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Open Source Software Releases – VLC 3.0 and Android-x86 7.1-r1

February 10th, 2018 7 comments

Two completely unrelated open source projects have released a stable version of their software this week, but instead of writing a post for each I’ll write about them in a single post.

VLC 3.0 Vetinari

VLC developers have just released version 3.0 – codenamed Vetinari – of the popular media player with new features such as ChromeCast support, and 8K video playback. Other highlights from the release include:

  • Hardware decoding enabled by default to get 4K and 8K playback
  • 10-bit and HDR support (only on Windows 10 Fall Creators Update for now)
  • 360 video and 3D audio, up to Ambisoncics 3rd order
  • Allows audio passthrough for HD audio codecs
  • Can play Blu-Ray Java menus: BD-J
  • Browsing of local network drives and NAS

VLC 3.0 is also the first major version to be released for all platforms at the same time, and you can download VLC 3.0 for Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, Android, iOS, and Windows Phone / RT, and since the project is open source so you can also retrieve the code. You may also find more details about Android specific changes, where the developer mentions Android support on DeX, Chromebooks and Android auto. I tried VLC on a TV box a few years ago, and it did not work well at all, but now they claim support for Android TV too, so this must have improved.

Android-x86 7.1-r1

Android-x86 project allows you to run Android on your Intel/AMD computer, and the developer have just released the first stable Android Nougat release with Android-x86 7.1-r1.

Changelog / key features:

  • Android-x86 installer was improved a lot:
    • Created EFI boot entry to efibootmgr.
    • Added auto-installation function which is useful to install Android-x86 as the only one OS.
    • Provided more information on disk and partition selection menu.
    • Added advanced options to provide more boot options.
    • Saved the last choice in grub2 menu.
  • Updated kernel to the LTS kernel 4.9.80 with more patches from AOSP.
  • Added a new HAL for IIO type sensors.
  • Shows poweroff menu by Ctrl-Alt-Del.
  • Fixed a lot of bugs.

You’ll find more details on the release page, including download links for the 32-bit / 64-bit ISO or RPM images.

Via Liliputing and XDA Developers

Shuttle DL10J Fanless Gemini Lake Mini PC Features Intel Celeron J4005 Dual Core Processor, 3 Video Outputs

February 7th, 2018 3 comments

Several mini PCs based on Intel Gemini Lake processors were unveiled at CES 2018, including Zotac PICO PI226, MeLE PCG63-APL4, and ECS LIVA Gemini Lake models all of which slated to launch in Q2 2018. ASRock and GIGABYTE also announced Gemini Lake motherboards a few weeks later.

Most of the products above are for the consumer market, but if you’re after a Gemini Lake mini PC more geared towards business use cases like digital signage and multi-display solutions, Shuttle is now showcasing their DL10J mini PC powered by an Intel Celeron J4055 Gemini Lake dual core processor, and offering 3 video output ports at Integrated Systems Europe 2018 (ISE 2018).

Shuttle DL10J mini PC specifications:

  • SoC – Intel Celeron J4005 dual core GLK processor @ 2.00/2.70 GHz with 12EU Intel UHD Graphics 600; 10W TDP
  • System Memory – 2x DDR4 slots @ 2133 MHz up to 8GB
  • Storage – 1x 2.5″ SATA III bay, 1x M.2 2280 M Key slot, SD card reader
  • Video Output – HDMI 2.0 up to 4K60, DisplayPort up to 4K60, VGA
  • Audio – Line out & Mic input audio jacks
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11b/g/n WiFi (via M.2 module)
  • USB – 2x USB 3.0, 4x USB 2.0
  • Serial – 1x RS232 port, 1x RS232/422/485 port supporting 5V/12V
  • Expansion – 1x M.2 2230 A/E key slot, Kensington lock hole
  • Misc – Power button, power and status LEDs
  • Power Supply – 40W
  • Dimensions  – 190 x 165 x 43 mm (metal case)
  • Weight – 1.5 kg
  • Certifications – CB,CE,BSMI,ETL,FCC,RCM,RoHS,VCCI

The fanless mini PC will support Windows 10 64-bit or Linux, and ship with a VESA mount. Optional accessories will include a stand for vertical operation, and a 19″ 2U rack mount front plate. Shuttle has not setup a product page yet, but some information could be derived from the product guide (in Russian).

Via Liliputing and FanlessTech

Companies Address Concerns related to Speculative Execution Exploits: Meltdown and Spectre

January 4th, 2018 17 comments

Yesterday, news surfaced about a “bug” in Intel processors that could be fixed at the operating system level at the cost of a decrease in performance for some tasks, from a typical, and barely noticeable 5% hit, to a more consequent 30% hit for some specific tasks, and as we discussed yesterday I/O intensive tasks are the most impacted by the changes.

While Intel (and Arm) are impacted, AMD claims not to be, and the issue was reported by major news outlets and likely impacting the stock price of the companies with Intel stock losing 3.39%, and AMD stock gaining 5.19%, so obviously every company felt the need to answer, starting with Intel’s response to security research findings:

Recent reports that these exploits are caused by a “bug” or a “flaw” and are unique to Intel products are incorrect. Based on the analysis to date, many types of computing devices — with many different vendors’ processors and operating systems — are susceptible to these exploits.

Check with your operating system vendor or system manufacturer and apply any available updates as soon as they are available.

Intel believes its products are the most secure in the world and that, with the support of its partners, the current solutions to this issue provide the best possible security for its customers.

This looks like damage limitation, and I guess more info will be released once the fixes are all released.

But the most detailed report is by Google, since Project Zero found three variant of two vulnerabilities – Metldown and Spectre – related to speculative execution, a technique to predict (and run) likely future instruction in order to boost performance:

We have discovered that CPU data cache timing can be abused to efficiently leak information out of mis-speculated execution, leading to (at worst) arbitrary virtual memory read vulnerabilities across local security boundaries in various contexts.

Variants of this issue are known to affect many modern processors, including certain processors by Intel, AMD and ARM. For a few Intel and AMD CPU models, we have exploits that work against real software. We reported this issue to Intel, AMD and ARM on 2017-06-01.

The three variants:

Variants 1 & 2 are referred to as Spectre, and variant 3 as Meltdown, with the latter easier to exploit.

The Meltdown attack uses exception handling or suppression to run a series of transient instructions

Yesterday, we learned AMD was not impacted, but Google clearly mention they could exploit AMD processors too, and that’s because AMD is only subject to Spectre. So AMD responded too:

It is important to understand how the speculative execution vulnerability described in the research relates to AMD products, but please keep in mind the following:

  • The research described was performed in a controlled, dedicated lab environment by a highly knowledgeable team with detailed, non-public information about the processors targeted.
  • The described threat has not been seen in the public domain.

and provided a table showing how AMD processors are impacted:

Google Project Zero (GPZ) Research Title Details
Variant One Bounds Check Bypass Resolved by software / OS updates to be made available by system vendors and manufacturers. Negligible performance impact expected.
Variant Two Branch Target Injection Differences in AMD architecture mean there is a near zero risk of exploitation of this variant. Vulnerability to Variant 2 has not been demonstrated on AMD processors to date.
Variant Three Rogue Data Cache Load Zero AMD vulnerability due to AMD architecture differences.

So it looks like only variant 1 is a potential issue, and operating systems will have to be patched.

Arm’s turn:

Cache timing side-channels are a well-understood concept in the area of security research and therefore not a new finding. However, this side-channel mechanism could enable someone to potentially extract some information that otherwise would not be accessible to software from processors that are performing as designed and not based on a flaw or bug. This is the issue addressed here and in the Cache Speculation Side-channels whitepaper.

It is important to note that this method is dependent on malware running locally which means it’s imperative for users to practice good security hygiene by keeping their software up-to-date and avoid suspicious links or downloads.

The majority of Arm processors are not impacted by any variation of this side-channel speculation mechanism. A definitive list of the small subset of Arm-designed processors that are susceptible can be found below.

The currently popular Cortex-A7 and Cortex A53 cores are not impacted at all, but some others are:

Processor

Variant 1

Variant 2

Variant 3

Variant 3a

Cortex-R7

Yes*

Yes*

No

No

Cortex-R8

Yes*

Yes*

No

No

Cortex-A8

Yes (under review)

Yes

No

No

Cortex-A9

Yes

Yes

No

No

Cortex-A15

Yes (under review)

Yes

No

Yes

Cortex-A17

Yes

Yes

No

No

Cortex-A57

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Cortex-A72

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Cortex-A73

Yes

Yes

No

No

Cortex-A75

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Variant 3a of Meltdown is detailed in the whitepaper linked above, and Arm “does not believe that software mitigations for this issue are necessary”. In the table above, “Yes” means exploitable, but has a mitigation, and “No” means “no problem” :). So only Cortex-A75 is subject to both Meltdown and Spectre exploits, and it’s not in devices yet. Like other companies, Arm will provide a fix for future revisions of their processors.

Silicon vendors are not the only companies to issue answers, as operating systems vendors will have to issues fixes, and cloud providers are also impacted. Patchsets have been merged into Linux 4.15 as we’ve seen yesterday, Microsoft issued a statement for their Cloud service, Red Hat / Debian and others are working on it, and Google listed products impacted, and even Chrome web browser users need to take action to protect themselves. Android phones with the latest security patch will be protected, bearing in mind that all those Cortex-A53 phones in the wild are not affected at all. It’s worse noting that while Meltdown and Spectre make the news, there are over thirty other critical or high severity vulnerabilities fixed in January that did not get much coverage if any…

BBen MN10 TV Stick Review – Windows 10, Ubuntu 17.04, Benchmarks, and Kodi

The BBEN MN10 is the second Apollo Lake device to be released in the stick form-factor and on paper looks to have a lot to offer:

It features an Apollo Lake N3350 SoC, an unusual 3GB of RAM, 64GB of storage and is cooled by a ‘mute’ fan. The devices comes in a plain box with a power adapter, and a leaflet style manual.

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It also included a three-pin UK power adapter, as this was advertised as the ‘BBen MN10 Mini PC  –  UK PLUG  BLACK’.

Looking at the detail specifications:

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We can immediately see discrepancies as the device does not have a ‘RJ45 Port Speed: 1000M LAN’ port, and was not supplied with ‘1 x HDMI Cable’ nor ‘1 x Remote Control’.

Powering on the device and the ‘mute’ fan is also a miss-representation as it starts immediately and is noticeably noisy. It also runs at full speed regardless of workload so the noise is a constant reminder that the device is switched-on:

Starting Windows and the disappointment continues with a message informing that ‘We can’t activate Windows on this device because you don’t have a valid digital license or product key’:

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also ‘Intel Remote Keyboard Host App’ is pre-installed (see icon top left) and the computer name is already been set as ‘BBEN’.

As a result I tried installing Microsoft’s Windows 10 Home ISO but because of the confirmed lack of license, I then installed Microsoft’s Windows 10 Enterprise product evaluation ISO in order to review the device.

The basic hardware matched the specification:

with plenty of free-space available post installation:

I then ran some standard benchmarking tools to look at performance under Windows. These are a new set of benchmarks as I’ve updated the tools and releases specifically for devices running Windows version 1709 and later:

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As can be seen the performance is as expected for the N3350 SoC and is comparable with other devices such as ECDREAM A9 or Beelink AP34 Ultimate:

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Next I installed Ubuntu as dual-boot using my ‘isorespin.sh’ script, which includes installing the rEFInd bootloader to enable booting on Apollo Lake devices when the BIOS doesn’t support Linux:

Performance is again as expected:

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And can be compared with other Intel Apollo Lake and earlier Intel Atom devices:

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Revisiting the hardware using Linux commands additionally shows the micro SD card is running the slower HS200 interface:

and rather interestingly a S/PDIF audio interface shows up in the sound settings. However given there is only a 3.5mm audio jack and when an external speaker is connected through it, sound works when selecting the S/PDIF interface. This again is somewhat misleading.

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Looking at real-work Windows usage cases the first being watching a 4K video using Microsoft Edge which works flawlessly:

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The same video when watched using Google Chrome results in occasional dropped frames:

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but notice how much harder the CPU and GPU are working.

Watching the same video and changing the video quality to high definition (1080p resolution) results in a better experience.

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Unfortunately this can’t be said for watching the same video in Google Chrome on Ubuntu. At 4K the video is unwatchable with excessive dropped frames and a stalled network connection after a short while:

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Even at 1080p the video still stutters:

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Running Kodi on both Windows and Ubuntu show similar ‘differences’ in the results.

On Windows if the video is encoded using the VP9 codec then decoding is using software resulting in high CPU usage and high internal temperatures:

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However when the video is encoded with the H.264 codec then Windows uses hardware to decode:

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and similar for videos encoded with H.265 or HEVC:

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with no issues playing the videos.

On Ubuntu hardware is used to decode all three codecs:

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however some H.265 videos resulted in a blank (black) screen just with audio whereas others played without issue:

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As previously mentioned the internal fan is screaming away merrily although it’s effectiveness with internal cooling is somewhat questionable:

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It does assist in keeping the device at a safe external temperature:

with the highest observed reading being 41°C.

So looking at the physical characteristics of the device its size is only slightly larger than the second generation Intel Compute Stick:

Initially I used the device upside down as it seemed sensible to have the case vents exposed:

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However cracking open the case reveals the fan actually uses the side vent between the two USB ports:

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with the bottom vents for cooling the memory and storage chips:

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Remarkably the WiFi chip appeared to have been exposed to excessive heat at some stage:

yet had still passed inspection as evidenced by the green ‘Pass’ sticker.

The only identifiable marking on the board were on the bottom under the sticky black coverings:

The BIOS is minimalistic:

which is an issue when booting with a connected USB to Ethernet adapter, as it defaults to PXE booting which needs to timeout before booting occurs from internal storage. A workaround is to boot Windows from the boot menu after pressing F7:

Notice also that the BIOS is unbranded and simply displays the Intel logo.

Finally after using Windows then Ubuntu and returning to Windows I encountered that audio over HDMI had disappeared:

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and reinstalling the Intel HD Graphics driver didn’t fix it.

So to sum up this is a device with specific limitations which the buyer should be aware of prior to purchase. I’d like to thank Gearbest for providing the BBEN MN10 for review. They sell it for $197.42 shipped. You’ll also find it on Aliexpress from various sellers with not-activated or activated Windows 10 Home / Pro.

AMBE+2 Vocoder Promises High Voice Quality at Low (2.0 to 9.6 Kbps) Data Rates

October 24th, 2017 4 comments

Opus 1.2 open source audio codec was release a few months ago with the ability to deliver low power low high-quality audio bitrate for speech with bitrates as low as  12 Kbps. Digital Voice Systems (DVSI) claims to have gone even lower thanks to their AMBE+2 vocoder (Advanced MultiBand Excitation) providing high-quality speech at data rates from 2.0 to 9.6 kilobytes per second.

AMBE+2 vocoder is said to outperform the company’s previous generation AMBE+ Vocoder as well as the G.729 and G.726 vocoders, while operating at only 4.0 Kbps. The vocoder is suitable for mobile radio, secure voice, satellite communication, computer telephony, digital voice and storage applications

AMBE+2 Vocoder Chips

The solution can be integrated into product either using software licensing, or through Vocoder chips, and the company lists the following key benefits:

  • Maintains speech intelligibility and speaker recognition at rates as low as 2.0 kbps
  • Resistant to background noise and channel bit errors
  • Customizable data from 2.0 to 9.6 kbps
  • Uses fewer computations than CELP (Code-excited linear prediction) as used in G.729
  • Does not require the use of a residual signal
  • Eliminates fixed data-rate and codebook problems
  • Low complexity reduces implementation costs

You can listen to male and female samples at different bitrate for your own evaluation. DVIC claims the technology is already used in digital mobile radio and satellite telephony solutions such as Inmarsat, Iridium, DMR Communication PBX, etc…

AMBE-4020 HDK

AMBE+2 voice compression algorithm is available for DSPs and CPUs from Texas Instruments, Analog Devices, ARM, MIPS, Intel, NXP, and others, and runtime environments are available for Windows, Linux, Android, iOS, VxWorks, uC/OS, and other operating systems on request. The company can also provide hardware development kits (HDK) based either on AMBE-3000 or AMBE-4020 AMBE+2 chip, USB based products from a single channel dongle to a the 12 full-duplex channel USB-3012 product, as well as Net-2000 VCUs (Voice Connect Unit) that bridge analog speech I/O to an Ethernet network for example for VoIP or voice-monitoring / recording products (for the CIA? :)).

More details can be found on DVSI’s AMBE+2 product page.

NComputing RX300 Thin Client Review – Part 2: Hardware Setup, Windows Server 2016

October 8th, 2017 8 comments

Ncomputing RX300 is a thin client based on Raspberry Pi 3 board, allowing to run Windows operating systems on a powerful server with the Raspberry Pi 3 handling the display, audio, and keyboard/mouse inputs.

The company sent me a sample for review, and I checked out the hardware and accessories in the first part entitled “NComputing RX300 Thin Client Review – Part 1: Unboxing and Teardown“, so in the post I’ve started the thin client, and connected it to vSpace Pro server.

Hardware Setup

RX300 uses the same peripherals as any mini PC, so I connected USB keyboard and mouse, an Ethernet cable (WiFi is also possible), and the power adapter. You could also connect other devices, and I added a USB flash drive which, as we’ll see later, will be properly recognized by the server. I was also sent a USB to VGA adapter that you can connect to the remaining USB port to add a secondary display, but it would never work with through my TV, maybe because VGA is limited to 1600×1050, and the resolution confused the adapter.

Server Options

You’ll also need to setup a server, and you have two main option here:

  • Download vSpace Pro 10 to install and manage a self-hosted server. I did not do this in this review, because my main PC is running Ubuntu 16.04, and the program only support Windows operating systems, and server virtualization infrastructure solutions from VMWare, Citrix and Microsoft.
  • So instead I used a vSpace Pro server hosted in Singapore using AWS (Amazon Web Services) with a demo account prepared by the company for the review

If you’re interested in the first solution, you may want to read to Quick Installation Guide to find out more.

Ncomputing RX300 and Windows Server 2016 AWS instance

Once the thin clients are installed, and the server is configured, you can start your RX300 devices. About an animated boot logo, you should soon (around 15 to 20 seconds total boot) time see vSpace Pro client interface as shown below. Please ignore the vertical lines in the photos and video below, it’s just a problem with my TV.
You’ll see two sections with a list of auto-detected servers if you have setup any local vSpace Pro 10 machine, and/or server groups with other vSpace Pro servers. I’m located in the north of Thailand, and Thailand->Thailand was already setup, so I had nothing to do except click on Connect, and within a few short second, I was asked to login into Windows.

I typed the credentials provided by the demo, and I ended up in Windows right away, and could use it normally. A few times later however, I was automatically disconnected during the login process: I would type the user name and password to login, Windows desktop will appear, only go to back to vSpace Pro client interface. Trying again once or twice usually did the trick.

As soon as I entered into the server, I wanted to find out what kind of hardware the virtual machine was running on. Intel Xeon CPU E5-2676 v3 @ 2.40 GHz running Windows Server 2016 64-bit with 4 GB RAM, and a 39.9 GB Windows partition.

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Quite a powerful machine so we should expect good performance that may be affected by the Internet connection between my ISP’s modem router and the server. You’ll also notice “Ubuntu 16.10” D: drive. That’s my own flash drive connected to one of the USB port of the Raspberry Pi 3 board.

The company had install several programs such as Chrome and LibreOffice, as well as demo files.  I also tried to install my own program (Gimp), and I could do that, and persistent storage mean even after I disconnect the client, or reboot the server, my programs and files were still present in the system.

So I went on to use it like I would for a desktop machine in a business setting, browsing the web, and loading multiple programs.

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More specifically, I ran the following tests:

  • Launching Chrome, LibreOffice Calc (excel spreadsheet), LibreOffice Impress (powerpoint presentation), LibreOffice Writer (word doc), and Gimp in succession to demonstrate the speed to launch apps
  • Multi-tab browsing in Chrome and Octane 2.0 benchmarks
  • Playing 1080p YouTube video in embedded and full screen modes
  • Playing local 1080p video with VLC

Overall the performance is impressive for a remote system, and in many cases, it’s hard to know we are not using a “normal” computer. The fonts may not be as sharp as on a normal PC, but it’s hardly noticeable, and the screen updates while scrolling up or down web pages are slower than on my main computer. However, I did not feel either issues were a big problem, and they will likely depend on your network performance, in my case “low to moderate”. It feels much better than the few times I used VNC in the past.

The first time however, YouTube video playback was very choppy, but then I saw Chrome complaining about “vCAST feature not available”. vCast streaming technology is a premium feature allowing you to watch videos smoothly on thin clients. After the company enable vCAST in the server, I could streaming 1080p YouTube videos, and play local video in VLC smoothly.

You can watch the video below to have an idea of the performance, and a look at the client settings.

Once you are done, you can click on the power icon and select Disconnect to go back to vSpace Pro client user interface.

vSpace Pro client configuration options and Going back to Raspbian

If you’ve watched the video above, you’ll know that the gear icon on the bottom right brings use to the configuration menu.

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The menu has eight sub-menus:

  • General to select between Thin client mode and Raspbian Desktop mode
  • Connections to select servers manually or automatically
  • Server Groups to manage servers
  • Kiosk Mode to automatically login and/or launch a program when connecting to the vSpace server
  • Display to change HDMI resolution, or manage dual display setups.
  • Audio to select audio output and input priority
  • Network to configure Ethernet or WiFi
  • Support for firmware update option
  • About with some information about the thin client.

I tried the Raspbian desktop mode, and sure enough it will be into Raspbian, and you could potentially use it as a normal Raspberry Pi 3 board too.

Once you’ve selected this mode, it will boot to Raspbian by default. If you want to use it as a thin client again, the Switch to Thin Client Mode icon will reboot RX300 to vSpace client user interface.

Recycling older Windows computer with vSpace Pro Client

If your organization owns some older Windows PCs or laptops that lack the performance or memory to run recent programs, you could download vSpace Pro client for Windows to put them to good use. Just to the the Software Downloads page, register or/and login, and select vSpace Pro Client for WIndows 7, 8.1 or 10 as needed. Linux clients are not available for download.

You could then have a “fleet” a thin clients mixing older hardware and NComputing RX300. You’d have to consider electricity charges while calculating your TCO, as RX300 only consumes around 3.0 to 3.4 Watts, and older hardware may consume much more than that.

The Costs

Larger organizations should probably contact the company to find out the best way to match their requirements. But if you have smaller needs, or just want to evaluate the system, you could purchase Ncomputing RX300 for $99 MSRP with a 1-year license, or $174.99 with a 3-year license. I understand vCAST streaming is included for free for 6 months, but after you’d have to pay extra for the feature. What I could not find is public pricing for the various licenses. The company however has a cost calculator allowing you to check how much you’d save with thin clients compared to having PCs, but again premium features license costs such as vCAST or dual display are not included. You’d also have to consider Windows server license requirements.

IkaScope WiFi Oscilloscope Probe Works with Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, Android and iOS

September 13th, 2017 11 comments

Last year, I wrote about Aeroscope, a portable Bluetooth oscilloscope that looks somewhat like a Stabilo Boss highlighter pen, and sends measurements over the air directly to your Android and iOS tablet or smartphone. It was introduced through a crowdfunding campaign which eventually failed, but Aeroscope can now be purchased for $199 on Amazon US or their own website. If you’d prefer WiFi over Bluetooth, and would like something that also works on Windows, Linux, and/or Mac OS X, IKALOGIC has just launched IkaScope WiFi oscilloscope probe compatible with all popular mobile and desktop operating systems.

IkaScope WS200 specifications:

  • Analog Bandwidth  – 30 MHz @ -3dB
  • Sample Rate – 200 MSps
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n/e/i WiFi @ 2.4 GHz configurable as access point or station
  • Input Range – +/-40 V range CAT1
  • Offset Range – +/- 20V to +/- 40V offset
  • Input Impedance – 10MΩ || 14pF
  • Input Contact – ProbeClick intelligent probe tip that will only start measurements upon contact
  • Voltage Resolution – 100 mV/division to 10 V/division
  • Sample Resolution – 8-bit
  • Max Refresh Rate – 250 fps
  • Memory Depth – 4K points (4x 1000 points for burst buffers)
  • Protection Input Level – 253 VAC 1min
  • USB – Isolated micro USB port for charging only
  • Misc – Power/Charging and WiFi status LEDs
  • Battery – 420 mAh battery good for about 1 week battery life with daily regular use.
  • Dimensions – 161mm long

IkaScope specifications are slightly better than the ones of Aeroscope when it comes with analog bandwidth and sample rate for example, but the battery capacity is lower. However,  the latter is likely more than compensated by ProbeClick technology that will only measure when a contact is detected, hence saving power during idle times. One advantage of WiFi over Bluetooth is that it allows for a higher refresh rate up to 250 fps.

The probe ships with a ground clip and a USB charging cable. OS support will be brought step by step starting with Windows, but Linux, Mac OS X, iOS, and Android will all be supported by November 9th if the schedule’s deadlines can be met, and all desktop OK will be supported by the end of September before shipping. More details about the software can be found in IkaScope knowledge base.

IKALOGIC has started taking pre-order for IkaScope for 299 Euros excluding VAT and shipping scheduled by the end of the year. “EARLYBIRD” coupon valid until the 20th of September will power the price by 10%.. Some more information, and the purchase link are available on the product page.

Axiomtek NA362 Network Appliance Features Intel Atom C3538/C3758 Processors, Up to 10 LAN Ports

August 19th, 2017 4 comments

We reported about GIGABYTE MA10-ST0 motherboard powered by a 16-core Intel C3958 Denverton processor earlier this week, but that also corresponded to the official launch of Intel Denverton family, and many companies made announcements for their Denverton boards, products, or COM Express modules including SuperMicro, Kontron, Portwell, and others, such as Axiomtek NA362 Network Appliance powered by Atom C3538 or C3758 processors, and offering up to 10 LAN ports with six GbE RJ-45 ports, and up to four SFP+ cages.

Axiomtek NA362 specifications:

  • SoC (one or the other)
    • Intel Atom C3538 quad core “Denverton” processor @ 2.10 GHz with 8MB cache; 15W TDP
    • Intel Atom C3758 octa core “Denverton” processor @ 2.2 GHz with 16MB cache; 25W TDP
  • System Memory – 2x or 4 x R-DIMM/U-DIMM non-buffer DDR4, up to 64/128GB
  • Storage – 1x 2.5″ SATA3 HDD; 1x mSATA
  • Ethernet
    • 6x 10/100/1000 Mbps RJ45 ports via Intel i210
    • 4x 10 GbE SFP+ cages for C3758 model only
    • One pair LAN Bypass
  • Expansion – 1x PCI Express Mini Card for optional Wi-Fi/3G/LTE
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 port
  • Management – 1x RS-232 (RJ45) console port
  • Misc – Power & network Status LEDs, power switch
  • Power Supply – 1x 12V/5A or 1x 12V/7A power adapter (depends on CPU SKU)
  • Temperature Range – 0°C ~ +40°C
  • Dimensions –  231 x 197 x 44 mm (1U desktop form factor)
  • Weight – Net: 1.64 kg; gross: 2.54 kg with 12V/5A adapter,2.69 kg with 12V/7A adapter
  • Certifications – FCC class B, CE class B

Atom C3538 SoC is equipped with two 10 GbE interface, but Axiomtek decided not to provide any SFP+ cages on the model based on this processor with only the six RJ45 ports.

The appliance supports the Intel Data Plane Development Kit (Intel DPDK), the Yocto Project, as well as Linux, Windows Server 2012 R2, and Windows Server 2016 operating systems. The server is said to be suitable for VPN, network bandwidth controller, firewall and UTM (Unified Threat Management) applications.

Axiomtek NA362 will be available in October 2017 through two SKUs: NA362-DAMI-C3758-US (C3758, 4x DIMM, 10 LAN) and NA362-D6GI-C3538-U (C3538, 2x DIMM, 6 LAN). Check out the product page for further information.