1866MHz, 8GB RAM
  • Storage I/F – TBD (Likely UFS 2.1, but maybe UFS 3.0?)
  • Display
    • Up to 4K Ultra HD, 60 FPS, or dual 2400×2400 @ 120 FPS (VR); 10-bit color depth
    • DisplayPort and USB Type-C support
  • Audio
    • Qualcomm Aqstic audio codec and speaker amplifier
    • Qualcomm aptX audio playback with support for aptX Classic and HD
    • Native DSD support, PCM up to 384kHz/32bit
  • Camera
    • Spectra 280 ISP with dual 14-bit ISPs
    • Up to 16 MP dual camera, up to 32 MP single camera
    • Support for 16MP image sensor operating up to 60 frames per second
    • Hybrid Autofocus, Zero Shutter Lag, Multi-frame Noise Reduction (MFNR)
    • Video Capture – Up to 4K @ 60fps HDR (H.265), up to 720p @ 480fps (slow motion)
  • Connectivity
    • Cellular Modem – Snapdragon X20 with peak download speed: 1.2 Gbps (LTE Cat 18), peak upload speed: 150 Mbps (LTE Cat 13)
    • Qualcomm Wi-Fi 802.11ad Multi-gigabit, integrated 802.11ac 2×2 with MU-MIMO, 2.4 GHz, 5 GHz and 60 GHz
    • Qualcomm TrueWireless Bluetooth 5
  • Location – Support for 6 satellite systems: GPS, GLONASS, Beidou, Galileo, QZSS, SBAS; low power geofencing and tracking, sensor-assisted navigation
  • Security – Qualcomm Secure Processing Unit (SPU), Qualcomm Processor Security, Qualcomm Mobile Security, Qualcomm Content Protection
  • Charging – Qualcomm Quick Charge 4/4+ technology
  • Process – 10nm LPP

The company will provide support for Android and Windows operating systems. eXtended Reality (XR) is enabled with features such as room-scale 6DoF with simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), advanced visual inertial odometry (VIO), and Adreno Foveation. Maybe I don’t follow the phone market closely enough, but I can’t remember seeing odometry implemented in any other phones, and Adreon Foveation is not quite self-explaining, so the company explains it combines graphics rendering with eye tracking, and directs the highest graphics resources to where you’re physically looking, while using less resources for rendering other areas. This improves the experience, performance, and lower power consumption.

 

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Compared to Snapdragon 835, the new processor is said to be around 25 to 30% faster, the Spectra camera and Adreno graphics architectures are claimed to boost power efficiency by up to 30 percent, and the LTE modem is a bit faster (1.2 Gbps/150Mbps vs 1.0 Gbps/150Mbps). Quick Charge 4+ technology should deliver up  to 50 percent charge in 15 minutes. Earlier this year when SD835 was officially launched, there was virtually no mention of artificial intelligence support in mobile APs, but now NNA (Neural Network Accelerator) or NPE (Neural Processing Engine) are part of most high-end mobile processors, which in SD845 appears to be done though the Hexagon 685 DSP. High Dynamic Range (HDR) for video playback and capture is also a novelty in the new Snapdragon processor.

One of the first device powered by Snapdragon 845 will be Xiaomi Mi 7 smartphone, and according to leaks it will come with a 6.1″ display, up to 8GB RAM, dual camera, 3D facial recognition, and more. Further details about the phone are expected for Mobile World Congress 2018. Considering the first Windows 10 laptop based on Snapdragon 835 processor are expected in H1 2018, we may have to wait until the second part of the year for the launch of Snapdragon 845 mobile PCs.

More details may be found on Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 mobile platform product page.

Giveaway Week Winners – November 2017

November 9th, 2017 15 comments

Like every year, I’ve organized a giveaway week to send some of the items I’ve reviewed in the past year or so. There was a good mix of devices this year starting with a mini Linux NAS kit, following by some ESP32 boards, and Amlogic development boards among others.

The results are in, and instead of 10 winners, I actually have 11 winners due a “timing issue”, and to make for one missing ESP32 board, a LinkIt Smart 7688 Duo board was also given away.

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While it started strongly for Eastern Europe, We have winners from 3 continents this year:

  • NanoPi NEO2 NAS Kit – Hap Hapablap, Serbia
  • Muses Beta DVB Encoder and Modulator Board – Luka, Slovenia
  • ESP32 PICO Kit v3 boards (5 Winners):
    • Andrius Kurtinaitis, Lithuania (2x ESP32 boards)
    • Kebab, Turkey (2x ESP32 boards)
    • Zoobab, Belgium (2x ESP32 boards)
    • Sollie, Germany (2x ESP32 boards)
    • BobR, USA (1x ESP32 PICO Kit + LinkIt Smart 7688 Duo)
  • NanoPi K2 board – ml, Sweden
  • Wio GPS Tracker – Tumpang L., Malaysia
  • Nextion Enhanced 7″ Display – Ved Vernekar, USA
  • Khadas VIM Pro board – gleveque, France

I’ve just send all 11 packages earlier this afternoon.

I hope the winners will enjoy their prizes, and thank you to everyone who played. Let’s do it again next year.

Giveaway Week – Wio GPS Tracker Board

November 3rd, 2017 106 comments

It’s Friday, and the fifth day of giveaway week on CNX Software. Today, I’ll be giving away Wio Tracker, an Arduino compatible board based on Microchip / Atmel SAMD21 ARM Cortex M0 MCU with GPS, Bluetooth, 2G GSM/GPRS connectivity.

Click to Enlarge

My review of the board was rather negative, as I only managed to make Bluetooth 3.0 work while following the documentation as it was back in May. Since then the documentation seems to have improved, and other people have been more successful than me, and made the blink LED, and GPS samples to work. This version of the board only support 2G, so make sure it is still supported in your region/country.

Click to Enlarge

To enter the draw simply leave a comment below. Other rules are as follows:

  • Only one entry per contest. I will filter out entries with the same IP and/or email address.
  • Contests are open for 48 hours starting at 10am (Bangkok time) every day. Comments will be closed after 48 hours.
  • Winners will be selected with random.org, and announced in the comments section of each giveaway.
  • I’ll contact the winner by email, and I’ll expect an answer within 24 hours, or I’ll pick another winner.
  • Shipping
    • $5 for registered airmail small packet for oversea shipping payable via Paypal within 48 hours once the contest (for a given product) is complete.
    • If Paypal is not available in your country, you can still play, and I’ll cover the cost of sending the parcel by Sea and Land (SAL) without registration if you win.
  • I’ll post all 10 prizes at the same time, around the 8th of November
  • I’ll make sure we have 10 different winners, so if you have already won a device during this giveaway week, I’ll draw another person.

Good luck!

The board is now sold for $24.95 on SeeedStudio, but if 2G sunset has happened or is coming soon in your country, you may consider Wio LTE board instead with 3G/4G connectivity. But as with other 4G capable devices, it is quite more expensive as it costs around $100.