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Posts Tagged ‘lpwan’

Arduino MKR WAN 1300 & MKR GSM 1400 Boards Launched with LoRaWAN and 3G Connectivity

September 25th, 2017 4 comments

Arduino has introduced two new boards right in time for Maker Faire New York: MKR WAN 1300 with a LoRa radio, and MKR GSM 1400 with a “3.75G” cellular module, both software compatible with Arduino Zero, and in Arduino MKRZero board form factor.

MKR WAN 1300 Board

 

Click to Enlarge

Arduino MKR WAN 1300 specifications:

  • MCU – Microchip Atmel SAMD21 32-bit ARM Cortex M0+ MCU @ 48 MHz with 32 KB SRAM, 256 KB flash (8KB for bootloader)
  • Digital I/O Pins – 8x digital I/Os, 12x PWM, UART, SPI, and I2C, 8x external interrupts
  • Analog Pins – 7x analog inputs (8/10/12-bit ADC), and 1x analog output (10-bit DAC)
  • DC Current per I/O Pin – 7 mA
  • LPWAN connectivity
    • Murata CMWZ1ZZABZ LoRa module based on Semtech SX1276 and STMicro STM32L
    • Antenna power – 2dB
    • Carrier frequency – 433/868/915 MHz
    • Working regions – EU/US
  • USB – 1x micro USB port for power and programming
  • Misc – Reset button, 6x LEDs, 32.768 kHz RTC
  • Power
    • 5V via micro USB port or Vin pin
    • 2x AA or AAA batteries support
    • I/O Operating Voltage – 3.3V
  • Dimensions – 67.64 x 25 mm
  • Weight – 32 grams

It’s interesting to note that the Murata module includes an STM32L MCU, and exposes ADC/DAC, GPIOs, SPI, I2C.. pins, so in theory it would be possible to create a similar board without the Microchip/Atmel chip, but Arduino IDE compatibility may have suffered despite work on Arduino STM32, and the exposed I/Os could not be the same (e.g. only 4x ADC).

MKR GSM 1400

 

Click to Enlarge

Arduino MKR GSM 1400 board has very similar specifications, except it replaces the LoRa radio with a u-blox cellular module, and supports LiPo batteries:

  • MCU – Microchip Atmel SAMD21 32-bit ARM Cortex M0+ MCU @ 48 MHz with 32 KB SRAM, 256 KB flash (8KB for bootloader)
  • Digital I/O Pins – 8x digital I/Os, 12x PWM, UART, SPI, and I2C, 8x external interrupts
  • Analog Pins – 7x analog inputs (8/10/12-bit ADC), and 1x analog output (10-bit DAC)
  • DC Current per I/O Pin – 7 mA
  • Cellular Connectivity
    • u-blox SARAU201 cellular module supporting 3.75G UMTS/HSPA with 2G GSM/(E)GPRS fallback
    • NanoSIM card slot
    • u.FL connector for external antenna
    • Working regions – Global
  • USB – 1x micro USB port for power and programming
  • Misc – Reset button, 6x LEDs, 32.768 kHz RTC
  • Power
    • 5V via micro USB port
    • 5V to 12V Vin pin
    • 3.7V LiPo battery support
    • I/O Operating Voltage – 3.3V
  • Dimensions – 67.64 x 25 mm
  • Weight – 32 grams

Both boards are up for pre-order with shipping expected for November 15th with MKR WAN 1300 going for $39 / 35 Euros excluding VAT, and MKR GSM 1400 selling for $69.00 / 59.90 Euros excluding VAT. Further documentation is accessible through the store links.

WizziKit is a DASH7, LoRa and Sigfox Wireless Sensor & Actuator Network Kit

September 13th, 2017 2 comments

Over the last few years, I’ve written several article about LoRaWAN, Cellular IoT, and Sigfox based long range low power IoT solutions. DASH7 is another LPWAN (Low Power Wide Area Network) standard that operates on the same 868 and 915 MHz ISM bands as LoRa and Sigfox, but has much lower power consumption, and the cost of a shorter range up to 500 meters, instead of the 5+km associated with LoRa or SigFox.

The DASH7 Alliance Protocol (D7A) is an Open Standard, and if you want more details you can download version 1.1 of the specifications on DASH7 Alliance website. I’m writing about DASH7 today thanks to an article on ST blog about Wizzilab’s Wizzikit, an evaluation kit and framework for DASH7 with a gateway, and several nodes that can also optionally support LoRaWAN and Sigfox protocols.

Click to Enlarge

The kit is comprised of the following items:

  • WizziGate GW2120 Ethernet/Wifi/Dash7 gateway – based on GL-iNet AR150 router –  with antenna for the selected band (868/915 MHz) and USB power cable.
  • 2x Nucleo-L432KC STM32 development board compatible with Arduino. mbed, and ST morpho
  • 2x D7A SH2050 Nucleo Shield with a multimode Murata Lora Module supporting LoRa, DASH7, and Sigfox, as well as four sensor chips: light sensor,  magnetometer & accelerometer, humidity and temperature sensor, and a pressure sensor.
  • 2x mini USB cable to power up and program the Nucleo boards

DA7 SH2050 Shield

You’ll also need to add you own USB power adapter for the gateway. The kit also comes with access to the company’s DASH7Board cloud service. The Wiki includes some information, including a quick start guide explaining how to register the gateway, and start loading the demo code using mbed. Since DASH7 is much more power efficient than LoRaWAN it can either be used to prolong battery life, or to send more frequent messages for example to control actuators. With LoRaWAN, downlink access can only be initiated by the end node, but DASH7 is bi-directional allowing for OTA firmware upgrades. The solution was showcased a few months ago at ST Techday with two demos: sending a message to a single node, and OTA code upgrade (actually picture upload) to multiple boards with a broadcast message.

Wizzilab’s Wizzikit is sold for 299.00 Euros with either 868 and 915 MHz band. Further details on be found on Wizzilab website.

RadioShuttle Network Protocol is an Efficient, Fast & Secure Alternative to LoRaWAN Protocol

September 6th, 2017 5 comments

LoRaWAN protocol is one of the most popular LPWAN standards used for the Internet of Things today, but some people found it “lacked efficiency, did not support direct node-to-node communication, and was too costly and far too complicated for many applications”, so they developed their own LoRa wireless protocol software called RadioShuttle, which they claim is “capable of efficiently sending messages in a fast and secure way between simple LoRa modules”.

Some of the key features of the protocol include:

  • Support for secure or insecure (less time/energy) message transmission, multiple messages transmission in parallel
  • Unique 32-bit device ID (device number) per LoRa member, unique 16-bit app ID (program number for the communication)
  • Security – Login with SHA-256 encrypt password; AES-128 message encryption
  • Air Traffic Control – Nodes only send if no LoRa signal is active on that channel.
  • Optimized protocol –  Message delivery within 110 ms (SF7, 125 kHz, free channel provided); default LoRa bandwidth 125 kHz (125/250/500 kHz adjustable), as narrow bandwidths allow for a longer range; Automatic transmitting power adjustment
  • Operating modes
    • Station, constant power supply recommended –  12 mA in receiving mode, transmitting mode (20 to 100 mA)
    • Node Online (permanently receiving), constant power supply recommended – 12 mA in receiving mode, transmitting mode (20 to 100 mA)
    • Wireless sensor (Node Offline checking) – Node reports back regularly. 1 µA in standby mode, battery operation for years.
    • Wireless sensor (Node Offline) – Node only active if events are reported. 1 µA in standby mode, battery operation for years.

The Radioshuttle library has a low memory and storage footprint with current requirements of

  • 100 kB Flash for RadioShuttle library with SHA256 & AES
  • 10 kB RAM for Node Offline/Checking/Online mode
  • 10 kB RAM for Station Basic mode (RAM depends on the number of nodes)
  • 1 MB RAM for Station Server mode (Raspberry Pi, 10,000 LoRa nodes)

The solution supports various Arduino boards, some ARM Mbed boards (e,g, STM32L0, STM32L4), and Linux capable boards like Raspberry Pi or Orange Pi (planned). Semtech SX1276MB1MAS and SX1276MB1LAS (SX1276-based), MURATA CMWX1ZZABZ-078/091 (found in STM32 Discovery kit for LoRaWAN), and HopeRF RFM95 transceivers are supported.

LonRa Board – Click to Enlarge

The developers have also designed their own LongRa board, compatible with Arduino Zero, based on Semtech SX1276 LoRa radio chip with a 168 dB link budget and support for 868 MHz & 915 MHz frequency. The board can be powered by its micro USB port, or by two AA batteries if you’re going to use the board as a wireless sensor node.

RadioShuttle protocol is not open source for now, and while it support multiple devices as stated previsouly, if you are not using LongRa board, a 25 Euros license is required per device.

 

$6.10 Loraduino Board Combines LoRa and Atmega328P MCU

August 30th, 2017 8 comments

We’ve previoulsy seen low costs SX1278 LoRa modules @ 433 MHz  which you could connect to your own board, but Electrodragon is now selling Loraduino board with an Atmega328P MCU and SX1278 for just $6.10 / 5 Euros plus shipping, and using a layout similar to Arduino Pro Mini.

Loraduino specifications:

  • MCU – Microchip / Atmel Atmega328P MCU with Arduino pro mini bootloader
  • Storage – 16Mbit SPI flash for data
  • LoRa
    • Semtech SX1278 IC with 433mhz, or 470mhz central frequency
    • 10 km max range
    • 20dbm max power rate (configurable by software)
    • Tx current: 120 mA @ + 20 dBm; 90mA @ + 17dBm;  29mA @ + 13dBm
    • Data Rate –  1.2K to 300Kbps with FSK;  18 bps to 37.5Kbps with LoRa
  • Expansion
    • SX1278 Lora: leadout for pins IO1, IO2, IO3
    • Atmega: 14x digital input/output pins (including 6x PWM outputs), 6x analog inputs (TBC)
  • Misc – Programmable LED (D7),  power LED, and charge status LED.
  • Power Supply – On-board Lithium battery source jack, and MCP73831 smart charge IC. Charge when 5V power supplied to board.
  • Dimensions – 46×23 mm (Arduino Pro Mini: ~33x17mm)
  • Operating temperature –  -40 ℃ ~ +85 ℃

The board ships with a spring pin antenna, and a battery cable. The MCU and SX1278 chip are connected through an SPI interface. There’s limited information on the Wiki, where they explain you can use the board with Radiohead RF95 library, and load rf95_reliable_client.ino in Arduino IDE to test it out.

Thanks to Zoobab for the tip

RakWireless RAK831 LoRa Gateway Module is Based on Semtech SX1301 Base Band Processor

August 6th, 2017 7 comments

We’ve previously covered several products from RakWireless, with a Realtek WiFi IoT board, a WiFi camera board, and a Amazon Alexa compatible audio board. The company has now launched RAK831, a LoRaWAN gateway board powered by Semtech SX1301 base band processor, and working with their RAK811 LoRa node or other compatible nodes.

Click to Enlarge

RAK831 LoRA gateway board specifications:

  • Connectivity
    • Semtech SX1301 base band processor with LoRa concentrator IP
    • Frequency bands – 433, 470, 868, or 915 MHz
    • Sensitivity – Down to -142.5 dBm
    • Maximum link budget – 162 dB
    • Output power level – up to 23 dBm
    • Emulates 49 x LoRa demodulators
    • 12x parallel demodulation paths
    • 1x (G)FSK demodulator
    • 2x SX1257 Tx/Rx front-ends high frequencies
    • 2x SX1255 Tx/Rx front-ends low frequencies
    • Range  – Up to 15 km (Line of Sight); several kilometers in urban environment
  • GNSS – Optional GPS support
  • Host Interface – SPI
  • Expansion – 24-pin 2.54mm pitch “DB24” header with access to SPI, 5x GPIOs, radio related signals, and +5V / GND
  • Misc – Status LEDs
  • Power Supply – 5V
  • Dimensions – size 80.0 x 50.0 x 5.0mm

The board can be used for various applications such smart metering, wireless star networks, home/building/factory automation, wireless sensors, wireless alarm & security systems, and so on. The guide start guide found in the documentation page, explains you’ll need a USB to SPI adapter board, for example based on FT2232HL chip,connected to an Ubuntu computer, or instead a board with an SPI interface running Ubuntu, or other Linux distribution. Finally, you’ll need to install  the software found in RAK831_LoRaGateway Github repository.

The company has also sent beta samples to several testers, and one of them – Naresh Krish – wrote a guide to use RAK831 with Raspberry Pi 3 board, registering the WiFi <-> LoRa gateway with TheThingsNetwork, and connecting to a RAK811 node.

RAK831 gateway is for $120 and up on Aliexpress for 433 MHz, 868 MHz or 915 MHz frequencies, or $125 if you want to add the acrylic case shown above. You may find additional details on the product page.

Mediatek MT2625 NB-IoT SoC is Designed for Cellular IoT Devices working Worldwide

August 4th, 2017 1 comment

Mediatek has recently unveiled MT2625 SoC based on an ARM Cortex-M core, equipped with an NB-IoT “WorldMode” modem allowing for a single design worldwide, and supporting the latest 3GPP Release 14 (LTE Cat NB2) specification.

Mediatek MT2625 specifications:

  • CPU – ARM Cortex-M @ up to 104 MHz with FPU
  • Embedded Memory – 4MB PSRAM
  • Storage – 4MB NOR Flash
  • Connectivity
    • NB-IoT compatible with 3GPP Release 14
    • Full frequency band (450MHz to 2.1GHz) of 3GPP R13 (NB1) and R14 (NB2) standards
    • Integrated baseband, RF, and modem DSP
  • Peripherals – I2C,  I2S,  PCM,  SDIO,  UART
  • Power Supply – Integrated PMU

The solution will be found in products for worldwide transportation, municipal use, and consumer products, with a much longer battery life compared to existing devices relying on other 2G/3G/4G standards.

According to the press release, one of the first module based on MT2625 has been designed in collaboration with China Mobile, integrates the company’s eSIM card, and supports OneNET IoT open platform. You won’t find many details on Mediatek MT2625’s product page, but you could contact the company there, if you plan to design and deploy such modules in large quantities.

U-blox SARA-R410M-02B Module Supports LTE Cat M1 and Cat NB1 in a Single Package

July 10th, 2017 No comments

We previously covered U-blox SARA-R4 LTE Cat M1 and SARA M2 NB-IoT (Cat NB1) modules, but in case you need support for LTE Cat M1 and Cat NB1, instead of just one or the other, in your product, U-blox launched a new SARA-R4 model with SARA-R410M-02B module supporting both standards.

U-blox SARA-R410M-02B module specifications:

  • LPWAN connectivity
    • LTE Cat M1 Half-duplex: 375 kb/s DL and UL
    • LTE Cat NB1 Half-duplex: 27.2 kb/s DL, 62.5 UL
    • Shared bands – 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 12, 13, 17, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 28;  Cat M1-only band – 39
    • Coverage enhancement Mode A and Mode B (in upcoming firmware),
    • 3GPP Rel 13 e-DRX  (Extended Discontinuous Reception) supported in upcoming firmware
    • SMS support – MT/MO PDU / Text mode; SMS over SG/NAS
    • Voice – VoLTE (Cat M1) using AMR-WB codec
    • (U)SIM supporting 1.8 and 3V
  • GNSS/GPS support with CellLocate and Hybrid positioning coming in new firmware version
  • I/Os – 1x UART, 1x USB 2.0 HS, 1x SDIO master, 1x DDC (I2C), 1x SPI, up to 6 GPIOs
  • Power Supply – 3.3 to 4.3V; 3.8V nominal
  • Power Consumption – Power save mode: 8 μA; active mode: 8 mA; LTE connected mode: 105 to 125 mA
  • Package – 96 pin LGA;  26.0 x 16.0 x 2.5 mm; < 3 grams
  • Extended temperature range: –40 to +85°C
  • Certifications – FCC, ISED, IFETEL, GCF, RCM, CCC, SRRC, NCC, RED, PTCRB, Verizon, AT&T, Telstra, GMA (Global M2M Association). Deployed bands: 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 12, 13, 20, 28

The other advantage of this model is that it’s configurable and works worldwide, instead of just USA, Noth America or ANZ + North America for the other 3 modules, meaning you could make one product and sell it worldwide without having to make variants for different locales. The module integrate IPv4 and IPv6 stacks, as well as a range a network protocols ranging from TCP/IP to MQTT and TLS. Device management is done through OMA LWM2M, and firmware update works either via USB or FOTA.

SARA-R4 modules can be used in various applications such as gas/water/electricity meters, city street lighting, building automation, HVAC, industrial monitoring and control, telematics, insurance, asset & vehicle tracking, security systems, alarm panels, outpatient monitoring and  consumer wearables.

The company did not provide pricing information, but mentioned product samples are available on request. You may find futher details on SARA-R4 Series product page.

Via ElectronicsWeekly

Categories: Hardware Tags: industrial, IoT, lpwan, lte, ublox

8Power Vibration Energy Harvesting Technology Powers Batteryless LPWAN GPS Trackers, MEMS Sensors

May 23rd, 2017 No comments

While IoT products usually promises one to 10 years battery life, they will be several billions of them, and ARM’s CEO even forecast one trillion IoT devices in the next 20 years. Recharging batteries at home may be fine, but imagine having to recharge or replace batteries on top of electric poles, inside walls, in remote locations, and other hard to reach places, considerable resources would have to be deployed just to replace or recharge battery every year or whenever the battery is close to being depleted.  That’s why work on energy harvesting technology for batteryless devices may be so important, and 8Power is one of the companies working in the field through their vibration energy harvesting technology that is said to harvest up to 10x the power of competing devices under comparable condition thanks to the use of parametric resonance phenomenon.

8Power LTE NB-IoT GPS Tracker (Left) and MEMS Sensor (Right)

The company has recently announced their Track 100 family of LPWAN GPS tracker, such as Track 100XL relying on LTE NB-IoT, but they also have models supporting LTE Cat M1 and LoRaWAN. The IP67 devices include vibration energy harvesting technology, as well as optionally a solar panel. The company also provides a “secure cloud hosted data platform to provide dashboards, analytics, device management, security and application API access to manage fleets of devices”. There’s no battery, and no need for (battery related) maintenance. Track 100 trackers are powered through the vibration generated by trucks, trains, or other vehicles.

The company is also working on integrating the technology into MEMS sensors that consume very little power (10 mW) in continuous operations. Beside leveraging vibrations from the transportation industry, and 8Power technology can also generate power from vibrations from  infrastructure (bridges, embankments, transmission lines) or machinery (high-power motors and rotating equipment), and the technology has already been validated through a experiment to monitor the structure of an older bridge in Scotland.

The company showcased their technology and latest products at IDTechEx 2017.

Via ARMDevices.net