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Posts Tagged ‘orange pi’

Raiscube R2 (Prusa I3 Clone) 3D Printer Review – Part 2: 3D Print Samples, E3D Clone Installation, Tips & Tricks

June 20th, 2017 No comments

Karl here with part 2 Exploring Raiscube R2. That is the official name by Raiscube. Gonna look at some more prints. Some mistakes I made in first part and some simple mods. Maybe not so much mistakes but an oversight.

Oversight / Mistake

So in the first part of Raiscube Prusa i3 review, I mentioned there were not very good instructions, and they sent a blank SD card with the kit. I was wrong. On first inspection, it looked like a factory sealed SD card but it is not. It is an 8 GB card with videos, instructions, pictures, parts list, STL, and gcode files as well as an old version of Cura. Not blank at all with about 1.5 GB of files. It didn’t include settings but if you install the latest Cura, it just takes a little tweaking to print well.

Official specs from SD card

Brand RAISCUBE
Model No. R2
Extruder Qty Single
Machine Size 450 x 420 x 480 mm
Printer Size 210 x 210 x 210 mm
Package Size 423 x 430 x 200 mm
Machine Weight 8.0 kg
Gross Weight 9.0 kg
Filament Colors White ,Red,Black,Blue,Green ,Yellow etc.
Filament Diameter 1.75 mm
Precision Z axis: 0.004 mm;  XY axis: 0.012 mm
Printing Precision 0.1-0.2 mm
Layer Thickness 0.1-0.4 mm
Nozzle diameter 0.4 mm
Power Supply 110/220V, 250W
Max Control Temp. Extruder 260 °C
Max Temp. of HotBed 100 °C
Recommend Temp. ABS:    Nozzle:235 °C  Hot Bed:100 °C
PLA:    Nozzle:200 °C  Hot Bed:50 °C
Printing Format STL/OBJ/G-code
System Compatibility Windows XP/Win7/Win 8/Linux/Mac
Language English
Connecting SD card/ USB

YouTube Videos

RAISCUBE R2 Leveling&Printing

RAISCUBE R2 Installation Video

RAISCUBE R2 Installation DEMO

With that being said I am not sure I would have struggled as much had I known the videos were available. I watched some of the videos but it is hard to know if I would have made the same mistakes.

Free mod

One of the complaints I had in the first part was that I had to level the bed after every print. I have been watching and reading a lot on 3D printing, and I ran across a video that was talking about placing a nut between the screw and the build plate and after trying myself it makes so much sense. Not only is it going to help make a moving plate more rigid it will compress the springs more. There were extra nuts in the kit so this one is a simple welcome freebie. I haven’t leveled the bed much at all after this. I also think it improves quality as well keeping the build plate more rigid.

Prints Before E3D Upgrade

New filament I just received. Some Blue WYZworks Blue PLA. I was tweaking at the bottom, so please ignore the under extrusion at the feet. I changed the flow back as soon as I noticed. All these prints are stock unless otherwise noted.

Another pre sliced file on sd card. Little trouble with overhangs. Overall prettygood. New tool holder

Last and final print on SD card. Kids liked this. Prints in one piece and moves as soon as removed from the print bed.

Moved into new office/work space, went onto thingiverse and printed off some hangers.

Orange Pi Lite development board case.

Joined the fidget spinner crowd, and printed off a bunch of these for son’s birthday party as gifts in different colors. About $1.30 each spinner.

E3D Clone

I have been working for a while on converting to a bowden style E3D clone. I have it mostly working but want to make sure I have a good working solution. My goal is to make it a simple upgrade with the least amount of work and modifications. It worked with the first iteration, until I started longer prints. I am pretty sure it is due to heat creeping up the heartbreak. I think with some Kapton tape insulating the hotend and new mount with bigger fan I can fix the issue.

1st mount with stock E3D fan.

This printer prints really well stock without any modifications, but you have to print slower to avoid ringing. Ringing happens when the print head is accelerating and decelerating and reducing the weight of the x carriage helps reduce this. The R2 is a direct drive type printer. Which means the stepper motor that pushes the filament is on the x carriage. This can be changed to a bowden style and weight can be reduced substantially.

In addition, this converts to an all metal heatbreak. The stock R2 has a short PTFE tube in the heatbreak which limits your temperature to max of 245 deg. Above 245 the PTFE starts to burn and melt and release bad fumes.

Example of Ringing. Stock left E3D Clone Right. Printed same gcode. This was short enough print that finished with E3D clone. Printing slower also reduces ringing.

I think this is a winner. Using 40mm fan instead of 30mm, and not obstructing airflow.

Filament Reel

One additional benefit changing to a bowden style is that you filament reel doesn’t have to turn as freely to get better prints. If you are printing stock you can improve your prints just by making the filament flow better to the hotend. Initially I raised the spool holder to above and behind the printer to improve the flow. With the stock setup when the direct drive is moving around if there is friction on the spool it will slightly twist the hotend as it is moving. I am talking about .1mm variance but you can see this on your prints. There are several spool holders on thingiverse, I am using this one with some bearings that I modified for my needs.

3D Builder

I had been using TinkerCAD to make modifications to parts, but I just noticed windows 10 has a program called 3D Builder built in. It is working OK for what I do most of the time. It is rudimentary for 3D modeling but I find it useful for what I need. TinkerCAD still seems better for slightly more complex stuff but for some simple changes 3D Builder opens quickly and I don’t have to log in. It might be that I have used TinkerCAD more.

Closing Thoughts

Wow! This has been challenging for me to work through the troubleshooting on the E3D upgrade. Stock printing with this printer yields good results. Only if you want to print faster is the E3D really necessary. As long as jamming doesn’t happen with this new design I should be able to share on Thingiverse, and final short write up and comparison. If you would like to purchase this printer you can use this code CNXPrusa on Gearbest and grab it for $179.99.

After the next E3D upgrade article, I’ll be working on TEVO Tarantula 3D printer next sold on GearBest for $418.59. Pretty excited about this one.

$10 Smartphone Display Released for Orange Pi 2G-IoT Board

June 14th, 2017 36 comments

Orange Pi 2G-IoT is a low cost ARM Linux board with 2G, and WiFi & Bluetooth connectivity, basically with the guts of a smartphone minus the display and battery. Shenzhen Xunlong has now released a 800×480 display with capacitive touch support for the board available in black or white, and selling for $9.98 plus shipping.

The board is too thick to make a smartphone out of it, but it reminds of the very expensive Qualcomm MDP’s (Mobile Development Platform), so Android app developers may find some use to test their apps on lower end hardware.  It could also be used for control panels that do not need to be very thin.

Orange Pi 2G-IoT display specifications:

  • 3.5″ TFT Display with 800×480 resolution
  • Capacitive touchscreen
  • Case with the Back, Home, and Recent buttons
  • Dimensions – With case: 57.14 x 96.85 x 2.0 mm; Display only: 51.84 x 86.4mm

Software support is a mystery, and while I’m pretty sure it will work in Android, I don’t know if Linux distributions will support the display, at least at the beginning. The complete kit with the board and display would cost $20 plus shipping.

Via Raffaele Tranquillini on Embedded Electronics Projects G+ community

Linux 4.11 Release – Main Changes, ARM & MIPS Architecture

May 1st, 2017 9 comments

Linus Torvalds has just released Linux 4.11:

So after that extra week with an rc8, things were pretty calm, and I’m much happier releasing a final 4.11 now.

We still had various smaller fixes the last week, but nothing that made me go “hmm..”. Shortlog appended for people who want to peruse the details, but it’s a mix all over, with about half being drivers (networking dominates, but some sound fixlets too), with the rest being some arch updates, generic networking, and filesystem (nfs[d]) fixes. But it’s all really small, which is what I like to see the last week of the release cycle.

And with this, the merge window is obviously open. I already have two pull request for 4.12 in my inbox, I expect that overnight I’ll get a lot more.

Linux 4.10 added Virtual GPU support, perf c2c’ tool, improved writeback management, a faster initial WiFi connection (802.11ai), and more.

Some notable changes for Linux 4.11 include:

  • Pluggable IO schedulers framework in the multiqueue block layer – The Linux block layer is know to have different IO schedulers (deadline, cfq, noop, etc). In Linux 3.13, the block layer added a new multiqueue design that performs better with modern hardware (eg. SSD, NVM). However, this new multiqueue design didn’t include support for pluggable IO schedulers. This release solves that problem with the merge of a multiqueue-ready IO scheduling framework. A port of the deadline scheduler has also been added (more IO schedulers will be added in the future)
  • Support for OPAL drives – The Opal Storage Specification is a set of specifications for features of data storage devices that enhance their security. For example, it defines a way of encrypting the stored data so that an unauthorized person who gains possession of the device cannot see the data. This release adds Linux support for Opal nvme enabled controllers. It enables users to setup/unlock/lock locking ranges for SED devices using the Opal protocol.
  • Support for the SMC-R protocol (RFC7609) – This release includes the initial part of the implementation of the “Shared Memory Communications-RDMA” (SMC-R) protocol as defined in RFC7609. SMC-R is an IBM protocol that provides RDMA capabilities over RoCE transparently for applications exploiting TCP sockets. While SMC-R does not aim to replace TCP, it taps a wealth of existing data center TCP socket applications to become more efficient without the need for rewriting them. A new socket protocol family PF_SMC is introduced. There are no changes required to applications using the sockets API for TCP stream sockets other than the specification of the new socket family AF_SMC. Unmodified applications can be used by means of a dynamic preload shared library.
  • Intel Bay Trail (and Cherry Trail) improvements – Intel HDMI audio support, patchsets for AXP288 PMIC, I2C driver, and C-state support to avoid freezes.

New features and bug fixes specific to ARM architecture:

  • Allwinner:
    • Allwinner A23 –  Audio codec device tree changes
    • Allwinner A31 – SPDIF output support
    • Allwinner A33 – cpufreq support, Audio codec support
    • Allwinner A64 – MMC Support, USB support
    • Allwinner A80 – sunxi-ng style clock support
    • Allwinner H2+ – New SoC variant, similar to H3 (mostly with a different, lower end VPU)
    • Allwinner H3 – Audio codec device tree changes, SPDIF output support
    • Allwinner V3s – New SoC support, USB PHY driver, pinctrl driver, CCU driver
    • New boards & devices – LicheePi One, Orange Pi Zero, LicheePi Zero, Banana Pi M64, Beelink X2
  • Rockchip:
    • Renamed RK1108 to RV1108
    • Clock drivers – New driver for RK3328, and non-critical fixes and clk id additions
    • Tweaks for Rockchip GRF (General Register File) usage (kitchensink misc register range on the SoCs)
    • thermal, eDP, pinctrl enhancements
    • PCI – add Rockchip system power management support
    • Add machine driver for RK3288 boards that use analog/HDMI audio
  • Amlogic
    • Add support for Amlogic Meson I2C controller
    • Add SAR ADC driver
    • Add ADC laddered keys to meson-gxbb-p200 board
    • Add configurable RGMII TX delay to fix/improve Gigabit Ethernet performance on some boards
    • Add pinctrl nodes for HDMI HPD and DDC pins modes for Amlogic Meson GXL and GXBB SoCs
    • New hardware: WeTek TV boxes
  • Samsung
    • Add USB 3.0 support in Exynos 5433
    • Removed clock driver for Samsung Exynos4415 SoCs
    • TM2 touchkey, Exynos5433 HDMI and power management improvements
    • Added Samsung Exynos4412 Prime SoC
    • Removed Samsung Exynos 4412 SoC
    • Added audio on Odroid-X board
    • Samsung Device Tree updates:
      • Add necessary initial configuration for clocks of display subsystem. Till now it worked mostly thanks to bootloader.
      • Use macro definitions instead of hard-coded values for pinctrl on Exynos7.
      • Enable USB 3.0 (DWC3) on Exynos7.
      • Add descriptive user-friendly label names for power domains. This  makes debugging easier
      • Use proper drive strengths on Exynos7.
      • Use bigger reserved memory region for Multi Format Codec on all Exynos chipsets so it could decode FullHD easily
      • Cleanup from old MACHs in s5pv210.
      • Enable IP_MULTICAST for libnss-mdns
      • Add bus frequency and voltage scalling on Exynos5433 TM2 device (along with  necessary bus nodes and Platform Performance Monitoring Unit on Exynos5433).
      • Use macros for pinctrl settings on Exynos5433.
      • Create common DTSI between Exynos5433 TM2E and TM2E.
  • Qualcomm
    • Added coresight, gyro/accelerometer, hdmi to Qualcomm MSM8916 SoC
    • Clock drivers – Updates to Qualcomm IPQ4019 CPU clks and general PLL support, Qualcomm MSM8974 RPM
    • Errata workarounds for Qualcomm’s Falkor CPU
    • Qualcomm L2 Cache PMU driver
    • Qualcomm SMCCC firmware quirk
    • Qualcomm PM8xxx ADC bindings
    • Add USB HSIC and HS phy driver for Qualcomm’s SoC
    • Device Tree Changes:
      • Add Coresight components for APQ8064
      • Fixup PM8058 nodes
      • Add APQ8060 gyro and accel support
      • Enable SD600 HDMI support
      • Add RIVA supprort for Sony Yuga and SD600
      • Add PM8821 support
      • Add MSM8974 ADSP, USB gadget, SMD, and SMP2P support
      • Fix IPQ8064 clock frequencies
      • Enable APQ8060 Dragonboard related devices
      • Add Vol+ support for DB820C and APQ8016
      • Add HDMI audio support for APQ8016
      • Fix DB820C GPIO pinctrl name
      • etc…
  • Mediatek
    • Mediatek MT2701 – Added clocks, iommu, spi, nand, adc, thermal
    • Added Mediatek MT8173 thermal
    • Added Mediatek IR remote receiver
  • GPU – Add Mali Utgard bindings;  the ARM Mali Utgard GPU family is embedded into a number of SoCs from Allwinner, Amlogic, Mediatek or Rockchip
  • Other new ARM hardware platforms and SoCs:
    • Marvell – SolidRun MACCHIATOBin board, Marvell Prestera DX packet processors
    • Broadcom – BCM958712DxXMC NorthStar2 reference board
    • HiSilicon – Kirin960/Hi3660 SoC, and HiKey960 development board
    • NXP – LS1012a SoC with three reference board; SoMs: Is.IoT MX6UL, SavageBoard, Engicam i.Core; Liebherr (LWN) monitor 6;
    • Microchip/Atmel – SAMA5d36ek Reference platform
    • Texas Instruments – Beaglebone Green Wireless and Black Wireless, phyCORE-AM335x System on Module
    • Lego Mindstorms EV3
    • “Romulus” baseboard management controller for OpenPower
    • Axentia TSE-850 Data Radio Channel (DARC) encoder
    • Luxul XAP-1410 and XWR-1200 wireless access points
    • New revision of “vf610-zii” Zodiac Inflight Innovations board

Finally here are some of the change made to MIPS architecture in Linux 4.11:

  • PCI: Register controllers in the right order to avoid a PCI error
  • KGDB: Use kernel context for sleeping threads
  • smp-cps: Fix potentially uninitialised value of core
  • KASLR: Fix build
  • ELF: Fix BUG() warning in arch_check_elf
  • Fix modversioning of _mcount symbol
  • fix out-of-tree defconfig target builds
  • cevt-r4k: Fix out-of-bounds array access
  • perf: fix deadlock
  • Malta: Fix i8259 irqchip setup
  • Lantiq – Fix adding xbar resoures causing a panic
  • Loongson3
    • Some Loongson 3A don’t identify themselves as having an FTLB so hardwire that knowledge into CPU probing.
    • Handle Loongson 3 TLB peculiarities in the fast path of the RDHWR  emulation.
    • Fix invalid FTLB entries with huge page on VTLB+FTLB platforms
    • Add missing calculation of S-cache and V-cache cache-way size
  • Ralink – Fix typos in rt3883 pinctrl data
  • Generic:
    • Force o32 fp64 support on 32bit MIPS64r6 kernels
    • Yet another build fix after the linux/sched.h changes
    • Wire up statx system call
    • Fix stack unwinding after introduction of IRQ stack
    • Fix spinlock code to build even for microMIPS with recent binutils
  • SMP-CPS: Fix retrieval of VPE mask on big endian CPUs”

Read Linux 4.11 changelog – with comments only – generated using git log v4.10..v4.11 --stat, to get the full list of changes. You may also want to checkout Linux 4.11 changelog on kernelnewbies.org.

RDA Micro RDA8810 Android SDK with Linux & U-boot Source Code for Orange Pi 2G IoT Board Released

April 18th, 2017 31 comments

Orange Pi 2G IoT board was released a couple of weeks ago, shortly followed by Android and Ubuntu images, but since it was not based on Allwinner, but an RDA Micro  8810PL processor, we did not have any source code so far, which can be a real problem for a development board… Shenzhen Xunlong has now managed to upload a 6.7GB Android SDK to MEGA, with the link published via Orange Pi Resources page.

MEGA has a download limit which depends on how much traffic they get at the time, and after 5.3 GB download,  I was asked to register for a PRO account, or wait for four hours before resuming the download. If you want to avoid this limit for any large MEGA download, you can run megadl instead. That’s what I did in Ubuntu 16.04 (remember to escape any special characters with \):

Once the download is done, none of the files have extension, but the first file is a gzip compressed files, while others are just raw data, so I concatenated all 6 files into a gzip file before uncompressing it, at which point I realized it was a tar file too:

The company has made it unnecessary difficult for that part, but I was finally successful, and that’s what the content of the SDK looks like.

Click to Enlarge

The Android SDK  relies on Linux 3.10.62, and I’ve been told while the Android part is quite poor, the Linux part looks better, even though the version is not quite the latest. U-boot source code is also included, and part of the 2G modem code can be found in the modem directory.

I got the news through ParrotGeek1 who plans to rebase the code to Linux 3.10.105, and release a Debian image. He has setup a RDA8810 github account with the Linux kernel. So you’ll have to be patient, or join the fun to get a better Linux image. There’s no clear roadmap for Orange Pi 3G-IoT or 4G-IoT based on other RDA Micro processors, but that would certainly help motivating a few more people if such boards were planned.

No Case for Orange Pi Zero or Other Tiny Development Boards? No problem: Use an Old Mouse

April 11th, 2017 1 comment

There now plenty of tiny ARM Linux boards, which are normally sold without case, but usually it’s not to hard to find a 3D printed case. But if you have small board, and don’t feel to purchase a case for it, there’s an other solution: use an old mouse. That’s exactly what Slider2732 has done with his Orange Pi Zero board to convert it to a mini PC running Armbian, or a game console running RetroOrangePi. So after the keyboard PC, here comes the mouse PC!

So what did he exactly use for the mouse PC?

  1. Orange Pi Zero board
  2. An old Logitech mouse for the case and cable
  3. An 8GB micro SD card to flash the operating system
  4. A 4.3″ car reversing monitor (optional) acting as the display with composite input
  5. An Rii wireless keyboard/mouse, as the mouse function is not included with the mouse PC…
  6. A PAM8403 based 3W audio amplifier
  7. A 0.25W speaker
  8. Salvaged fan from an ATI graphics card + 32 Ohm resistor

You’ll have to find an old mouse with sufficient height, and cut plastic parts that get in the way. The mouse cable is used to carry power, audio and composite video in his setup, but you could customize it as you see fit. Note that you should get 6 wires in a PS/2 mouse, and only 4 wires in a USB mouse, so the older the better 🙂

You can find more details about the build in the video.

Via Hackaday.

Shenzhen Xunlong Releases Two Orange Pi Boards with 64-Bit ARM Processor, 2GB RAM

April 4th, 2017 21 comments

Shenzhen Xunlong has already been selling 64-bit ARM development board with their Orange Pi PC 2 & Orange Pi Zero Plus 2 H5 boards based on Allwinner H5, as well as Orange Pi Win board powered by Allwinner A64 processor. However, so far none of them are equipped with much memory, with the only options being 512MB or 1GB RAM. The company has recently launched  two new boards with 2GB RAM, namely Orange Pi Win Plus featuring Allwinner A64 SoC, and Orange Pi Prime equipped with Allwinner H5 SoC.

Orange Pi Win Plus

That board is just an update to Orange Pi Win board with the only difference I could find being the 2GB RAM:

  • SoC – Allwinner A64 quad core ARM Cortex A53 processor @ 1.2 GHz with Mali-400MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3
  • Storage – 2MB SPI flash, micro SD slot up to 64GB, footprint for optional eMMC flash
  • Video Output / Display interface – HDMI 1.4 up to 4K @ 30 Hz with CEC, 3D and HDCP; MIPI LCD interface
  • Audio – HDMI, 3.5 mm headphone jack, built-in microphone
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet + 802.11 b/g/n WiFi & Bluetooth 4.2 (AP6212)
  • USB – 4x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB OTG port
  • Camera – MIPI CSI interface up to 5MP camera, up to [email protected] fps video capture
  • Expansion – 40-pin Raspberry Pi somewhat-compatible header
  • Debugging – 3-pin UART header
  • Misc – IR receiver; reset and power buttons; power and status LEDs;
  • Power
    • 5V via power barrel or micro USB port
    • Lithium battery header
    • Power selection jumper (4-pin header)
    • AXP803 PMIC
  • Dimensions – 93 x 60 mm
  • Weight – 48 grams

The company has released Android, Ubuntu 16.04 “Xenial” Server & Desktop, and Debian Jessie Server & Desktop images for the board on the resources page. Windows 10 IoT support is coming later thanks to a partnership between Allwinner and Microsoft. It’s also possible community images will also become available.

Orange Pi Prime

Orange Pi Prime required a new PCB layout, but it still shares many of the features found in Orange Pi PC 2 (changes highlighted in bold):

  • SoC – Allwinner H5 quad core Cortex A53 processor with an ARM Mali-450MP4 GPU
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3
  • Storage – micro SD card slot up to 64GB, optional 8Mbit SPI NOR flash
  • Video Output – HDMI 1.4 with CEC support, AV port
  • Audio I/O – HDMI, AV port, on-board microphone
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11 b/g/n WiFi + Bluetooth 4.0 with u.FL antenna
  • USB – 3x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB OTG port
  • Camera – MIPI CSI Interface for up to 5 MP camera sensor
  • Expansions – 40-pin Raspberry Pi compatible header
  • Debugging – 3-pin UART header for serial console
  • Misc – IR receiver; Power & reset buttons; Power and status LEDs
  • Power Supply – 5V/2A via barrel jack or micro USB port
  • Dimensions – 98 x 60 mm (Orange Pi PC 2 was 85 x 55 mm)
  • Weight – 48 grams (38 grams for Orange Pi PC 2)

Click to Enlarge

Xunlong has released four OS images on their resources page: Android, Ubuntu Desktop, Arch Desktop, and Debian Desktop. Since the board is so similar to Orange Pi PC 2, except for the extra memory, wireless module, and reset button!, and Orange Pi PC 2’s Armbian Ubuntu Xenial server & desktop nightly build images with Linux 4.10 are available, I’d expect an Orange Pi Prime build soonish. Note that while Armbian image with mainline Linux may have improved security and potentially better performance, a few things like GPIOs may not be working yet.

Orange Pi Win Plus is sold on Aliexpress for $29.99 shipping, and Orange Pi Prime for the exact same price.

Orange Pi 2G-IoT ARM Linux Development Board with 2G/GSM Support is Up for Sale for $9.90

March 30th, 2017 60 comments

Orange Pi 2G-IoT was unveiled at the start of the year as an ultra cheap ($10) Linux development board with 2G cellular connectivity. The board has just launched for $9.90 + shipping on Aliexpress.

Orange Pi 2G-IoT specifications have changed a little since the initial announced as WiFi is confirmed to be supported:

  • SoC – RDA Micro 8810PL ARM Cortex A5 processor @ up to 1.0 GHz with 2Gbit (256 MB) on-chip LPDDR2 RAM, 4Gbit (512 MB) on-chip SLC NAND flash , 256KB L2 cache, Vivante GC860 3D GPU, and GSM/GPRS/EDGE Modem (Download datasheet)
  • External Storage – micro SD slot
  • Display I/F – LCD connector up to qHD resolution
  • Video – Decoding up to 1080p30, encoding up to 1080p30 H.264
  • Audio I/F – 3.5mm audio +FM jack, built-in microphone?
  • Connectivity – WiFi 802.11 b/g/n + Bluetooth 2.1/EDR module (RDA5991), and 2G GSM/GPRS/EDGE module with SIM card slot
  • Camera – MIPI CSI-2 connector for camera sensor up to 2MP
  • USB – 1x USB host port, 1x micro USB OTG port
  • Expansion – 40-pin GPIO header with SPI, I2C, GPIOs, etc…
  • Debugging – 3x pin UART for serial console
  • Misc – 8 selection jumpers, power button, boot selection header
  • Power Supply – 5V via micro USB port; optional battery
  • Dimensions – 68 x 42 mm
  • Certifications – CE and FCC (if we can believe the markings on the PCB silkscreen)

Linaro showcased Ubuntu on the similar Orange Pi i96 board at Linaro Connect Budapest 2017 last month, but I have not been able to find an image, nor source code yet. Needless to say, beginners better wait before buying this board, as everything is new, and software support is unclear at this stage. You’ll also have to check 2G sunset status in your countries, as some have stopped supporting 2G already, while others plan on keeping 2G networks for many more years.

Thanks to OvCa77 for the tip.

Orange Pi Zero Plus 2 H5 Board Replaces Allwinner H3 by Allwinner H5 for $1 More

March 28th, 2017 20 comments

It’s hard to keep up, but Shenzhen Xunlong has launched another Orange Pi board, as two weeks after introducing Orange Pi Zero Plus 2 development board, the company has now introduced “Orange Pi Zero Plus 2 H5” board, with the exact same specification, except Allwinner H3 quad core Cortex A7 32-bit processor has been replaced by Allwinner H5 quad core Cortex A53 64-bit processor.

Orange Pi Zero Plus 2 H5 board specifications:

  • SoC – Allwinner H5 quad core Cortex A53 processor with 2+4 core Mali-450MP4 GPU
  • System Memory – 512 MB DDR3 SDRAM
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC flash + micro SD card slot
  • Video Output – HDMI port
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n WiFi + Bluetooth 4.0 LE (Ampak AP6212) with u.FL antenna connector and external antenna
  • USB – 1x micro USB OTG port
  • Camera – MIPI CSI port
  • Expansion headers – Unpopulated 26-pin “Raspberry Pi B+” header + 13-pin header with headphone, 2x USB 2.0, TV out, microphone and IR receiver signals
  • Debugging – 3-pin serial console header
  • Misc – 2x LEDs for power and status
  • Power Supply – 5V via micro USB port
  • Dimensions – 48 x 46 mm
  • Weight – 20 grams

Allwinner H5 is pin-to-pin compatible with Allwinner H3, so the PCB is exactly the same. The upgrade brings slightly better CPU performance, as well as – in theory – better GPU performance, but the latter might not be usable right now (in Linux) due to a lack of software support. Power consumption might be a little higher too (TBC).

The company claims support for Android, Ubuntu, Debian, and “Raspbian”, but I can’t double check since their website won’t load (yet again). Armbian will likely have Ubuntu Xenial nightly images with mainline Linux ready soon, like they did for NanoPi NEO 2 and Orange Pi PC 2, and while they are usable for some applications, you should not expect everything to work just yet.

The board costs just $1 more than the H3 version, as it sells for $19.90 + shipping on Aliexpress.