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Embedded Linux Conference & IoT Summit 2018 Schedule

February 13th, 2018 No comments

The Embedded Linux Conference 2018 and the OpenIoT Summit 2018 will jointly take place next month, on March 12 – 14, 2018 in Portland, Oregon, USA. The former is a “vendor-neutral technical conference for companies and developers using Linux in embedded products”, while the latter is a “technical conference for the developers and architects working on industrial IoT”. The Linux Foundation has already published the schedule, and it’s always useful to learn what will be discussed about even for people who won’t attend.

With that in mind, here’s my own virtual schedule with some of the talks I find interesting / relevant to this blog.

Monday, March 12

  • 10:50 – 11:40 – Progress in the Embedded GPU Ecosystem by Robert Foss, Collabora Ltd.

Ten years ago no one would have expected the embedded GPU ecosystem in Linux to be what it is now. Today, a large number of GPUs have Open Source support and for those that aren’t supported yet, improvements are happening at a rapid pace.

In just the last year Vivante GPUs have gained mainline support and Mali GPUs have seen good progress being made.

In this talk, Robert will cover GPUs in the embedded space and give an overview about their current status, what lies ahead and how the Open Source state of the art compares to the proprietary alternatives.

  •  11:50 – 12:40 – Zephyr LTS Release, What to Expect and Why are We Doing This by Anas Nashif, Intel

After eleven 1.x.x releases of Zephyr since the project has launched 2 years ago, the Zephyr project is planning to release Zephyr LTS in 2018 with many new features that have been in the works for the last year, stable APIs and with the goal of taking a subset of the released project code through various certification activities.

In this talk the status plans for Zephyr LTS will be presented and discussed and the next steps that the project will take after the LTS release.

  • 14:00 – 14:50 – Preempt-RT Raspberry Pi Linux by Tiejun Chen, VMware

As we know, the Raspberry Pi is a series of small single-board computers developed in the United Kingdom by the Raspberry Pi Foundation to promote the teaching of basic computer science in schools and in developing countries. Now it is very popular around our IoT world, and you can see many guys use Pi to build great things, and even it can play a role in the production environment. The official Raspberry Pi Linux maintains Linux kernel specific to Pi platform. But it does not include Preempt RT Linux support. Obviously, in some IoT cases we really need to meet hard real time requirement. In this presentation, we will review if-how we can integrate Preempt RT Linux patches to Pi Linux, an see what the problems are for this particular hardware platform.

  • 15:00 – 15:50 – OpenEmbedded/Yocto on RISC-V – New Kid on the Block by Khem Raj, Comcast

RISC-V a new open source ISA based architecture is rapidly gaining acceptance in embedded space. Several core packages e.g. gcc toolchain, linux kernel, binutils, newlib, qemu has already been ported for RISC-V. At this point, OpenEmbedded is one of first embedded linux distribution frameworks to support RISC-V architecture. This talk will cover the status of support as the core support has been upstreamed into OpenEmbedded-core, additionally SOC layer meta-riscv is also created which would serve as common layer for all RISC-V based SOCs.

  • 16:10 – 17:00 – Bluetooth Mesh with Zephyr OS and Linux by Johan Hedberg, Intel

Bluetooth Mesh is a new standard that opens a whole new wave of low-power wireless use cases. It extends the range of communication from a single peer-to-peer connection to a true mesh topology covering large areas, such as an entire building. This paves the way for both home and industrial automation applications. Typical home scenarios include things like controlling the lights in your apartment or adjusting the thermostat. Although Bluetooth 5 was released over a year ago, Bluetooth Mesh can be implemented on any device supporting Bluetooth 4.0 or later. This means that we’ll likely see very rapid market adoption of the feature.

The presentation will give an introduction to Bluetooth Mesh, covering how it works and what kind of features it provides. The talk will also give an overview of Bluetooth Mesh support in Zephyr OS and Linux and how to create new wireless solutions with them.

  • 17:10 – 18:00 – Drive your NAND within Linux by Miquèl Raynal, Bootlin (formerly Free Electrons)

NAND flash chips are almost everywhere, sometimes hidden in eMMCs, sometimes they are just parallel NAND chips under the orders of your favorite NAND controller. Each NAND vendor follows its own rules. Each SoC vendor creates his preferred abstraction for interacting with these chips.

Handling all of that requires some abstraction, and that is currently being enhanced in Linux! A new interface, called exec_op is showing up. It has been designed to match the most diverse situations. It should ease the support of advanced controllers as well as the implementation of vendor-specific NAND flash features.

This talk will start with some basics about NAND memories, especially their weaknesses and how we get rid of them. It will also show how the interaction between NAND chips and controllers has been standardized over the years and how it is planned to drive NAND controllers within Linux.

Tuesday, March 13

  •  10:50 – 11:40 – Comparing and Contrasting Embedded Linux Build Systems and Distributions by Drew Moseley, Mender.io

We will discuss the various options for creating embedded Linux operating systems. We will provide a basic description of each option, including an overview of the workflow for each choice. The talk will cover the advantages and disadvantages of each of these options and provide viewers with a matrix of design considerations to help them pick the right choice for their design. We will cover the following options:

  • Yocto/OpenEmbedded
  • Buildroot
  • OpenWRT/LEDE
  • Slimmed down desktop distributions (e.g. Debian, Raspbian, Ubuntu)

We will also touch upon other tools, such as crosstool-ng and ucLinux, which are peripherally related to building embedded Linux systems. The focus for this section will be to make the viewers aware of these tools as they frequently come up while researching embedded Linux so that you are better informed which tools are available.

  • 11:50 – 12:40 – The Things Network: An IOT Global Phenomenon by Bryan Smith, Tacit Labs

IoT has many connectivity options and systems based on Low Power Networks(LPN’s) such as LoraWAN are showing a great deal of promise. LoraWAN uses the ISM Band which doesn’t require a license for use.

The Things Networks (TTN) is a community about LoraWAN, Low Power Wide Area Network (LPWAN). It’s collaboratively built by passionate people, Open Source Software and Open Governance. The network has a manifesto and fair access policy that governs its use and management. In the session we’ll discuss:

  • The technology behind LoraWAN, TTN and similar networks.
  • TTN’s impact on public and private LPWAN’s.
  • The initiators and communities that install and build LoraWAN gateways.
  • Lastly we’ll discuss the impact of the deployments in real world use cases.

There will also be a live demo of a LoraWAN gateway and node in action on several public networks including TTN as well as others.

  • 14:00 – 14:50 – I + I2C = I3C: What’s in this Additional ‘I’? by Boris Brezillon, Bootlin (formerly Free Electrons)

The MIPI Alliance recently released version 1 of the I3C (pronounce ‘eye-three-see’) bus specification, which is supposed to be an improvement over the long-standing I2C and SPI protocols. Compared to I2C/SPI, I3C provides a higher data rate, lower power consumption and additional features such as dynamic address assignment, host join, in-band interrupts. For the last year or so, Free Electrons has been working with Cadence Design Systems on supporting this new kind of bus in Linux.

With this talk we would like to introduce this new bus and the concepts it brings to the table. We will also detail how we plan to expose the new features exposed by the I3C protocol in Linux and go through future possible improvements of the I3C framework that has already been submitted for review on the Linux kernel mailing list.

  • 15:00 – 15:50 – Android Common Kernel and Out of Mainline Patchset Status by Amit Pundir & John Stultz, Linaro

A quick overview of what the speakers ares going to cover in this session.

  • A brief background on Android common kernels – Out of tree Android patches and how they have evolved over time.
  • The current/active patchset introduction and status – Their use cases in Android and on-going upstreaming efforts if any.
  • A brief Intro to android-mainline-tracking tree.
  • Rebasing latest android-$LTS tree to latest linux release tag
  • Find/Report/Fix Android regressions or ABI breakages in mainline kernel.
  • 16:20 – 17:10 – Tock, The Operating System for a Programmable IoT by Amit Levy, Stanford University

Tock is an open-source operating system for low-power ARM Cortex-M microcontrollers that enables radically different kinds of embedded and IoT products.

In typical embedded systems, every line of code is fully trusted because embedded operating systems lack traditional isolation mechanisms like processes. Unfortunately, this makes developing secure products difficult, and running third-party applications virtually impossible.

Tock uses a language sandbox in the kernel and a process-like hardware enforced mechanism in userspace to isolate third-party and other untrusted code in the system.

In this presentation I’ll introduce Tock’s vision for IoT and how its isolation mechanisms work. Then, I’ll use examples of deployed systems and products using Tock to show how developers can use it to build more secure and extensible IoT systems today.

  • 19:00 – 20:00 – BoF: Open Source Hardware by Drew Fustini, OSH Park

Open Source Hardware BoF (Birds of a Feather) session for those interested in how Open Source Hardware design can benefit embedded Linux systems.

The session will start will start with a short presentation of a few slides to clarify terminology and highlight Open Source Hardware projects relevant to Linux. The panelists will then lead a discussion with the BoF attendees about the benefits and challenges of designing Open Source Hardware.

Jason and Drew can talk about the experience of working with community, manufacturers, and distributors to create an Open Source Hardware platform. Leon can speak about his experience of learning hardware design as a software engineer, and how he took his Raspberry Pi HATs from concept to product. John can speak about his experience leading an Open Source Hardware platform within a large corporation.

Wednesday, March 14

  • 11:05 – 11:55 – Landscape of Linux IoT Ecosystems by Christian Daudt, Cypress Semiconductor

IoT products are getting richer in their functionality daily, and as a result there is a trend for increased use of Linux in these products. As we are early in the IoT ecosystem cycle, there is a large number of projects and products vying for developer attention as frameworks and protocols to be used in new product development. This talk provides an overview of the options available and how they relate to each other. It covers OS stacks such as EdgeX Foundry, Automotive Grade Linux, Android Things, IoTivity, Tizen, etc.. as well as IoT-tailored cloud integrations from cloud vendors such as AWS, Google, Microsoft.

  • 12:05 – 12:55 – CPU Power Saving Methods for Real-time Workloads by Ramesh Thomas, Intel

Configurations created for real time applications mostly disable power management completely to avoid any impact on latency. It is however, possible to enable power management to a degree to which the impact on latency is tolerable based on application requirements. This presentation addresses how CPU idle states can be enabled and tuned to allow power savings while running real time applications.

The presentation will give a background of the issues faced by real-time applications when CPU power management is enabled. It will then explain tools, configurations and methods that can be used to tune applications and CPU power management in the kernel to be able to save power without impacting the deterministic latency tolerance requirements.

  • 14:30 – 15:20 – Debian for Embedded Systems: Best Practices by Vagrant Cascadian, Aikidev, LLC

As embedded hardware becomes more capable, Debian becomes an attractive OS for projects. Debian provides clear licensing, a solid technical foundation, and over twenty-five thousand software projects already available within Debian.

Unfortunately, embedded system projects may make changes to a customized Debian OS in ways that make it difficult to apply security updates or system upgrades. This can lead to an unmaintained fork of Debian with long-standing security vulnerabilities unfixed in the hands of end-users. Nobody likes bit-rot.

Many of these common pitfalls can be mitigated or avoided entirely by understanding Debian’s culture, infrastructure, technical norms, and contribution processes. These understandings will improve embedded systems using Debian over the long-term.

  • 15:30 – 16:20 – Civil Infrastructure Platform: Industrial Grade Open Source Base-Layer by Yoshitake Kobayashi, Toshiba Corporation, Software Development and Engineering Center

The Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) is creating a super long-term supported (SLTS) open source “base layer” of industrial grade software. The base-layer consists of the SLTS kernel and a basic set of open source software and standardization concepts. By establishing this “base layer,” the CIP Project will enable the use and implementation of software building blocks in civil infrastructure projects. Currently, all civil infrastructure systems are built from the ground up, with little re-use of existing software building blocks, which drains resources, money and time. In this devroom, we’ll share project strategy, use cases, roadmap, milestones and policies. We’ll also share technical details for each development activities for the base-layer that includes open source, real-time development tools, testing and answer questions.

  • 16:30 – 17:20 – 3D Printing with Linux and Xenomai by Kendall Auel, 3D Systems Corp.
Software running on embedded Linux with Xenomai is used to control a 3D printer. The lessons learned and practical advice will be shared in this presentation. There were many challenges to overcome. A complete 3D printing system requires precise motion control, thermal control, material delivery and monitoring, and coordinated data transfers. All concurrent real time processes must be coordinated and managed, while providing interactive response to user input. In parallel with the real time processing, the system must slice the 3D model into layers for printing, which is by its nature a compute-bound application. The dual-kernel architecture of Linux with Xenomai was ideal for maintaining low and predictable latencies for real time control, while allowing the complex and resource intensive slicing application to run in parallel.

Selecting the sessions was not easy as most talks are relevant, so I’d recommend checking out the whole schedule.

The Embedded Linux Conference & OpenIoT Summit require registration with the fees listed as follows:

  • Early Bird Fee: US$550 (through January 18, 2018)
  • Standard Fee: US$700 (January 19,  February 17, 2018)
  • Late Fee: US$850 (February 18, 2017 – Event)
  • Academic Fee: US$200 (Student/Faculty attendees will be required to show a valid student/faculty ID at registration.)
  • Hobbyist Fee: US$200 (only if you are paying for yourself to attend this event and are currently active in the community)

TECHBASE Moduino X Series Industrial IoT Modules / Endpoints are Based on ESP32 WiSoC

September 27th, 2017 4 comments

We’ve previously covered TECHBASE ModBerry industrial IoT gateways leveraging Raspberry Pi 3, FriendlyELEC NanoPi M1 Plus, or AAEON’s UP Linux boards. The company has now launched Moduino X series modules powered by Espressif ESP32 WiFi + Bluetooth SoC to be used as end points together with their ModBerry gateways.

Moduino X1

Two models have been developed so far, namely Moduino X1 and X2, with the following specifications:

  • Wireless Module – ESP32-WROVER with ESP32 dual-core Tensilica LX6 processor @ 240 MHz, 4MB pSRAM (512KB as option), 4MB SPI flash;
  • External Storage – X2 only: micro SD card slot
  • Connectivity
    • 802.11 b/g/n WiFi up to 16 Mbps + Bluetooth 4.2 LE with u.FL antenna connector
    • X2 only: 10/100M Ethernet
    • Options: LoRa (Semtech SX1272); Sigfox (TI CC1125); LTE Cat M1/NB1; Zigbee
  • Serial – 2x RS-232/485
  • Display – Optional 0.96″ OLED display with 128×64 resolution
  • Expansion I/Os
    • 4x Digital I/O (0 ~ 3V)
    • 2x Analog Input:
    • A2 Only: 2x analog output (optional)
    • A2 only: support for Techbase ExCard add-on modules for extr RS-232/485 ports, Ethernet ports, PCIe slots, analog input and output, digital I/Os, relays, M-Bus interface, etc…
  • Battery – Optional battery power support (A1 only); optional UPS function with LiPo battery or Supercapacitor
  • Power Supply -5V DC
  • Dimensions
    • A1 – ABS: 90 x 36 x 32 mm (LxWxH); Aluminum: 95 x 35 x 41 mm (LxWxH)
    • A2 – ABS: 90 x 71 x 32 mm (LxWxH); Aluminum: 95 x 71 x 41 mm (LxWxH)

Moduino A1 consumes less than A2, and can be powered by batteries only, but both models can use battery as UPS. The modules support Espressif ESP-IDF SDK, Zephyr Project, Arduino programming, MicroPython, Mongoose OS, and more, and would typically be used as meters & sensor nodes capable of reporting temperature, humidity, pressure, acceleration, & light with attached sensors. More sensors are being developed by the company.

Moduino X2 (right)

Moduino X1 & X2 appear to be available now, but you’d need to contact the company to get price information. Visit Moduino X series product page for more details.

Linaro Connect SF 2017 Welcome Keynote – New Members, Achievements, the Future of Open Source, and More…

September 26th, 2017 No comments

Linaro Connect San Francisco 2017 is now taking place until September 29, and it all started yesterday with the Welcome Keynote by George Grey, Linaro CEO discussing the various achievements since the last Linaro Connect in Budapest, and providing an insight to the future work to be done by the organization.

The video is available on YouTube (embedded below), and since I watched it, I’ll provide a summary of what was discussed:

  • Welcoming New Members – Kylin (China developed FreeBSD operating systems) joined LEG (Enterprise Group), NXP added LHG (Home Group) membership, and Xilinx joined LITE (IoT and Embedded).
  • Achievements
    • OPTEE open portable trusted environment execution more commonly integrated into products. Details at optee.org.
    • LEG 17.08 ERP release based on Linux 4.12, Debian 8.9 with UEFI, ACPI, DPDK, Bigtop, Hadoop, etc…
    • LITE group has been involved in Zephyr 1.9 release, notably contributing to LwM2M stack
    • More projects to be found on download page.
  • Open source future with many fields involved including artificial intelligence, security, automotive, automation, etc.
    • Security requires software/hardware combination, and with a single global standard such as OPTEE desirable
    • Artificial Intelligence / Machine Learning
      • Trend is to move out of the CPU to off-load tasks to GPU, FPGA, or NNA (Neural Network Accelerators)
      • Not single API, for example TensorFlow supports CPU and NVIVIA CUDA, using other platforms require heavy customization
      • Linaro to work abstraction layer/ common API for machine learning
      • A.I will bring many benefits, but also potential dangers/issues: privacy, military use, etc… Development in the open is better.
    • Automotive
      • Currently Intel and NVIDIA provides ADAS / autonomous driving platform, both closed sources
      • More open platform needed, maybe a 96Boards Automotive platform with 6x cameras, GPS, touch screen display, processing power good enough for ADAS and IVI (In Vehicle-Entertainment)
      • Linux now mostly handles non-safety critical code, will change in the future. Containers will help.
      • Currently working on proof-of-concept with StreetDrone One autonomous driving development platform, DragonBoard 410c and Gumstix AeroCore 2 mezzanine. More details, maybe demo, at next Linaro Connect
  • 96Boards
    • Recently (and soon to be) announced – Hikey 960, Orange Pi i96, Uranus (WiFi board based on TI CC3220, to run Zephyr OS)
    • Mezzanine boards – NeonKey with sensors and LEDs, Secure96 with crypto chips & TPM (used to play with OPTEE)
  • ARM Platforms for developers – Three types:
  • Microplatforms
    • Definition – open source, minimal, secure, OTA upgradeable distributions
    • Cortex M platforms will use Zephyr OS, Cortex A support will be based on OpenEmbedded with a unified multi-SoC kernel
    • Currently tested on Hikey, DragonBoard 410c, and Raspberry Pi 3, more platforms to be supported in the future
    • Demos with 6x Carbon + Nitrogen board with BLE running Zephyr OS, Raspberry Pi 3 IoT gateway:
      • 1. Use Linaro Developer Cloud (running LED Enterprise Reference Platform) + Hawkbit dash to monitor temperature sensors on the board
      • 2. Switch Raspberry Pi 3 gateway to use Softbank cloud using Alibaba infrastructure on-the-fly, and control lights from Japan severs.
      • The two demos above shows how a multi-standard automation gateway could be implemented solving the problem of incompatibility of devices from different manufacturers
      • BLE mesh demo with six board controlling lights
      • Source code for demos can be found on Github
    • Going forwards downstream microplatforms will be developed by a separate entity: Open Source Foundries, unrelated to Linaro which will keep on focusing on upstream work
  • Linaro also launched the Associate Program for OEMs, ODMs, service providers, startups, and university who want to join Linaro. No details were provided, only an email address [email protected]

You’ll also find the presentation slides on Slideshare.

MCUBoot is an Open Source Secure Bootloader for IoT / MCUs

May 15th, 2017 5 comments

Bootloaders takes care of the initial boot sequence on the hardware before the operating system takes over. For example, U-boot is often used in embedded systems as the bootloader before starting the main operating systems such as Linux or FreeBSD. MCUBoot is also a bootloader, but it targets the IoT, here referring to MCU based systems with limited memory and storage capacity, and is born out of work on Apache Mynewt OS, when developers decided to develop the bootloader separately from the operating system.

MCUBoot is designed to run on small & low cost systems running on MCU with ~512 KB flash, ~256 KB RAM, and currently supports Zephyr OS and Mynewt, with support for other RTOS also considered. Due to constraint the bootloader uses minimal features with a flash driver, a single thread, and crypto services. The project also aims at solving security and field firmware updates. To address the latter, the flash is partitioned in four sections, one for the bootloader, one “slot” with the primary image, a second slot for the firmware upgrade, and a Scratch partition to swap slots when an upgrade is needed. An image trailer at the end of each slot indicates the state of the slot.

You’ll find the source code in MCUBoot repository in Github, and you may want to watch the presentation at Linaro Connect Budapest 2017 for more details.

New 96Boards IoT Edition Boards Showcased at Linaro Connect 2017: BlueSky IE and WRTNode IE

March 9th, 2017 10 comments

Linaro Connect Budapest 2017 is taking place this week in Hungary, and during George Grey – Linaro CEO – keynote, he provided a status updates for the Linaro group, addressed some of Linaro’s criticisms from members and the community, and unveiled two upcoming boards compliant with 96Boards IoT edition both running Zephyr OS, and adding to BLE Carbon board announced last year.

Click to Enlarge

The first board is BlueSky IE board with the following key specifications:

  • SoC – RDA Micro RDA5981A ARM Cortex-M4 Wireless MCU with 64KB ROM, and 32KB cache
  • System Memory – 485KB SRAM. It’s unclear if that’s only the on-chip SRAM, and there’s also some external PSRAM added.
  • Storage – 8Mb NOR flash 802.11 b / g / n HT20 / 40 mode
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n WiFi with support for  HT20 / 40 modes
  • Crypto security hardware

The second board is WRTnode IE:

  • SoC – Mediatek MT7697 ARM Cortex-M4 wireless MCU @ up to 192MHz with 64KB ROM, 353 KB SRAM
  • Storage – 4Mb NOR flash
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n WiFi and Bluetooth 4.2 LE
  • Crypto security hardware

Neither boards are available now, and Linaro and their members must still be working on them before the launch. There’s currently very little information about RDA5981(A) MCU except on some Chinese websites, but you’ll find many more resources for Mediatek MT7697. Mr Grey also demo’ed Orange Pi i96 board announced last year with an Ubuntu distribution developed by Shenzhen Xunlong Software.

Linaro also announced four new members with Acer joining the Linaro IoT and Embedded (LITE) Group, Guizhou Huaxintong Semiconductor Technology Co., Ltd (HXT Semiconductor) & Fujitsu Limited coming to the Linaro Enterprise Group (LEG), with the latter also joining as founding member of the LEG High Performance Computing Special Interest Group (HPC SIG), and Google joined as a Club member.

You might be interested in watching the keynote with all those announcements, and to be more up-to-date with Linaro’s progress.


If you are in a rush, you may prefer flicking through the keynote presentation slides instead.

Embedded Linux Conference & OpenIoT Summit 2017 Schedule

February 4th, 2017 1 comment

The Embedded Linux Conference 2017 and the OpenIoT Summit 2017 will take place earlier than last year, on February  20 – 23, 2017 in Portland, Oregon, USA. This will be the 12th year for ELC, where kernel & system developers, userspace developers, and product vendors meet and collaborate. The schedule has been posted on the Linux Foundation website, and whether you’re going to attend or not, it’s always informative to check out the topics.

So as usual, I’ll make a virtual schedule for all 5 days.

Monday, February 20

For the first day, the selection is easy, as choices are limited, and the official first day it actually on Tuesday. You can either attend a full-day paid training sessions entitled “Building A Low Powered Smart Appliance Workshop“, and the only session that day:

  • 14:30 – 15:20 – Over-the-air (OTA) Software Updates without Downtime or Service Disruption, by Alfred Bratterud, IncludeOS

Millions of consumers are at risk from security vulnerabilities caused by out-of-date software. In theory all devices should update automatically, but in practice, updating is often complicated, time-consuming and requires manual intervention from users. IncludeOS is a unikernel operating system that enables over-the-air (OTA) software updates of connected devices without downtime or service disruption.

The talk starts with a brief introduction to unikernels, their capabilities and how they can be very beneficial for IoT products from security, performance and operational perspectives. Then we give an overview of the IncludeOS Live Update functionality, which we use to demonstrate an atomic update of a device using Mender.io.

Tuesday, February 21

  • 10:30 – 11:20 – Bluetooth 5 is here, by Marcel Holtmann, Open Source Technology Center, Intel

The next version of Bluetooth has been released just a few month ago. This presentation gives an introduction to Bluetooth 5 and its impacts on the ecosystem. It shows new and exciting use cases for low energy devices and IoT with the focus on Linux and Zephyr operating systems.

With Bluetooth 5, the wireless technology continues to evolve to meet the needs of the industry as the global wireless standard for simple and secure connectivity. With 4x range, 2x speed and 8x broadcasting message capacity, the enhancements of Bluetooth 5 focus on increasing the functionality of Bluetooth for the IoT. These features, along with improved interoperability and coexistence with other wireless technologies, continue to advance the IoT experience by enabling simple and effortless interactions across the vast range of connected devices.

  • 11:30 – 12:20 – Embedded Linux Size Reduction Techniques, by Michael Opdenacker, Free Electrons

Are you interested in running Linux in a system with very small RAM and storage resources? Or are you just trying to make the Linux kernel and its filesystem as small as possible, typically to boot faster?

This talk will detail approaches for reducing the size of the kernel, of individual applications and of the whole filesystem. Benchmarks will you show how much you can expect to save with each approach.

  • 14:00 – 14:50 – Moving from IoT to IIoT with Maker Boards, Linux, and Open-Source Software Tools, by Matt Newton, Opto 22

In this session, developers will learn how to use the open-source tools, maker boards, and technology they’re already familiar with to develop applications that have the potential to deliver a massive positive impact on society. There are billions of devices–sensors, I/O, control systems, motors, pumps, drives–siloed behind proprietary control and information systems, waiting to be tapped into. This workshop is geared towards teaching the developer community how to use the tools they’re already familiar with to access, monitor, and manage these assets to create a potentially huge positive impact on our way of life.

  • 15:00 – 15:50 – Debugging Usually Slightly Broken (USB) Devices and Drivers, by Krzysztof Opasiak, Samsung R&D Institute Poland

USB is definitely the most common external interface. Millions of people are using it every day and thousands of them have problems with it. Driver not found, incorrect driver bound, kernel oops are just examples of common problems which we are all facing. How to solve them or at least debug? If you’d like to find out, then this talk is exactly for you!

We will start with a gentle introduction to the USB protocol itself. Then standard Linux host side infrastructure will be discussed. How drivers are chosen? How can we modify matching rules of a particular driver? That’s only couple of questions which will be answered in this part. Final part will be an introduction to USB communication sniffing. Krzysztof will show how to monitor and analyze USB traffic without expensive USB analyzers.

  • 16:20 – 17:10 – SDK in the Browser for Zephyr Project, by Sakari Poussa, Intel

Starting a development for embedded IoT system can be a tedious task, starting with the tools and SDK installations. You also need to have proper operating system, cables and environment variables set up correctly in order to do anything. This can take hours if not days. In this tutorial, we present an alternative, fast and easy way to start IoT development. All you need is your Zephyr board, USB cable and Web Browser. The Zephyr will be running JavaScript Runtime for Zephyr including a “shell” developer mode and Web USB. The Browser has the IDE where you can edit and download code to your board. No compiling, flashing or rebooting is required. During the tutorial, we have few boards available and participants can start developing applications for zephyr in 5 minutes.

  • 17:20 – 18:10 – Fun with Zephyr Project and BBC micro:bit, by Marcel Holtmann, Open Source Technology Center, Intel

This presentation shows how Zephyr empowers the BBC micro:bit devices and its Bluetooth chip to do fun things.

  • 18:15 – 19:00 – Yocto Project & OpenEmbedded BoF, by Sean Hudson, Mentor

Got a comment, question, gripe, praise, or other communication for the Yocto Project and/or OpenEmbedded technical leaders? Or maybe you just want to learn more about these projects and their influence on the world of embedded Linux? Feel free to join us for an informal BoF.

Wednesday, February 22

  • 10:40 – 11:30 – Journey to an Intelligent Industrial IOT Network, by Giuseppe (Pino) de Candia, Midokura

There are 66 million networked cameras capturing terabytes of data. How did factories in Japan improve physical security at the facilities and improve employee productivity? With the use of open systems, open networking, open IOT platforms of course!

Edge Computing reduces possible kilobytes of data collected per second to only a few kilobytes of data transmitted to the public cloud every day. Data is aggregated and analyzed close to sensors so only intelligent results need to be transmitted to the cloud while non-essential data is recycled. The system captures all flow information, current and historical.

Pino will draw from real IIOT use cases and discuss the variety of operations and maintenance tool to support proactive policy-based flow analysis for edge computing or fog nodes enabling IT and OT end to end visibility from a network perspective.

  • 11:40 – 12:30 – SecurityPI: IronClad your Raspberry Pi, by Rabimba Karanjai

Raspberry Pi has garnered huge interest in last few years and is now one of the most popular Linux boards out there sparking all kinds of DIY projects. But most of these function with the default settings and connect to the Internet. How secure is your Pi? How easy is it for someone to take over and make it part of a botnet or sneak peek on your privacy?

In this talk Rabimba Karanjai will show how to harden the security of a Raspberry Pi 3. He will showcase different techniques with code examples along with a toolkit made specifically to do that. This cookbook will harden the device and also provide a way to audit and analyze the behavior of the device constantly. After all, protecting the device finally protects us all, by preventing another dyndns DDOS attack.

  • 14:00 – 14:50 – IoTivity-Constrained: IoT for Tiny Devices, by Kishen Maloor, Intel Corporation

The IoT will be connected by tiny edge devices with resource constraints. The IoTivity-Constrained project is a small-footprint implementation of the Open Connectivity Foundation’s (OCF) IoT standards with a design that caters to resource-constrained environments. It is lightweight, maintainable and quickly customizable to run on any hardware-software deployment.

This talk will present IoTivity-Constrained’s architecture, features, APIs, and its current integration with a few popular real-time operating systems. It will end with a discussion of IoTivity-Constrained’s adaptation for the Zephyr RTOS.

  • 15:00 – 15:50 – RIOT: The Friendly Operating System for the IoT (If Linux Won’t Work, Try RIOT), by Thomas Eichinger, RIOT-OS

This presentation will start with RIOT’s perspective on the IoT, focusing on CPU- and memory-constrained hardware communicating with low-power radios. In this context, similarly to the rest of the Internet, a community-driven, free and open source operating system such as RIOT is key to software evolution, scalability and robustness. After giving an overview to RIOT’s overall architecture and its modular building blocks, the speaker will describe in more detail selected design decisions concerning RIOT’s kernel, hardware abstraction and network stack. Furthermore, the talk will overview the development and organizational processes put in place to help streamline the efforts of RIOT’s heterogeneous community. The presentation will end with an outlook on upcoming features in RIOT’s next releases and longer-term vision.

  • 16:20 – 17:10 – Graphs + Sensors = The Internet of Connected Things, by William Lyon, Neo4j

There is no question that the proliferation of connected devices has increased the volume, velocity, and variety of data available. Deriving value and business insight from this data is an ever evolving challenge for the enterprise. Moving beyond analyzing just discrete data points is when the real value of streaming sensor data begins to emerge. Graph databases allow for working with data in the context of the overall network, not just a stream of values from a sensor. This talk with cover an architecture for working with streaming data and graph databases, use-cases that make sense for graphs and IoT data, and how graphs can enable better real-time decisions from sensor data. Use cases covered will include data from oil and gas pipelines and the transportation industry.

Thursday, February 23

  • 9:00 – 9:50 – Android Things: High Level Introduction, by Anisha Dattatraya & Geeta Krishna, Intel Corporation

An overview of the basic concepts behind Android things and its structure and components is presented. Upon completion of this session, you should have a good overview of how Android Things brings simplicity to IoT software and hardware development by providing a simple and secure deployment and update model. This presentation provides the context needed for the Android Things Tutorial and other deep dive sessions for Android Things.

  • 10:00 – 10:50 – 2017 is the Year of the Linux Video Codec Drivers, by Laurent Pinchart, Ideas on Board

Codecs have long been the poor relation of embedded video devices in the Linux kernel. With the embedded world moving from stateful to stateless codecs, Linux developers were left without any standard solution, forcing vendors and users to resort to proprietary APIs such as OpenMAX.

Despair no more! Very recent additions to V4L2 make it possible to support video codecs with standard Linux kernel APIs. The ChromeOS team has proved that viable solutions exist for codecs without resorting to the proprietary options. This presentation will explain why video codecs took so long to properly support, and how the can be implemented and used with free software and open APIs.

  • 11:10 – 12:00 – Embedded Linux – Then and Now at iRobot, by Patrick Doyle, iRobot

Mr. Doyle will review the history of the use of embedded Linux at a commercial company (iRobot) and discuss the challenges faced (and overcome) then and now. While home routers and WiFi Access Point developers have enjoyed the benefits (and risks) of deploying Linux based products, that has not always been the case for other products. With the advent of low cost cell phone processors and vendor support for Linux, it is now possible to embed a Linux based solution in a consumer retail product such as a vacuum cleaner, minimizing risk and development time in the process.

  • 12:10 – 13:00 – Mainline Linux on AmLogic SoCs, by Neil Armstrong, BayLibre

Inexpensive set-top boxes are everywhere and many of them are powered by AmLogic SoCs. These chips provide 4K H.265/VP9 video decoding and have fully open source Linux kernel and U-boot releases. Unfortunately most of the products based on these devices are running an ancient 3.10 Android kernel. Thankfully AmLogic has put a priority on supporting their chips in the mainline Linux kernel.

Neil will present the challenges and benefits to pushing support for these SoCs upstream, as well as the overall hardware architecture in order to understand the Linux upstreaming decisions and constraints. He will also detail the future development plans aiming to offer a complete experience running an Upstream Linux kernel.

  • 14:30 – 15:20 – OpenWrt/LEDE: When Two become One, by Florian Fainelli, Broadcom Ltd

OpenWrt is a popular Linux distribution and build system primarily targeting the Wi-Fi router/gateway space. The project has been around for more than 12 years, but has recently experienced a schism amongst the developers over various issues.  This resulted in the formation of the LEDE project.  This split has caused confusion among the community and users. This presentation will cover what OpenWrt/LEDE projects are, what problems they are solving in the embedded Linux space, and how they do it differently than the competition. We will specifically focus on key features and strengths: build system, package management, ubus/ubox based user space and web interface (LuCI). We will demonstrate a few typical use cases for the audience. Finally, the conclusion will focus on the anticipated reunification of the two projects into one and what this means for the community and the user base.

  • 15:30 – 16:20 – Unifying Android and Mainline Kernel Graphics Stack, by Gustavo Padovan, Collabora Ltd.

The Android ecosystem has tons of out-of-tree patches and a good part of them are to support Graphics drivers. This happened because the Upstream Kernel didn’t support everything that is needed by Android. However the Mainline Graphics Stack has evolved in the last few years and features like Atomic Modesetting and Explicit Fencing support are making the dream of running Android on top of it possible. In other words, we will have Android and Mainline Kernels sharing the same Graphics stack!

This talk will cover what has been happening both on Android and Mainline Graphics Stacks in order to get Android to use the Upstream Kernel by default, going from what Android have developed to workaround the lack of upstream support to the latest improvements on the Mainline Graphics Stack and how they will fit together.

  • 16:30 – 17:20 – Developing Audio Products with Cortex-M3/NuttX/C++11, by Masayuki Ishikawa, Sony

Sony released audio products with Cortex-M3 in late 2015. Considering development efficiency, code reusability, feature enhancements and training costs, we decided to port POSIX-based open source RTOS named NuttX to ON Semiconductor’s LC823450 by ourselves, modified the NuttX for fast ELF loading, implemented minimum adb (Android debug bridge) protocols for testing purpose, DVFS in autonomous mode with a simple CPU idle calculation, wake_lock and stack trace which are popular in Linux/Android worlds. Middleware and Applications were developed in C++11 with LLVM’s libc++ which are also popular for large software systems. To debug the software, we implemented NuttX support for OpenOCD so that we can debug multi threaded applications with gdb. In addition, we used QEMU with the NuttX to port bluetooth stack and in-house GUI toolkit and finally got them work before we received LC823450 FPGA.


That’s all. I had to make choice, and did not include some sessions I found interested due to scheduling conflicts such as “Comparing Messaging Techniques for the IoT” by Michael E Anderson, The PTR Group, inc, and “Improving the Bootup Speed of AOSP” by Bernhard Rosenkränzer, Linaro.

You’ll need to register and pay an entry fee if you want to attend the Embedded Linux Conference & OpenIoT Summit:

  • Early Registration Fee: US$550 (through January 15, 2017)
  • Standard Registration Fee: US$700 (January 16, 2017 – February 5, 2017)
  • Late Registration Fee: US$850 (February 6, 2017 – Event)
  • Academic Registration Fee: US$175 (Student/Faculty attendees will be required to show a valid student/faculty ID at registration.)
  • Hobbyist Registration Fee: US$175 (only if you are paying for yourself to attend this event and are currently active in the community)

BLE Carbon 96Boards IoT Edition Board Runs Zephyr OS

September 27th, 2016 6 comments

Linaro Connect Las Vegas 2016 is taking place right now, and the organization has some very interesting development, with a new focus on the Internet of Things thanks to the creation of LITE (Linaro IoT and Embedded) segment group that will work on “delivering end to end open source reference software for more secure connected products, ranging from sensors and connected controllers to smart devices and gateways, for the industrial and consumer markets”. The first LITE IoT Reference Platform release to be made in December 2016, but in the meantime, Linaro introduced 96Board IoT specifications, as well as the first compliant board with the launch of Carbon board (aka BLE Carbon) running Zephyr OS.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Carbon 96Boards IoT Edition board specifications:

  • MCU – STMicro STM32F401 ARM Cortex M4 microcontroller @ up to 84 MHz with 512kB Flash, 96kB ram
  • Connectivity – Bluetooth 4.0 LE via Nordic Semi nRF51822 SoC + chip antenna
  • USB – 1x micro USB OTG port, 1x micro USB port for UART
  • Expansion – 2x 15-pin Low speed connector with GPIO, UART, Analog inputs,SPI, I2C, PWM, and power signals; 3.3V I/O voltage
  • Debugging – SWD debug connectors, UART console via micro USB port
  • Misc – 6LEDs ( USR1, USR2, BT, PWR, RX, TX), 2x push buttons (BOOT0 and RESET)
  • Power Supply – 5V via micro USB port with fuse protect
  • Dimensions –  60 x 30 mm as per 96Boards IoT standards
Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

You’ll find the software and hardware documentation on 96Boards Carbon page, as well as Seeed Studio Wiki, since they are the designer and manufacturer of the board.

As with other 96Boards specifications, 96Board IoT Edition (IE) specification defines requirement for multiple revision of boards either using Cortex-A or Cortex-R/M profile, and IE standard (60x30x9mm) or IE Extended (85x54x12mm) form factor. On top of that you’ll also have board with 3.3V I/Os, and others with 1.8V I/Os. That means that BLE Carbon board is compliant with “96Board IoT Edition standard using Cortex-R/M profile and 3.3V I/Os“.

96Boards IoT Edition Standard (3.3V) Dimensions

96Boards IoT Edition Standard (3.3V) Dimensions

The specifications also mandates at least one wireless interface such as Zigbee and Bluetooth LE, as well as optional Ethernet, USB, and micro SD card support.

Seeed Studio is now taking pre-orders for the BLE Carbon board for $27.95 with shipping planned for October 20th.

Embedded Linux Conference & IoT Summit Europe 2016 Schedule

August 2nd, 2016 4 comments

Embedded Linux Conference & IoT summit 2016 first took place in the US in April, but the events are now also scheduled in Europe on October 11 – 13 in Berlin, Germany, and the schedule has now been published. Even if you are no going to attend, it’s always interesting to find out more about the topic covered in that type of events, so I had a look, and created my own virtual schedule with some of the sessions.

Embedded_Linux_Conference_Europe_2016Tuesday, October 11

  • 10:40 – 11:30 – JerryScript: An Ultra-lightweight JavaScript Engine for the Internet of Things – Tilmann Scheller, Samsung Electronics

JerryScript is a lightweight JavaScript engine designed to bring the success of JavaScript to small IoT devices like lamps, thermometers, switches and sensors. This class of devices tends to use resource-constrained microcontrollers which are too small to fit a large JavaScript engine like V8 or JavaScriptCore.

JerryScript is heavily optimized for low memory consumption and runs on platforms with less than 64KB of RAM and less than 200KB of flash memory. Despite the low footprint, JerryScript is a full-featured JavaScript engine implementing the entire ECMAScript 5.1 standard. It is actively used in production and runs already on hundreds of thousands of smartwatches!

JerryScript is an open source project and has been released under the Apache License 2.0. The talk will include a demo showing JavaScript code executing on top of JerryScript on a resource-constrained microcontroller.

  • 11:40 – 12:30 – Read-only rootfs: Theory and Practice – Chris Simmonds, 2net

Configuring the rootfs to be read-only makes embedded systems more robust and reduces the wear on flash storage. In addition, by removing all state from the rootfs it becomes easier to implement system image updates and factory reset.

In this presentation, Chris shows how to identify components that need to store some state, and to split it into volatile state that is needed only until the device shuts down and non-volatile state that is required permanently. He gives examples and shows various techniques of mapping writes onto volatile or non-volatile storage. To show how this works in practice, he uses a standard Yocto Project build and shows what changes you have to make to achieve a real-world embedded system with read-only rootfs. In the last section, Chris considers the implications for software image update. Expect a live demonstration.

  • 14:00 – 14:50 – Comparison of Linux Software Update Technologies – Matt Porter, Konsulko

The update of software in an embedded Linux system has always been an important part of any product. In the past, however, planning and design for software update was often an afterthought in system design. Further, software update mechanisms for embedded Linux products were typically implemented as ad hoc one-off projects within each product company. As the requirements for products have matured to include security updates at a frequent intervals, software update strategy has become a focal point of product development. This session will explore a number of different Linux software update technologies that are FOSS projects, comparing each for their strengths and weaknesses. In order to better understand the applicability of these technologies, we will also deep dive into both common and uncommon use cases that drive requirements for these software update mechanisms.

  • 15:00 – 15:50 – Building a Micro HTTP Server for Embedded System – Jian-Hong Pan

Apache HTTP Server, NGINX .. are famous web servers in the world. More and more web server frameworks come and follow up, like Node.js, Bottle of Python .., etc. All of them make us have the abilities to get or connect to the resources behind the web server. However, considering the limitations and portability, they may not be ported directly to the embedded system which has restricted resources. Therefore, we need to re-implement an HTTP server to fulfill that requirement.

Jian-Hong will introduce how he used the convenience of Python to implement a Micro HTTP Server prototype according to RFC 2616/HTTP 1.1. Then, re-write the codes in C to build the Micro HTTP Server and do the automated testing with Python Unit Testing Framework. Finally, he’ll explain how he combined the Micro HTTP Server with an RTOS, and lit the LEDs on an STM32F4-Discovery board.

  • 16:10 – 17:00 – Stuck in 2009 – How I Survived – Will Sheppard, Embedded Bits Limited

When developing Linux based products it’s desirable to use the latest version of the Linux kernel – however this is not always possible. In this presentation Will Sheppard will enlighten you with his experiences in developing a product based on a 2.6.28 kernel. Throughout the presentation he will share with you the reasons why you can be stuck with an old kernel, the issues this causes and the surprising and unexpected benefits that also arise. The presentation will also give you an indication as to how far the kernel has developed since 2009 and perhaps some hope if you too are also stuck working in the past.

  • 17:10 – 18:00 – Power Management Challenges in IoT and How Zephyr RTOS Meets Them – Ramesh Thomas, Intel

An OS that runs on tiny IoT devices is already meeting several challenges. These challenges are due to the limited resources in these devices and the diverse nature of the applications and the ecosystem. These same reasons make adding an effective power management infrastructure extremely complex. These devices that run on tiny batteries for extensive periods, mostly unattended, have a very critical need to conserve power.

Zephyr is a RTOS from Intel, designed for IoT and wearable devices. It is open source and supports x86, ARM and ARC SoC platforms. It has a small footprint and can run with very less memory. Power management is built in the core of its scheduling and idling design. It exports infrastructure for PM services to implement custom power policies.

This presentation will give an insight into the Zephyr power management design and the philosophies behind it.

  • 18:10 – 19:00 – BoF: Linux Device Performance Framework – Michael Turquette, BayLibre

Complex system-on-chip processors provide performance levels for their devices and peripherals. The same chips also provide interconnects with performance knobs connecting these devices. For years, Linux has not provided a way to express the relationship between a device and its performance states, nor a uniform method for drivers to change these states. There are many solutions to this in downstream vendor trees. Let’s fix that.

The purpose of this BoF is to start a discussion around the topic with a wide audience, solicit feedback on the currently proposed approach and move forward with consensus. This BoF will discuss the types of performance states that need to be modeled, existing Linux driver frameworks that can be re-used, new code that needs to be written and how Device Tree plays a role. Will we write a new DVFS or Interconnect Framework? Attend and find out!

Wednesday, October 12

  • 09:00 – 09:50 – Supporting the Camera Interface on the C.H.I.P – Maxime Ripard, Free Electrons

Every modern multimedia-oriented ARM SoC usually has some kind of camera interface to be able to capture a video (or photo) stream from an external camera. The framework of choice to support these controllers in Linux is the Video4Linux subsystem, also called v4l2.

This talk will walk through the v4l2 stack, the architecture of a v4l2 driver and the interaction between the SoC driver and its camera’s. The presentation is based on the work Free Electrons has done to develop such a driver for the Allwinner SoCs, as part of enabling the C.H.I.P platform with the upstream Linux kernel.

  • 10:00 – 10:50 – How to Develop the ARM 64bit Board, Samsung TM2 with Exynos5433 – Chanwoo Choi, Samsung Electronics

In the last period of twenty years ARM has been undisputed leader for processor’s architecture in the embedded and mobile industry. With its 64 bit platform, ARM widens up its field of applicability. The ARMv8 introduces a new register set, it is compatible with its 32 bit predecessor ARMv7 and suits best those system that try to be amongst the high end performance devices. Tizen OS is an open multi profile platform that can run on TV, mobile, cars and wearables. Samsung TM2 board based on Exynos5433, which patches has been recently posted to mainline, is an ARM 64-bit board supported by Tizen 64-bit. However, during the bring-up, the kernel developers have faced many challenges that will be presented in this session. The presentation will go through a number of issues and the way they have been solved in order to make Tizen run on a 64 bit platform.

  • 10:45 – 11:35 – Devicetree Hardware Autoconfiguration – Hans de Goede, Red Hat

One can buy 7″ android tablets for around $35 now, assuming one gets the standard Q8 Allwinner based model, these are actually supported by the mainline linux kernel now. These tablets use a standard case + SoC + display, which get paired with a different touchscreen-controller, accelerometer and wifi chip for every other batch.

This talk will outline my experience in making a single devicetree file covering all variants using an in kernel hardware auto-detection module which creates and applies devicetree changesets depending on the detected hardware. This talk will give the audience an idea what is and is not possible wrt dynamic devicetree usage as well as give does and don’ts for people who want to use dynamic devicetree themselves.

  • 11:45 – 12:35 – Wyliodrin STUDIO: An Open Source Tool for IoT Development – Alexandru Radovici, Wyliodrin

Have you been using your development board (like the Raspberry pi for example) as a glorified computer? Are you tired of needing to hookup your boards to a display and keyboard any time you want to program them?

Wyliodrin STUDIO is a software development tool especially created for the design of IoT projects. It comes as an open source Chrome extension so that programmers can use it independently of their specific OS platform and with little setup overhead.

Wyliodrin STUDIO abstract away many of the issues regarding setting up your development boards and allows programmers to directly focus on their projects. It offers a friendly programming environment with many of the features of advanced IDEs, like Eclipse. For beginners, Wyliodrin STUDIO offers a large range of tutorials to help people take their first steps in IoT development. MagPi gave Wylidorin STUDIO a 5/5 rating.

  • 14:00 – 14:50 – ASoC: Supporting Audio on an Embedded Board – Alexandre Belloni, Free Electrons

ASoC, which stands for ALSA System on Chip, is a Linux kernel subsystem created to provide better ALSA support for system-on-chip and portable audio codecs. It allows to reuse codec drivers across multiple architectures and provides an API to integrate them with the SoC audio interface.

This talk will present the typical hardware architecture of audio devices on embedded platforms, present the ASoC API and how to use it for machine drivers, which are used to glue audio codecs with the processor audio interface. Examples, common issues and debugging tips will also be discussed.

  • 15:00 – 15:50 – Cameras in Embedded Systems: Device Tree and ACPI View – Sakari Ailus, Intel

Cameras in embedded systems are often collections of different components rather than monolithic devices such as USB webcams. They consist of sensors, lenses, LED or xenon flashes and ISPs, each of which are individual devices with their specific drivers.

Once the prevalent solution for supporting hardware variation between different ARM based systems was platform data. Since around 2011 new platform data files have had hard time getting to mainline, the preferred solution being the Device tree. However, Device tree support in the V4L2 framework was not around until over a years after that, additionally help from the V4L2 async framework is also required in order to achieve the same functionality as with platform data.

This talk shows how the frameworks are used in drivers and Device tree source, reviews the status of ACPI and discuss potential future developments.

  • 16:30 – 17:20 – Swapping and Embedded: Compression is the Key – Vitaly Wool

Ever since Linux started running on embedded devices, having a swap for such had been considered a misconfiguration rather than a method for overcoming RAM shortage or performance booster. This attitude started to change with the spread of Android devices which usually don’t have a problem utilizing virtually any amount of memory. An with the introduction of ZRAM the usage of a compressed swap in RAM became more useful and more popular. This talk will give a comprehensive description of ZRAM and its counterpart, zswap, a summary of pros and cons of both. This talk will also cover a brand new z3fold compressed memory allocator which can be used for both zswap and ZRAM, of course presenting measurement results for these, obtained on various devices, ranging from set top boxes to laptops, not to forget Android phones.

Thursday, October 14

  • 09:00 – 09:50 – Time is Ready for the Civil Infrastructure Platform – Yoshitake Kobayashi, Corporate Software Engineering Center & Urs Gleim, Seimens

The Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) – launched in April – CIP defined and started to realize a super long-term supported open source “base layer” for industrial grade software. This base layer aims to be used for current and future industrial systems which supports machine-to-machine connectivity for digital future. This kind of systems, being the field for decades, should have long-term support for security and robustness reasons. In this talk, we will show the first steps on CIP development. This includes initial set of components for the base layer and its maintainers. Are you ready? It’s time to start your development with and for the CIP.

  • 10:00 – 10:50 – Introduction to Memory Management in Linux – Alan Ott, Signal 11 Software

All modern non-microcontroller CPUs contain a memory management unit and utilize the concept of virtual memory. This presentation will describe the different types of virtual memory spaces and mappings used in the Linux kernel, the cases in which they are useful, how they are implemented in the kernel, and how they differ from user space memory. Concepts such as the hardware memory-management unit (MMU) and translation lookaside buffer (TLB) will be discussed, as well as software concepts like kernel page tables. User space concepts such as growable stacks, memory paging, memory mapping, page faults, exceptions, and other memory-related conditions will be covered as well.

  • 11:15 – 12:15 – MinnowBoard Delta: Fishing for Easy IoT Hardware – David Anders, Intel

With the introduction of the Zephyr Project, a small scalable real-time operating system for use on resource-constrained systems, the need for an easy to use platforms to enable Internet of Things development has grown. With the idea of enabling both hardware and software developers to quickly prototype and develop proof-of-concept, as well as transitioning directly to product, the MinnowBoard Delta was designed as an open source hardware platform to highlight the Zephyr Project. This presentation will cover design considerations as well as implementation methods for creating open source hardware specifically for open source software.

  • 12:15 – 13:05 – Cloud Platforms for the Internet of Things: How Do They Stack Up? – Koustabh Dolui, Politecnico di Milano

With the advent of the Internet of Things (IoT), there has been a recent surge in the number of cloud platforms offering their services for data collection and processing from IoT devices. These platforms, open-source and closed, are diverse in terms of ease of use, architecture, data storage, privacy, security and communication protocols. However, how these cloud platforms measure up against each other, given the set of tradeoffs that they present, remains quite unexplored in existing literature. In this presentation, Koustabh will present a detailed study on the architecture that these platforms are based on and how the open source platforms compare against closed platforms. Koustabh will compare the platforms based on a real data-set generated from a sensor network deployed at the heritage site of Circo Massimo, Rome, as a part of an ongoing project at Politecnico di Milano, Italy.

  • 14:30 – 15:20 – GPIO for Engineers and Makers – Linus Walleij
We will go over the changes to the GPIO subsystem in the recent years, including GPIO descriptor refactoring, new support for things like open drain, some words on device tree and ACPI hardware descriptions, and we will discuss the new userspace character device ABI for GPIO chips and how use cases such as those presented by the maker community or industrial control clients can benefit from it. We will also talk a bit about the future direction of the subsystem.
  • 15:30 – 16:20 – FDO: Magic ‘Make My Program Faster’ Compilation Option? – Pawel Moll, ARM

Feedback Driven Optimisation (FDO), also known as Profile Guided Optimisation (PGO) is a well known code optimisation technique, employed by compilers since mid XX century, yet not widely used in the wild these days. It relies on providing runtime-captured information about code execution (eg. “branch taken or not?”) during next code compilation, improving quality of decisions made by compiler heuristics.

To be fair, there were good reasons for its demise which I hope to discuss, mainly time and complexity overhead and deployment difficulties, but there is some hope on the horizon, coming with new approach, called AutoFDO and originating at Google, based on statistical profiling (namely Linux perf + extra tools) and source code level attribution. I’ll discuss existing support for it available in mainline GCC and LLVM and give examples of real-life, successful deployments.

If you’d like to attend the event, you can do so by registering online, and paying the entry fee:

  • Early Registration Fee: US$550 (through August 1, 2016)
  • Standard Registration Fee: US$650 (August 2, 2016 – September 3, 2016)
  • Late Registration Fee: US$850 (September 4, 2016 – Event)
  • Student Registration Fee: US$175 (valid student ID required)
  • Hobbyist Registration Fee: US$175