Archive

Posts Tagged ‘sbc’

QNAP QBoat Sunny IoT Mini Server Board Officially Announced with Annapurna Labs AL-314 ARM Processor

November 15th, 2017 11 comments

We first had a glance at QNAP QBoat Sunny at CES 2017. At the time, QNAP IoT development board was powered by an Intel AnyWAN GRX750 dual core Atom based processor with 2GB RAM, 4GB flash, three Gigabit Ethernet ports, some mSATA slot and so on.

The company has now officially announced the board, but with a twist, as the Intel processor has been replaced by Annapurna Labs (now part of Amazon) AL-314 quad core ARM Cortex-15 processor instead, and left most of the other features pretty much unchanged.

QBoard Sunny board specifications:

  • Processor – Annapurna Labs AL-314 quad core ARM Cortex-15 processor up to 1.7 GHz
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3L
  • Storage – 512MB NAND flash, 2x M.2 2260/2280 SATA slots for SSDs (Key M)
  • Network connectivity – 3x Gigabit Ethernet
  • USB – 2x USB 3.1 Gen1 ports
  • Audio – 3.5mm audio out jack, 3.5mm audio in jack
  • Expansion
    • 1x M.2 Key A 2230 for Wi-Fi/Bluetooth
    • 40-pin connector, for I2C, UART, SPI, SDIO, GPIO
  • Misc –  Debug console via 3.5mm jack; RTC battery; status and user LEDs; power & system reset buttons; pin connector for 4-wire fan
  • Power – 12V/3A
  • Power Consumption – 9.49 Watts with SSD idle; 13.31 Watts in operation
  • Dimensions – 144 x 126 x 33.5 mm (with heatsink base)
  • Weight – 490 grams
  • Environmental Conditions – 0 to 35˚C, 5 to 95%, non-condensing, wet bulb temperature: 27˚C

The board runs QTS Lite 4.3.3 embedded Linux operating system, supports features like Wake on LAN, scheduled power on/off, and automatic power on after power recovery.

Annapurna Labs does not appear to be the kind of company that release SoC documentation publicly, and I really wonder why they even bothered to setup a website. They (or somebody else) did add support to Alpine SoCs in Linux 4.6, but I’d still assume you’d have to relies on QNAP for the OS and low level software, and just take care of the application on top, praying the lower level feature(s) you need is/are well supported.

Qboat Sunny ships with an Ethernet cable, a quick installation guide, a 36W AC adapter and power cord, a wall mount kit, an M.2 screw kit, and two M.2 SSD heatsinks. The promo video below explains why you may want to use the board in your (IoT) projects, for example using it instead of public cloud services to save money.

The company claims the board is available now at an affordable price. The only thing is I’ve not been able to find the price… At CES 2017, there was talk about a $100 to $120 with the Intel version. [Update: MSRP is $169/€159]. More details may be found on the product page.

Thanks to TLS for the tip.

Gateworks Newport SBCs Powered by Cavium Octeon TX 64-bit ARM SoC are Designed for Networking Applications

November 11th, 2017 3 comments

Gateworks is a US based company that provides embedded hardware solutions to mobile and wireless communications markets such as their NXP i.MX6 powered  Ventana single board computers, including Ventana GW5530 SBC with compact form factor making it suitable for robotics projects and drones.

The company has now launched a new family of single board computers with Newport boards based on Cavium Octeon TX dual and quad core processors, and targeting high performance network applications with up to 5 GbE copper Ethernet ports, 2 SFP ports for fiber.

GW6300/GW6304 SBC – Click to Enlarge

Eight boards from 4 board designs using the dual or quad core version of the processors will be launched in sequence until Q2 2018, but let’s first have a closer look at Newport GW6300/GW6304 boards’ specifications since they are available now:

  • SoC
    • GW6300 – Cavium Octeon TX CN8020 dual core custom ARMv8.1 SoC @ 800 MHz
    • GW6304 – Cavium Octeon TX CN8030 quad core custom ARMv8.1 SoC @ 1.5GHz
  • System Memory
    • GW6300 – 1GB DDR4 (default); optional up to 4GB
    • GW6304 – 2GB DDR4 (default); optional up to 4GB
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC flash (4 to 64GB option), micro SD socket, 1x mSATA 3.0 (See expansion)
  • Networking – 2x Gigabit Ethernet ports (RJ45)
  • GNSS – Ublox ZOE-MQ8 GNSS GPS Receiver with PPS (optional on GW6300, standard on GW6304)
  • USB – 2x USB 3.0 ports up to 5 Gbps
  • Expansion
    • mPCIe socket 1 – PCIe or GW1608x expansion, USB 2.0
    • mPCIe socket 2 – PCIe or mSATA, USB 2.0
    • mPCIe socket 3 – PCIe or USB 3.0, USB 2.0, SIM

      Click to Enlarge

    • Connector for 2x RS232 or 1x RS232/422/485 serial port
    • Digital I/O, I2C, and SPI headers
    • CAN 2.0B bus header via Microchip MCP25625  (optional on GW6300, standard on GW6304)
  • Security – Tamper switch support, optional Maxim DS28C22 Secure Authentication and Encryption
  • Misc – Real Time Clock with battery backup, voltage and temperature monitor, serial configuration EEPROM, programmable watchdog timer, programmable fan speed controller, programmable shut-down and wake-up,
  • Power Supply
    • 8 to 60V DC via barrel jack
    • Ethernet Jack Passive PoE with Input Voltage Range: 10 to 60V
    • Ethernet Jack 802.3at PoE with Input Voltage Range: 37 to 57V
    • Input Voltage Reverse and Transient Protection
  • Power Consumption
    • GW6300 – 6W @ 25°C typ.
    • GW6304 – 8W @ 25°C typ.
  • Dimensions – 105 x 100 x 21 mm (Compatible with Ventana GW5300 SBC)
  • Temperature Range – -40°C to +85°C
  • Weight – 96 grams

GW6300/4 Board Block Diagram – Click to Enlarge

The company provides OpenWrt and Ubuntu board support packages (BSP) for the boards. The company sells the board standalone, but also as a development kit (GW11042) with U-Boot bootloader, OpenWrt Linux BSP, Ethernet/ Serial/USB cables, passive PoE power injector and power supply, and a JTAG programmer. More technical details about software and hardware can be found in the Wiki.

Octeon TX Block Diagram

Octeon TX processors are specifically designed for networking applications, include networking acceleration engines & hardware virtualization, and can deliver IPSec performance of 8Gbps with only 2 cores.

If Newport GW6300/GW6304 SBCs do not match your requirements, Gateworks have 6 more SBCs planned with different form factors and various combinations of Ethernet ports.

Newport Family Matrix – Click to Enlarge

As you can see from the table above, some boards are available now, with a rollout of other versions planned until Q2 2018. Price for GW6300/GW6304 boards is not publicly available, but you can request a quote, inquire for customization options, and find more details on the product page.

SanStar WS-3A Medical Board Runs Android 5.1 on Rockchip RK3288 SoC

September 12th, 2017 2 comments

Warp United, a “Chinese Health 2.0″/point-of-Care medical technology company based in Shenzhen, launched Warp 3 medical recorder – an Android powered handheld device supporting various  vital signs and ultrasound medical modules – earlier this year,  and the company has now just introduced SanStar WS-3A motherboard powered by Rockchip RK3288 quad core Cortex-A17 SoC, and running Android 5.1 in order to allow engineers to develop and connect their own medical modules via the various interfaces of the board, and create their own medical products.

SanStar WS-3A medical motherboard specifications:

  • SoC – Rockchip RK3288 quad core Cortex-A17 processor @ 1.8GHz with an ARM Mali-T764 GPU with support for OpenGL ES 1.1/2.0 /3.0, OpenVG1.1, OpenCL, Directx11
  • System Memory – 2GB or 4GB DDR3
  • Storage – 8GB, 16GB, or 32GB eMMC flash, micro SD slot up to 32GB
  • Video Output / Display I/F
    • HDMI 2.0 up to 3840 x 2160 pixel
    • embedded DisplayPort (eDP)
    • 10-bit dual LVDS, MIPI DSI, 1x backlight header, 1x I2C interface for touchscreen
  • Audio – audio input, output, MIC interfaces, HDMI out.
  • Connectivity
    • Isolated 10/100M Ethernet interface
    • Dual band  802.11 a/b/g/n WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0
    • SIM slot for support for cellular networks via 4G LTE, 3G, 2G modules
    • Optional GPS module : -159dBm, 1575.42MHz, 20 channels, positioning accuracy <10m
  • USB – 7x USB host, 1x USB OTG
  • Serial – 2x RS232
  • Expansion – 4x custom I/O ports, mini PCie interface
  • Camera – USB/MIPI camera up to 13MP
  • Sensors – Support for 3-axis G-sensor, gyroscope, compass
  • Misc – IR receiver; 3x user keys; 1x 12V cooling fan header; 3x LEDs for power, status, and user; RTC with battery; watchdog timer
  • Power Supply – 12V @ 3A-5A via power barrel connector
  • Dimension – 145(L) x 90(W) x 22(H) mm
  • Weight – 99.27g
  • Conformity
    • ISO 13485:2003 Medical devices – Quality management systems – Requirements for regulatory purposes
    • EN 60601-1: 2006 + A1: 2013 Medical Electrical Equipment – Part 1: General Requirements for Basic Safety and Essential Performance
    • EN 60601-1-2:2007 Medical electrical equipment – Part 1-2: General requirements for basic safety and essential performance – Collateral standard: Electromagnetic compatibility – Requirements and tests
    • EN 60950-1:2006+A11:2009+A1:2010+A12:2011 Information technology equipment – Safety –Part 1: General requirements

Block Diagram – Click to Enlarge

The board runs Android 5.1, and support up to two independent screens, or one 4K screen. The best way to find out what’s possible with the board is to check out what the company has done with Warp 3 medical recorder system comprised of a 7″ RK3288 tablet communicating with Volans 3 Vital Sign Module to gather ECG, heart rate (HR), respiration (Resp) rate, temperature (Temp), SpO2, pulse rate (PR), and non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP), as well as various “Urxa 3” ultrasound modules. Software includes an interface to display all those metrics on the tablet, as well as support for cloud based mobile health (mHealth) and EMRs (electronic medical records).

SanStar WS-3A single board computer is available now at an undisclosed price. Visit Warp United’s SanStar WS-3A product page for further details.

Via LinuxGizmos

$99 Inforce IFC6420 Qualcomm Snapdragon 600E Board Comes with 3 HDMI Out/In Ports

September 11th, 2017 3 comments

Inforce Computing has introduced the first board of their “Application Ready Platforms” family with Inforce 6420 SBC powered by Qualcomm Snpadragon 600 / 600E processor, and equipped with three HDMI ports including one HDMI input, and two independent HDMI outputs making suitable for products needing streaming, content sharing or rendering on multiple displays. The board also comes with WiFi, Bluetooth, Ethernet, etc… for “edge computing in the IoT space”.

Click to Enlarge

Inforce 6420 board specifications:

  • SoC –  Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 / 600E (APQ8064 / APQ8064E)  quad core Krait 300 CPU @ up to 1.7 GHz with Qualcomm Adreno 320 GPU, and Hexagon DSP
  • System Memory – 2GB on-board DDR3 (PCDDR3-533MHz)
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC flash (expandable to 64GB)
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet via Atheros8151, dual band dual stream 802.11 b/g/n/ac WiFi and Bluetooth 4.1 via QCA6234
  • Video – 2x HDMI 1.4a outputs up to 1080p, 1x HDMI input up to 1080p
  • Audio – WCD9311 audio codec; 8-channel 7.1 surround sound, Dolby Digital Plus, Dolby True HD, and DTS-HD via HDMI-out
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 ports, 1x micro USB OTG port
  • Camera – Via USB 2.0 port or/and HDMI input
  • Misc – IR receiver
  • Power Supply – 5V/4A (typ.)
  • Dimensions – 160 mm x 70 mm
  • Temperature Range – 0-70° C
  • RoHS and WEEE compliant

The board comes pre-loaded with Android Lollipop 5.1.1, and the company provide a board support package (BSP) for development. Linux support based on an Open embedded is in progress. The solution is destined to be used for video collaboration, medical applications such as remote diagnosis & treatment, video capture, and smart boards.

Inforce Computing commits to supply Inforce 6420 board for at least 10 years, and you can purchase samples directly on their website for $99. Further information can be found on the product page.

Habey EMB-2200 Pico-ITX board is Designed for Industrial IoT Gateways & HMI Panels

September 8th, 2017 No comments

Habey USA has sent out an email to announce their EMB-2200 industrial grade Pico-ITX board powered by NXP i.MX6UL processor with up to 512 MB DDR3, WIFi and Bluetooth, optional PoE support, LCD interface, etc…, and designed for IoT gateways, HMI applications, and other embedded applications.

Click to Enlarge

Habey EMB-2200 board specifications:

  • SoC- NXP i.MX 6UltraLite single core ARM Cortex-A7 processor at 528/696MHz
  • System Memory – 128, 256 or 512MB RAM
  • Storage – Various options of eMMC, iNAND or SLC NAND flash (Default: 8GB eMMC flash)
  • Display – 1x 24-bit Parallel LCD (RGB) interface up to 1366×768, 4-wire touch interface
  • Audio – 1x 3.5mm Line OUT jack
  • Connectivity – 2x 10/100 Mbps Fast Ethernet ports, WiFi and Bluetooth module
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 ports
  • I/Os – 5x RS-232 header, 2x CAN Bus, 2x USB2.0, 1x USB OTG Configurable GPIO, SPI, I2C
  • Expansion – 1x full-size mini-PCIe with USB connection for cellular modules
  • Misc – Watchdog Timer Programmable timer system reset
  • Power Supply – 9V~ 36V DC via 2.5mm power jack; PoE ready via add-on module
  • Dimensions – 100 x 72 mm (Pico-ITX form factor)
  • Temperature Range – Operating: -40 ~ 80°C; storage: -50 ~ 105°C
  • Humidity – 5% ~ 95% @ 40°C (Non-Condensing)

The company also provides a Power over Ethernet (POE) 802.3af add-on module, and a 5” resistive touch panel development kit (800×480) to create custom HMI or automation systems easily. One the software side, the board runs Embedded Linux, but apart from that, details are sparse…

Click to Enlarge

The board – and add-on modules – should be available now, at an undisclosed price. More information about Habey’s EMB-2200 pico-ITX board can be found in the product page.

Linux 4.13 Release – Main Changes, ARM & MIPS Architectures

September 4th, 2017 6 comments

Linus Torvalds has just announced the release of Linux 4.13 and a kidney stone…:

So last week was actually somewhat eventful, but not enough to push me to delay 4.13.

Most of the changes since rc7 are actually networking fixes, the bulk of them to various drivers. With apologies to the authors of said patches, they don’t look all that interesting (which is definitely exactly what you want just before a release). Details in the appended shortlog.

Note that the shortlog below is obviously only since rc7 – the _full_4.13 log is much too big to post and nobody sane would read it. So if you’re interested in all the rest of it, get the git tree and limit the logs to the files you are interested in if you crave details.

No, the excitement was largely in the mmu notification layer, where we had a fairly last-minute regression and some discussion about the problem. Lots of kudos to Jérôme Glisse for jumping on it, and implementing the fix.

What’s nice to see is that the regression pointed out a nasty and not very well documented (or thought out) part of the mmu notifiers, and the fix not only fixed the problem, but did so by cleaning up and documenting what the right behavior should be, and furthermore did so by getting rid of the problematic notifier and actually removing almost two hundred lines in the process.

I love seeing those kinds of fixes. Better, smaller, code.

The other excitement this week was purely personal, consisting of seven hours of pure agony due to a kidney stone. I’m all good, but it sure _felt_ a lot longer than seven hours, and I don’t even want to imagine what it is for people that have had the experience drag out for longer. Ugh.

Anyway, on to actual 4.13 issues.

While we’ve had lots of changes all over (4.13 was not particularly big, but even a “solidly average” release is not exactly small), one very _small_ change merits some extra attention, because it’s one of those very rare changes where we change behavior due to security issues, and where people may need to be aware of that behavior change when upgrading.

This time it’s not really a kernel security issue, but a generic protocol security issue.

The change in question is simply changing the default cifs behavior: instead of defaulting to SMB 1.0 (which you really should not use: just google for “stop using SMB1” or similar), the default cifs mount now defaults to a rather more modern SMB 3.0.

Now, because you shouldn’t have been using SMB1 anyway, this shouldn’t affect anybody. But guess what? It almost certainly does affect some people, because they blithely continued using SMB1 without really thinking about it.

And you certainly _can_ continue to use SMB1, but due to the default change, now you need to be *aware* of it. You may need to add an explicit “vers=1.0” to your mount options in /etc/fstab or similar if you *really* want SMB1.

But if the new default of 3.0 doesn’t work (because you still use a pterodactyl as a windshield wiper), before you go all the way back to the bad old days and use that “vers=1.0”, you might want to try “vers=2.1”. Because let’s face it, SMB1 is just bad, bad, bad.

Anyway, most people won’t notice at all. And the ones that do notice can check their current situation (just look at the output of “mount” and see if you have any cifs things there), and you really should update from the default even if you are *not* upgrading kernels.

Ok, enough about that. It was literally a two-liner change top defaults – out of the million or so lines of the full 4.13 patch changing real code.

Go get the new kernel,

Linus

Two months ago, Linux 4.12 was released with initial support for AMD Radeon RX Vega GPU, BFQ (Budget Fair Queuing) and Kyber block I/O schedulers, AnalyzeBoot tool for the kernel, “hybrid consistency model” implementation for live kernel patching, but disabled the Open Sound System, and removed AVR32 support, among many other changes.

Some interesting changes in Linux 4.13 – mostly based on LWN 4.13 Merge Window part 1 & part 2 – include:

  • Support for non-blocking buffered I/O operations added at the block level, which should also improve asynchronous I/O support when used with buffered I/O.
  • AppArmor security module’s “domain labeling” code has been merged into the mainline. It was maintained by Ubuntu out of tree previously.
  • Kernel-based TLS implementation that should deliver better performance for HTTPS, and other protocol relying on TLS.
  • CIFS/SAMBA now defaults to v3.0 instead of v1.0 due to security issues
  • File System Changes – EXT-4: support for to ~2 billion files per directory with largedir option, extended attributes up to 64KB, new deduplication feature; f2fs: supports disk quotas; overlayfs union: new “index directory” feature that makes copy-up operations work without breaking hard links.

Changes specific to ARM include:

  • Rockchip:
    • Added support for RV1108 SoC for camera applications
    • Rockchip IOMMU driver is now available on ARM64
    • PCIe – configure Rockchip MPS and reorganize + use normal register bank
    • Clock driver for Rockchip RK3128 SoC
    • Rockchip pinctrl driver now supports iomux-route switching for RK3228, RK3328 and RK3399
    • Sound driver – Support for Rockchip PDM controllers
    • Device tree
      • Added RK3399-Firefly SBC
      • Added ARM Mali GPU
      • Added cru
      • Added sdmmc, sdio, emmc nodes for Rockchip RK3328
  • Amlogic
    • Updated CEC EE clock support
    • Enabled clock controller for 32-bit Meson8
    • Device tree changes
      • Meson UARTs
      • new SPI controller driver
      • HDMI & CVBS for multiple boards
      • new pinctrl pins for SPI, HDMI CEC, PWM
      • Ethernet Link and Activity LEDs pin nodes
      • SAR ADC support for Meson8 & Meson8b
    • Defconfig changes – Meson SPICC enabled as module; IR core, decoders and Meson IR device enabled;
    • New boards & devices: NanoPi K2, Libre Computer SBC, R-Box Pro
  • Samsung
    • Clock driver updated for Samsung Exynos 5420 audio clocks, and converted code to clk_hw registration APIs
    • Pinctrl drivers split per ARMv7 and ARMv8 since there’s no need to compile everything on each of them
    • ARM DT updates:
      • Add HDMI CEC to Exynos5 SoCs + needed property for CEC on Odroid U3
      • Fix reset GPIO polarity on Rinato
      • Minor cleanups and readability improvements.
    • ARM64 DT updates:
      • Remove unneeded TE interrupt gpio property
    • Defconfig changes – Some cleanups, enabled Exynos PRNG along with user-space crypto API.
  • Qualcomm
    • Clock & pinctrl drivers for Qualcomm IPQ8074
    • Add debug UART addresses for IPQ4019
    • Improve QCOM SMSM error handling
    • Defconfig
      • Enable HWSPINLOCK & RPMSG_QCOM_SMD to get some Qualcomm boards to work out of the box/again
      • Enable IPQ4019 clock and pinctrl
    • Mailbox – New controller driver for Qualcomm’s APCS IPC
    • RPMsg – Qualcomm GLINK protocol driver and DeviceTree-based modalias support, as well as a number of smaller fixes
    • Qualcomm Device Tree Changes
      • Fix IPQ4019 i2c0 node
      •  Add GSBI7 on IPQ8064
      • Add misc APQ8060 devices
      • Fixup USB related devices on APQ8064 and MSM8974
    • Qualcomm ARM64 Updates for v4.12
      • Fix APQ8016 SBC WLAN LED
      • Add MSM8996 CPU node
      • Add MSM8992 SMEM and fixed regulator
      • Fixup MSM8916 USB support
  • Mediatek
    • CPU clks for Mediatek MT8173/MT2701/MT7623 SoCs
    • Pinctrl – Serious code size cut for MT7623
    • Mediatek “scpsys” system controller support for MT6797
    • Device tree
      • Added support for MT6797 (Helio X20) mobile SoC and evaluation board
      • Extended MT7623 support significantly
      • Added MT2701 i2c device & JPEG decoder nodes
  • Other new ARM hardware platforms and SoCs:
    • STM32 – stm32h743-disco, stm32f746-disco, and stm32f769-disco boards; Drivers for digital audio interfaces, S/PDIF receiver, digital camera interfaces, HDMI CEC, watchdog timer
    • NXP – Gateworks Ventana GW5600 SBC;  Technexion Pico i.MX7D board; i.MX5/6 image processing units & camera sensor interfaces
    • Realtek – Initial support for Realtek RTD1295 SoC and Zidoo X9S set-top-box
    • Actions Semi – Initial support for Actions Semi S900 / S500, and corresponding LeMaker Guitar & Bubblegum-96 SBCs
    • Renesas – Salvator-XS and H3ULCB automotive development systems; GR-Peach board, iWave G20D-Q7 System-on-Module plus
    • Socionext- Support for Uniphier board support for LD11-global and LD20-global
    • Broadcom – Stingray communication processor and two reference boards;
    • Marvell – Linksys WRT3200ACM router
    • Texas Instruments – BeagleBone Blue
    • Microchip / Atmel – MMU-less ARM Cortex-M7 SoCs (SAME70/V71/S70/V70)

Some of the changes specific to MIPS include:

  • Boston platform support – Document DT bindings; Add CLK driver for board clocks
  • CM – Avoid per-core locking with CM3 & higher; WARN on attempt to lock invalid VP, not BUG
  • CPS – Select CONFIG_SYS_SUPPORTS_SCHED_SMT for MIPSr6; Prevent multi-core with dcache aliasing; Handle cores not powering down more gracefully; Handle spurious VP starts more gracefully
  • DSP – Add lwx & lhx missaligned access support
  • eBPF – Add MIPS support along with many supporting change to add the required infrastructure
  • Generic arch code:
    • Misc sysmips MIPS_ATOMIC_SET fixes
    • Drop duplicate HAVE_SYSCALL_TRACEPOINTS
    • Negate error syscall return in trace
    • Correct forced syscall errors
    • Traced negative syscalls should return -ENOSYS
    • Allow samples/bpf/tracex5 to access syscall arguments for sane
      traces
    • Cleanup from old Kconfig options in defconfigs
    • Fix PREF instruction usage by memcpy for MIPS R6
    • Fix various special cases in the FPU eulation
    • Fix some special cases in MIPS16e2 support
    • Fix MIPS I ISA /proc/cpuinfo reporting
    • Sort MIPS Kconfig alphabetically
    • Fix minimum alignment requirement of IRQ stack as required by ABI / GCC
    • Fix special cases in the module loader
    • Perform post-DMA cache flushes on systems with MAARs
    • Probe the I6500 CPU
    • Cleanup cmpxchg and add support for 1 and 2 byte operations
    • Use queued read/write locks (qrwlock)
    • Use queued spinlocks (qspinlock)
    • Add CPU shared FTLB feature detection
    • Handle tlbex-tlbp race condition
    • Allow storing pgd in C0_CONTEXT for MIPSr6
    • Use current_cpu_type() in m4kc_tlbp_war()
    • Support Boston in the generic kernel
  • Generic platform:
    • yamon-dt: Pull YAMON DT shim code out of SEAD-3 board;  Support > 256MB of RAM;  Use serial* rather than uart* aliases
    • Abstract FDT fixup application
    • Set RTC_ALWAYS_BCD to 0
    • Add a MAINTAINERS entry
  • core kernel – qspinlock.c: include linux/prefetch.h
  • Add support for Loongson 3
  • Perf – Add I6500 support
  • SEAD-3 – Remove GIC timer from DT; set interrupt-parent per-device, not at root node; fix GIC interrupt specifiers
  • SMP – Skip IPI setup if we only have a single CPU
  • VDSO – Make comment match reality; improvements to time code in VDSO”
  • Various fixes:
    • compressed boot: Ignore a generated .c file
    • VDSO: Fix a register clobber list
    • DECstation: Fix an int-handler.S CPU_DADDI_WORKAROUNDS regression
    • Octeon: Fix recent cleanups that cleaned away a bit too much thus breaking the arch side of the EDAC and USB drivers.
    • uasm: Fix duplicate const in “const struct foo const bar[]” which GCC 7.1 no longer accepts.
    • Fix race on setting and getting cpu_online_mask
    • Fix preemption issue. To do so cleanly introduce macro to get the size of L3 cache line.
    • Revert include cleanup that sometimes results in build error
    • MicroMIPS uses bit 0 of the PC to indicate microMIPS mode. Make sure this bit is set for kernel entry as well.
    • Prevent configuring the kernel for both microMIPS and MT. There are no such CPUs currently and thus the combination is unsupported and results in build errors.
    • ralink: mt7620: Add missing header

You can read the full Linux 4.13 changelog – with comments only – generated using git log v4.12..v4.13 --stat for the full details, and eventually kernelnewsbies’s Linux 4.13 changelog will be updated with an extensive list of chances.

NutsBoard Pistachio 3.5″ Embedded SBC is Powered by NXP i.MX 6Dual/Quad Processor

August 17th, 2017 2 comments

I don’t write about i.MX6 solutions much anymore, since there are so many options available on the market, but Pistachio SBC has been designed by a company I had never heard of before: NutsBoard, and they’ve released documentation and software publicly, which does not always happen in the industrial/embedded space.

Click to Enlarge

Pistachio single board computer specifications:

  • SoC – NXP ARM Cortex-A9 IMX6 Quad/Dual @ 800MHz
  • System Memory –  Up to 2GB LPDDR3
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC flash, 1x SATA interface, 1x micro SD card slot
  • Display I/F / Video Output

    Click to Enlarge

    • 2x LVDS (6 or 8 bit)
    • 1x 24-bit VGA output
    • 1x HDMI port up to 1920×1080 (FHD)
    • 1x I2C AR1021 touch controller
  • Audio – SGTL5000 audio codec with class D amplifier; 1x audio header for speaker and microphone
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet (Qualcomm AR8035), industrial grade wireless module  (Jorjin WG7833) with dual band WiFi 802.11 a/b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.2
  • USB – 4x USB 2.0 host interfaces with two USB type A ports, and two internal headers
  • Serial – 1x RS232/422/485 DB9 port, 3x RS232 headers including one for debugging
  • Other I/Os
    • 1x CAN bus
    • 1x I2C, 1x GPIO’s (5 V)
    • 1x PWM
  • Expansion – 1x mPCIE, 1x SIM card slot
  • Misc – RTC with batter slot (no battery by default)
  • Power Supply – 9 to 36V DC input; PMIC NXP PFUZE100
  • Dimensions – 148 x 102mm (3.5″ embedded SBC form factor)
  • Temperature Range – -30 to 70°C
  • Certifications – CE, FCC, RoHS, EMI, ESD and Surge for pre-testing

The company provides Linux 4.1.15, and support for Debian, Buildroot, Yocto Project, and Android 7.1 Nougat. You’ll find source code on pistachio-android-7 github account, software development tools and Android 7.1 firmware for HDMI/VGA or LCD panel in the download page, and documentation such as product brief, hardware manual, and getting started guide in the product page.

Click to Enlarge

The board will officially launch tomorrow (Friday), with the quad core version selling for $164, and the dual core version for $153 for quantities less than 100 pieces, and Pistachio development toolkits with 7″ (1024×600) LVDS touchscreen display or 10″ (1024×600) LVDS touchscreen display for respectively $284 and $291. The company will accept orders by email for samples or larger quantities first, before listing the boards and kits in their online shop by the end of the month.

SKATE-212 Snapdragon 212 Development Kit with 7″ Display is now available for $349

August 8th, 2017 4 comments

Last month, I wrote about two boards based on Snapdragon 212 processor that can be used for smart speakers, IoT applications, industrial automation, etc..: Intrinsyc Open-Q 212 SBC selling for $595 without LCD, and Kaynes Technology SKATE-212. We did not have that much information about the latter at the time, but the company has now published some photos, more details, and revealed pricing.

SKATE-212 single board computer specifications:

  • SoC –  Qualcomm Snapdragon 212 quad core Cortex A7 @up to  1.3GHz with Adreno 304 GPU supporting OpenGL ES 3.0, OpenCL, DirectX
  • System Memory – 1 GB LPDDR3 (Expandable upto 2GB)
  • Storage – 8 GB eMMC flash (Expandable up to 16GB) +  micro SD slot
  • Video Output / Display  – 7″ capacitive touchscreen, full size HDMI port (Only one or the other can be used at a given time)
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet, 802.11 b/g/n WiFi + Bluetooth 4.x LE, GPS with optional GLONASS support
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB device port (can not be used at the same time as Ethernet, and other USB host ports),  1x micro USB debug console
  • Camera –  8 MP primary camera; 2MP secondary camera
  • Audio
    • Mono loudspeaker output
    • 3.5mm stereo audio jack with mic
    • On board single (default)or dual microphone
  • Expansion – 40-pin expansion header with SPI, I2C, GPIO, etc.. signals
  • Sensors – 6-axis MEMS gyroscope & accelerometer; 3-axis magnetometer
  • Power supply – 12VDC power adapter, or optional 3.7V/2,500 mAh battery
  • Dimensions – 90 x 70 mm

Click to Enlarge

The company provides support for Android Nougat for the board, with Linux support available on request.

The development kit can be pre-ordered for $349 by companies interested in developing their products with the solution, and includes the board itself, a 7″ LCD capacitive touch display, a 12V power supply, a USB type A to Micro-B cable, an “Android delivery package”, and documents. Customers will also get 4 weeks free technical support from the date of kit is received. You may want to visit the product page for further information.