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Posts Tagged ‘wifi’

WifiMETRIX Wi-Fi Networks Analyzer Supports Packet Injection, Throughput Analysis

November 2nd, 2017 No comments

Nuts about Nets (that’s the company name…) WifiMETRIX is a dual band WiFi diagnostic tool used to analyze, monitor and troubleshoot Wi-Fi networks. The handheld device implements two main features:

  • AirHORN RF signal / channel generator that transmits RF signals for each of the Wi-Fi channels, and aids in testing Wi-Fi antennas, RF shields and wireless networks.
  • WiFiPROBE for per channel’s throughput analysis

The device operates in standalone mode and does not need to associate with the access point to perform the functions.

WifiMETRIX technical specifications:

  • Dual-band 802.11 Wi-Fi chip
  • Antennas / connectors
    • Dual-band antenna for 2.4 and 5.x GHz ISM bands
    • Standard 50 ohm SMA antenna connector
    • 50 ohm SMA terminator to protect antenna connection
    • SMA terminator (dummy load) also used for calibrating the device
  • Functions
    • AirHORN channel / signal generator functionality (packet injection)
    • WifiPROBE channel analyzer functionality
  • Display – 128×64 built-in LCD screen
  • USB – 1x micro USB port for charging
  • Dimensions – 210mm x 155mm x 39mm (Solid aluminum case plus silicon rubber boot protector)
  • Weight – 425 grams
  • Certifications – CE and FCC compliance

The AirHORN feature can be used to test WiFi antennas & amplifiers, test the effectiveness of RF shield designs,  stress-test wireless networks, align directional Wi-Fi antennas, quick evaluation of receiver performance, and locating Wi-Fi dead spots.

The WifiPROBE feature can be used to detect presence of RF interferences,  determine whether performance can be improved by using a different channel, quantify expected change in performance that would result from using a different channel,  configure Wi-Fi networks with the goal of improving throughput performance, and as a tool to help placing Wi-Fi devices into a location offering the best performance.

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You can find how to use the device in the documentation page, which also explains how to interpret the results. The WiFiMETRIX is on back order on Seeed Studio for $295 with shipping expected on November 11.

Giveaway Week – ESP32 PICO Kit v3 Boards

November 1st, 2017 240 comments

I don’t have one, but eight boards to give away to four winners (2 each) with Espressif Systems ESP32 PICO Kit v3 board based on ESP32-PICO-D4 SIP, an all-in one package with ESP32, 4MB SPI flash, crystal oscillator, and passive components, which allows for smaller boards.

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The board is very similar to any other ESP32 boards, and software compatible, but it’s just quite thinner, and easier to work with on breadboards. Since I had already played with Arduino Core and Espruino (JavaScript) on other boards, I used one of the 10 boards provided by Espressif to play with Micropyhon on ESP32.

Each winner will get two ESP32 PICO Core board in order to make it worthwhile with regards to shipping costs.

To enter the draw simply leave a comment below. Other rules are as follows:

  • Only one entry per contest. I will filter out entries with the same IP and/or email address.
  • Contests are open for 48 hours starting at 10am (Bangkok time) every day. Comments will be closed after 48 hours.
  • Winners will be selected with random.org, and announced in the comments section of each giveaway.
  • I’ll contact the winners by email, and I’ll expect an answer within 24 hours, or I’ll pick another winner.
  • Shipping
    • $4 for registered airmail small packet for oversea shipping payable via Paypal within 48 hours once the contest (for a given product) is complete.
    • If Paypal is not available in your country, you can still play, and I’ll cover the cost of sending the parcel by Sea and Land (SAL) without registration if you win.
  • I’ll post all 10 prizes at the same time, around the 8th of November
  • I’ll make sure we have 10 different winners, so if you have already won a device during this giveaway week, I’ll draw another person.

Good luck!

The boards above are not for sale yet, but the similar ESP32-PICO motherboard is sold for $16 on Tindie. Alternatively, you could contact Espressif Systems, if you are interested in getting ESP32 PICO Core samples.

Telegea Smart Hub DIN Rail IoT Gateway is Powered by Raspberry Pi CM3 Module

October 17th, 2017 8 comments

DEK Italia has recently introduced Telegea Smart Hub, an IoT gateway based on Raspberry Pi Computer Module 3 (CM3) with Ethernet, WiFi, RS232/485 ports, and various other I/O ports, that can leverage Raspberry Pi software ecosystem.

The company explains the device is mainly targeted at DIY home automation applications as a smart home controller which runs open source smart home software like OpenHAB and Home Assistant, but it can also be used for many other IoT applications.

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Telegea Smart Hub R3B0 specifications:

  • SoC – Broadcom BCM2837 quad core Cortex A53 processor with VideoCore IV GPU
  • System Memory – 1GB LPDDR2 RAM
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC flash, 256 byte EEPROM
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet port, optional Wifi 802.11 b/g/n at 2.4 GHz
  • Serial – RS485 serial port, RS232 serial debug port
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports
  • Expansion
    • 6xdigital inputs via screw terminals (for dry contacts or S0 interface)
    • 4x analog inputs (0-5V) via screw terminals
    • Dallas 1-wire bus via screw terminals
    • 1x RJ14 connector for I2C bus peripherals
    • 1x XBee module compatible connector for ZigBee and other RF modules
    • 3x expansion headers with additional GPIO, SPI and I2C bus connections
  • Sensor –  SHT21 temperature and humidity sensor
  • Debugging / Programing – 1x micro USB OTG port
  • Misc – RTC with integrated battery, user button, user LED
  • Power supply – 5VDC via micro USB connector;  24V DC / 24V AC via screw terminals
  • Dimensions – 155 x 86 mm

The gateway supports a customized version of Raspbian Jessie Lite with Linux kernel 4.9.x and later. The changes to Raspbian include enablement of clock generation for integrated Ethernet bridge on GPIO pin, UART ports for RS485 connector and serial debug port, drivers for RTC/ADC/EEPROM/ I2C relay card,  configuration of the 1-wire bus on screw terminals, and installation of GPIO handling command line tools and Zulu Embedded OpenJDK VM. You’ll find source code, hardware and software documentation on Github, and get support on Telegea Google Groups.

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The boards has been designed to fit into a commercial Camdenboss CNMB/9 DIN rail enclosure as shown above, in which case the model is called TSH-CM R3B0.

Telegea Smart Hub R3B0 board is sold on eBay without the Raspberry Pi module for 179.00 Euros, while the TSH-CM R3B0 modle with DIN rail enclosure and RPi CM3 module goes for 219.00 Euros. The complete kit is also sold on Tindie for $249.99. Visit the product page for more information.

Getting Started with MicroPython on ESP32 – Hello World, GPIO, and WiFi

October 16th, 2017 12 comments

I’ve been playing with several ESP32 boards over the months, and tried several firmware images. I started with a tutorial for Arduino Core on ESP32, a few month later I tested ESP32 JavaScript programming with Espruino on ESPino32 board, and recently Espressif Systems sent me ESP32 PICO core development board powered by their ESP32-PICO-D4 SiP, and while I took some pretty photos, I had not used it so far.

So I decided to go with yet another firmware, and this time, I played with MicroPython on ESP32, and will report my experience with basic commands, controlling GPIOs, and WiFi in this getting started post.

Flashing Micropython Firmware to ESP32 Board

Source code is available on Github, as a fork of MicroPython repo as ESP32 support has not been upstreamed yet. We could built the firmware from source, but there’s also a pre-built binary which you can download on MicroPython website.

I’ll be using Ubuntu 16.04 for the instructions, which should be pretty similar for other Linux distributions, especially the ones based on Debian, and if you’re using Windows 10, you should be able to follow the same instructions after installing Windows Subsystem for Linux with Ubuntu on your computer.

Let’s open a terminal, to download the firmware (October 14):

If you have not done so already, install the latest version of esptool:

Now connect the board via a micro USB to USB cable to your computer. The log should like like:

In my case, the device is ttyUSB0, but it may vary depending on the board used. We can now erase the flash, and copy the firmware to the board:

If the last step is successfull,  the output should be similar to the one below:

As a side note, version 2.1 of esptool does not know about ESP32-PICO-D4, but it can still detect an ESP32 device, and the update went through normally.

Hello World Sample / Boot Log with MicroPython

We can test the firmware, by connecting to the board using minicom, screen, putty, or whatever software you feel most comfortable with. I went with minicom, setup a connection to /dev/ttyUSB0 device with 115200 bps baudrate. I immediately tested the print function, and made an hard reset to check out the boot log:

The reset command will first generate some errors message, before rebooting the board:

We can type help function to get some more help:

I also often refered to MicroPython 1.9.2 documentation to write this quick start guide.

LED Blink Sample with MicroPython

The easiest way to test GPIOs is to connect an LED, since the board does not have user LED, only the power lED. I connected a 5V LED to pin 21 via a transistor to make the 3.3V to 5V conversion.

Controlling the LED in the command line interface is easy. Import the machine library, set the pin to output, and change the pin level as needed:

Success! But what about doing a proper blink sample? MicroPython developers’ official PyBoard would show as a USB mass storage drive in you computer, where can copy Python files like boot.py and main.py files, but in the case of ESP32 PICO core, it appears the only option is to use the serial console for programming, as we can’t simply copy files to the board from the host computer.

I  found a solution on Techtutorialsx – which also has plenty of articles about MicroPython on ESP32/ESP8266. We need ampy script that can be install from our Linux terminal:

However, the first time I tried it I got an error:

I installed files module, but the error remained. So instead I installed it for Python 3:

I then created blink.py on my computer to blink the LED every 500 ms:

Before uploading the file to the board, you can try to run it as follow:

If you have plenty of errors here, that’s probably because your code is incorrect. Since I’m not very familiar with Python, it happened to me a couple of times, until I got the code right, and the LED was blinking as expected.

Now that we’ve made sure the code works, we can now copy our sample to the board…

… reconnect to the serial console, and verify the file is there:

To run the program type the following:

The LED should blink again. You can interrupt the program with Ctrl+C, and if you want to soft reset the board, press Ctrl+D.

In order to automatically start the blink program at each boot, rename blink.py to main.py, delete blink.py, and copy main.py instead:

Power cycle the board, and the LED should start blinking almost immediately.

ESP32 WiFi with MicroPython (Station and AP modes)

We’ve got GPIOs working, but one of the most important feature of ESP32 is obvisouly WiFi. I’ll start by configuring the board in station mode. First import the network library, set the board to station mode, and scan access points:

The latter should return a list of access points with ssid, bssid, channel, RSSI, authmode, and hidden status as explained here.

I can then connect the board to one of the access points with:

The log above with IP address should give  a clue, but you can check connection status with the following function:

and use ifconfig to get the IP info:

Switching to AP mode is easy with the three commands below configuring the board with ESP32-PICO-CNX SSID:

At this stage I can see ESP32-PICO-CNX on my phone, but it’s an open connection. We can change that with authmode option that can take 5 values:

  • 0 – open
  • 1 – WEP
  • 2 – WPA-PSK
  • 3 – WPA2-PSK
  • 4 – WPA/WPA2-PSK

I’ll use WPA2-PSK and define the password with the config function.

Working as planned…

ESP32 Web Server with Micropython

Many ESP32 project will require a web interface for monitoring or configuration. Let’s first setup the board as an access point using the command we’ve used above:

Now create webserver.py file based on Python code found here that’s supposed to return the status of some GPIO pins in an HTML table:

Copy the file to the board:

Start the serial console again, import/run the python sample we’ve copied, and connect to the board (in my case http://192.168.4.1):

 

It works as expected, but we wrote the HTML code inside the Python file, and you need to handle socket programming by yourself. To further simply the task, some MicroPython web servers such as MicroWebSrv, and Picoweb are available.

MicroWebSrv (Not working yet for me)

I tried to install MicroWebSrv first, but never managed to make it work. I still reproduce the step I followed in case somebody finds out what I did wrong. I got the code, and copied files from the Linux terminal:

We can check the files are where they are supposed to be:

Go into the terminal (aka REPL console) to start a basic example, after setting up a connection:

I could connect to the server, but I would always get 404 error.

PicoWeb

So instead I switched to picoweb, adapting the instructions here and there. It’s very easy to install.  First make sure you have a working Internet connection in your board (i.e. set station mode), and install the web server with upip:

That’s the output if everything goes according to plans:

Now let’s go back to the host computer to create an html document, for example index.html:

as well as picowebtest.py sample file that will request the HTML page from the board, and return it to the client.

You’ll need to change “192.168.0.108” by the IP address of your board.

Let’s copy both files to the board…

… go back to the serial console, connect in station mode, and run the sample:

Type or copy/paste the URL in the last line into a web browser, and you should get the output below.

ESP32 Bluetooth with MicroPython

There’s no Bluetooth support in the official MicroPython documentation, because it’s work in progress, and for the most adventurous MrSulry released an alpha version  a few days ago. The Bluetooth API is also in flux, but the basic code to enable Bluetooth should look like:

I’ll update that section once Bluetooth makes it to the stable release, and/or when I’m sure the API is frozen.

Other ESP32 (Micro)Python Resources

I’ve just covered a few things that can be done with MicroPyhon on ESP32, and beside the official documentation, you can also check the various MicroPython ESP32 tutoral on techtutorialsx blog. Loboris also made another MicroPython ESP32 firmware that supports pSRAM as MicroPython may use a lot of RAM. If you’re interested in Python for ESP32, but Zerynth is another option for Python on ESP32 that works with an IDE/GUI available for Windows, Linux and MAC OS X. [Update: Yet other options are Pumbaa a port of MicroPython running on top of Simba, and Pycom version of MicroPython]

UniElec U7621-06 MediaTek MT7621 Router Supports OpenWrt, Padavan, and PandoraBox Firmware

October 13th, 2017 18 comments

UniElec U7621-06 is a router / gateway based on Mediatek MT7621 dual core/Quad Thread processor, and offered either as a board only or complete system with optional WiFi and/or LTE PCIe modules.

While the board is said to run OpenWrt or firmware based on Mediatek Linux SDK , the company also mentions the board runs Breed bootloader that can be used to  upgrade the firmware through a web interface. UniElec claims the router supports alternative firmware such as Padavan or PandoraBox.

UniElec U7621-06 specifications:

  • SoC – Mediatek MT7621 dual-core, quad-thread MIPS1004K processor @ up to 880MHz
  • System Memory – 256MB DDR3 (optional 512 MB)
  • Storage – 16MB NOR Flash (optional 8/32/64MB), 1x SATA 3.0 port, 1x micro SD card slot
  • Connectivity – 5x Gigabit Ports (4x LAN, 1x WAN)
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 port
  • Expansion
    • 2x “normal” mPCIe for 802.11ac or 802.11n WiFi module
    • 1x mPCIe connector for LTE or mSATA module
    • 1x 30-pin GPIO connector
  • Debugging – 1x 4-pin Serial Debug Port
  • Misc – Reset buttons, LEDs (power, LAN, LTE, 2x user), watchdog timer
  • Power Supply – [email protected]
  • Power Consumption – 8 Watt (Max)
  • Dimensions – 188.5 x 128.5 x 25 mm (aluminum alloy case)
  • Certifications – CE & FCC Certified, RoHS Compliant
  • Temperature Range – Operating: 0ºC to 55ºC or -20-85°C; Storage: -40ºC to 90ºC
  • Humidity – Operating: 5% to 95%, Storage: Max. 90%

There’s a short discussion thread on 4PDA where they should some boot log, and other information (in Russian).

Most people who read this blog will know about OpenWrt, but I had never heard about Padavan, nor PandoraBox firmware.

The first is an open source project hosted on Bitbucket that aims to “improve the rt-n56u and other supported devices on the software part, allowing power user to take full control over their hardware”. This refers to ASUS RT-N56U router powered by Mediatek MT7621 SoC. The project is actually just called rt-n56u, and Andy Padavan is the developer.

Padavan 3.4.3.9-099 Web Interface on UniElec U7621-06 – Click to Enlarge

The second is developed by a team of Chinese developer, and support various Mediatek routers. I could not find the source code, but we know it’s based on OpenWrt. You’ll find firmware for over 30 routers and evaluation boards, including PandoraBox-PBR-M1 firmware, that according to screenshots provided on Aliexpress, is the one compatible with UniElec U7621-06.

PandoraBox PBR-M1 Firmware – Click to Enlarge

The router is sold on Aliexpress, with price starting at $41.90 with the board only without WiFi or LTE support, nor enclosure, and up to $124.80 with an MT7615 4×4 802.11ac Wave2 PCIe module, and metal enclosure. Between the two extremes, there are various options for WiFi modules, with or without enclosure. If you need LTE or mSATA, you’d have to source a compatible module separately. The manufacturer’s product page does not have much more information.

Thanks to Danman for the tip

This TTGO Board Combines ESP32, LoRa Radio, and OLED Display for just $10

October 13th, 2017 12 comments

Just one year ago, it would cost around $15 to $20+ to get an ESP32 board, that is if you were lucky/fast enough to order one one before it went out of stock. Since then, availability is no longer an issue, and you now can get an ESP32 development board for as low as about $7, or even around $4 during promotions.

Today, I was made aware of another board sold under the “TTGO” brand, that includes not only ESP32 WiFi and Bluetooth SoC, but also a (433 MHz) LoRa radio, and an OLED display. Price? Just $10 plus shipping ($1.75 here).

Battery not Included – Click to Enlarge

TTGO ESP32/LoRa board specifications:

  • WiSoC – Espressif ESP32
  • Storage – 32MB on-board flash (or maybe just 16MB?)
  • LoRa
    • Semtech SX1278 with u.FL connector + 433MHz antenna (N.B.: Antenna must be connected during use or the Semtech chip could be damaged)
    • Sensitivity” ~ -148dBm; output power: +20dBm
  • Display – 0.96″ blue OLED display
  • USB – 1x micro USB port for debugging (CP2102) and power
  • Expansion – 2x 18-pin headers with GPIOs, UART, ADC, Touch, SPI, power signals… (See pinout diagram)
  • Misc – Charging Status LED
  • Power Supply – 5V via micro USB port, 2-pin battery header, 5V Pin. (Operating voltage: 3.3V to 7V)

The board can be programmed with the Arduino IDE after downloading and installing the TTGO folder in arduino/hardware. After selecting “WiFi_LoRa_32” board, you should be able to load various samples to play with the board.

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The board is sold with a 433MHz antenna, and two male headers. You’ll save a little bit on shipping if you purchase two kits instead.  The board can also be found on eBay and Banggood.

Thanks to Mpampis for the tip.

Sonoff B1 Smart Light Bulb Review – Part 1 : eWeLink Android App and Teardown

October 1st, 2017 2 comments

ITEAD Studio has a popular family of home automation devices call Sonoff with WiFi switches, smart sockets, RF to WiFi bridges and so on. All WiFi devices are based on Espressif ESP8266 or ESP8285, and while the company provide a stock firmware working with eWelink app, at least two communities have formed around Sonoff and other similar devices providing two open source firmware alternatives: ESPurna and Sonoff-Tasmota.

The company has sent me Sonoff B1 smart RGB light bulb for review. Today, I’ll check out the light with eWelink app for Android, and do a teardown, before trying one of the open source firmware in the second part of the review.

Sonoff B1 Unboxing

Some Chinese products come in a blank cardboard boxes, but Sonoff’s light bulb comes with in a nice looking retail package that would look good on store’s shelves.

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One of the side lists the specifications with an E27 base, 6W LED, WiFi support etc,, and a quick setup guide. It also mentions the light bulb can be controlled with Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant / Nest.

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The light bulb is securely packed in a polyethylene foam, and is highly unlikely to break during transport.


A user manual in Chinese & English is included together with a “Quality Control Passed” card.

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Sonoff B1 with eWelink App

I’ve already reviewed Sonoff TH16 switch with eWelink App, and Sonoff B1 works the same way. Download the app for Android, or iOS, register an account, and click the + icon to add a new device. Sonoff B1 must then be put into pairing mode, but turn it off and on, three times, after switch it could blink and dim regularly. Click next, connect to your router, and you should be done. I’ve shot a short demo in the video below.

Once in the app you can control the white light with warm to cold, and brightness settings… If you’ve watched the video above, you’ll have noticed a 1+ second delay between the selected value in the app, and the actual change in the light, so the app must use the cloud instead of direct access to the home network.

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and the RGB lights with a color wheels.

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The white lights are quite brighter, but not bright enough to light up a room. It’s more suited as a bed light for reading, or outdoor for a romantic atmosphere like you;d get in bars or restaurants, similar – yet brighter – than candles lights.  RGB lights are not bright at all.

Green is the New Orange

The photo above has been taken at night, and  you’ll also notice the color selected on the phone does not also quite match the color set in the app, as I was expected an Orange light, but I got some pale green light instead. It also quite difficult to select specific colors with the wheel, as I could only get variation of pink when wanted to get a red light. The only way I found was to switch between White and Color menus, and it will automatically set it to red.


It’s not quite obvious on the photo above, but you should see three dark dots on the top of the light when using the color mode. That’s normal, as we’ll see below, and is due to the shadow of the WiFi antenna. Beside White and Color menus, there are 4 pre-defined color scenes for reading, resting, etc…, as well as a time / sleep function…

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… and schedules that can be setup once, or repeated on any given day of the week.

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The share function is use to also another phone to control the light.

Sonoff B1 Teardown

I could not take out of the bulb with my bare hands, so I used a rigid plastic tool, and it came off easily.A close up on the board reveals 3 RGB LEDs and the antenna in the middle that explains why we have three dots in RGB mode. There are also two pairs of eight white LEDs respectively used for warm or cold whites.

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We can see GND, Tx, Rx, and 3.3V that can be used to upgrade firmware, as well as GPIO0 and SDA pin in the top right of the inner circle PCB. A close up on the board shows the circuit is controlled by Espressif ESP8285 SoC.

We can also loosen the top and bottom of the “heatsink” part to access the power supply that’s protected with some black plastic cover.

Click to Enlarge

Teardowns are fun, but once I put everything back together nothing worked. I also managed to the short the mains resulting in some burned parts of the cable I used for with the E27 bulb holder. Thge light seemed OK, but it would always show offline. I try to re-enter pairing mode but no luck. I then check if I would get 220V to the bulb holder with a multimeter (yes), and then whether I would get 5 or 12V – both are exposed on the PCB – and nothing there. I finally checked the power supply connections only to find out the red cable had come off…
The plastic does not come out easily, so instead I cut it out to expose the pin, inserted the wire back, added some solder, and finally some hot glue to cover the joint. The 6W LED does not get hot at all, so it should not be a problem.

It worked again, and I took a picture of the lamp without the three RGB LEDs set to red.

I’d like to thank ITEAD Studio for sending a review sample. If you are interested, you can purchase the light bulb directly from them for $18 plus shipping, but it is also available on sites like Amazon US or Banggood. As mentioned in the introduction, the next step will be to flash an open source firmware. So far, I’ve been using ESPurna, but the developer has already published a review of Sonoff B1 with ESPurna, so this time around, I’ll give a try with Sonoff-Tasmota that also supports Sonoff B1.

[Update: continue reading to the follow up posts:

]

TECHBASE Moduino X Series Industrial IoT Modules / Endpoints are Based on ESP32 WiSoC

September 27th, 2017 3 comments

We’ve previously covered TECHBASE ModBerry industrial IoT gateways leveraging Raspberry Pi 3, FriendlyELEC NanoPi M1 Plus, or AAEON’s UP Linux boards. The company has now launched Moduino X series modules powered by Espressif ESP32 WiFi + Bluetooth SoC to be used as end points together with their ModBerry gateways.

Moduino X1

Two models have been developed so far, namely Moduino X1 and X2, with the following specifications:

  • Wireless Module – ESP32-WROVER with ESP32 dual-core Tensilica LX6 processor @ 240 MHz, 4MB pSRAM (512KB as option), 4MB SPI flash;
  • External Storage – X2 only: micro SD card slot
  • Connectivity
    • 802.11 b/g/n WiFi up to 16 Mbps + Bluetooth 4.2 LE with u.FL antenna connector
    • X2 only: 10/100M Ethernet
    • Options: LoRa (Semtech SX1272); Sigfox (TI CC1125); LTE Cat M1/NB1; Zigbee
  • Serial – 2x RS-232/485
  • Display – Optional 0.96″ OLED display with 128×64 resolution
  • Expansion I/Os
    • 4x Digital I/O (0 ~ 3V)
    • 2x Analog Input:
    • A2 Only: 2x analog output (optional)
    • A2 only: support for Techbase ExCard add-on modules for extr RS-232/485 ports, Ethernet ports, PCIe slots, analog input and output, digital I/Os, relays, M-Bus interface, etc…
  • Battery – Optional battery power support (A1 only); optional UPS function with LiPo battery or Supercapacitor
  • Power Supply -5V DC
  • Dimensions
    • A1 – ABS: 90 x 36 x 32 mm (LxWxH); Aluminum: 95 x 35 x 41 mm (LxWxH)
    • A2 – ABS: 90 x 71 x 32 mm (LxWxH); Aluminum: 95 x 71 x 41 mm (LxWxH)

Moduino A1 consumes less than A2, and can be powered by batteries only, but both models can use battery as UPS. The modules support Espressif ESP-IDF SDK, Zephyr Project, Arduino programming, MicroPython, Mongoose OS, and more, and would typically be used as meters & sensor nodes capable of reporting temperature, humidity, pressure, acceleration, & light with attached sensors. More sensors are being developed by the company.

Moduino X2 (right)

Moduino X1 & X2 appear to be available now, but you’d need to contact the company to get price information. Visit Moduino X series product page for more details.