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Posts Tagged ‘openembedded’

Embedded Linux Conference & IoT Summit 2018 Schedule

February 13th, 2018 No comments

The Embedded Linux Conference 2018 and the OpenIoT Summit 2018 will jointly take place next month, on March 12 – 14, 2018 in Portland, Oregon, USA. The former is a “vendor-neutral technical conference for companies and developers using Linux in embedded products”, while the latter is a “technical conference for the developers and architects working on industrial IoT”. The Linux Foundation has already published the schedule, and it’s always useful to learn what will be discussed about even for people who won’t attend.

With that in mind, here’s my own virtual schedule with some of the talks I find interesting / relevant to this blog.

Monday, March 12

  • 10:50 – 11:40 – Progress in the Embedded GPU Ecosystem by Robert Foss, Collabora Ltd.

Ten years ago no one would have expected the embedded GPU ecosystem in Linux to be what it is now. Today, a large number of GPUs have Open Source support and for those that aren’t supported yet, improvements are happening at a rapid pace.

In just the last year Vivante GPUs have gained mainline support and Mali GPUs have seen good progress being made.

In this talk, Robert will cover GPUs in the embedded space and give an overview about their current status, what lies ahead and how the Open Source state of the art compares to the proprietary alternatives.

  •  11:50 – 12:40 – Zephyr LTS Release, What to Expect and Why are We Doing This by Anas Nashif, Intel

After eleven 1.x.x releases of Zephyr since the project has launched 2 years ago, the Zephyr project is planning to release Zephyr LTS in 2018 with many new features that have been in the works for the last year, stable APIs and with the goal of taking a subset of the released project code through various certification activities.

In this talk the status plans for Zephyr LTS will be presented and discussed and the next steps that the project will take after the LTS release.

  • 14:00 – 14:50 – Preempt-RT Raspberry Pi Linux by Tiejun Chen, VMware

As we know, the Raspberry Pi is a series of small single-board computers developed in the United Kingdom by the Raspberry Pi Foundation to promote the teaching of basic computer science in schools and in developing countries. Now it is very popular around our IoT world, and you can see many guys use Pi to build great things, and even it can play a role in the production environment. The official Raspberry Pi Linux maintains Linux kernel specific to Pi platform. But it does not include Preempt RT Linux support. Obviously, in some IoT cases we really need to meet hard real time requirement. In this presentation, we will review if-how we can integrate Preempt RT Linux patches to Pi Linux, an see what the problems are for this particular hardware platform.

  • 15:00 – 15:50 – OpenEmbedded/Yocto on RISC-V – New Kid on the Block by Khem Raj, Comcast

RISC-V a new open source ISA based architecture is rapidly gaining acceptance in embedded space. Several core packages e.g. gcc toolchain, linux kernel, binutils, newlib, qemu has already been ported for RISC-V. At this point, OpenEmbedded is one of first embedded linux distribution frameworks to support RISC-V architecture. This talk will cover the status of support as the core support has been upstreamed into OpenEmbedded-core, additionally SOC layer meta-riscv is also created which would serve as common layer for all RISC-V based SOCs.

  • 16:10 – 17:00 – Bluetooth Mesh with Zephyr OS and Linux by Johan Hedberg, Intel

Bluetooth Mesh is a new standard that opens a whole new wave of low-power wireless use cases. It extends the range of communication from a single peer-to-peer connection to a true mesh topology covering large areas, such as an entire building. This paves the way for both home and industrial automation applications. Typical home scenarios include things like controlling the lights in your apartment or adjusting the thermostat. Although Bluetooth 5 was released over a year ago, Bluetooth Mesh can be implemented on any device supporting Bluetooth 4.0 or later. This means that we’ll likely see very rapid market adoption of the feature.

The presentation will give an introduction to Bluetooth Mesh, covering how it works and what kind of features it provides. The talk will also give an overview of Bluetooth Mesh support in Zephyr OS and Linux and how to create new wireless solutions with them.

  • 17:10 – 18:00 – Drive your NAND within Linux by Miquèl Raynal, Bootlin (formerly Free Electrons)

NAND flash chips are almost everywhere, sometimes hidden in eMMCs, sometimes they are just parallel NAND chips under the orders of your favorite NAND controller. Each NAND vendor follows its own rules. Each SoC vendor creates his preferred abstraction for interacting with these chips.

Handling all of that requires some abstraction, and that is currently being enhanced in Linux! A new interface, called exec_op is showing up. It has been designed to match the most diverse situations. It should ease the support of advanced controllers as well as the implementation of vendor-specific NAND flash features.

This talk will start with some basics about NAND memories, especially their weaknesses and how we get rid of them. It will also show how the interaction between NAND chips and controllers has been standardized over the years and how it is planned to drive NAND controllers within Linux.

Tuesday, March 13

  •  10:50 – 11:40 – Comparing and Contrasting Embedded Linux Build Systems and Distributions by Drew Moseley, Mender.io

We will discuss the various options for creating embedded Linux operating systems. We will provide a basic description of each option, including an overview of the workflow for each choice. The talk will cover the advantages and disadvantages of each of these options and provide viewers with a matrix of design considerations to help them pick the right choice for their design. We will cover the following options:

  • Yocto/OpenEmbedded
  • Buildroot
  • OpenWRT/LEDE
  • Slimmed down desktop distributions (e.g. Debian, Raspbian, Ubuntu)

We will also touch upon other tools, such as crosstool-ng and ucLinux, which are peripherally related to building embedded Linux systems. The focus for this section will be to make the viewers aware of these tools as they frequently come up while researching embedded Linux so that you are better informed which tools are available.

  • 11:50 – 12:40 – The Things Network: An IOT Global Phenomenon by Bryan Smith, Tacit Labs

IoT has many connectivity options and systems based on Low Power Networks(LPN’s) such as LoraWAN are showing a great deal of promise. LoraWAN uses the ISM Band which doesn’t require a license for use.

The Things Networks (TTN) is a community about LoraWAN, Low Power Wide Area Network (LPWAN). It’s collaboratively built by passionate people, Open Source Software and Open Governance. The network has a manifesto and fair access policy that governs its use and management. In the session we’ll discuss:

  • The technology behind LoraWAN, TTN and similar networks.
  • TTN’s impact on public and private LPWAN’s.
  • The initiators and communities that install and build LoraWAN gateways.
  • Lastly we’ll discuss the impact of the deployments in real world use cases.

There will also be a live demo of a LoraWAN gateway and node in action on several public networks including TTN as well as others.

  • 14:00 – 14:50 – I + I2C = I3C: What’s in this Additional ‘I’? by Boris Brezillon, Bootlin (formerly Free Electrons)

The MIPI Alliance recently released version 1 of the I3C (pronounce ‘eye-three-see’) bus specification, which is supposed to be an improvement over the long-standing I2C and SPI protocols. Compared to I2C/SPI, I3C provides a higher data rate, lower power consumption and additional features such as dynamic address assignment, host join, in-band interrupts. For the last year or so, Free Electrons has been working with Cadence Design Systems on supporting this new kind of bus in Linux.

With this talk we would like to introduce this new bus and the concepts it brings to the table. We will also detail how we plan to expose the new features exposed by the I3C protocol in Linux and go through future possible improvements of the I3C framework that has already been submitted for review on the Linux kernel mailing list.

  • 15:00 – 15:50 – Android Common Kernel and Out of Mainline Patchset Status by Amit Pundir & John Stultz, Linaro

A quick overview of what the speakers ares going to cover in this session.

  • A brief background on Android common kernels – Out of tree Android patches and how they have evolved over time.
  • The current/active patchset introduction and status – Their use cases in Android and on-going upstreaming efforts if any.
  • A brief Intro to android-mainline-tracking tree.
  • Rebasing latest android-$LTS tree to latest linux release tag
  • Find/Report/Fix Android regressions or ABI breakages in mainline kernel.
  • 16:20 – 17:10 – Tock, The Operating System for a Programmable IoT by Amit Levy, Stanford University

Tock is an open-source operating system for low-power ARM Cortex-M microcontrollers that enables radically different kinds of embedded and IoT products.

In typical embedded systems, every line of code is fully trusted because embedded operating systems lack traditional isolation mechanisms like processes. Unfortunately, this makes developing secure products difficult, and running third-party applications virtually impossible.

Tock uses a language sandbox in the kernel and a process-like hardware enforced mechanism in userspace to isolate third-party and other untrusted code in the system.

In this presentation I’ll introduce Tock’s vision for IoT and how its isolation mechanisms work. Then, I’ll use examples of deployed systems and products using Tock to show how developers can use it to build more secure and extensible IoT systems today.

  • 19:00 – 20:00 – BoF: Open Source Hardware by Drew Fustini, OSH Park

Open Source Hardware BoF (Birds of a Feather) session for those interested in how Open Source Hardware design can benefit embedded Linux systems.

The session will start will start with a short presentation of a few slides to clarify terminology and highlight Open Source Hardware projects relevant to Linux. The panelists will then lead a discussion with the BoF attendees about the benefits and challenges of designing Open Source Hardware.

Jason and Drew can talk about the experience of working with community, manufacturers, and distributors to create an Open Source Hardware platform. Leon can speak about his experience of learning hardware design as a software engineer, and how he took his Raspberry Pi HATs from concept to product. John can speak about his experience leading an Open Source Hardware platform within a large corporation.

Wednesday, March 14

  • 11:05 – 11:55 – Landscape of Linux IoT Ecosystems by Christian Daudt, Cypress Semiconductor

IoT products are getting richer in their functionality daily, and as a result there is a trend for increased use of Linux in these products. As we are early in the IoT ecosystem cycle, there is a large number of projects and products vying for developer attention as frameworks and protocols to be used in new product development. This talk provides an overview of the options available and how they relate to each other. It covers OS stacks such as EdgeX Foundry, Automotive Grade Linux, Android Things, IoTivity, Tizen, etc.. as well as IoT-tailored cloud integrations from cloud vendors such as AWS, Google, Microsoft.

  • 12:05 – 12:55 – CPU Power Saving Methods for Real-time Workloads by Ramesh Thomas, Intel

Configurations created for real time applications mostly disable power management completely to avoid any impact on latency. It is however, possible to enable power management to a degree to which the impact on latency is tolerable based on application requirements. This presentation addresses how CPU idle states can be enabled and tuned to allow power savings while running real time applications.

The presentation will give a background of the issues faced by real-time applications when CPU power management is enabled. It will then explain tools, configurations and methods that can be used to tune applications and CPU power management in the kernel to be able to save power without impacting the deterministic latency tolerance requirements.

  • 14:30 – 15:20 – Debian for Embedded Systems: Best Practices by Vagrant Cascadian, Aikidev, LLC

As embedded hardware becomes more capable, Debian becomes an attractive OS for projects. Debian provides clear licensing, a solid technical foundation, and over twenty-five thousand software projects already available within Debian.

Unfortunately, embedded system projects may make changes to a customized Debian OS in ways that make it difficult to apply security updates or system upgrades. This can lead to an unmaintained fork of Debian with long-standing security vulnerabilities unfixed in the hands of end-users. Nobody likes bit-rot.

Many of these common pitfalls can be mitigated or avoided entirely by understanding Debian’s culture, infrastructure, technical norms, and contribution processes. These understandings will improve embedded systems using Debian over the long-term.

  • 15:30 – 16:20 – Civil Infrastructure Platform: Industrial Grade Open Source Base-Layer by Yoshitake Kobayashi, Toshiba Corporation, Software Development and Engineering Center

The Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) is creating a super long-term supported (SLTS) open source “base layer” of industrial grade software. The base-layer consists of the SLTS kernel and a basic set of open source software and standardization concepts. By establishing this “base layer,” the CIP Project will enable the use and implementation of software building blocks in civil infrastructure projects. Currently, all civil infrastructure systems are built from the ground up, with little re-use of existing software building blocks, which drains resources, money and time. In this devroom, we’ll share project strategy, use cases, roadmap, milestones and policies. We’ll also share technical details for each development activities for the base-layer that includes open source, real-time development tools, testing and answer questions.

  • 16:30 – 17:20 – 3D Printing with Linux and Xenomai by Kendall Auel, 3D Systems Corp.
Software running on embedded Linux with Xenomai is used to control a 3D printer. The lessons learned and practical advice will be shared in this presentation. There were many challenges to overcome. A complete 3D printing system requires precise motion control, thermal control, material delivery and monitoring, and coordinated data transfers. All concurrent real time processes must be coordinated and managed, while providing interactive response to user input. In parallel with the real time processing, the system must slice the 3D model into layers for printing, which is by its nature a compute-bound application. The dual-kernel architecture of Linux with Xenomai was ideal for maintaining low and predictable latencies for real time control, while allowing the complex and resource intensive slicing application to run in parallel.

Selecting the sessions was not easy as most talks are relevant, so I’d recommend checking out the whole schedule.

The Embedded Linux Conference & OpenIoT Summit require registration with the fees listed as follows:

  • Early Bird Fee: US$550 (through January 18, 2018)
  • Standard Fee: US$700 (January 19,  February 17, 2018)
  • Late Fee: US$850 (February 18, 2017 – Event)
  • Academic Fee: US$200 (Student/Faculty attendees will be required to show a valid student/faculty ID at registration.)
  • Hobbyist Fee: US$200 (only if you are paying for yourself to attend this event and are currently active in the community)

96Boards Gets a TV Platform Edition Targeting $50 Mid-range Boards, $99 High-end Boards

July 26th, 2016 2 comments

96Boards was born as a hardware and software standard with Consumer (CE) & Enterprise Editions (EE), with different form factors with the latter focusing on server boards, but with similar software requirements requiring recent and mostly open source software. The consumer edition was also split into “Standard” and “Extended” editions, which the latter allowing for larger boards with more features, while the Enterprise Edition has its own larger format, as well as an option for micro-ATX form factor. I’ve just learned that a “fifth” 96Boards standard has been worked on with 96Board TV Platform for Home Gateways, OTT Streaming boxes, and TV boards with prices target of $50 or lower for mid-range boards, and $99 or lower for high-end boards.

96Boards TV Platform Board Layout - Click to Enlarge

96Boards TV Platform Board Layout – Click to Enlarge

96Boards TV Platform hardware requirements:

  • Dimensions – 160 x 120 mm (EE Standard form factor)
  • RAM – 1GB minimum; 2GB recommended
  • Flash – 8GB eMMC minimum
  • WiFi – 802.11 g/n minimum; 802.11ac recommended
  • Bluetooth LE – Optional; at least Bluetooth 4.0

    96Boards TV Platform Board by Hisilicon

    96Boards TV Platform Board by Hisilicon

  • Video Output
    • HDMI 1.4 minimum; HDMI 2.0 recommended
    • HDCP 2.0 minimum; HDCP 2.2 recommended
    • Optional Video Outputs – Composite, Component, S-Video
  • Video Input – Optional same requirements as Video output; used for TV boards
  • Audio – HDMI audio mandatory; options stereo I/O and S/PDIF
  • Ethernet – RJ45; >= 100 Mbps recommended
  • Expansion – 40-pin Low Speed Connector as per 96Boards EE specs
  • Additional functionality options:
    • User input – Optional IR detector
    • Security interfaces – Optional smartcard I/F
    • Transport stream I/F – Optional parallel connector for tuner card (ATSC, DVB-T2, DVB-S2, etc…)

On of the software side, the kernel must be buildable from source code with eventual closed-source binary blobs from either kernel.org, latest Google-supported Android kernel version, or one of the latest two LTS kernels from kernel.org. Supported operating systems must at least one of the latest version of Android, Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, Red Hat, or Linaro / Vendor supported Linux OS built with OpenEmbedded/Yocto Project. The latter being supported by Linaro Home Group (LHG). Other requirements include support for vendor or open source bootloader, optional but recommended OP-TEE support, ARM Trust Firmware, and royalty-free vendor or open source accelerated graphics support. Note that the specifications are aimed at development boards, and not at commercial products. You can find more details in the slides for 96Boards – TV Platform presentation at Linaro Connect Bangkok 2016, as corresponding YouTube video.


I learned about the new 96Boards specifications through the blog post about a “sprint” at the Huawei/Hisilicon facilities in Shenzhen, China on July 11-14. Hisilicon showcased “Poplar” – manufactured by Tocoding Technologies startup – one of the first 96Boards TV platform boards (pictured above), and worked on/demonstrated support for OP-TEE builds on Linux and Android for PlayReady and Widevine DRMs, AOSP TV with TV input framework, LHG OpenEmbedded builds with Yocto 2.1, automatic testing, and so on…

It’s unclear when 96Boards TV platform specifications will be officially released, and when the boards will come to market.

Gateworks Ventana GW5530 SBC is Designed for Drones, Robots, and Digital Signage

July 21st, 2016 No comments

Gateworks Ventana is a family of boards based on NXP i.MX6 processor designed for embedded applications, and often include one or more mini PCIe ports for expansion. Their latest single board computer – Ventana GW5530 –  is powered by an NXP i.MX 6Dual processor coupled with 512MB RAM, 256MB storage, a mini PCIe port, a micro SD / SIM card slot, micro HDMI output, and some I/Os.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Ventana GW5530 specifications:

  • SoC – NXP i.MX6 Dual Core ARM Cortex-A9 processor @ 800MHz with Vivante 2D and 3D GPUs
  • System Memory – 512MB DDR3 (Up to 2GB as option)
  • Storage – 256MB flash (Up to 2GB as option), micro SD/SIM card slot, serial configuration EEPROM
  • Video & Audio Output – micro HDMI 1.4 port
  • Connectivity – Optional u-blox EVA-M8M GPS Receiver with MMCX or u.FL Antenna Connector
  • USB – 1x micro USB 2.0 OTG Port
  • Sensors – 9-axis inertial module (accelerometer/gyro/magnetometer)
  • Expansion
    • High-Power Gen 2.0 mini-PCIe Socket with USB 2.0 Support
    • SIM socket (shared with micro SD card)
    • Video input header for CVBS, Y/C, YPrPb
    • Digital and serial I/O header
  • Debugging – JTAG connector
  • Misc – RTC with battery backup, voltage and temperature monitor, programmable watchdog timer, reset header, LED header
  • Power Supply – 8 to 60V DC input via 2-pin header; Reverse voltage protection
  • Power Consumption – [email protected]°C (typical); 7W Available for mini-PCIe socket
  • Dimensions – 100x35x13 mm
  • Weight – 28 grams
  • Temperature Range – -40°C to +85°C

    Click to Enlarge

    Click to Enlarge

The company can provide OpenWrt, Android, Yocto Linux, and OpenEmbedded board support packages (BSP) for the board. Some documentation can be found on Ventana wiki. The boards targets “small embedded applications such as Man Portable Units (MPUs), Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) equipment, digital signage, and robotics”.

Block Diagram

Block Diagram

The board is available now, with pricing not disclosed, and 1 year warranty. Gateworks GW11038 development kit with GW5530 SBC, OpenWrt BSP, USB and video cables, power supply, and a JTAG programmer can also be purchased for evaluation. More details can be found on Gateworks Ventana GW5530 product page.

Linaro 15.07 Release with Linux 4.2 and Android 5.1

July 31st, 2015 No comments

Linaro 15.07 has been released with Linux 4.2-rc3 (Baseline), Linux 3.10.83, 3.14.45 and 3.18.17 (LSK), and Android 5.1.1_r8.

The Linux kernel got various bug fixes, and a power reduction technique has been implemented for Qualcomm processor. Progress has been made to boot Android with UEFI on Hikey board, and work is still on-going on 96boards including Hisilicon Hikey, Qualcomm DragonBoard 410c, and an upcoming and yet-to-be-formally-announced Marvell PXA1928 board called Helium.

Highlights of this release:

  • Linux Linaro 4.2-rc3-2015.07
    • linaro-android topic updated to 4.2-rc3 and recent AOSP/android-3.18
    • included GATOR version 5.21.1
    • llct-misc-fixes topic: “HACK: of: Limit FDT size for CRC check on arm64” has been dropped. FVP model was the last target to require this hack, but the new FVP firmware doesn’t need it anymore
    • updated integration-linaro-vexpress64 topic by ARM LT: Versatile Express TC2 support is back, HDLCD display now works on TC2, the topic will be renamed to integration-linaro-vexpress next cycle
    • updated integration-linux-qcomlt topic by Qualcomm LT: QCOM Core Power Reduction (CPR) support has been added
    • linaro-builddeb-tweaks topic is dropped (most of our changes have been upstreamed)
  • Linaro builds of AOSP 15.07
    • Android baseline updated to 5.1.1_r8
    • ART CI setup for TIP and stable builds
      • Boot to gui tests added for tip and stable builds
      • ART code coverage for tip and stable builds
      • m-preview based builds setup for emulators
      • ART-host-gtests added for tip and stable builds
    • Hikey builds updated to 5.1.1_r8. Android boots with UEFI and GRUB on HiKey. Wifi drivers are integrated in the build system. Drivers are built as part of Android build process.
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2015.07
    • integrated Linaro GCC 4.9-2015.06
    • updated linux-linaro to 4.2-rc3
    • disabled aarch64 bootwrapper
    • integrated various improvements for LNG CI
    • upstreaming:
      • fixed bootimg.bbclass to work with all kernel image types
      • fixed cmake builds for native recipes
  • Linaro Ubuntu 15.07 – updated packages: fvp-pre-boot (FVP firmware), LSK 3.10.83/3.14.45/3.18.17 and linux-linaro 4.2-rc3 kernels
  • 96boards contributions:
    • DragonBoard 410c is now using NetworkManager only to manage the network (previously a combination with systemd-networkd/resolved has been used).
    • HiKey made some progress toward the switch to UEFI. GRUB is now integrated into the snapshots builds for both AOSP and Debian.
    • Initial Debian based build for Marvell PXA1928 Helium is setup and available.

Visit https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1507/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB, LMB (Linaro Member Builds), and community builds, as well as Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain components.

Linaro 15.06 Release with Linux 4.1 and Android 5.1

June 26th, 2015 1 comment

Linaro 15.06 has been released with Linux 4.1-rc8, Linux 3.10.80 and 3.14.44 (LSK), and Android 5.1.1.

Highlights of this release:

  • Linux Linaro 4.1-rc8-2015.06
    • linaro-android topic updated to 4.1-rc8 and recent aosp/android-3.18
    • included GATOR version 5.21.1
    • updated integration-linaro-vexpress64 topic by ARM LT
  • Linaro builds of AOSP 15.06 is released
    • CI bring up: setup AOSP master build on Emulator
    • implemented boot-to-gui test for Emulator
    • CI bring up: setup AOSP 5.0 headless build for APM X-Gene Mustang
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2015.06
    • updated linux-linaro to ll-20150616.0 (based on 4.1-rc8)
    • updated linux-linaro-stable to 3.10.79
    • workaround meta-virtualization breakage
    • upstreaming
      • fixed bootimg.bbclass to work with all kernel image types
      • imported xorriso v1.4.0 from luvOS
      • cloud-image-*: catch up with OE-core class rename
  • Linaro Ubuntu 15.06 – updated packages: fvp-pre-boot (FVP firmware), LSK 3.10.79/3.14.44/3.18.16 and linux-linaro 4.1-rc8 kernels
  • CI bring up: uprobes/systemtap enabled build

Visit https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1506/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB, LMB (Linaro Member Builds), and community builds, as well as Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain components.

Linaro 15.05 Release with Linux 4.1 and Android 5.1

May 31st, 2015 6 comments

Linaro 15.04 has been released with Linux 4.1-rc4, Linux 3.10.79 and 3.14.42 (LSK), and Android 5.1_r3. The Ubuntu image is now based on Vivid instead of Utopic.

Android and Debian builds/images have been released for Hikey’s 96boards, Ubuntu Vivid and Android builds have been setup for Qualcomm’s Dragonboard 410c. A new platform, Socionext M8M, has also show in Linaro changelog. I could not find details about M8M, but Socionext is a “new company that designs, develops and delivers System-on-Chip products” and focuses on “imaging, networking and other dynamic technologies”. Their latest press release mentions a 4K media processor with build-in HDMI 2.0 Tx and Rx, so maybe M8M is based on that processor, but I can’t know for sure as they have several chips.

Highlights of this release:

  • Linux Linaro 4.1-rc4-2015.05
    • GATOR updated to version 5.21.1
    • updated integration-linaro-vexpress64 topic by ARM LT: PCI support added – for Juno r1.
  • Linaro builds of AOSP 15.05 is released – baseline updated to android-5.1_r3
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2015.05
    • updated linux-linaro to ll-20150519.0 (based on 4.1-rc4)
    • updated linux-linaro-stable (LSK) to 3.10.74
    • update GATOR to 5.21.1
    • updated ODP to v1.0.3
    • Initial for ptest support to LNG images
    • fixed layout differences between external binary linaro toolchains and OE sysroot
    • fixed CI loop code path for external linaro binary toolchains
  • Linaro Ubuntu 15.05
    • migrated from Utopic based images to Vivid
    • fixed transtion from upstart to systemd (introduced with Vivid)
    • updated packages: LSK 3.10.79/3.14.42 and linux-linaro 4.1-rc4 kernels
  • CI bring up: U-Boot upstream
    • upstream U-boot is now build tested and covers all armv7/armv8 configurations (297 in total)
    • build artifacts are published
  • CI bring up: setup Member LCR and Reference LCR builds
  • CI bring up: Socionext M8M board (DEVPLAT-364)
  • 96boards: HiKey Debian and AOSP builds are released
  • 96boards: setup Ubuntu Vivid build for DragonBoard 410c
  • 96Boards: setup Android build for DragonBoard 410c
  • CI bring up: add 3.18 branches for LSK
  • migrating TCWG jenkins jobs and build slaves to ci.linaro.org
  • Ubuntu baseline: Utopic to Vivid migration
  • Linaro CI: added check-lava-status, LAVA job status is now added to the build job on ci.linaro.org (Jenkins)
  • Linaro CI: migration of AOSP based builds from android-build.linaro.org to ci.linaro.org in progress

Visit https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1504/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB, LMB (Linaro Member Builds), and community builds, as well as Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain components.

Linaro 15.04 Release with Linux 4.0 and Android 5.1

May 1st, 2015 1 comment

Linaro 15.04 has been released with Linux 4.0 (baseline), Linux 3.10.74 and 3.14.39 (LSK), and Android 5.1.1.

Other noticeable changes include support for the new DragonBoard 410c 96boards compliant board, the addition of A80 Optimusboard (Allwinner A80) to Android Kitkat build, Hisilicon D01 support added to the Debian installer, and support for Ubuntu ARM64 Gnome rootfs.

Highlights of the release:

  • Linux Linaro 4.0-2015.04
    • updated linaro-android topic: aosp/android-3.18 branch has been merged
    • GATOR topic: version 5.20.1
    • updated integration-linaro-vexpress64 topic by ARM LT (FVP Base and Foundation models, and Juno support)
    • updated topic from Qualcomm LT (IFC6410 and DB410c boards support):
      • Resource Power Manager (RPM) – MSM Shared Memory Driver (SMD) driver
      • quite some changes under drivers/gpu/drm/ related to adv7511 and adv7533 support
      • ASoC support for QCOM platforms
      • external Connector Class (extcon) support (used for USB VBUS and ID detection)
  • Linaro builds of AOSP 15.04
    • baseline updated to android-5.1.1_r1
    • updated Nexus 10 CI for LAVA testing
    • added Optimus A80 Android Kitkat build
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2015.04
    • removed stress recipe in favor of oe-core recipe
    • updated linux-linaro to ll_20150422.0 (based on 4.0)
    • libevent-fb: OE-core updated to 2.0.22, fix require statement
    • APM mustang boot failure was tracked down to using ‘arm64’ as U-Boot arch for the initramfs header while the vendor U-Boot 2013.04 expects ‘arm’.
    • upstreaming – strace: fix build for aarch64; libgpg-error 1.18: simplify tuple handling and add armv8b support
  • Linaro Ubuntu 15.04 – updated packages: LSK 3.10.74/3.14.39 and linux-linaro 4.0 kernels
  • U-Boot: upstream fastboot support
  • Add HiSilicon D01 platform support to Debian installer
  • Updated android-build job to work with docker slaves
  • Cleaned up ILP32 build job
  • LSK: enable debug options on regular builds
  • linux-linaro: ll-fold.sh script fixed to work correctly with newer git versions
  • CI bring up: tshark board Android member build
  • Added Ubuntu arm64 gnome rootfs
  • Added D01 platform to Coresight CI loop

Check out https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1504/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB, LMB (Linaro Member Builds), and community builds, as well as Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain components.

Ventana GW5220 ARM Linux SBC Supports WiFi, Wimax, 3G Cellular Connectivity & PoE

April 29th, 2015 No comments

Gateworks recently launched another Freescale i.MX6 board part of theur Ventana family with Ventana GW5220 single board computer with Freescale i.MX6 dual processor, HDMI out, Ethernet, and a PCIe slot that takes modules adding WiFi 802.11 b/g/n/a, 4G Wimax, and 3G (CDMA/GSM) connectivity, as well as other compatible PCIe modules.
Gateworks_GW5220Gateworks GW5520 board specifications:

  • SoC- Freescale i.MX6 Dual with 2x Cortex A9 core @ 800MHz and Vivante GPU
  • System Memory – 512 MB (default) to 2GB DDR3-800 SDRAM
  • Storage – 256 MB (default) to 2GB Flash, micro SD slot, serial configuration EEPROM
  • Connectivity – 1x Gigabit Ethernet port (RJ45)
  • Video Output and Input – HDMI 1.4 out, CVBS, Y/C, and YPbPr inputs, LVDS output (TIA/EIA 644-A)
  • Audio – HDMI, analog stereo Line In/Out, or Headphone/Mic
  • Expansion – 2x Mini PCIe sockets including one supporting USB and SIM socket, and the other supporting PCIe, mSATA and USB signals.
  • Other I/O ports:
    • Serial – 2x RS232, CAN Bus 2.0B @ 1 Mbps, optional RS485 serial port
    • SPI, GPIO
    • USB – 1x USB 2.0 OTG port up to 480 Mbps
  • Misc – RTC with battery,  voltage & temperature monitor; 6-axis accelerometer/magnetometer, optional GPS receiver, etc…
  • Power Supply – 8 to 60V DC via a power barrel or 36 to 60V DC via 802.3af PoE
  • Typical power consumption – 2W Watts @ 25 C (0.08A @ 24VDC)
  • Dimensions – 100 x 70 x 21 mm
  • Weight – 57 grams
  • Operating Temperature – -40 to +85 C
Ventana GW5220 Block Diagram

Ventana GW5220 Block Diagram

The company can provide OpenWRT, OpenEmbedded/Yocto, and Android BSPs (Board Support Packages). A development kit with GW5220 network computer, cables (Ethernet, Serial, USB, AV), a passive PoE power injector and power supply, and a JTAG programmer is also available. More technical details about the board and supported wireless modules can be found on Ventana Wiki.

Ventana GW5220 board has started shipping, and costs $297 per unit for 100 pieces orders. The development kit pricing has not been disclosed, but you can find request more information via Ventana Development Kits page, as well as Ventana GW5520 product page.