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Meet the First Windows 10 Arm “Always Connected PCs” – HP Envy x2 (2017) and ASUS NovaGo TP370

December 6th, 2017 28 comments

Qualcomm and Microsoft showcased some Snapdragon 835 based Windows 10 “Mobile PCs” at Computex 2017 last June, and while the press was allowed film the demo, the device could only be operated by a Qualcomm employee.

But both companies and their partners have made progress, and at the Snapdragon Technology Summit, Qualcomm announced “Always Connected PCs” which will run Windows 10, be always on and always connected at Gigabit LTE speeds, and support all-day battery life while keeping thin and fanless designs. all while incorporating Windows 10. HP and ASUS unveiled their very own “Always Connected PCs”, respectively Envy X2 and Novago TP370. What I used to call laptop or in this case 2-in-1 hybrid (laptop) is now apparently called “Always Connected PC”, but in any case let’s have a closer look at both devices.

HP Envy x2 (2017)

Specifications:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 Mobile Processor @ 2.6GHz with Adreno 540 GPU @ 710MHz
  • System memory – Up to 8GB RAM
  • Storage – Up to 256GB UFS 2.0 storage, micro SD card reader
  • Display – 12.3″ WUXGA+ (1920 x 1280) touch display
  • Audio – 1x combo audio jack; dual speaker; microphone array with Cortana voice-recognition support
  • Backlit Keyboard and touchpad
  • Connectivity
    • WiFi – 802.11a/b/g/n, 802.11ac
    • Qualcomm Snapdragon X16 modem (Gigabit LTE with DL: 1Gbps, UL: 150Mbps; 4×4 MIMO); 1x SIM card reader
  • Camera – 13MP rear camera and 5MP front camera
  • USB – 1x USB-C port
  • Misc – Volume buttons
  • Battery – Good for up to 20 hours of local video playback, over 700 hours of connected standby
  • Dimensions –  6.9 mm thick
  • Weight – 1.21 kg

ASUS Novago TP370

NovaGo-TP370QL specifications:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 Mobile Processor @ 2.6GHz with Adreno 540 GPU @ 710MHz
  • System memory – 4GB / 6GB / 8GB 1866MHz LPDDR4x (soldered)
  • Storage – 64GB / 128GB / 256GB UFS 2.0 storage, micro SD card slot up to 256 GB
  • Display – 13.3” LED-backlit Full HD (1920x 1080) display
  • Video Output – HDMI
  • Audio – 1x audio jack; dual speaker; smart amplifier; microphone array with Cortana voice-recognition support
  • Backlit keyboard and PTP touchpad
  • Connectivity
    • WiFi – 802.11a/b/g/n, 802.11ac (2×2 MIMO)
    • Qualcomm Snapdragon X16 modem (Gigabit LTE with DL: 1Gbps, UL: 150Mbps; 4×4 MIMO); 1x Combo Nano SIM (tray with needle)
  • Camera – 1280×720 HD camera
  • USB – 2x USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-A ports
  • Sensors – Fingerprint sensor
  • Battery – 52 Wh lithium-polymer battery good for up to 22 hours battery life, over 30 days of modern standby
  • Dimensions – 31.6 x 22.1 x 1.49 cm
  • Weight – 1.39 kg

The 2-in-1 laptop always connected PC will run Windows 10 S by default, but a recommended free upgrade to Windows 10 Pro will be offered. More details may be found on the product page. Windows 10 S only allows the installation of apps in Windows Store, and Microsoft own Edge browser (no Firefox, no Chrome), so most people will likely upgrade to Windows 10 Pro, especially if it is free, and this is probably a condition imposed by Microsoft.

ASUS NovaGo is expected to be available early next year, while the HP Envy x2 is planned for Spring 2018. I could not find pricing on the official page, but Liliputing reports an “entry-level model with 4GB of RAM and 64GB of storage should sell for about $599, while an 8GB/256GB model will run $799”.

You’ll find various hands-on video for the Envy x2 (2017) model online, including the one from Engadget embedded below.

HP Chromebook 13 G1 Features Skylake Pentium or Core M Processor, 4 to 16GB RAM, and a 3200×1800 Display for $499 and Up

April 29th, 2016 No comments

HP Chromebook 13 G1 is the middle ground between Google’s $1000 Chromebook Pixel and the cheap Rockchip RK3288 chromebooks, thanks to a choice of low power Skylake Core M processor,  plenty of memory, and for people who loathe 1366×768, or even 1920×1080 displays, a 13.3″ display with 3200×1800 resolution.

HP_Chromebook_13_G1HP Chromebook 13 G1 specifications:

  • SoC (four options)
    • Intel Pentium 4405Y dual core / quad thread processor @ 1.5 GHz with Intel HD Graphics 515 GPU @ 300/800 MHz (TDP: 6W)
    • Intel Core m3-6Y30 dual core / quad thread processor @ 900 / 2.2 GHz with Intel HD Graphics 515 GPU @ 300/850 MHz (TDP: 4.5W)
    • Intel Core m5-6Y57  dual core / quad thread processor @ 1.1 / 2.8 GHz with Intel HD Graphics 515 GPU @ 300/900 MHz (TDP: 4.5W)
    • Intel Core m7-6Y75 dual core / quad thread processor @ 1.2 / 3.1 GHz with Intel HD Graphics 515 GPU @ 300MHz/ 1 GHz (TDP: 4.5W)
  • System Memory – 4 GB (Pentium and Core m3), 8GB (Core m5), or 16GB (Core m7) LPDDR3
  • Storage – 32 GB internal storage + micro SD slot
  • Display – 13.3″ IPS screen with 3200×1800 resolution (non-touch)
  • Connectivity –
  • Camera – Front camera
  • Audio – Line out, speakers, and microphone
  • USB – 2x USB type-C ports for power, data, and display, 1x USB 2.0 port
  • Integrated keyboard
  • Battery –  45 or 67 Whr Li-ion Polymer battery good for 11.5 hours based on power LoadTest
  • Dimensions – Approx. 32 x 23 x 1.3 cm (aluminum lid and palmrest)
  • Weight – 1.22 kg

A few Chromebook 13 G1 has been sent to popular US blogs such as Arstechnica, who quickly checked out the Core m3 versions, and were rather positive about the device, although noting it’s targeting business and enterprise users.

Chromebook_13_G1_USB-C_Audio

All four models can be ordered on Promevo, with the Pentium, Core m3, Core m5, and Core m7 selling respectively for $499, $599, $819, and $1029. HP Chromebook 13 G1 is also listed on Google.com, where they mention a $50 management fee for the first year.

Linaro Connect Hong Kong 2015 Schedule and Demos

January 27th, 2015 2 comments

Linaro Connect Hong Kong 2015 will take place on February 9 – 13,2015 in Hong Kong, and the organization has released the schedule for the five days events with keynotes, sessions, and demos.

Linaro_Connect_Hong_Kong_2015Each day will start with the keynote including speakers such as:

  • George Grey, Linaro CEO, who will welcome attendees to Linaro Connect, and provide an update on the latest Linaro developments
  • Jon Masters, Chief ARM Architect, Redhat, who will present Red Hat update and latest ARMv8-A demonstrations
  • Dejan Milojicic, Senior Researcher & Manager, HP Labs
  • Bob Monkman, Enterprise Segment Marketing Manager, ARM, will discuss about  the impact of ARM in next generation cloud and communication network infrastructure
  • Greg Kroah-Hartman, Linux Foundation Fellow, will introduce the Greybus Project (Linux for Project Ara modular phones)
  • Warren Rehman,  Android Partner Engineering Manager, Google

The agenda also features sessions covering Android, ARMv8-A, Automation & Validation, Digital Home, Enterprise Servers, LAVA, Linux Kernel, Networking, Power Management, Security, Toolchain, Virtualization and multiple training sessions. I’ve gone through the full schedule to make my own virtual list of sessions.

Monday 9th

  • 14:00 – 14:50 – maddog: ARMv8 Optimization (No abstract)
  • 15:00 – 15:50 – ACPI Power Management on ARM64 Servers (No abstract)
  • 16:10 – 17:00 – Standardizing Linux Kernel Power Management on ARM 32/64-bit

The 32-bit ARM kernel supports a wide variety of processors harking back to ARM v4 architecture up to the latest v7 SMP processors. This huge legacy forced kernel developers to adapt the power management code for the newest processors (eg v7 multi-cluster systems) to an infrastructure that was developed to support simpler uniprocessor (UP) ARM architectures, resulting in code fragmentation and lack of unified drivers.

The brand new ARMv8 architecture provides kernel developers a clean slate to start developing new code, a nice opportunity to learn lessons from the past and bring about a kernel power management (PM) subsystem completely generic and up to the latest standards. This talk will provide details of the undergoing effort carried out at ARM to develop a kernel PM framework for ARM v8 systems, with kernel design details of the respective DT and ACPI implementations.

Tuesday 10th

  • 10:10 – 11:00 – UMEQ (User Mode Emulation Quest)

UMEQ (user-mode emulation quest) and has been developed to eliminate the functional deficiencies of qemu in user mode (multi-threaded applications, signal handling, etc). Umeq primarily targets ARM 64-bit. The presentation will focus on the architecture principles of umeq and on its implementation.

  • 11:15 – 12:05 – Solving the year 2038 problem in Linux

The concept of ‘time’ in Linux is encoded in many different ways, but the most common one is based on the ‘time_t’ type that counts the number of seconds that have passed since Jan 1, 1970. This type is currently defined as ‘long’, which on 32-bit systems is a signed 32-bit number that will overflow on Jan 19 2038 and likely cause all systems existing today to stop working.

In our presentation, we give an introduction to range of problems that we see across user space and kernel, and we talk about the work that we are doing to address some of these issues.

  • 12:10 – 13:00 – Browser Testing Framework for LHG

The purpose of this talk is to provide the audience with an introduction to the testing framework used in Web browser performance testing as implemented by LHG (Linaro Home Group). The browser test suite is used to compare browser performance and compliance by using a series of benchmarks in key test categories. Sample browser results for both Android and RDK will be presented.

  • 14:00 – 14:50 – Training 1 – FOSS
  • 15:00 – 15:50 – Training 2 – Upstreaming 101
  • 16:10 – 17:00 – Training 3 – Upstreaming 200

Wednesday 11th

  • 10:10 – 11:00 – Art’s Quick Compiler: An unofficial overview

One of the important technical novelties introduced with the recent release of Android Lollipop is the replacement of Dalvik, the VM which was used to execute the bytecode produced from Java apps, with ART, a new Android Run-Time. One interesting aspect in this upgrade is that the use of Just-In-Time compilation was abandoned in favour of Ahead-Of-Time compilation. This delivers better performance, also leaving a good margin for future improvements. ART was designed to support multiple compilers. The compiler that shipped with Android Lollipop is called the “Quick Compiler”. This is simple, fast, and is derived from Dalvik’s JIT compiler. In 2014 our team at ARM worked in collaboration with Google to extend ART and its Quick Compiler to add support for 64-bit and for the A64 instruction set. These efforts culminated with the recent release of the Nexus 9 tablet, the first 64-bit Android product to hit the market. Despite Google’s intention of replacing the Quick Compiler with the so-called “Optimizing Compiler”, the job for the the Quick Compiler is not yet over. Indeed, the Quick Compiler will remain the only usable compiler in Android Lollipop. Therefore, all competing parties in the Android ecosystem have a huge interest in investigating and improving this component, which will very likely be one of the battlegrounds in the Android benchmark wars of 2015. This talk aims to give an unofficial overview of ART’s Quick compiler. It will first focus on the internal organisation of the compiler, adopting the point of view of a developer who is interested in understanding its limitations and strengths. The talk will then move to exploring the output produced by the compiler, discussing possible strategies for improving the generated code, while keeping in mind that this component may have a limited life-span, and that any long-term work would be better directed towards the Optimizing Compiler.

  • 11:15 – 12:05 – Secure Media using DMA-buf

Secure data path for media streams involve lots of differents software and hardware elements and is very complexe. The goal of this talk is to expose an hardware independent proposition using open-TEE and dmabuf. Feedback from all SoC experts is more than welcome.

  • 12:10 –  13:00 – OP-TEE for Beginners and Porting Review

Explains the building blocks involved in Security including TrustZone, OP-TEE, Trusted Firmware etc. Goes into detail on how Secure Boot Works.. and Why. Explains how a simple secure Trusted Application interacts with OP-TEE and works. Brief overview on how to port OP-TEE to an ARM platform. Opens discussions for Potential Challenges and Hardware limitations and how they can be overcome.

  • 14:00 – 18:00 – Hacking sessions or training (no description provided)

Thursday 12th

  • 10:10 – 11:00 – Chromium Blink on Wayland with HW accelerated video playback using Gstreamer

Linaro and STM implemented an integration layer between Chromium and Wayland/Gstreamer. The solution allows HW accelerated video playback, high performance GPU accelerated HTML5 rendering. The approach uses hole punching mechanism to compose the UI layer on the top of the video content. The Gstreamer Chromium plugin is implemented trough the Pepper API. The presentation will provide implementation details on the Wayland/Chromium/Gstreamer integration.

  • 11:15 – 12:05 – EME implementation in Chromium: Linaro Clear Key

An example of a key system from a Clear Key point of view. Linaro implemented a sample CDM plugin for Chromium capable to exercise the EME implementation of the browser. The presentation gives an insight to the EME/CDM implementation in Chromium and the guidelines to integrating various DRM systems. We will present call flows with example classes, experiences learned, and example of things to watch out for.

  • 12:10 – 13:00 – ARM v8-A NEON optimization

With FFT optimization as an example, the following topics are discussed:

  1. Performance boost using ARM v8-A NEON
  2. NEON-optimization workflow for Ne10
  3. Some tips with example of Ne10 FFT and Android libraries
  4. Performance comparison between assembly and intrinsic
  • 14:00 – 18:00 – Hacking sessions or training (no description provided)

Friday 13th

  •  10:10 – 11:00 – Toolchain Performance Analysis and Investigations

This session will present a workflow of analyzing application or benchmark performance and ways investigate how performance can be increased by improving the toolchain. The session will cover use of profiling tools, reading of compiler optimization dumps, reducing optimization problems using compiler debug counters, and submitting optimization request/bug report to compiler developers

  • 11:15 – 12:05 – Power Management interactions with OP-TEE and Trusted Firmware

Understand what use cases related to Power Management have to interact with Trusted Firmware via Secure calls. Walk through some key use cases like CPU Suspend and explain how PM Linux drivers interacts with Trusted Firmware / PSCI (Power State Coordination Interface).

That’s it for the schedule, I find there are a lot of sessions about security, mainly OP-TEE, so this should become something important.

Linaro 2015 Demos

Beside keynotes, sessions, and training, there will be several demos during the event including:

  • Linaro Clear Key CDM
  • Chromium on Wayland with Gstreamer
  • Linaro Web Browser Test Framework
  • Demo of VLANd
  • l2fwd (See code on github)
  • OVS – x86 – ARM
  • ODP on Cavium platform
  • OpenJDK running on ARMv8 hardware
  • OpenStack running on ARMv8 hardware
  • Android support for clang 3.6 and gcc 5.0
  • Ceph on remote server cluster
  • UEFI on BeagleBone Black

If you want to attend Linaro Connect HK 2015, you can register online for £941.50 (~$1420 US). Live and recorded sessions should also be available for free via Linaro OnAir YouTube account.

HP SlateBook 14 Android Laptop Features a 14″ Display, a Quad Core Tegra SoC

April 28th, 2014 5 comments

Most Android laptops on the market come with tiny 7″ to 11.6″ screens, and those with larger displays (e.g. 13.3″) are often crippled with a subpar processor. Hewlett Packard is about to change that thanks to the SlateBook 14, an Android laptop with a 14″ touchscreen display, and a quad core Tegra SoC which could either be Tegra 4 or Tegra K1.

HP_SlateBook_14The product has not been launched officially, but NetbookItalia found about it via a promo video (embedded below), and we don’t know the full specs just yet:

  • SoC- Nvidia Tegra quad core Cortex A15 (Tegra 4 or Tegra K1)
  • System Memory – 2GB RAM
  • Storage – 16GB flash + micro SD card slot
  • Display – 14″ touchscreen display, 1080p resolution
  • Video Output – HDMI
  • Audio – 3.5mm audio jack, beat audio stereo speakers
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/n/g Wi-Fi and Bluetooth
  • USB – 3x USB host ports

HP laptop will run Android 4.2.2, and come with Google Play. That’s about all we know at this stage. Pricing and availability are both unknown.

Via Liliputing

webOS Community Edition Release for HP TouchPad

July 1st, 2012 No comments

Open webOS 1.0 is planned to be released in September 2012, but in the meantime, the development team has released an intermediate webOS “Community Edition” for the HP TouchPad.

This code is different from the Open webOS project, and is composed of additional components from the current release of webOS for the TouchPad.

The open webOS project team has been working with WebOS Internals to bring this release out for legacy TouchPad devices. Thanks to the release of the webOS Community Edition, it is now possible to learn how the TouchPad works, modify your TouchPad experience and then apply that to Open webOS 1.0 once it is released.

The Community Edition only supports HP TouchPad, whereas Open webOS 1.0 release will enable the community to port webOS to different hardware platform, and add more features by using open source stacks such as BlueZ bluetooth and GStreamer.

You’ll need to download 2 packages to work with WebOS CE:

  • CE-build-support.tgz – A tarball that contains staged headers (and some binary libraries) that are needed to build the Community Edition of the webOS SysMgr (luna-sysmgr).
  • webOS-WOCE.tgz – A tarball that contains source code files that are used to build the Community Edition of the webOS SysMgr (luna-sysmgr).

webOS WOCE is also available at https://github.com/woce/LunaSysMgr, and CE-build-support at https://github.com/woce/build-support. There is also a third repository on woce github called woce-build with some files requires to build woce.

webOS CE build is only officially supported on Ubuntu 12.04 (32- and 64-bit) and build instructions are available on webOS-ports Wiki.
open webOS team also discussed about the progress of Enyo cross-platform JavaScript framework, and listed some exhibitions in the US and Spain that will attend in July. For more details, you can visit open webOS blog.

Android Kernel Source Released for HP TouchPad

February 10th, 2012 No comments

The CyanogenMod team has been working on an Android port for the HP TouchPad for a while, and although good progress has been made, the firmware is still considered alpha due to issues with hardware and driver support. There are 2 versions: CM 7 (Alpha) with Android 2.3 and CM 9 (Alpha) with Android 4.0. The CM7 version is more complete and stable than CM9.

The Android port might be sped-up as following pressure from the developer community, Hewlett Packard has released the Android kernel source and some other GPL packages modified for the HP TouchPad. Apparently, HP used those for factory testing.

The source code is available on github at https://github.com/dalingrin/hp-kernel-tenderloin/tree/hp-topaz-android

“green” user at rootzwiki built the kernel binary which is available at  http://crimea.edu/~green/TP/oss-db910-QC1065-Kernel.tar.bz2

They also have the source code for:

Apparently all components needed are available, except the wifi driver (Atheros AR6003), which HP may also release a bit later as it might also be covered by the GPL license.

HP Releases Open WebOS 1.0 Roadmap and Enyo 2.0 Source Code

January 26th, 2012 No comments

HP announced further details on webOS including a roadmap & its license and released Enyo 2.0 source code. The webOS code will be made available under the Apache License, Version 2.0, beginning with the source code for Enyo. Enyo is a Javascript development platform allowing developers to write applications that works across mobile devices and desktop web browsers, from the webOS, iOS and Android platforms to the Internet Explorer and Firefox browsers.

webOS roadmap

Here’s webOS roadmap until September 2012:

  • January – Enyo 2.0 and Enyo source code released under Apache License, Version 2.0
  • February – Intended project governance model, QT WebKit extensions, JavaScript core and UI Enyo widgets
  • March – Linux standard kernel, Graphics extensions EGL, LevelDB and USB extensions
  • April – Release of Ares 2.0, Enyo 2.1 and Node services
  • July – System manager (“Luna”), System manager bus, Core applications and Enyo 2.2
  • August – Build release model and Open webOS Beta
  • September – Open webOS 1.0 Release

Enyo 2.0 and Enyo source code

Enyo 1.0 is a Javascript application development framework used in WebOS 3.0. With version 2.0, HP extends the reach of applications developed under this framework to other operating systems (e.g. Android, iOS..) and web browsers (e.g.Firefox, Internet explorer..).

The source code for Enyo 1.0 and 2.0 is available today, but Enyo 2.0 is still work in progress as it does not yet include any UI widgets. I assume UI widgets support will be released in April with Enyo 2.1.

You can download Enyo platform and source code on EnyoJs website. The website also has samples, documentation about Enyo 1.0 and Enyo 2.0 as well as a forum for developers.

To follow updates about webOS Open Source and related tools visit webOS Developer Blog.

Categories: Linux Tags: foss, hewlett packard, hp, open source, webos

Android 2.3.7 (Alpha) for HP TouchPad Has Been Released

October 14th, 2011 No comments

CyanogenMod team has just released the CyanogenMod 7.1 port for the HCM 7.1 LogoP TouchPad. This is an initial alpha release, so there are still plenty of bugs and a few non-working features, but overall it should be in a state that you can at least play around with Android on your TouchPad.

For this release they used a new experimental installer called the Alpha CyanogenMod Experimental Installer (ACMEInstaller). This installer will reorganize partitions on the flash (resize the WebOS media volume to make room for Android).ACMEInstaller will be used to install ClockworkMod Recovery, CyanogenMod 7.1 and the new Moboot bootloader.

After installation you’ll be able to boot WebOS or Android (dual-boot).

The firmware currently support the following features:

  • GPU acceleration
  • 1080p video playback
  • Wifi(with caveats)
  • Bluetooth(no headset profile)
  • Touchstone dock support
  • Audio

As it is alpha, there are also plenty of known issues including:

  • Higher than normal battery drain, ~2%/hr while suspended
  • Only partially-working camera
  • Need to change the wifi sleep policy to “never sleep” in wifi settings
  • Some app compatibility issues
  • And many more other issues.

Developer can download the kernel source at http://github.com/cyanogenmod and  submit patches for review at http://review.cyanogenmod.com. The rest of the device source will be released as soon as some changes to support the MSM8660 architecture can be merged into mainline CyanogenMod 7.

Visit http://kan.gd/17fw for further information.