Archive

Posts Tagged ‘projector’

Rikomagic Introduces V3 TV Stick, MK39 TV Box, R3 Projector, and DS01 Digital Signage Player

September 19th, 2017 1 comment

Rikomagic will launch four new Android devices this month with RKM V3 TV stick powered by Rockchip RK3328 processor, RKM MK39 TV box / mini PC based on Rockchip RK3399, RKM R3 projector with an octa-core processor, and DS01 digital signage player.

RKM V3 TV Stick

RKM V3 specifications:

  • SoC – Rockchip RK3328 quad core Cortex A53 processor @ 1.5 GHz with Mali-450MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – 2 GB RAM
  • Storage – 8 GB eMMC flash + micro SD card up to 32GB
  • Video & Audio Output – HDMI 2.0a up to 4K @ 60 Hz with HDR10 and HLG support
  • Video Codec – 4K VP9, H.265 and H.264. 1080p VC-1, MPEG-1/2/4, VP6/8
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet, 802.11 b/g/n WiFi, Bluetooth 4.2
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 port, 1x USB 3.0 port
  • Misc – IR receiver? (TBC)
  • Power Supply – 5V/2A via power barrel jack

The stick runs Android 7.1 OS with Google Play store, Miracast, DLNA, etc… It ships with a USB male to female adapter, and a power supply.

RKM MK39 TV box

RKM MK39 mini PC specifications:

  • SoC – Rockchip RK3399 hexa core processor with 2x ARM Cortex A72 cores @ up to 2.0 GHz, 4x ARM Cortex A53 cores @ up to 1.5 GHz, and ARM Mali-T860MP4 GPU
  • System Memory – 4GB DDR3
  • Storage – 32 GB eMMC flash + micro SD card slot up to 32GB
  • Video Output – HDMI 2.0a up to 4K @ 60 Hz
  • Video Codecs – 4K H.265 & VP9 decoding
  • Audio Output – HDMI, optical S/PDIF
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet, dual band 802.11 b/g/n/ac WiFi + Bluetooth 4.1
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 ports, 1x USB 3.0 port, 1x USB type C port (no details about supported features)
  • Misc – IR receiver
  • Power Supply – 12V/2A

The device also runs Android 7.1, and ships with an HDMI cable, a simple IR remote control, and the power supply.

R3 Projector, and DS01 Digital Signage Player

We don’t have the full details about the last two devices to launch this month, but we do know RKM R3 will be an Android 6.0 smart Full HD projector powered by an Octa-core processor (maybe RK3368) coupled with 2GB RAM, 32GB storage, and delivering 220 lumen brightness, while DS01 will be a digital signage player powered by Rockchip RK3228 quad core Cortex A17 processor, and also sold with the board only.

Eventually, all details about the four new models should be provided on Rikomagic products’ page, and sold to individuals via their Aliexpress store.

Factory Prices of Some TV Boxes and Accessories

September 12th, 2017 13 comments

Some companies that contact me have not read the about section of the blog, and either tell me they can give me a good price for TV boxes, and some even send me their price list. And this morning, I’ve received a EXW (Ex Works) price list this of Amlogic S912/S905X/S905W and Rockchip based TV boxes, as well as some air mice, and Android projectors.

The cheapest models are based on S905W and RK3229, with MXQ Pro 1GB/8GB going for $17.5 per unit for 200 pieces orders. For reference that models goes for around $26 shipped online before any discount coupon you may find. At the other end of the scale, you have TX2 model with 3GB RAM, 64GB flash going for $77.5 EXW for 200-unit orders, and sold online for $86 including shipping, again before coupon. Margin must be really low, or the prices above are not that competitive, but nevertheless it gives an idea of factory prices of various TV boxes. Air mice are really cheap, and backlight usually only adds 90 cents.

Lightank W100 is a Windows 10 Apollo Lake mini PC with Projector Sold in China

July 10th, 2017 No comments

We’ve previously seen Windows 10 mini PCs with a projector based on Intel Cherry Trail processor such as Sunty SP-001 and Partaker M3, but there’s now an Apollo Lake model coming soon, at least in China, in an interesting form factor.LighTank W100 specifications:

  • SoC – Intel Celeron N3350 dual core Apollo Lake processor @ 1.10 / 2.40 GHz with 12EU Intel HD graphics 500 @ 200 / 650 MHz; (6W TDP)
  • System Memory – 4GB RAM
  • Storage – 32GB eMMC flash
  • Video Output – HDMI output
  • Audio – HDMI, stereo audio jack, microphone array
  • Projector – 1280×800 native resolution; 1000 ANSI lumens; 30,000 hours LED lifetime
  • Connectivity – Ethernet, WiFi and Bluetooth
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 port, 2x USB 2.0 ports
  • Dimensions – 345 x 338 x 57 mm
  • Weight – 1.5 kg

The projector comes pre-isntalled with Windows 10 and Office365, and boots in 30 seconds. It ships with a keyboard, and mouse. There also appears to be a USB miracast adpater that you can connect to your laptop to easily mirror your display on the projector. The microphone array allows to use Skype for business or other videoconference applications in meeting.

The promotion video (in Chinese) shows some of the use cases and features of the projector.

Lightank W100 will start selling for 4,999 RMB ($735) on JD.com on the 12th of July, but eventually it might be possible to purchase online worldwide via other e-retailers.

Via Liliputing, GizmoChina & Mydrivers

Rikomagic RKM R1 Mini Projector Review – Part 2: Android Firmware, Kodi, Touchpad, and HDMI Input

April 10th, 2017 1 comment

Rikomagic RKM R1 is a projector running Android 4.4.4, and powered by Rockchip RK3128 quad core Cortex A7 processor with 1GB RAM, and 32GB storage. It has a particular feature as it comes with a touchpad on the top of the case as we’ve seen in the unboxing and teardown part of the Rikomagic R1 review. Today, I’ll report my experience with the projector playing games in Android, 1080p videos with Kodi 14.2, using the touchpad, and connecting a laptop through the HDMI input port. I’ll also run some benchmarks as usual.

RKM R1 Android User Experience and HDMI Input

I wanted to relax and use the projector on the bed pointing to the ceiling. RKM R1 comes with a tripod, but it’s quite small, not the projector would fall off, so I used my own tripod, connected a USB keyboard, and the USB RF dongle for Tronsmart Mars G01 gamepad as I planed to play some games.

Click to Enlarge

I turned it on, and it was already all good to use, as I had already configured WiFi using the touchpad and USB keyboard, and installed various apps and games using Google Play, all without any issue whatsoever. It was a big difference in terms of user-friendlyness compared to Doogee P1 projector when it comes to initial setup, as you don’t need to go through various steps to scan a QR Code, install the control app on your smartphone and so on.

I had my (thick) curtain closed, and once I adjusted the focus with the wheel on the side of the projector the output projector looks like that.

Click to Enlarge

I would have wished for a brighter picture, so RKM R1 is better suited in really dark room or at night. If you want more control about the display there’s a setting section for this. The auto-rotate screen has nothing to do with landscape or portrait like in tablets or phone, but makes sure the bottom of the screen always faces down. For example, if you move the projector from the bed and turn it up to screw on the ceiling it will rotate the display 180 degrees so that it shows properly.

Click to Enlarge

I started playing Beach Buggy Racing with the gamepad, and it worked very smoothly in the tutorial, but then I noticed some degradation of performance in gameplay. Note that the framebuffer resolution is set to 1280×720 which makes it easier compared to most recent TV boxes where it is set to 1920×1080. Before considering we are using an old Mali-400MP GPU, it’s not too bad, the game as set the maximum graphics setting by default probably due to the low resolution.

By default the volume was very, so I used the remote control to turn up the volume, and while I could hear music and audio effects during the game, the quality was quite poor. I decided to connect my headphones to the 3.5mm audio jack, and the audio was quite saturated. I could eventually find a sweet spot by not pushing the audio jack fully, but obviously it’s not ideal. I would not say the fan is very noisy, but it will be a problem for some people, as it’s noisier than some mini PCs I’ve tried in the past.

I moved the projector outdoors evening time, and connected some USB powered speakers, but sill using the 3.5mm audio jack. I have not mention the power supply simply because the projector is battery powered, and I can last 4 to 5 hours for the projector on playing videos at times, and in the launcher at other times.

Click to Enlarge

Instead of playing games, I decided to start YouTube to play a few videos, and the only problem I really had was to switch to full screen mode. For some reason the full screen icon on shows a very short time, and when using the touchpad to go full screen I would often switch to another video or jump to the end of the current video. Apart from that, no problem, and the quality is OK, just like the one you may get if you watch a sports event at a bar. Of course this is standard resolution, so don’t expect miracles.

Click to Enlarge

The touchpad supports multi-finger gestures such as taping with two fingers for going back, or sliding with two fingers upwards for page up, and downwards or page down.

RKM R1 also comes with an HDMI input which can be convenient for presentation or any media that you prefer to play on another device. I connected CHUWI Laptbook 14.1 Windows 10 laptop, and enabled HDMI Input in the settings.

Within a few seconds I could the Windows 10 desktop from my laptop on the projected display, opened a few apps, and played a YouTube video. No problem, except audio saturation in the speakers. Audio really seems to be one of the weaknesses of this projector.

You can watch a quick demo of RKM R1 projector in the embedded video below.

Rikomagic RKM R1 Kodi Video Playback

As beside Android 4.4.4, it’s also running the older Kodi 14.2, so RKM R1 feels some sort of time machine, going back about 2 years in times.

Click for Original Size

Since the projector resolution is 854×480 native, and the video decoder is limited to 1080p60, I’ll skip the usual 4K video decoding and audio pass-through (since there’s no hardware for it), and only went through some 1080p videos (Linaro samples) played over a SAMBA share:

  • H.264 codec / MP4 container (Big Buck Bunny) – 1080p – OK
  • MPEG2 codec / MPG container –  1080p – OK
  • MPEG4 codec, AVI container – 1080p – Plays, but frequent buffering
  • VC1 codec (WMV) – 1080p – 1080p – Audio only, frequent audio cuts
  • Real Media (RMVB), 720p / 5Mbps – Plays in slow motion (software decode)
  • WebM / VP8 – 1080p – Plays in slow motion (software decode), frequent buffering.
  • H.265 codec / MPEG TS container  – 1080p – Not smooth at all (software decode)

That was no good, so I repeated the tests from a USB hard drive instead, and while I could browse the hard drive, none of the videos would start to play. Last change with a USB flash drive instead (lower power consumption):

  • H.264 codec / MP4 container (Big Buck Bunny) – 1080p – OK
  • MPEG2 codec / MPG container –  1080p – OK
  • MPEG4 codec, AVI container – 1080p – OK
  • VC1 codec (WMV) – 1080p – 1080p – Audio only, and it cuts after a while (stuck at 00:08 time mark)
  • Real Media (RMVB), 720p / 5Mbps – Plays in slow motion (software decode)
  • WebM / VP8 – 1080p – Plays in slow motion
  • H.265 codec / MPEG TS container  – 1080p – Not smooth at all (software decode)

So it’s clearly not the best platform for Kodi, but if you are only playing the most common videos codec like H.264 or MPEG2, you’ll probably do fine.

Rikomagic RKM R1 System Information

During the teardown I found two flash chips, and since there were advertised as 16 Gbit each on several websites, I believed there was only 4GB storage on the projector, but apparently this is a mistake as there’s just under 32 GB flash on the board with a 1.91GB internal storage partition, and a 32GB (less than that in reality, maybe ~28GB) “NAND flash” partition. The firmware is rooted by default.

Click to Enlarge

The system completely lacks DRM, but considering the projector is only running Android 4.4, I’m not even sure that’s a problem.

Click to Enlarge

CPU-Z wrongly reports a “Rockchip RK3066” processor, but it gets the rest correct with a quad core Cortex A7 processor clocked at 216 MHz to1.20 GHz with a Mali-400MP GPU. Android 4.4.4 runs on top of Linux 3.10.0 in rk30sdk board. 999MB total RAM is available to the system, but at the time I ran CPU-Z only 448 MB was available.

Click to Enlarge

Rikomagic RKM R1 Benchmarks

Antutu 6.x confirms Rockchip RK3128 is not exactly a beast, and the projector performance may not satisfy everybody, depending on which apps you play to run. Performance may not be that important if you only plan to watch videos, or use the HDMI input.

While the processor is slow I never had “app not working: windows, likely because the internal flash performance is quite decent at 39.91 MB/s (R) and 31.46 MB/s (W)

Click to Enlarge

Finally, let’s have a look at network performance by copying a file over WiFi + SAMBA with ES File Explorer in both direction. The results are rather weak (1.8 MB/s on average), and may explain why some videos were buffering in Kodi.

WiFi Throughput in MB/s – Click to Enlarge

I also did some tests with iperf in case the culprit is SAMBA as with Amlogic Android Marshmallow firmware, but results with iperf are also rather low (about 3 MB/s):

Upload:

Download:

Conclusion

Rikomagic RKM R1 Android projector works much better than Doogee P1, is much easier to use, and also comes with HDMI input. The projector is also mostly bug free, and I had almost no problems playing YouTube videos, but that does not mean the user experience is perfect. First the processor is quite low end, and relying on older software like Android 4.4 and Kodi 14.2, possibly because of all the extra work needed to make the DLP projector work.

PROS

  • Mostly bug-free and responsive firmware
  • Projector works well in dark room
  • The touchpad on top of the project is an amazing idea, and works really well, also supporting multi-finger gestures.
  • HDMI input to connect another computer or laptop
  • Built-in battery  that last about 4 to 5 hours with the projector
  • Google Play install, and no problem to install and use apps such as YouTube
  • OTA firmware update appears to be supported

CONS

  • Low end SoC with quad core Cortex A7 and Mali-400MP GPU
  • The projector runs somewhat older software: Android 4.4 and Kodi 14.2
  • Kodi 14.2 does not work with all video codec, for example H.265 and VC1 are not supported
  • WiFi performance is rather poor
  • Built-in speaker of low quality, and audio is often distorted or saturates via the 3.5mm audio jack (headphone and external speakers)
  • Lack of DRM support
  • Higher brightness would be beneficial in some situations
  • Focus appears to be slightly different on left and right sides of display (at least with my sample)

I’d like to thank Rikomagic for providing a sample, and if you are interested you could purchase the projector for around $246 shipped by DHL, or if you plan to order in quantities, contact the company via the product page.

Rikomagic R1 Android Projector Review – Part 1: Unboxing and Teardown

March 27th, 2017 5 comments

Rikomagic R1 Android mini projector runs Android 4.4 on Rockchip RK3128 quad core processor, and the company sent me a sample for review, so today I’ll first do an unboxing, and partial teardown, before testing the projector in more details in the second part of the review.

Rikomagic R1 Projector Unboxing

The projector comes with a white package marked RKM R1.

The bottom of the package indicated its unsurprisingly based on Texas Instruments DLP technology with a LED light, and is equipped with a touch panel and a battery.

Click to Enlarge

More importantly, there’s a QR code that links to R1 Setup Guide, which for once will be useful, as this device has some unique features.

Click to Enlarge

The projector ships with a 5V/2.5A power supply, an IR remote control, a HDMI cable, a tripod, and an adapter to make the interface between the projector box and the tripod.

Click to Enlarge

The top of the device has a touch area, the front comes with the projector and plenty of ventilation holes. One of the sides features opening for speakers, and the other the power button, a reset pinhole likely use for firmware recovery, and a wheel to manually adjust focus. The rear panel includes a micro SD slot, the IR receiver window, a 3.5mm headphone jack, HDMI input, two USB ports, and the power jack.

The tripod and adapter feels a little flimsy, but it does the job. It’s easy to assemble, and to adjust to your needs.

There are two locations to screw the tripod to the adapter, and it’s also possible to mount the projector on the tripod to project the image on the ceiling.

Rikomagic R1 Projector Teardown

RKM R1 is the second Android projector I review, and with the first one I miserably failed to teardown Doogee P1, so I was quite motivated to succeed with R1 projector. The problem is that it was not easy. There are four rubber pad on the bottom of the case, but no screws underneath. I eventually figured out I had to take the top cover using a sharp to lift it up at at least two of the corners, and work my way under the cover with an old credit card to peel it off.

At this stage, we can see the touch panel board is called JSX-TP15 and comes with two chips: Elan Micro EM78F611 USB Flash MCU, and eKTF2135EAW which should be a Touch Sensor IC from Elan. We can also see the projector comes with a fan to cool the projector.

Click to Enlarge

The next step is to cover the second cover. First I tried to do that on the corners but just damaged the box a bit doing so. So finally, I just pulled the cover with my hand using the rectangle area in the middle.

Click to Enlarge

We’ve got the project on the bottom left, right on the left of the fan. The Rockchip processor and memory (1GB) are covered by some sort of black heatsink, so we still have plenty to ICs to checkout starting with Ampak AP6330 module for 802.11 b/g/n WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0 LE connectivity. Sandisk SDTNSGAMA-016GM NAND flash gives us 16Gbit (2GB) storage a far cry from the 32GB flash promised, but more on that latter. Other ICs include GL850G USB hub, Texas Instruments DRV632 audio stereo line driver, MSTAR MST6M182VG-LF-Z1 “video processing IC”, Terawins T113AI visual processor with 24-bits TTL, single/dual LVDS, serial RGB output… and for the projector part: DLP DPP2607 DLP PICO processor combined with Winbond W948D6FBHX5E 256 Mbit SDRAM. So it appears that both T113A and the MSTAR IC are used to convert the video signal from the Rockchip processor to make it compatible with the DLP chip.

I loosened 6 screws to try to take out of the board completely, but the battery is firmly attached to the case, and it was also require disconnecting the DLP projector part, so I did not go further, especially there’s only one noticeable IC on the other side of the board: another Sandisk SDTNSGAMA-016GM NAND flash.


This brings to total storage to 32 Gbit, meaning there’s just 4GB storage, not 32GB as previously advertised. [Update: Android shows two partitions: one 1.91 GB, one 25.5 GB, so it seems the info on Internet about the NAND flash having 16Gbit capacity is wrong, and it’s 16GB, with a total of 32 GB (Gigabyte) as advertised]

Since time I was not entirely confident I could put everything together without issue, but finally it works fine.

Click to Enlarge

Brightness is not that strong so you’ll need a failry dark room to use. I quickly use the touch panel on the top, and it’s just fantastic, no need to connect a mouse or install an Android app like I had to do with Doogee P1. But we’ll find out a bit more about the details in the second part of the review.

I’d like to thank Rikomagic for sending a review sample. Resellers can inquire the company to purchase in quantities via the product page, while individuals can purchase the projector for around $246 shipped with DHL on Aliexpress.

Avegant Glyph a Headphone with Two DLP Projectors Acting as Your Own Portable Home Theater

March 7th, 2017 2 comments

I reviewed my first and only Android VR headset last year, and while it was fun to use for short periods, I found it very uncomfortable to my eyes and head for periods of usage over 15 minutes, and would definitely not watch an entire movie on such device. Avegant’s engineers worked for a headset for the military that had to be used for long periods of time, and they found they could adapt their product for consumer use and create Avegant Glyph, and alternative to VR headset that looks like a stereo headset, but also includes two 720p DLP projectors placed right in front of your eyes, hereby creating your own private, and portable – home theater.

Avegant Glyph specifications:

  • Resolution – 1280x720p per eye via 2 million micro-mirrors
  • Aspect Ratio – 16:9
  • Field of view – ~40° diagonal
  • Diopter Adjustment – +1 to -7 range
  • Adjustable IPD, and projectors vertical position.
  • Head Tracking – 9 Axis IMU
  • Video & Audio Input – micro HDMI
  • Audio-Only Input – 3.5mm TRRS (standard AUX)
  • Frequency Response: 20Hz-20kHz; Dynamic Range: 95 dB
  • USB – 1x micro USB port for charging
  • Battery – 2,060 mAh Li Ion battery with up to 4 hours video playback, and unlimited passive audio
  • Dimensions – 190.5 x 190.5 x 101.6 mm
  • Weight – 411 grams

The device weight is about the same as the virtual reality headset I used, but I can still believe it might be more comfortable due to the different weight distribution. It’s also not a standalone device, so you need to connect a source via the micro HDMI port and/or audio jack, which in many cases means purchasing a XXX to micro HDMI adapter. The Glyph firmware can be upgraded for “enhanced features and capabilities”. Beside watch 2D and 3D movies, it can also be used for 3D gaming, flying drones, private mode while connected to laptop, etc…  Note that contrary to VR headset, you still have peripheral vision, which may be an downside since it’s less immersive, and an upside, as you are still aware of the environment around you.

Charbax interviewed a company’s representative as they showcased the Glyph at Mobile World Congress 2017.


Avegant Glyph first started to sell in the US last year, and some larger blog already reviewed it, such as Wired and Engadget, and while they really liked the video and audio experience, they still found it to be a little uncomfortable to use for longer duration, although it was an improvement over VR headsets. Customer feedback on Amazon, where is it sold for $499, is positive on average, but with many mixed reviews, possibly because the company made some adjustments to their product since they fist launched it. You’ll find more information on Avegant website.

Rikomagic R1 mini Projector Runs Android 4.4 on Rockchip RK3128 Quad Core Processor

February 27th, 2017 1 comment

Rikomagic R1 may look like a Android TV box from some angles, but it’s actually a mini projector powered by Rockchip RK3128 quad core processor, with 1GB RAM, 32GB storage, with many of the port of featuring found on a TV box, plus a 854×480 DLP LED projector.

Rikomagic R1 projector specifications:

  • SoC – Rockchip RK3128 quad core Cortex A7 processor @ 1.2 GHz with Mali-400MP2 GPU
  • System memory – 1GB DDR3
  • Storage – 32GB NAND flash + micro SD slot up to 32GB
  • Projector
    • DLP technology with 0.3″ DMD + RGB LED with 1000 lumens (TBC), likely based on Texas Instruments DLP3000.
    • Resolution – 854×480 (WVGA)
    • Contrast ratio – 2000:1
    • Projection – Area – 30 to 120″; distance: 1 to 5 meters; ratio: 1.19:1
    • Keystone correction – automatic, vertical: -/+ 40 degrees
    • Manual focus
  • Video Input – HDMI 1.4 port
  • Audio – 3.5mm earphone jack, built-in speaker(s)
  • Connectivity – Dual band 802.11 b/g/n WiFi, and Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 host port, 1x USB OTG port
  • Misc – IR receiver, touchpad on top of enclosure, power button, reset pinhole
  • Power Supply – 5V/2.5A via power barrel
  • Battery – 5,000 mAh @
  • Dimensions – 137 x 82 x 24mm

The projector runs Android 4.4, and ships with an HDMI cable, an IR remote control, a power supply, and a tripod.

In some way Rikomagic R1 is very similar to Doogee P1 with a quad core processor running Android 4.4, an WVGA DLP projector, and a battery. R1 however adds HDMI input, a micro SD port, a larger eMMC flash, an audio jack, and an IR receiver. The resolution may seem low, but based on my experience with Doogee P1 review, it’s perfectly usable. The stated luminance of 1,000 lumens contrast a lot with the 70 lumens listed for Doogee P1, but it’s probably because one is expressed in raw lumens and the other, in effective lumens.

Rikomagic R1 is not for sale yet, but considering Doogee P1 goes for about $160, I’d expect the new projector to be little more expensive due to the extra features. More details may be available on the product page.

Canon 4K600STZ 4K UHD Laser Projector Delivers up to 6,000 Lumens

November 29th, 2016 3 comments

At the beginning of the year, I wrote about Texas Instruments’ DLP technology for affordable 4K projectors, and the company’s DLP 0.67″ digital micromirror device (DMD) was expected to be found in 4K projector in the second half of 2016. So I went on Amazon, and I could find lots of “4K UHD projectors” with prices starting at $599, but if we look into details we may find some of those are “4K projector” with a 1280×800 resolution… And many of the ones selling in the $2,000+ range don’t list their native resolution with many able to handle 4K input, but actually projecting at 1920×1080 as can be seen in the table below.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

The most honest companies promote those models as “projectors with 4K Enhancement”, but if you want a true 4K projector, the cheapest option is probably Sony VPL-VW350ES that goes for close to $10,000 on Amazon. CNET has a review of this model, and finds it to be very good with “excellent 4K content”, but “for most 4K current sources and all 1080p material, its resolution advantage over 1080p projectors is negligible”. I’m writing about 4K projectors today, as I’ve come across an article on Nikkei Technology about Canon 4K600STZ, the “world smallest and lightest” 4K projector based on laser technology, and capable of delivering a brightness of up to 6,000 lumens.

canon-4k-projector-laser

I guess miniaturization is still in its infancy for such technology, as the projector weights 26 kilograms and measures a good 624 x 559 x 201 mm. The projector features Canon’s Aisys 0.74″ 4K-LCOS (liquid crystal on silicon) 4096×2400 panel, and the company managed to reduce the size by combining it to a new laser light source. The architecture of the new system is described in the diagram below.

4k-projector-laser-architecture6,000 lumens brightness was achieved on some laser modules only, and it’s likely the final product may have a lower maximum brightness. The light source can be used for about 20,000 hours, and up to 40,000 hours if brightness is adjusted lower.

This type of 4K projector is mostly targeted at the enterprise with applications such as digital signage, projection mapping, CAD (computer-aided design), training simulators, etc… Canon 4K600STZ is scheduled for release in April 2017 at a cost of around ¥8 million (~ $71,000 US).

Categories: Hardware Tags: 4k, canon, projector