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Posts Tagged ‘iiot’
Orange Pi Development Boards

Microsemi VSC7513 and VSC7514 MIPS SoCs for Ethernet Switches Get Initial Mainline Linux Support

December 15th, 2017 No comments

Microsemi VSC7514 is a 10-port Gigabit Ethernet (GbE)/SMB switch supporting a combination of 1G and 2.5G Ethernet ports, and VSC7513 comes with basically the same features except it’s limited 8 ports. Both SoCs include a MIPS processor with DDR3 memory interface, and support industrial and enterprise Ethernet switching features such as VLAN and QoS processing.

Microsemi VSC751x Ocelot family was unveiled in June 2016, but I only heard about them today, as Free Electrons recently added initial support for VSC7513 & VSC7514 chip into mainline Linux with the patch series available here.

Block Diagram for VSC7514

Microsemi VSC7514 specifications & features:

  • CPU / Memory Interface – Integrated 500 MHz MIPS 24KEc CPU with MMU and DDR3/DDR3L SDRAM  controller
  • Ethernet Connectivity – 4x dual media copper ports, 2x 1G SGMII ports, and 2x 1G/2.5G SGMII ports
  • Host CPU Interfaces – PCIe 1.x and NPI CPU interface
  • Internal shared memory buffer (8 queues per port)
  • Jumbo frame support
  • Strict priority and DWRR scheduler/shaper
  • Layer 2 Switching – 802.1Q VLAN switch with 4K MACs and 4K VLANs, RSTP and MSTP support, Hardware-based and software-based learning, etc…
  • Multicast – Layer 2, IGMP and MLD Snooping
  • Industrial Ethernet – Integrated timing: VeriTimeTM (1588v2) and SyncE support, Ethernet ring protection switching (ERPS)
  • Package – 17 mm × 17 mm CABGA package
  • Temperature Range – –40 °C to 125 °C

The processor can optionally be connected to a host CPU via PCIe or NPI interface, but the MIPS processor may be sufficiency for most applications.

Typical VSC7514 Gigabit Ethernet Switch Design

Free Electrons explains the patch series adds support to boot the platform up to a shell, with interrupts, pin-muxing, GPIOs and UARTs, but additional features will such as support for the switch fabric will be implemented later (switchdev driver).

More details about the processor can be found on Microsemi VSC7513 and VSC7514 product pages, with the product brief being available publicly, but datasheets, reference designs, models, and reports requiring registration with a valid company email address. I could not find a product based on BSC7514, except for VSC7514EV board platform based on “VSC7514 device, together with NX7102 and NX7124A DC-DC controllers, and MSMCJ12A and MSMCJ12CA transient voltage suppressor”.

Future Electronics FTM Board Club actually appears to offers a free samples of the evaluation kit to qualified applicants, but the rules are not clear, except they obviously expect some return on investment since they ask about the projected production volume & date.

SAMA5D2 Based SiPs Combine ARM Cortex-A5 Processor With Up to 128MB DDR2

October 31st, 2017 5 comments

Atmel SAMA5D2 ARM Cortex-A5 processor was released about two years ago with extended temperature range and lower power consumption compared to previous SAMAD5 processors, with the new SoC still targeting industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), wearables and point of sale applications.

In recent years, we’ve seen companies packing main components into systems-in-package (SiP) with products such as Octavo Systems OSD3358 and Espressif Systems ESP32-PICO-D4 with integrate an existing processor with memory, storage, and/or PMIC. Microchip (previously Atmel) has now done the same for their SAMA5D2 processors with SiPs combining the Cortex A5 SoC with DDR2 memory.

Click to Enlarge

Four SAMA5D2 SiPs have been launched:

  • ATSAMA5D225C-D1M based on ATSAMA5D22C MPU with extra SD/SDIO, QSPI, FLEXCOMs (2x), I2S, and timers (2x) and:
    • 128 Mb (16 MB) DDR2 DRAM
    • 90 Peripheral I/Os
    • 196 BGA Package
    • Designed for RTOS/bare metal development
  • ATSAMA5D27C-D5M based on ATSAMA5D27C MPU with:
    • 512 Mb (64 MB) DDR2 DRAM
    • 128 Peripheral I/Os
    • 289 BGA Package
    • Designed for small Linux OS applications
  • ATSAMA5D27C-D1G based on ATSAMA5D27C MPU with
    • 1 Gb (128 MB) DDR2 DRAM
    • 128 Peripheral I/Os
    • 289 BGA Package
    • Designed for large Linux OS applications
  • ATSAMA5D28C-D1G based on ATSAMA5D28C MPU with:
    • 1 Gb (128 MB) DDR2 DRAM
    • 128 Peripheral I/Os
    • 289 BGA Package
    • PCI-pre-certified security
    • Designed for large Linux OS applications

atsama5d27-som1-ek1 – Click to Enlarge

Microchip provides software and hardware development tools for the SiP including ATSAMA5D27-SOM1-EK1 is a fast prototyping and evaluation platform together with SAMA5D27-SOM1. The kit’s main features include:

  • ATSAMA5D27-SOM1 module:
    • SiP – Microchip ATSAMA5D27C-D1G SiP withCortex-A5 MPU @ 500 MHz, 128 MB DDR2 DRAM
    • Storage
      • Microchip SST26VF064B-104I/MF 64Mb Serial Quad I/O (QSPI) flash memory for boot code (Linux kernel or RTOS)
      • Microchip 24AA02E48T-I/OT 2Kb Serial EEPROM with EUI-48 Note Identity for the Ethernet MAC address
    • Connectivity – Microchip KSZ8081RNAIA 10Base-T/100Base-TX Ethernet PHY for wired Ethernet connection
    • Power Management – Microchip MIC2800-G4JYML Power Management IC (PMIC) providing 3 power rails for the CPU, VDD I/O and the SDRAM
  • External Storage – 1x standard SD card interface, 1x microSD card interface
  • onnectivity – 10/100M Ethernet (RJ45 connector)
  • Display I/F – LCD RGB 24-bit interface (50-pin FPC connector)
  • Camera I/F – 12-bit camera interface (2×15 male connector)
  • USB – 1x USB host, 1x USB device, 1x USB HSIC (jumper not populated)
  • Expansion – 1x CAN interface ATA6561, 1x PMOD connector, 2x mikroBUS connector
  • Debugging – 1x JLINK-OB and JLINK-CDC, x1 JTAG interface
  • Security – 1x ATECC508 CryptoAuthentication device  (populated but not provisioned), 1x tamper connector
  • Misc – 1x RGB LED, 4x push button switches
  • Power Supply – From USB A and USB JLINK-OB; SuperCap for power saving

SAMA5D2-based SiPs are available now starting at $9.03 per unit for 5K orders, and the development kit is sold for $245. More details, including some documentation, can be found via the product page.

TECHBASE Moduino X Series Industrial IoT Modules / Endpoints are Based on ESP32 WiSoC

September 27th, 2017 4 comments

We’ve previously covered TECHBASE ModBerry industrial IoT gateways leveraging Raspberry Pi 3, FriendlyELEC NanoPi M1 Plus, or AAEON’s UP Linux boards. The company has now launched Moduino X series modules powered by Espressif ESP32 WiFi + Bluetooth SoC to be used as end points together with their ModBerry gateways.

Moduino X1

Two models have been developed so far, namely Moduino X1 and X2, with the following specifications:

  • Wireless Module – ESP32-WROVER with ESP32 dual-core Tensilica LX6 processor @ 240 MHz, 4MB pSRAM (512KB as option), 4MB SPI flash;
  • External Storage – X2 only: micro SD card slot
  • Connectivity
    • 802.11 b/g/n WiFi up to 16 Mbps + Bluetooth 4.2 LE with u.FL antenna connector
    • X2 only: 10/100M Ethernet
    • Options: LoRa (Semtech SX1272); Sigfox (TI CC1125); LTE Cat M1/NB1; Zigbee
  • Serial – 2x RS-232/485
  • Display – Optional 0.96″ OLED display with 128×64 resolution
  • Expansion I/Os
    • 4x Digital I/O (0 ~ 3V)
    • 2x Analog Input:
    • A2 Only: 2x analog output (optional)
    • A2 only: support for Techbase ExCard add-on modules for extr RS-232/485 ports, Ethernet ports, PCIe slots, analog input and output, digital I/Os, relays, M-Bus interface, etc…
  • Battery – Optional battery power support (A1 only); optional UPS function with LiPo battery or Supercapacitor
  • Power Supply -5V DC
  • Dimensions
    • A1 – ABS: 90 x 36 x 32 mm (LxWxH); Aluminum: 95 x 35 x 41 mm (LxWxH)
    • A2 – ABS: 90 x 71 x 32 mm (LxWxH); Aluminum: 95 x 71 x 41 mm (LxWxH)

Moduino A1 consumes less than A2, and can be powered by batteries only, but both models can use battery as UPS. The modules support Espressif ESP-IDF SDK, Zephyr Project, Arduino programming, MicroPython, Mongoose OS, and more, and would typically be used as meters & sensor nodes capable of reporting temperature, humidity, pressure, acceleration, & light with attached sensors. More sensors are being developed by the company.

Moduino X2 (right)

Moduino X1 & X2 appear to be available now, but you’d need to contact the company to get price information. Visit Moduino X series product page for more details.

Habey EMB-2200 Pico-ITX board is Designed for Industrial IoT Gateways & HMI Panels

September 8th, 2017 No comments

Habey USA has sent out an email to announce their EMB-2200 industrial grade Pico-ITX board powered by NXP i.MX6UL processor with up to 512 MB DDR3, WIFi and Bluetooth, optional PoE support, LCD interface, etc…, and designed for IoT gateways, HMI applications, and other embedded applications.

Click to Enlarge

Habey EMB-2200 board specifications:

  • SoC- NXP i.MX 6UltraLite single core ARM Cortex-A7 processor at 528/696MHz
  • System Memory – 128, 256 or 512MB RAM
  • Storage – Various options of eMMC, iNAND or SLC NAND flash (Default: 8GB eMMC flash)
  • Display – 1x 24-bit Parallel LCD (RGB) interface up to 1366×768, 4-wire touch interface
  • Audio – 1x 3.5mm Line OUT jack
  • Connectivity – 2x 10/100 Mbps Fast Ethernet ports, WiFi and Bluetooth module
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 ports
  • I/Os – 5x RS-232 header, 2x CAN Bus, 2x USB2.0, 1x USB OTG Configurable GPIO, SPI, I2C
  • Expansion – 1x full-size mini-PCIe with USB connection for cellular modules
  • Misc – Watchdog Timer Programmable timer system reset
  • Power Supply – 9V~ 36V DC via 2.5mm power jack; PoE ready via add-on module
  • Dimensions – 100 x 72 mm (Pico-ITX form factor)
  • Temperature Range – Operating: -40 ~ 80°C; storage: -50 ~ 105°C
  • Humidity – 5% ~ 95% @ 40°C (Non-Condensing)

The company also provides a Power over Ethernet (POE) 802.3af add-on module, and a 5” resistive touch panel development kit (800×480) to create custom HMI or automation systems easily. One the software side, the board runs Embedded Linux, but apart from that, details are sparse…

Click to Enlarge

The board – and add-on modules – should be available now, at an undisclosed price. More information about Habey’s EMB-2200 pico-ITX board can be found in the product page.

Particle E Series is a Family of 2G, 3G, 4G LTE Cellular IoT Modules Optimized for Mass Production

September 7th, 2017 9 comments

Cellular IoT has really taken off this year from the low cost Orange Pi 2G IoT board to 4G GPS Trackers, and global IoT SIM cards. Particle has been in this market for a couple of years, starting with their Electron boards, and the company has just announced the new Particle E series family of industrialized 2G, 3G, and LTE-enabled modules and a development kit.

Key features of Particles E series modules:

  • Cellular Connectivity
    • u-blox SARA modules for cellular connectivity
      • LTE: SARA-R410M
      • 3G: SARA-U201/U260/U270
      • 2G: SARA-G350 (2G)
    • Embedded SIM card, Particle MVNO support in 100+ countries
    • u.FL antenna connector
  • MCU – STM32F205RGT6 120MHz ARM Cortex M3 microcontroller with 1MB flash, 128KB RAM
  • Storage – • Expandable flash memory
  • I/Os – 63-pin surface mountable castellated module with up 30x GPIOs, 12x ADC, 2x DAC, 13x PWM, 3x UART, 2x SPI, 1x I2S, 2x CAN, 1x USB 2.0 (Some signals are multiplexed)
  • Power Supply – 3.88 to 12V input; BQ24195 power management unit and battery charger; MAX17043 fuel gauge
  • Power Consumption (@5V?)
    • Operating current (cellular ON): 180 mA to 250 mA
    • Operating current (cellular OFF): 47 mA to 50 mA
    • Peak current: 800mA (3G), 1800 mA (2G)
    • Sleep Current: 0.8 mA to 2 mA
  • Dimensions – 43 x 36 x 4.6 mm
  • Weight – < 10 grams
  • Temperature Range – -20 to +85°C (extended range)
  • Certifications – FCC, CE, IC wireless certifications, PTCRB (End-Product Certified) & GCF cellular certifications, RoHS

A total of 7 modules are planned to launch by mid 2018 with the naming convention using the first number reserved for the “G” number, the second for local (0) or global (1), and the third being an incremental number:

  • E210 – 2G only – Q4 2017 working worldwide (quad band)
  • E301 – 3G with 2G fallback – Q4 2017 for Americas/Australia (850/1900 MHz)
  • E302 – 3G with 2G fallback – Q4 2017 for Europe, Asia, and Africa (900/1800/2100 MHz)
  • E310 – 3G with 2G fallback – Q4 2017 working worldwide (850/900/1800/1900/2100 MHz)
  • E401 – LTE M1 – Early 2018 for US (LTE B13)
  • E402 – LTE M1 – Early 2018 for North America (LTE B2/4/5/12)
  • E410 – LTE M1/NB1 – Mid 2018 for the global market

Electron Board (Left) and E-Series Eval Kit (Right)

The new modules share the same software development tools, Particle Cloud platform, code and peripherals as Electron prototyping board with the modules running FreeRTOS, supporting  CoAP encrypted messaging, TCP/IP and UDP/IP, GCC toolchain, and various firmware update methods including OTA. E series were created because while Electron board suitable for evaluation, pin-row headers, plastic SIM cards, and USB connectors made it less appropriate for integration into products and mass production.

The company has also introduced an E Series evaluation kit working globally with the following specifications:

  • Module – Particle E310 3G with 2G fallback
  • Breakout Board with
    • 2x micro USB port for flashing and serial communications
    • SMA antenna connector
    • 1x female expansion header, 2x Grove connectors
    • Misc – MODE and RESET buttons, Charge and status LEDs
    • Power – Li-Po battery connector,  power barrel jack
  • Battery –  2,000 mAh Li-Po battery
  • Antenna – Taoglas penta-band antenna (u.FL), SMA to u.FL adapter for connecting external SMA antennas
  • 1x Grove temperature sensor
  • 1x USB Micro cable
  • Pinout reference card

The kit will come with three months of Particle’s 1MB monthly data plan upon eSIM activation. Data plan pricing depends on the country of operation and number of nodes, but for reference, for up to 100 nodes in the US, you’d pay $2.99 per month/device including 1MB data, plus $0.99 per extra MB.

Pricing information has not been publicly disclosed for the module, but you can purchase E series development kit for $99.99, or $249 with 3 extra spare E310 modules. Visit Particle E-Series product page for further details.

MangOH Red Open Source Hardware Board Targets Cellular Industrial IoT Applications

June 14th, 2017 3 comments

Sierra Wireless has announced MangOH Red open source hardware platform designed for IIoT (Industrial IoT) applications with a snap-in socket for 2G to 4G & LTE-M/NB-IoT modules, built-in WiFi and Bluetooth, various sensors, a 26-pin expansion header, and more.

mangOH Red Board without CF3 / IoT Modules – Click to Enlarge

MangOH Red board specifications:

  • Snap-in socket to add any CF3-compatible modules, most of which based on Qualcomm MDM9215 ARM Cortex A5 processor including:
    • Airprime WP7502 LTE Cat 3, HSPA, WCDMA, EDGE/GPRS module
    • Airprime WP7504 LTE Cat 3, HSPA, WCDMA, CDMA module
    • Airprime WP7601 LTE Cat 4 module
    • Airprime WP7603 LTE Cat 4, WCDMA module
    • Airprime WP8548 HSPA, WCDMA, EDGE/GPRS, and GNSS module
    • AirPrime HL6528RD quad-band GSM/GPRS Embedded Wireless Module designed for the automotive market
    • And more….

      mangOH Red with CF3 Module, Shield, and IoT Module – Click to Enlarge

  • Storage – micro SD slot
  • Wireless MCU Module – Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n and Bluetooth 4.2 BLE module with an ARM Cortex-M4 core MCU (Mediatek MT7697) providing access to real-time I/Os
  • Wireless Connectivity “Accessories”
    • Micro SIM card holder; ESIM
    • Main, GNSS, & Diversity antennas connectors, and WiFi/Bluetooth chip antenna
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 host port
  • Audio – 3.5mm audio jack (unpopulated)
  • Sensors – Bosch Sensortec Accelerometer, Gyroscope, Temperature and Pressure sensors, Light sensors
  • Expansion
    • 26-pin Raspberry Pi compatible connector
    • IoT Expansion Card slot to plug in any technology based on the IoT Connector open standard
    • 6-pin real-time I/O header controlled by WiFi/BLE module.
    • 6-pin low power I/O header
  • Debugging – 1x micro USB port for serial console
  • Misc – LEDs; reset and user buttons;
  • Power Supply – 5V via micro USB port; battery connector; power source jumpers

Click to Enlarge

mangOH Red hardware design is fully open source with BoM, schematics (PDF an Allegro/OrCAD), PCB Layout (Intercept Pantheon), Gerber, and mechanical files available for download in the resources section, where you’ll also find other documentation and getting started guides for users and developers.  The CF3 modules run Legato Linux developed by Sierra Wireless, and open source with the source code on Github. Code specific to MangOH Red + WP8548 was also upstreamed in Linux 4.10.

The company also offers Sierra Wireless Smart SIM with up to 100 MB free data, but you can use the board any commercially available SIM car. The board also supports AirVantage IoT Platform to create, deploy and manage solutions in the cloud.

MangOH Red board can be purchased as a bareboard, but most people will probably want to get a Starter Kit with MangOH Red plus Air Prime WP8548, WP7502 or WP7504 sold on Digikey. I’m very confused by the price list, as $99 is shown for both the bare board, and kits including the board and a CF3 module. So I’ll assume $99 is for mangOH board only, and you’d likely have to pay $200+ for a board plus a CF3 module with the total price depending on the selected module. You may find additional details on MangOH Red product page.

Embedded Linux Conference & OpenIoT Summit 2017 Schedule

February 4th, 2017 1 comment

The Embedded Linux Conference 2017 and the OpenIoT Summit 2017 will take place earlier than last year, on February  20 – 23, 2017 in Portland, Oregon, USA. This will be the 12th year for ELC, where kernel & system developers, userspace developers, and product vendors meet and collaborate. The schedule has been posted on the Linux Foundation website, and whether you’re going to attend or not, it’s always informative to check out the topics.

So as usual, I’ll make a virtual schedule for all 5 days.

Monday, February 20

For the first day, the selection is easy, as choices are limited, and the official first day it actually on Tuesday. You can either attend a full-day paid training sessions entitled “Building A Low Powered Smart Appliance Workshop“, and the only session that day:

  • 14:30 – 15:20 – Over-the-air (OTA) Software Updates without Downtime or Service Disruption, by Alfred Bratterud, IncludeOS

Millions of consumers are at risk from security vulnerabilities caused by out-of-date software. In theory all devices should update automatically, but in practice, updating is often complicated, time-consuming and requires manual intervention from users. IncludeOS is a unikernel operating system that enables over-the-air (OTA) software updates of connected devices without downtime or service disruption.

The talk starts with a brief introduction to unikernels, their capabilities and how they can be very beneficial for IoT products from security, performance and operational perspectives. Then we give an overview of the IncludeOS Live Update functionality, which we use to demonstrate an atomic update of a device using Mender.io.

Tuesday, February 21

  • 10:30 – 11:20 – Bluetooth 5 is here, by Marcel Holtmann, Open Source Technology Center, Intel

The next version of Bluetooth has been released just a few month ago. This presentation gives an introduction to Bluetooth 5 and its impacts on the ecosystem. It shows new and exciting use cases for low energy devices and IoT with the focus on Linux and Zephyr operating systems.

With Bluetooth 5, the wireless technology continues to evolve to meet the needs of the industry as the global wireless standard for simple and secure connectivity. With 4x range, 2x speed and 8x broadcasting message capacity, the enhancements of Bluetooth 5 focus on increasing the functionality of Bluetooth for the IoT. These features, along with improved interoperability and coexistence with other wireless technologies, continue to advance the IoT experience by enabling simple and effortless interactions across the vast range of connected devices.

  • 11:30 – 12:20 – Embedded Linux Size Reduction Techniques, by Michael Opdenacker, Free Electrons

Are you interested in running Linux in a system with very small RAM and storage resources? Or are you just trying to make the Linux kernel and its filesystem as small as possible, typically to boot faster?

This talk will detail approaches for reducing the size of the kernel, of individual applications and of the whole filesystem. Benchmarks will you show how much you can expect to save with each approach.

  • 14:00 – 14:50 – Moving from IoT to IIoT with Maker Boards, Linux, and Open-Source Software Tools, by Matt Newton, Opto 22

In this session, developers will learn how to use the open-source tools, maker boards, and technology they’re already familiar with to develop applications that have the potential to deliver a massive positive impact on society. There are billions of devices–sensors, I/O, control systems, motors, pumps, drives–siloed behind proprietary control and information systems, waiting to be tapped into. This workshop is geared towards teaching the developer community how to use the tools they’re already familiar with to access, monitor, and manage these assets to create a potentially huge positive impact on our way of life.

  • 15:00 – 15:50 – Debugging Usually Slightly Broken (USB) Devices and Drivers, by Krzysztof Opasiak, Samsung R&D Institute Poland

USB is definitely the most common external interface. Millions of people are using it every day and thousands of them have problems with it. Driver not found, incorrect driver bound, kernel oops are just examples of common problems which we are all facing. How to solve them or at least debug? If you’d like to find out, then this talk is exactly for you!

We will start with a gentle introduction to the USB protocol itself. Then standard Linux host side infrastructure will be discussed. How drivers are chosen? How can we modify matching rules of a particular driver? That’s only couple of questions which will be answered in this part. Final part will be an introduction to USB communication sniffing. Krzysztof will show how to monitor and analyze USB traffic without expensive USB analyzers.

  • 16:20 – 17:10 – SDK in the Browser for Zephyr Project, by Sakari Poussa, Intel

Starting a development for embedded IoT system can be a tedious task, starting with the tools and SDK installations. You also need to have proper operating system, cables and environment variables set up correctly in order to do anything. This can take hours if not days. In this tutorial, we present an alternative, fast and easy way to start IoT development. All you need is your Zephyr board, USB cable and Web Browser. The Zephyr will be running JavaScript Runtime for Zephyr including a “shell” developer mode and Web USB. The Browser has the IDE where you can edit and download code to your board. No compiling, flashing or rebooting is required. During the tutorial, we have few boards available and participants can start developing applications for zephyr in 5 minutes.

  • 17:20 – 18:10 – Fun with Zephyr Project and BBC micro:bit, by Marcel Holtmann, Open Source Technology Center, Intel

This presentation shows how Zephyr empowers the BBC micro:bit devices and its Bluetooth chip to do fun things.

  • 18:15 – 19:00 – Yocto Project & OpenEmbedded BoF, by Sean Hudson, Mentor

Got a comment, question, gripe, praise, or other communication for the Yocto Project and/or OpenEmbedded technical leaders? Or maybe you just want to learn more about these projects and their influence on the world of embedded Linux? Feel free to join us for an informal BoF.

Wednesday, February 22

  • 10:40 – 11:30 – Journey to an Intelligent Industrial IOT Network, by Giuseppe (Pino) de Candia, Midokura

There are 66 million networked cameras capturing terabytes of data. How did factories in Japan improve physical security at the facilities and improve employee productivity? With the use of open systems, open networking, open IOT platforms of course!

Edge Computing reduces possible kilobytes of data collected per second to only a few kilobytes of data transmitted to the public cloud every day. Data is aggregated and analyzed close to sensors so only intelligent results need to be transmitted to the cloud while non-essential data is recycled. The system captures all flow information, current and historical.

Pino will draw from real IIOT use cases and discuss the variety of operations and maintenance tool to support proactive policy-based flow analysis for edge computing or fog nodes enabling IT and OT end to end visibility from a network perspective.

  • 11:40 – 12:30 – SecurityPI: IronClad your Raspberry Pi, by Rabimba Karanjai

Raspberry Pi has garnered huge interest in last few years and is now one of the most popular Linux boards out there sparking all kinds of DIY projects. But most of these function with the default settings and connect to the Internet. How secure is your Pi? How easy is it for someone to take over and make it part of a botnet or sneak peek on your privacy?

In this talk Rabimba Karanjai will show how to harden the security of a Raspberry Pi 3. He will showcase different techniques with code examples along with a toolkit made specifically to do that. This cookbook will harden the device and also provide a way to audit and analyze the behavior of the device constantly. After all, protecting the device finally protects us all, by preventing another dyndns DDOS attack.

  • 14:00 – 14:50 – IoTivity-Constrained: IoT for Tiny Devices, by Kishen Maloor, Intel Corporation

The IoT will be connected by tiny edge devices with resource constraints. The IoTivity-Constrained project is a small-footprint implementation of the Open Connectivity Foundation’s (OCF) IoT standards with a design that caters to resource-constrained environments. It is lightweight, maintainable and quickly customizable to run on any hardware-software deployment.

This talk will present IoTivity-Constrained’s architecture, features, APIs, and its current integration with a few popular real-time operating systems. It will end with a discussion of IoTivity-Constrained’s adaptation for the Zephyr RTOS.

  • 15:00 – 15:50 – RIOT: The Friendly Operating System for the IoT (If Linux Won’t Work, Try RIOT), by Thomas Eichinger, RIOT-OS

This presentation will start with RIOT’s perspective on the IoT, focusing on CPU- and memory-constrained hardware communicating with low-power radios. In this context, similarly to the rest of the Internet, a community-driven, free and open source operating system such as RIOT is key to software evolution, scalability and robustness. After giving an overview to RIOT’s overall architecture and its modular building blocks, the speaker will describe in more detail selected design decisions concerning RIOT’s kernel, hardware abstraction and network stack. Furthermore, the talk will overview the development and organizational processes put in place to help streamline the efforts of RIOT’s heterogeneous community. The presentation will end with an outlook on upcoming features in RIOT’s next releases and longer-term vision.

  • 16:20 – 17:10 – Graphs + Sensors = The Internet of Connected Things, by William Lyon, Neo4j

There is no question that the proliferation of connected devices has increased the volume, velocity, and variety of data available. Deriving value and business insight from this data is an ever evolving challenge for the enterprise. Moving beyond analyzing just discrete data points is when the real value of streaming sensor data begins to emerge. Graph databases allow for working with data in the context of the overall network, not just a stream of values from a sensor. This talk with cover an architecture for working with streaming data and graph databases, use-cases that make sense for graphs and IoT data, and how graphs can enable better real-time decisions from sensor data. Use cases covered will include data from oil and gas pipelines and the transportation industry.

Thursday, February 23

  • 9:00 – 9:50 – Android Things: High Level Introduction, by Anisha Dattatraya & Geeta Krishna, Intel Corporation

An overview of the basic concepts behind Android things and its structure and components is presented. Upon completion of this session, you should have a good overview of how Android Things brings simplicity to IoT software and hardware development by providing a simple and secure deployment and update model. This presentation provides the context needed for the Android Things Tutorial and other deep dive sessions for Android Things.

  • 10:00 – 10:50 – 2017 is the Year of the Linux Video Codec Drivers, by Laurent Pinchart, Ideas on Board

Codecs have long been the poor relation of embedded video devices in the Linux kernel. With the embedded world moving from stateful to stateless codecs, Linux developers were left without any standard solution, forcing vendors and users to resort to proprietary APIs such as OpenMAX.

Despair no more! Very recent additions to V4L2 make it possible to support video codecs with standard Linux kernel APIs. The ChromeOS team has proved that viable solutions exist for codecs without resorting to the proprietary options. This presentation will explain why video codecs took so long to properly support, and how the can be implemented and used with free software and open APIs.

  • 11:10 – 12:00 – Embedded Linux – Then and Now at iRobot, by Patrick Doyle, iRobot

Mr. Doyle will review the history of the use of embedded Linux at a commercial company (iRobot) and discuss the challenges faced (and overcome) then and now. While home routers and WiFi Access Point developers have enjoyed the benefits (and risks) of deploying Linux based products, that has not always been the case for other products. With the advent of low cost cell phone processors and vendor support for Linux, it is now possible to embed a Linux based solution in a consumer retail product such as a vacuum cleaner, minimizing risk and development time in the process.

  • 12:10 – 13:00 – Mainline Linux on AmLogic SoCs, by Neil Armstrong, BayLibre

Inexpensive set-top boxes are everywhere and many of them are powered by AmLogic SoCs. These chips provide 4K H.265/VP9 video decoding and have fully open source Linux kernel and U-boot releases. Unfortunately most of the products based on these devices are running an ancient 3.10 Android kernel. Thankfully AmLogic has put a priority on supporting their chips in the mainline Linux kernel.

Neil will present the challenges and benefits to pushing support for these SoCs upstream, as well as the overall hardware architecture in order to understand the Linux upstreaming decisions and constraints. He will also detail the future development plans aiming to offer a complete experience running an Upstream Linux kernel.

  • 14:30 – 15:20 – OpenWrt/LEDE: When Two become One, by Florian Fainelli, Broadcom Ltd

OpenWrt is a popular Linux distribution and build system primarily targeting the Wi-Fi router/gateway space. The project has been around for more than 12 years, but has recently experienced a schism amongst the developers over various issues.  This resulted in the formation of the LEDE project.  This split has caused confusion among the community and users. This presentation will cover what OpenWrt/LEDE projects are, what problems they are solving in the embedded Linux space, and how they do it differently than the competition. We will specifically focus on key features and strengths: build system, package management, ubus/ubox based user space and web interface (LuCI). We will demonstrate a few typical use cases for the audience. Finally, the conclusion will focus on the anticipated reunification of the two projects into one and what this means for the community and the user base.

  • 15:30 – 16:20 – Unifying Android and Mainline Kernel Graphics Stack, by Gustavo Padovan, Collabora Ltd.

The Android ecosystem has tons of out-of-tree patches and a good part of them are to support Graphics drivers. This happened because the Upstream Kernel didn’t support everything that is needed by Android. However the Mainline Graphics Stack has evolved in the last few years and features like Atomic Modesetting and Explicit Fencing support are making the dream of running Android on top of it possible. In other words, we will have Android and Mainline Kernels sharing the same Graphics stack!

This talk will cover what has been happening both on Android and Mainline Graphics Stacks in order to get Android to use the Upstream Kernel by default, going from what Android have developed to workaround the lack of upstream support to the latest improvements on the Mainline Graphics Stack and how they will fit together.

  • 16:30 – 17:20 – Developing Audio Products with Cortex-M3/NuttX/C++11, by Masayuki Ishikawa, Sony

Sony released audio products with Cortex-M3 in late 2015. Considering development efficiency, code reusability, feature enhancements and training costs, we decided to port POSIX-based open source RTOS named NuttX to ON Semiconductor’s LC823450 by ourselves, modified the NuttX for fast ELF loading, implemented minimum adb (Android debug bridge) protocols for testing purpose, DVFS in autonomous mode with a simple CPU idle calculation, wake_lock and stack trace which are popular in Linux/Android worlds. Middleware and Applications were developed in C++11 with LLVM’s libc++ which are also popular for large software systems. To debug the software, we implemented NuttX support for OpenOCD so that we can debug multi threaded applications with gdb. In addition, we used QEMU with the NuttX to port bluetooth stack and in-house GUI toolkit and finally got them work before we received LC823450 FPGA.


That’s all. I had to make choice, and did not include some sessions I found interested due to scheduling conflicts such as “Comparing Messaging Techniques for the IoT” by Michael E Anderson, The PTR Group, inc, and “Improving the Bootup Speed of AOSP” by Bernhard Rosenkränzer, Linaro.

You’ll need to register and pay an entry fee if you want to attend the Embedded Linux Conference & OpenIoT Summit:

  • Early Registration Fee: US$550 (through January 15, 2017)
  • Standard Registration Fee: US$700 (January 16, 2017 – February 5, 2017)
  • Late Registration Fee: US$850 (February 6, 2017 – Event)
  • Academic Registration Fee: US$175 (Student/Faculty attendees will be required to show a valid student/faculty ID at registration.)
  • Hobbyist Registration Fee: US$175 (only if you are paying for yourself to attend this event and are currently active in the community)

Axiomtek Introduces IP67 Rated Waterproof Embedded Computer for Outdoor Applications

October 4th, 2016 No comments

Axiomtek has just launched eBOX800-841-FL rugged IP67-rated fanless embedded system for “outdoor critical applications” such as the Industrial Internet of Things (IIOT) gateways. The waterproof mini PC is  powered by a quad core Intel Atom E3845 Bay Trail-I processor, and supports temperatures between -30°C to 60°C.

ip67-embedded-computerAxiomtek eBOX800-841-FL embedded computer specifications:

  • SoC – Intel Atom E3845 quad core processor @ up to 1.91 GHz with Intel HD graphics (10W TDP)
  • System Memory – 204-pin SO-DIMM DDR3L-1066/1333 slot up to 8 GB RAM
  • Storage – 1 x mSATA,  1x 2.5″ SATA HDD, 1x CFAST slot
  • Video Output – VGA (M12 screw type)
  • Connectivity
    • 2x 10/100/1000Mbps Ethernet (M12 type)
    • WiFI & LTE via mini PCIe slots
    • 1x SIM socket
    • 4x N-jack waterproof antenna connectors
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 ports (M12 type)
  • Serial ports – 2 x RS-232/422/485 ports (M12 type)
  • Expansion
    • 1x full-size PCI Express Mini Card slot (USB + PCI Express signal)
    • 1x half-size PCI Express Mini Card slot (USB + PCI Express signal)
  • Misc – Watchdog Timer, 1x green LED for system power-on
  • Power Supply – 9 to 36V DC power input
  • Dimensions – 210 x 366.8 x 83 mm
  • Weight – 4.15 kg
  • IP Rating – IP67
  • Temperature Range – -30°C ~ +60°C (with the right RAM/storage devices)
  • Relative Humidity – 10% ~ 95% non-condensing
  • Vibration – 3 Grams with SSD @ 5 ~ 500Hz
  • Certifications – CE, FCC

This all weather rugged mini PC supports Wall and VESA mounts, and by default ships with a waterproof power cable (1 m), a waterproof VGA cable (1.8 m), a waterproof USB 2.0 cable (1.8 m), a quick manual, and a driver CD.

waterproof-mini-pcOne of the ways the company made the computer waterproof was not to use “standard” ports like USB (type A), Ethernet (RJ45), etc.. , but instead M12 and N-jack connectors, with which the cables can be firmly tightened and waterproof joints used.

The company mentions Windows 7 and Windows 10 IoT are supported on the computer, but since it’s based on the same Atom E3845 SoC used in MinnowBoard Turbot SBC, other operating systems such as Debian, Ubuntu, or Android 4.4 should also run on the device, possibly with some extra work needed on the drivers side.

Axiomtek eBOX800-841-FL will be available in November 2016 at an undisclosed price, and a few more details can be found in the product page.