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Posts Tagged ‘health’

Mediatek Unveils Sensio MT6381 6-in-1 Biosensor Module for Smartphones

December 15th, 2017 1 comment

Nearly exactly two years ago, Samsung unveiled S3FBP5A bio-processor for fitness tracking wearables with five analog frontends measuring PPG, ECG,skin temperature, BIA, and GSR data, and that is (or was?) expected in the company’s S-Patch3 health tracker.

Mediatek has now come up with something with similar functionalities, but instead of being a standalone bio-processor for wearables, Sensio MT6381 biosensor module is designed as a companion chip for smartphones, and capable for delivering 6 different types of heart and fitness data in about 60 seconds.

MediaTek Sensio key features and specifications:

  • Integrated R and IR LEDs for reflective PPG measurement + 1-channel ECG analog front-end
  • Health Data
    • Heart-rate in heart beats per minute
    • Heart-Rate Variability (variation in the time between heartbeats).
    • Blood Pressure Trends
    • Peripheral Oxygen Saturation (SpO2) – amount of oxygen in the blood.
    • Electrocardiography (ECG) – electrical activity of the heart over a period of time
    • Photoplethysmography (PPG) – change in volume of blood.
  • I2C /SPI digital interface
  • Dimensions – 6.8 mm x 4.93 mm x 1.2 mm OLGA 22-pin package
  • Total External BOM – 4 caps + 2 electrodes

The company explains roughly how it works, and how the user will be using the solution once embedded in a smartphone:

The module uses light emitting diodes (LEDs) in conjunction with a light sensitive sensor to measure the absorption of red and infrared light by the user’s fingertips. By touching a device’s sensors and electrodes with your fingertips, MediaTek Sensio creates a closed loop between your heart and the biosensor to measure ECG and PPG waveforms.

MediaTek Sensio will be available in early 2018. Visit the product page for a few more details.

A Day at Chiang Mai Maker Party 4.0

December 6th, 2017 6 comments

The Chiang Mai Maker Party 4.0 is now taking place until December 9, and I went there today, as I was especially interested in the scheduled NB-IoT talk and workshop to find out what was the status about LPWA in Thailand. But there are many other activities planned, and if you happen to be in Chiang Main in the next few days, you may want to check out the schedule on the event page or Facebook.

I’m going to go though what I’ve done today to give you a better idea about the event, or even the maker movement in Thailand.

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Booth and activity area should be the same over the 4 days, but the talks, open activity, and workshop will be different each day. Today, people could learn how to solder in the activity area.
The even was not really big with manufacturers/sellers like ThaiEasyElec, INEX, or Gravitech closer to the entrance…


… and slighter higher up in a different zone, companies and makers were showcasing their products or projects. I still managed to spent 5 interesting hours at the event attending to talks and checking out the various projects.

I started my day with a talk entitled “Maker Movement in South East Asia” presented by William Hooi, previously a teacher, who found One Maker Group and setup the first MakerSpace in Singapore, as well as helped introduce the Maker Faire in Singapore in 2012 onwards.


There was three parts to talk with an history of the Maker movement (worldwide), the maker movement in Singapore, and whether Making should be integrated into school curriculum.
He explained at first the government who not know about makers, so it was difficult to get funding, but eventually they jump on the bandwagon, and are now puring money on maker initiative. One thing that surprised me in the talk is that before makers were hidden their hobby, for fear of being mocked by other, for one for one person doing an LED jacket, and another working on an Iron Man suit. The people around them would not understand why they would waste their time on such endeavors, but the Maker Space and Faire helped finding like minded people. Some of the micro:bit boards apparently ended in Singapore, and when I say some, I mean 100,000 units. Another thing that I learned is the concept of “digital retreat for kids” where parents send kids to make things with their hands – for example soldering -, and not use smartphone or tablets at all, since they are already so accustomed to those devices.

One I was done with the talk, I walked around, so I’ll report about some of the interesting project I came across. I may write more detailed posts for some of the items lateron.

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Falling object detection demo using OpenCV on the software side, a webcam connected to…

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ASUS Tinker board to handle fall detection, and an NVIDIA Jetson board for artificial intelligence. If fall is detection an alert to send to the tablet, and the system also interfaces with Xiaomi Mi band 2.

Katunyou has also made a more compact product, still based on Tinker Board, for nursing home, or private home where an elderly may live alone. The person at the stand also organizes Raspberry Pi 3 workshops in Chiang Mai.

I found yet another product based on Raspberry Pi 3 board. SRAN is a network security device made by Global Tech that report threats from devices accessing your network using machine learning.

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Nordic Technology House showcased a magic mirror based on Raspberry Pi 3, and a webcam to detect your dance move, but their actual product shown above is a real-time indoor air monitoring system that report temperature, humidity, CO2 level, and PM 2.5 levels, and come sent alerts via LINE if thresholds are exceeded.

One booth had some drones including the larger one above spraying insecticides for the agriculture market.

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There was also a large about sewing machines, including some smarter one where you can design embroidery in a table before sewing.

There were also a few custom ESP8266 or ESP32 boards, but I forgot to take photos.

The Maker Party is also a good place to go with your want to buy some board or smart home devices.

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Beside Raspberry Pi Zero W / 3, ESP8266 boards and Asus Tinker board seem to be popular items in Thailand. I could also spot Sonoff wireless switch, and an Amazon Dot, although I could confirm only English is supported, no Thai language.

BBC Micro:bit board and accessories can also be bought at the event.


M5Stack modules, and Raspberry Pi 3 Voice Kit were also for sale.

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Books are also available for ESP32, Raspberry Pi 3, IoT, etc… in Thai language.

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But if you can’t read Thai there was also a choice of book in English about RPi, Arduino, Linux for Makers, IoT and so on. I then attended the second talk of the day: “NB-IoT” by AIS, one of the top telco company in Thailand. Speakers included Phuchong Charoensub, IoT Marketing Specialist, and Pornsak Hanvoravongchai, Device Innovation Manager, among others. They went through various part include a presentation of AIS current M2M business, what IoT will change (e.g. brings in statups and makers), some technical details about NB-IoT, and the company offering for makers.

I’ll go into more details in a separate post tomorrow, but if you want to get started the good news is that it’s now possible to pre-order a 1,990 THB Arduino Shield ($61) between December 6-9, and get it shipped on February 14, 2018. NB-IoT connectivity is free for one year, and will then cost 350 Baht (around $10) per year per device. However, there’s a cost to enable NB-IoT on LTE base stations, so AIS will only enable NB-IoT at some universities, and maker spaces, meaning for example, I would most certainly be able to use such kit from home. An AIS representative told me their no roadmap for deployment, it will depend on the business demand for such services.

If you are lucky you may even spot one or two dancing dinosaurs at the event.

HeartyPatch is an Open Source Wireless ECG Patch Powered by ESP32 WiSoC (Crowdfunding)

October 2nd, 2017 No comments

Smart health gadgets will soon have a bigger part to play in our lives, especially for health monitoring. It mainly started with fitness trackers, but now we are starting to see connected devices such as blood pressure monitors, including the upcoming watch like Omron HeartVue, thermometer, scales, vital sign monitoring systems, certified medical SBC‘s to allow engineers to developer their own medical applications, and even open source surgical robots.

HeartPatch is one of those medical board that specifically aims at measuring ECG data, and sent it over Bluetooth or WiFi thanks to Espressif ESP32 WiSoC.

HeartPatch specifications:

  • SoC – Espressif Systems ESP32 dual core Tensilica LX6 processor with Wi-Fi/Bluetooth
  • ECG Chip – Maxim MAX30003 analog front-end
  • USB – 1x micro USB connector for programming, data, power, and battery charging
  • Debugging – USB-UART bridge based on CP2104
  • Misc – Onboard Snap-on Buttons for disposable electrode pads, RGB LED,
  • Battery – 450 mAH LiPo battery
  • Dimensions – 65 mm x 42 mm x 4 mm without battery; Dimensions with Case: ~70 mm x 46 mm x 12.7 mm

Basic Kit with Battery and Electrodes

The developers explain that HeartyPatch has several advantages over other low-price heart monitors:

  • ECG-based R-R Interval Measurement is more accurate than optical heart-rate measurement
  • Wide Dynamic Range for robust functioning during movement (not available in traditional ECG monitors)
  • Mathematical and Machine Learning Algorithms for automatic detection of arrhythmia, stress, and several other physiological conditions (not available with regular heart-rate patches)
  • Small, Wearable Form-factor with snap connectors for disposable, pre-gelled ECG electrodes.
  • Open Source and Non-proprietary – can be used with any software or algorithm

HealthyPatch is fully open source hardware with all files available on Github. The current GUI can support three modes:  beat-to-beat, Arrhythmia detection, and Heart-rate variability. If you have the required skills, you’d be able to add other modes to the user interface, or even roll your own. Note that ESP32 currently supports all BLE profiles, but the baseband works only in Bluetooth Classic mode. It will not affect the function, but battery life will be shorter than normal. Espressif Systems claims this will be fixed in the next release (SDK or Silicon?). If you want to follow the project’s progress over time, you may want to visit the Hackaday.io page.

HeartyPatch has just been launched on CrowdSupply, where you can get the basic kit with the board, a 450 mAh Li-Ion battery (soldered to the board), and a set of 10 disposable electrode pads with a $87 or more pledge. You can also add a case for $15, and shipping is free to the US, $15 to the rest of the world. Delivery is scheduled for December 14, 2017.

Review of Koogeek BP2 Bluetooth Blood Pressure Monitor

September 16th, 2017 3 comments

Koogeek BP2 is an FDA approved smart blood pressure monitor that connects over Bluetooth to your Android or iOS smartphone, or WiFi to the cloud. The company sent me a sample for evaluation, so let’s get started right away.

Koogeek BP2 Unboxing

The device is sent in a cardboard package with Koogeek brand…

and some more derails about the specifications on the bottom of the package.

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I asked the company to confirm about FDA approval, and they told me to look for K134029 on the FDA website, which lead me to this document testing Shenzhen Belter Health Management and Analysis ePA-46B, and comparing it to the results of Omron HEM-7200-Z (BP742) with the conclusion being that:

The Belter Blood pressure meter (ePA-46B) is substantially equivalent to the predicate devices.

Koogeek BP2 is the same as Belter ePA-46B, but just rebranded, and with a different mobile app.

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In the package will find the device with the cuff attached to the main unit with an LCD display.

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The top of the unit comes with a power button, an LED, a reset pin hole, and a micro USB port for charging the 400 mAh battery.

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The package also included a charging cable and a multi-language quick start guide.

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We’ll find marking for CE and FDA approval on the cuff, and it’s a medium cuff designed for arms between 22 and 36 cm circumference.

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The blood pressure monitor wraps aroudn your upper arm, and is kept in place with Velcro. But before going ahead, you may want to read the user manual…

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..with two pages per language, except for Chinese where there are more details provided. Beside English, and Chinese, other languages include French, German, Spanish, Italian, and Japanese. You may also want to charge the monitor before starting. It took about two hours to fully charge the device, with the LED blinking while charging, and solid once it is completed.

Koogeek BP2 Blood Pressure Monitor Review

In theory, you could use the blood pressure monitor without smartphone, by pressing the button once to power it, and another time to start measurement, with diastolic and systolic blood pressure and heart rate shown on the display at the end. But mostly people will likely prefer to use a smartphone to keep track of the evolution instead of relying on pen and paper, and download Koogeek app available for Android or iOS.

 

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Once it’s done, you’ll be asked to login and join Koogeek. THe latter can be done with an email, Facebook or Google+ account. I first tried with Facebook, and it failed with an HTTP 500 error, but I could go ahead with Google+.

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You’ll then be prompted to created a new user. For the date of birth, make sure to tap on the year, as it makes it much faster than scrolling through the months… Also indicate your height and weight, and click on create a new user.

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You’ll then be shown the timeline (empty), and can start using the monitor as follows:

  1. Tap on the Heart icon
  2. Select “Arm type” (first time only)
  3. Place BP2 monitor on your upper arm with your elbow on the table to make sure the monitor is at heart level, and place your hand palm up
  4. Turn on the monitor
  5. It will establish a Bluetooth connection, and within a few seconds later the Start button will show up
  6. Select the user (if more than one), and press Start, the cuff will inflate and take the measurement. This should take less than one minute
  7. The results will be shown on the smartphone and the LCD display on the monitor
  8. Koogeek BP2 monitor will automatically turn off after 15 seconds. Do not press the button, as it would just start measurement again

The screenshot on the right above shows the results for systolic and diastolic blood pressure in a diagram with 6 different zones:

  • Green – Optimal blood pressure
  • Blue – Normal blood pressure
  • Yellow – High blood pressure (within the normal range)
  • Orange – Mild hypertension
  • Orange Red – Moderate to high blood pressure
  • Red – Severe Hypertension

I’ve shot a video to show the full process.

In theory, after the first setup with the app, you can take measurements and upload results to the cloud without your smartphone. In the timeline, click the + button which will allow you to install a new device.

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The company also offers smart scales, thermometers,  fitness trackers, etc.., but for our use case, I selected KS-BP2 device, and set it up to connect to my WiFi router. I then tried to make a measurement without starting the app, pressing the power button once to start it up, and once again to start measurement, and at the end I could see the WiFi icon on the display showing it upload the data to the cloud, but it may have gone too high, and to medical records heaven, as I was unable to retrieve the results in my phone. I had setup two users at the time, so maybe that’s why. There’s an unknown measurement section in the app, but the results were not their either.

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You can create and switch between users in the timeline by tapping on the blue round icon in the bottom left corner with the initials of the current selected users, or switch between users and access to more settings by tapping on the three bars icon on the top left, which will also allow you to set reminders, adjust settings such as app language, units, Google Fit support, and so on. We’ve created two fictitious users to take daily measurements on two different real 🙂 humans between Monday and Saturday, and for each user you can access a chart with the blood pressure over time…

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.. as well as heart rate, and a full list of measurements is also accessible. If you can see some outliers, it’s likely a problem with the measurements, but not due to the device. For example, Marge Simpson had a normal blood pressure only on September 11, but we can see the heartrate at 92 bpm was higher than during the other days, and so it must have interfered with the measurement, as we should have waited a little longer after sitting, before starting taking the blood pressure.

Koogeek BP2 (aka KS-BP2) works as expected most of the time, and results appears to be in line with reality based on each respective patient’s history, but I had troubles using WiFi to cloud function when not using my smartphone, and once the blood pressure monitor started to inflate, deflate, inflate, etc…as if it had troubles completing the measurements. I could easily stop it by pressing the power button to turn it off, and restarted it to make a successful measurement right after.

I’d like to thank Koogeek for sending the review sample, and Koogeek BP2 can be purchased for $69.99 on Amazon. Koogeek is a TomTop brand, so you’ll also find their products on Tomtop.com.

SanStar WS-3A Medical Board Runs Android 5.1 on Rockchip RK3288 SoC

September 12th, 2017 2 comments

Warp United, a “Chinese Health 2.0″/point-of-Care medical technology company based in Shenzhen, launched Warp 3 medical recorder – an Android powered handheld device supporting various  vital signs and ultrasound medical modules – earlier this year,  and the company has now just introduced SanStar WS-3A motherboard powered by Rockchip RK3288 quad core Cortex-A17 SoC, and running Android 5.1 in order to allow engineers to develop and connect their own medical modules via the various interfaces of the board, and create their own medical products.

SanStar WS-3A medical motherboard specifications:

  • SoC – Rockchip RK3288 quad core Cortex-A17 processor @ 1.8GHz with an ARM Mali-T764 GPU with support for OpenGL ES 1.1/2.0 /3.0, OpenVG1.1, OpenCL, Directx11
  • System Memory – 2GB or 4GB DDR3
  • Storage – 8GB, 16GB, or 32GB eMMC flash, micro SD slot up to 32GB
  • Video Output / Display I/F
    • HDMI 2.0 up to 3840 x 2160 pixel
    • embedded DisplayPort (eDP)
    • 10-bit dual LVDS, MIPI DSI, 1x backlight header, 1x I2C interface for touchscreen
  • Audio – audio input, output, MIC interfaces, HDMI out.
  • Connectivity
    • Isolated 10/100M Ethernet interface
    • Dual band  802.11 a/b/g/n WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0
    • SIM slot for support for cellular networks via 4G LTE, 3G, 2G modules
    • Optional GPS module : -159dBm, 1575.42MHz, 20 channels, positioning accuracy <10m
  • USB – 7x USB host, 1x USB OTG
  • Serial – 2x RS232
  • Expansion – 4x custom I/O ports, mini PCie interface
  • Camera – USB/MIPI camera up to 13MP
  • Sensors – Support for 3-axis G-sensor, gyroscope, compass
  • Misc – IR receiver; 3x user keys; 1x 12V cooling fan header; 3x LEDs for power, status, and user; RTC with battery; watchdog timer
  • Power Supply – 12V @ 3A-5A via power barrel connector
  • Dimension – 145(L) x 90(W) x 22(H) mm
  • Weight – 99.27g
  • Conformity
    • ISO 13485:2003 Medical devices – Quality management systems – Requirements for regulatory purposes
    • EN 60601-1: 2006 + A1: 2013 Medical Electrical Equipment – Part 1: General Requirements for Basic Safety and Essential Performance
    • EN 60601-1-2:2007 Medical electrical equipment – Part 1-2: General requirements for basic safety and essential performance – Collateral standard: Electromagnetic compatibility – Requirements and tests
    • EN 60950-1:2006+A11:2009+A1:2010+A12:2011 Information technology equipment – Safety –Part 1: General requirements

Block Diagram – Click to Enlarge

The board runs Android 5.1, and support up to two independent screens, or one 4K screen. The best way to find out what’s possible with the board is to check out what the company has done with Warp 3 medical recorder system comprised of a 7″ RK3288 tablet communicating with Volans 3 Vital Sign Module to gather ECG, heart rate (HR), respiration (Resp) rate, temperature (Temp), SpO2, pulse rate (PR), and non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP), as well as various “Urxa 3” ultrasound modules. Software includes an interface to display all those metrics on the tablet, as well as support for cloud based mobile health (mHealth) and EMRs (electronic medical records).

SanStar WS-3A single board computer is available now at an undisclosed price. Visit Warp United’s SanStar WS-3A product page for further details.

Via LinuxGizmos

HealthyPi Raspberry Pi HAT Measures ECG, Body Temperature, and Oxygen Saturation (Crowdfunding)

June 12th, 2017 10 comments

Bangalore based ProtonCentral has launched the third version of Healthy Pi, a vital sign monitor using the Raspberry Pi as its computing and display platform, and capable of measuring body temperature, oxygen saturation, and ECG/respiratory data.

Healthy Piv3 board specifications:

  • MCU – Atmel ATSAMD21 ARM Cortex M0 MCU, compatible with Arduino Zero
  • Vital Signs Chips
    • ECG and respiration front-end –  TI ADS1292R 24-bit analog front-end with SNR of 107 dB
    • Pulse oximetry – TI AFE4490 Pulse Oximetry front-end with integrated LED driver and 22-bit ADC
    • Temperature – Maxim MAX30205 digital body temperature sensor for skin temperature sensing
  • Expansions Headers and Ports
    • 1x 40-pin header to connect to Raspberry Pi
    • 2x 3-pin connectors for temperature and BP/GLUCO
    • DB9 connector for finger-clip Spo2 probe
    • 3.5mm jack for ECG cable and probes
    • 1x UART connector for an external blood pressure module
  • USB – 1x micro USB port for power and programming
  • Debugging – 10-pin JTAG header
  • Dimensions – 65 mm x 56.5 mm x 6 mm (Raspberry Pi HAT form factor)
  • Weight – 100 g

The board comes with Arduino Zero bootloader, can be programmed with the Arduino IDE or Atmel Studio, and is usable as a standalone board. However, connecting it to a Raspberry Pi 3 board will allow you to leverage WiFi connectivity to communication with a TCP client for telemedicine applications, or using an MQTT client for continuous logging applications for example sending data to an AWS EC2 instance running Thingsboard IoT platform, as well as running Java based HealthyPi GUI on a display. The board is not fully open source hardware, as gerber files and BoM are missing, but they’ve released PDF and EAGLE schematics and PCB layout, as well as GUI and firmware source code on github.

The company launched the board on Crowdsupply, where they have raised over $10,000 dollars so far. There are two main options:

  • $195 Healthy Pi 3 HAT Kit with HealthyPi v3 board, 3-electrode cable with “button” connectors on one end and stereo connector on the other end, Finger-clip Spo2 probe, digital skin temperature sensor, 20 single-use disposable ECG electrodes, and a HAT mounting kit
  • $369 (Early bird)/ $395 Healthy Pi 3 Complete Kit with the content of Healthy Pi 3 HAT Kit plus a Raspberry Pi 3 board, a 16GB microSD card with pre-loaded Raspbian and Healthy Pi software, a 7” touchscreen LCD, SmartiPi Touch enclosure for display and Pi, a 5 V/2.5 A medical-grade power adapter with a country-specific snap-on plug

While they provide a 5V/2.5A power bank, they recommend to use a power bank for safety reasons, and to minimizes noise. If you use the board in standalone connected to a laptop, it is also recommended to run on battery during measurements for extra safety.

Delivery is scheduled for July 10, 2017, and free worldwide shipping is included in the prices above. The system will eventually be sold on ProtoCentral website too.

Samsung S-Patch3 Wearable Health Tracker Based on Samsung Bio-Processor Hits the FCC

June 9th, 2017 No comments

At the end of 2015, Samsung unveiled their S3FBP5A Bio-Processor comprised of an ARM Cortex-M4 MCU, a DSP, and sensors for PPG, ECG (electrocardiography), Skin temperature, BIA, and GSR to have a single package to design tracker able to monitor your health condition. The company demonstrated an early prototype called S-Patch at CES 2016 (See embedded video at the end of this post), and now S-Patch3 wearable health monitoring system has just hit the FCC.

The system has two round shapes case connected via a cable, with one for the battery compartment, and the other containing the Bio Processors, and meant to be placed on your chest. The device can then synchronize the data with your smartphone in real-time over Bluetooth. People with heart conditions may benefit from the system, as if they wish to do so, they could share the data with their doctor. Few documents are publicly available on the FCC website, and while we don’t know the expect launch date of the device itself, the user’s manual and photos will be released on December 3rd, 2017 on the FCC website, which should roughly correspond to the launch date, or at least the official announcement date from Samsung.

Via Sammobile

$100 Xiaomi “90 Minutes Ultra Smart Running Shoes” are Equipped with Intel Curie Module

March 29th, 2017 2 comments

If you’ve ever used a fitness tracker on a wristband, you must know that although it gives an indication of your level of activity, it’s usually not really accurate to count steps. Xiaomi’s “90 Minutes ultra smart running shoes” fixes the issue as the fitness tracker powered by Intel Curie module is placed right inside the shoes.

Most of the information is in Chinese, and I could only find limited specifications for the shoes:

  • Size – 39 to 45
  • Intel Curie Module based on Quark SE SoC with 6-axis accelerometer and gyroscope, Bluetooth 4.0 LE connectivity
  • Battery – Good for 60 days on a charge
  • Material
    • Shoe sole – Rubber
    • Shoe vamp – Fabric + Synthetic leather
    • Shoe insole – Antibacterial removable air cushions

The small device based on Intel Curie module resides inside the sole, stores fitness data such steps, distance covered, speed, (estimated) calories burnt, etc… It’s unclear whether it will be charged wirelessly, or some charging port is available on the shoes.

You’ll allegedly get all that fitness data using Mihome app by connecting over Bluetooth 4.0 LE, and the app will be able to differentiate between walking, running, and riding a bicycle.

Xiaomi’s smart shoes have been selling for 299 RMB ($44) via a Crowdfunding campaign in China, but GeekBuying is already taking pre-orders for the shoes for $99.99 including shipping with delivery scheduled for mid April.