Android 5.0 Lollipop Coming to Allwinner A33 & A80, Rockchip RK3288, and More…

I can often see questions requesting whether SoC XYZ will support Android 5.0 Lollipop. The good news is that last week, I’ve read lots of news about Android 5.0 support on various devices including Nvidia Shield tablet, Motorola G & X smartphones, and of course the Google Nexus devices. A developer (Nanik T.) also ported Android Lollipop to ODROID U3 development board based on Exynos 4412, and he mentioned that “porting was pretty straight forward as KK and 5.0 does not have a lot of differences in terms of HAL”, which means there’s hope for more recent devices and SoCs getting the update. Chinese SoC vendors are also getting the word out that they are working on Android 5.0. Rockchip announced Lollipop support for RK3288 processor (original news in Chinese) probably coming to tablets first, and Android TV boxes later. They used their reference platforms in the provided pictures, and did not publish ETA for public availability. Allwinner also showcased …

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First Tizen 3.0 Common Milestone Released, Developer Program Announced

The Tizen Steering Group has announced the first release of Tizen 3.0 Common. Tizen Common is the common subset of development / build / test platform of the Tizen profiles, used by platform developers to develop the next version of the profiles, and a Tizen 3.0 common release is planned every quarter. This milestone release includes: 64-bit support for both Intel and ARM architectures Crosswalk-based web runtime Multiuser support Systemd Security: three-domain rule system for SMACK and Cynara as authorization framework Wayland display server Pre-built binary releases for can be downloaded @ http://download.tizen.org/releases/daily/tizen/common/common-wayland-x86_64/tizen_20140602.26/ for Intel Atom 3815 NUC Kit and NEXCOM VTC1010 in-vehicle computer based on Intel Atom 3825. However, Tizen 3.0 Common will also be tested on Intel NUC Haswell (core i5),  Lenovo x230 IvyBridge (core i5) and on the ARM side, ODROID-U3 development board. If you want to build your own, refer to the developer guide, using tizen_common_2014.Q2 tag. More details can be found on Tizen 3.0 Wiki, and questions can be asked on the tizen …

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Dedicated Hosting Services on ARM Development Boards (Cubieboard2, Raspberry Pi, ODROID…)

At least two companies have recently launched hosting services using dedicated ARM servers based on low cost development boards: NanoXion with its NX-BOX service powered by PiBox (Raspberry Pi) and CubieBox (Cubieboard 2) microservers, and miniNodes with servers based on Cubieboard2 first, then ODROID development boards, and possibly AllWinner OptimusBoard once/if it becomes available. The PiBox will feature a Raspberry Pi Model B with 512 MB RAM, and 16GB Class 10 UHS-1 microSD card by Samsung, and the dual core Cubiebox comes with 1GB RAM and a Crucial M500 SATA III 120GB SSD. Both NX-BOXes run Linux Debian Server NX distribution, support instant remote reboot, with guaranteed 10 Mbps connectivity for IPv4 & IPv6, and unlimited bandwidth. The boards are all hosted in France. The company expects their ARM servers to be used as private cloud servers, backup servers, private chat servers, web servers, mail servers, DNS Servers, monitoring servers, and well as some other proprietary solutions their customers may come …

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$69.95 NanoPC-T1 by FriendlyARM Features Samsung Exynos 4412 SoC

If you like low cost boards by Hardkernel such as ODROID-U3, but the add-ons required, and/or shipping costs put you off, an alternative will soon be available thanks to FriendlyARM NanoPC-T1, a tiny computer designed and manufactured by CoreWind Tech FriendlyARM Guangzhou, and powered by Samsung Exynos 4412 quad core Cortex A9 SoC with 1GB RAM, and 4GB built-in flash. FriendlyARM NanoPC specifications: SoC – Samsung Exynos 4412 quad core Cortex-A9 @ 1.5GHz + Mali-400MP4 GPU System Memory – 1GB DDR3 RAM, 32bit data bus Storage – 4GB eMMC Flash + SD Card slot Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet (RJ45) Video Output – HDMI Audio –  3.5mm Audio Out jack USB – 1x micro USB OTG, 2x USB 2.0 host ports Expansions and I/Os: UART –  4 x TTL UART LCD –  TFT LCD interface, support Capacitive/Resistive touch driver 2x Digital sensor input CMOS CAMERA Interface MIPI interface – Support HD Camera 30x GPIO Misc – 2x User keys,  2x User …

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Radxa Rock and ODROID-U3 Quad Core Development Boards Comparison

If you want a quad core development board for less than $100, you only have two choices right now: Radxa Rock powered by Rockchip RK3188, and Hardkernel ODROID-U3 powered by Samsung Exynos 4412 prime. There are also a few Freescale i.MX 6Q boards such as Wandboard Quad and UDOO Quad for around $130 which you could consider because of potentially better software support and features like SATA, but in this post, I’ll compare Radxa Rock and ODROID-U3 to help you decide which one may be right for your application or project. Let’s get right to the subject, with a side-by-side comparison table. Radxa Rock Hardkernel ODROID-U3 Comments Processor Rockchip RK3188 ARM Cortex-A9 quad core @ 1.6Ghz Samsung Exynos 4412 Prime quad core Cortex A9 @ 1.7 Ghz Slight advantage for ODROID-U3, but it’s basically a draw. GPU ARM Mali-400 MP4 GPU ARM Mali-400MP4 GPU @ 440MHz Same GPU, that’s a draw. System Memory 2GB DDR3 @ 800Mhz 2GB LP-DDR2 @ 880MHz …

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Hardkernel Unveils $59 ODROID-U3 Board Powered by Exynos 4412 Prime Quad Core SoC

Hardkernel ODROID board family already features of the most cost effective development / hobbyist boards in the market. But the company has done it again, with ODROID-U3 a quad core board, software compatible with ODROID-U2, that sells for just $59 + shipping. ODROID-U3 specifications: SoC – Samsung Exynos 4412 Prime @ 1.7 Ghz with ARM Mali-400MP4 GPU @ 440MHz System Memory – 2GB @ 880MHz Storage – microSD slot, eMMC module socket USB – 3x USB 2.0 Host ports, 1x USB 2.0 device for ADB/mass storage Ethernet – 10/100Mbps (LAN9730) Video Output – micro HDMI Audio Output – 3.5mm Jack, micro HDMI System Console – UART (1.8Volt) DC Power – 5V/2A PCB Dimension – 83 x 48mm Weight – 48g with heatsink The company provides images and source code for Xubuntu 13.10, Android 4.x with u-boot 2010.12 and kernel 3.8, as well as the schematics (PDF). Support is available on ODROID-U3 Forums. Compared to the $89 ODROID-U2 board, you’ll get …

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Texas Instruments OMAP5432 EVM Benchmarked Against ODROID-U2, BeagleBone Black, GK802… and an Intel Core i7-2600K based PC

Texas instruments and SVTronics announced an OMAP5 evaluation board a couple of months ago. The board features OMAP5432 dual Cortex A15, dual Cortex M4 SoC, 2GB RAM, a 4GB eMMC module, USB 3.0, SATA and more. SVTronics sent a board to Linux.com, where they wrote a short review, followed by an article benchmarking the OMAP5 EVM against AllWinner A10, Freescale i.MX6, Exynos 4412 Prime, and TI Sitara platforms, namely Cubieboard, GK802, ODROID-U2, and BeagleBone Black, all running Linux. Ben Martin, the writer, also benchmarked the board against a Linux PC powered by an Intel Core i7-2600K processor (4 cores, 8 thread, clocked at 3.4GHz, with a turbo frequency up to 3.8GHz). The board used was an early version, clocked at 800MHz, and later in September, all boards will be clocked at 1.5Ghz, so for benchmarks that stress the CPU, you could expect almost double the performance. With that in mind, let’s have a look at the benchmarks and results. Octane …

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Mini PCs (MK802+, UG802, GK802 & iStick A200) Linux Performance Comparison

Ian MORRISON (linuxium) has tested Linux with several mini PCs powered by different processors. The main point of his tests was to evaluate the performance difference between running Ubuntu 12.04 natively, or in a chroot in Android using tools such as Complete Linux Installer. I previously tried Linux on Android in ODROID-X, and found the applications start time when running from an low-end SD card pretty dismal, and the graphics performance poor.  Ian had a different approach, and decided to use a subset of Phoronix Suite benchmarks to compare different hardware / software combination and posted the results in “mini PCs” G+ community. There’s a lot of data, and analyzing the results is not really straightforward without spending some time looking at the data. In this post, I’ll explain how the tests have been conducted, explain the results and try to draw a conclusion. Mini PCs and other Hardware Under Test Ian used four mini PC hardware running Ubuntu 12.04 …

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