STMicro STM32L5 Cortex-M33 ARMv8-M MCU Family Targets Secure IoT Applications

STM32L5

STMicro STM32 microcontrollers have so far been based on Arm Cortex-M0/M0+, M3, M4, or M7 cores, although we’ve also seen a yet-to-be formally announced Cortex A7 variant show up in Linux 4.17 with STM32MP157C. The company has very recently announced a new family, namely STM32L5 series, powered by an Arm Cortex-M33 ARMv8-M 32-/64-bit TrustZone enabled core clocked at up to 110 MHz, and equipped with on-chip SMPS for easy low power efficiency, USB FS device, and USB type-C PD Controller. Two sub-families are part of STM32L5 series: STM32L552 with 256 to 512 KB of Flash memory and from 48 to 144-pin packages. STM32L562 with 512 KB of Flash memory, and an additional encryption accelerator engine (AES, PKA, and OTFDEC). Beside the extra HW crypto block both share the same key specifications: MCU Core – Arm Cortex-M33 ARMv8-M core clocked at up to 110 MHz (+20% versus Cortex-M4) with FPU, TruztZone Memory – 256 KB RAM Flash – 256KB to 512KB …

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STLink V3 Modular Debugger & Programmer for STM32/STM8 Adds I2C, SPI, CAN Interfaces

STLink V3

STLink is the in-circuit debugger and programmer for STMicro STM32 and STM8 micro-control working with SWIM and JTAG/SWD interfaces. ST Microelectronics has now introduced STLink V3 which also provides a Virtual COM port interface allowing the host PC to communicate with the target microcontroller through one UART, as well as bridge interfaces (SPI, I2C, CAN, GPIOs) which can be used for programming of the target through the bootloader for example. Key features of STLink V3 debugger: Stand-alone probe with modular extensions Self-powered through a USB connector (Micro-B) USB 2.0 high-speed compatible interface Direct firmware update support (DFU) JTAG / serial wire debugging (SWD) specific features:3 V to 3.6 V application voltage support and 5 V tolerant inputs Flat cables STDC14 to MIPI10 / STDC14 / MIPI20 (connectors with 1.27 mm pitch) JTAG communication support SWD and serial wire viewer (SWV) communication support SWIM specific features (only available with adapter board MB1440):1.65 V to 5.5 V application voltage support SWIM header …

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OpenMV Cam H7 MicroPython Machine Vision Camera Launched on Kickstarter

OpenMV CAM H7

OpenMV team has launched an upgrade to their popular OpenMV CAM M7 machine vision camera, with OpenMV CAM H7 replacing the STMicro STM32F7 micro-controller by a more powerful STM32H7 MCU clocked at up to 400 MHz. Beside having twice the processing power, the new camera board also features removable camera modules for thermal vision and global shutter support. OpenMV CAM H7 camera board specifications: MCU – STMicro STM32H743VI Arm Cortex M7 microcontroller @ up to 400 MHz with 1MB RAM, 2MB flash. External Storage – micro SD card socket supporting up to 100 Mbps read/write to record videos and store machine vision assets. Camera modules Omnivision OV7725 image sensor (default) capable of taking 640×480 8-bit Grayscale /  16-bit RGB565 images at 60 FPS when the resolution is above 320×240 and 120 FPS when it is below; 2.8mm lens on a standard M12 lens mount Optional Global Shutter camera module to capture high quality grayscale images not affected by motion blur Optional …

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STMicro STM32F7x0 & H7x0 Value Line Microcontrollers Deliver Cortex-M7 Performance at Lower Cost

STMicro introduces their first Arm Cortex-M7 microcontrollers in 2014 with STM32F7 series clocked up to 200 MHz. The next year, Atmel – now Microchip – announced SAM S70 & SAM E70 Cortex-M7 MCU families clocked at up to 300 MHz, STMicro up the ante to 400 MHz with their STM32H7 family in 2016, and more recently NXP launched their i.MX RT series “crossover” processor with the Cortex-M7 reaching up to 600 MHz. AFAIK, nobody has tried to push the clock speeds higher, but STMicroelectronics must  recently unveiled  STM32F7x0 & H7x0 Value Line microcontrollers with the same performance level as their earlier STM32F7 and STM32H7 MCUs, but with a lower price by reducing the amount of internal flash. Three Cortex-M7 value line families have been introduced: STM32F730 entry-level MCU @ 216MHz with 64KB flash, 8KB data / instructions cache, 256KB RAM and 16KB+64KB TCM (Tightly Coupled Memory). The microcontroller also includes cryptographic hardware acceleration, a USB 2.0 High Speed port with …

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Dragino LoRaST M.2 LoRa Card Convert Compatible Platforms into LoRa Nodes

Dragino LoRaST

Modern motherboards or single board computers often expose mPCIe or M.2 / NGFF socket, and we’ve seen it was possible to easily add a LoRa radio using RAK833 mPCIe LoRaWAN gateway card to hardware with an mPCIe (USB/SPI) socket. You can now do something similar with Dragino LoRaST M.2 LoRa card by inserting into a spare M.2 / NGFF socket. There’s an important distinction however, as while RAK833 is designed for LoRa gateways, LoRaST is based on SX1276/SX1278 for LoRa end nodes. Dragino LoRaST M.2 LoRa card specifications: MCU – STMicro STM32L072CZT6 Arm Cortex M0+ MCU @ 32 MHz with 192 KB flash,  20 KB of RAM, 6 KB data EEPROM LoRa Connectivity Semtech SX1276/78 LoRa Wireless Modem Available Bands – 433/868/915/920 Mhz Built-in antenna or optional external antenna via I-PEX connector Host interface – Standard M.2 (NGFF) interface Supply Voltage – 1.8V ~ 3.6V Dimensions – 22 x 42 x 3.6 mm Weight – 4g Temperature Range – -40 …

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TS80 USB type-C Soldering Iron Up for Sale for $79.99

TS100 digital programmable soldering iron has been popular in recent years due to its compact size, open source STM32 firmware, fast heating, and it does the job. Another advantage is that the soldering can be powered by a standard 19V laptop power supply. As noted in a post about a separate soldering pen board with audio jack, the company behind TS100 has been working on a new model called TS80 powered via USB type C port, lighter & more compact, and supporting soldering tips that connect through a typical 3.5mm audio jack. The good news is that TS80 is now available for $89.99 on Sainsmart under the ToolPAC brand. Use TS80 coupon for $10 discount. [Update: TS80 is now sold on Banggood for $72.99 shipped] TS80 SUB type-C soldering iron specifications: MCU – STMicro STM32F103T8 Arm Cortex-M3 MCU @ 72 MHz with 20KB SRAM, 64KB or 128KB flash Temperature Range – 100℃ – 400℃ (Max) ±3% Display –  OLED display …

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This Soldering Pen Board with Audio Jack Supports Weller RT Tips

Soldering Pen Board Audio Jack

The 3.5mm audio jack may be slowly disappearing from new mobile phones, but I’ve recently discovered they were also used in some soldering irons such as the upcoming TS80 USB soldering iron succeeding TS100 model. I initially thought it was a custom design from the maker of TSxxx soldering irons, but this morning I’ve come across the “RT Soldering Pen” board which also features a 3.5mm (audio) jack and can be used to make your own soldering iron by 3D printing your own enclosure, adding some power source, and inserting one of the many Weller RT tips available into the jack. RT soldering pen board specifications: MCU – STMicro STM32F031 Arm Cortex-M0 micro-controller Display – 0.91″ OLED display with 128×32 resolution Compatible with all Weller RT tips with 3.5mm jack. Set-point temperature – 20°C – 400°C with about +/-5°C accuracy (calibration is planed) Maximum measurable temperature – 500°C Heating speed – 30°C to 300°C in about 4s with RT-2 pen …

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NoCAN IoT Platform Leverages Raspberry Pi & Arduino for CAN Bus Projects (Crowdfunding)

Many IoT projects rely on wireless connectivity through WiFi or Bluetooth, but in some cases it may be more reliable and convenient to use wired connectivity. The CAN Bus is a little like a low bandwidth Ethernet PoE solution for IoT, as it allows to transfer data over a serial connection while provided power at the same time, and can be daisy chain to support multiple boards. Omzlo’s NoCAN IoT platform provides a CAN bus solution leveraging Raspberry Pi 3 board through their PiMaster HAT acting as a CAN bus gateway, and Arduino compatible CANZERO boards to which you can connect sensors and actuators. Omzlo PiMaster HAT specifications: MCU – STMicro STM32F042 Cortex-M0 32bit ARM MCU – 48Mhz. Networking –  125000 bps CAN bus up to 300 meters range GPIO – Communicates with Raspberry Pi through SPI + GPIOs Security – Smart power switch with over-current protection. Power Supply – 6V to 28V DC Dimensions – Standard Pi HAT footprint …

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