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Posts Tagged ‘allwinner’

Allwinner’s New Media Codec Library (CedarX) May Infringe on Open Source Licenses and Copyrights

February 26th, 2015 3 comments

Allwinner has had to good idea to open allwinner-zh github account last September in order to release source code, binary libraries, and documentation for these ARM processors. Yesterday, the company released a new version of their closed source CedarX library used to decode and encode video streams. But Luc Verhaegen (libv), known for his reverse-engineering work on ARM Mali-400 (lima driver) and now Mali-Txxx GPU (Tamil driver), analyzed the binary and claimed  the library is not compliant with LGPL licenses, and may also infringe on On2 copyrights.

Allwinner_GPL_LGPLLuc wrote his concerns on sunxi-linux mailing list, and Allwinner promised to look into it.

Two libraries are involved:

  • ffmpeg which includes both LGPL and GPL licenses, but the contention seems to be about the LGPL part, since only optional features are GPL’ed in ffmpeg. It’s perfectly fine to include LGPL libraries into your binaries, as long as you don’t modify the open source libraries, but if you do, the source code modifications must be released under an LGPL license.
  • libvp62 an open source implementation of On2 VP6 codec released in 2006 that was taken down due to copyright infringements since it was allegedly “anti-compiled from Java”

I can imagine the timeline for the latter happened that way:

  1. Management to customer: “OK, we’ll get you a VP6 demo next week”
  2. Management to engineering team: “I need VP6 for next week to show to our most important customer”
  3. Engineering team: Open jaw first, then look for code on Baidu, and find it on pudn (Sight of relief)
  4. VP6 demo is implemented and successfully demo’ed to customer
  5. Management, customer and engineers are all happy! Mission accomplished.

On2 is now owned by Google, so Allwinner could have a problem or two if the copyright infringement is confirmed, and Google takes action. Luckily VP6 video decoding is also supported by ffmpeg, so they may be able to sort this out.

It’s also interesting to read the full thread on sunxi-linux mailing, as people explains what kind of issues they had with closed source project, including a canceled project using Allwinner A20, and potential security issues.

Via Phoronix

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Linux 3.19 Release – Main Changes, ARM and MIPS Architectures

February 9th, 2015 4 comments

Linus Torvalds released Linux Kernel 3.19 yesterday:

So nothing all that exciting happened, and while I was tempted a couple of times to do an rc8, there really wasn’t any reason for it.

Just as an example, Sasha Levin used KASan and found an interesting bug in paravirtualized spinlocks, but realistically it’s been around forever, and it’s not even clear that it can really ever trigger in practice. We’ll get it fixed, and mark it for stable, and tempting as it was, it wasn’t really a reason to delay 3.19.

And the actual fixes that went in (see appended shortlog) were all fairly small, with the exception of some medium-sized infiniband changes that were all reverting code that just wasn’t ready.

So it’s out there – go and get it. And as a result, the merge window for 3.20 is obviously also now open.

Linus

Linux 3.18 improved performance of the network stack, received BTRFS and EXT-4 file systems improvements, introduced overlayfs for live CDs, and more.

Some changes made to Linux 3.19 include:

  • Btrfs: support scrubbing and fast device replacement in RAID 5&6Btrfs  – Added support for fast & live device replacement (see btrfs-replace), much faster and efficient than adding the new device and removing the old one in separated commands. This feature could not fast-replace devices from file systems using RAID 5 & 6, this release has removed that limitation. Support for the process of scrubbing a btrfs filesystem (with btrfs-scrub) has also been added for RAID 5&6 file systems.
  • Support for Intel Memory Protection Extensions – Intel’s Memory Protection Extension (MPX) is a set of CPU instructions which brings increased robustness to software by checking pointer references usurped maliciously at runtime by buffer overflows. This Linux release adds support in the Linux kernel, although CPUs with MPX support are not sold yet (To be introduced with Intel Skylake and Goldmont microarchitectures). LWN article: Supporting Intel MPX in Linux
  • SquashFS adds LZ4 Compression Support
  • Work on year 2038 bug – do_settimeofday(), timekeeping_inject_sleeptime(), and mktime() now have 2038-safe replacements
  • The networking layer has a new subsystem for offloading switching and routing duties to suitably capable hardware
  • Audio – Intel Baytrail-based audio devices, Samsung Exynos7 I2S controllers, NXP Semiconductors TFA9879 amplifiers, and Texas Instruments TS3A227E headset chips.

Some of the new features and improvements specific to the ARM architecture include:

  • Allwinner:
    • Simple Framebuffer and USB phy driver support for usb0  for Allwinner A10 / A10s / A13 / A20 / A31 / A23
    • NAND Flash driver for Allwinner A10 & A20
    • DMAengine driver for Allwinner A23 (Shared with A31)
    • Allwinner A80 – initial machine support, basic clocks and reset, pinctrl driver, extra UART, I2C, LEDS
    • New boards: Mele M3, LeMaker Banana Pi, Merrii A80 Optimus Board, Olimex A20-OLinuXino-Lime2
  • Rockchip
    • RK3288 – Basic SMP support
    • Device tree for MarsBoard RK3066
    • Added support for rk3066-tsadc variantof rockchip_saradc
    • Add support for the mmc clock phases using the framework
  • Amlogic
    • Added DTSI for Meson8 SoCs
    • Driver for Meson IR remote control
    • Support for Meson SPIFC
  • Mediatek
    • Basic support for MT6592, MT8127 and MT8135
    • DTS for 8127 Moose board, MT8125 evaluation board, and MT6592-EVB
  • ARM64
    • Added Device tree for Juno and AMD Seattle platform
    • Added framework for legacy instruction emulation, secomp suport, SMBIOS/DMI support, etc…
  • Atmel AT91 architecture has gotten rid of board files, and is now fully converted to device tree
  • Other new device tree files: Altera Arria10 SoC, Synology DS213j/DS414, Braodcom BCM5301X devices (Asus RT-N18U, Buffalo WZR-1750DHP, Buffalo WZR-600DHP2, Netgear R6300 V2 ), DLink DIR665, Raspberry Pi model B+, Freescale LS1021A, TBS2910 Matrix ARM mini PC, NHK15 board (nomadik)

Some changes have been listed for MIPS architecture too:

  • BMIPS: Add PRId for BMIPS5200 (Whirlwind)
  • Enable VDSO randomization
  • Loongson-3 –  Add PHYS48_TO_HT40 support, Add RS780/SBX00 HPET support, Add oprofile support
  • Loongson1B – Add a clockevent/clocksource using PWM Timer
  • Loongson –  Allow booting from any core
  • Support for hybrid FPRs
  • ath25 – Add basic AR2315 SoC support, add AR2315 PCI host controller driver, add basic AR5312 SoC support
  • bcm3384 – Initial commit of bcm3384 platform support
  • ralink – add mt7628an support, add rt2880 pci driver, add support for MT7620n

A more detailed changelog for Linux 3.19 will soon be available on Kernelnewbies.org. You can also checkout ARM architecture and drivers sections for more details about changes related to ARM, MIPS and other platforms.

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Snappy Ubuntu Core is an IoT Linux Distribution for ARM and x86

January 21st, 2015 14 comments

Canonical has announced a version of Ubuntu specifically designed for IoT devices running Linux, with a low hardware requirements, and a new package manager called snappy, replacing apt-get for this version of Ubuntu, which provides simpler, faster, and more reliable updates, stronger security, and allows roll-backs in case something goes wrong. Easy firmware updates are something missing in most connected device, which means they are more vulnerable to potential hackers, but with snappy security updates should be able to make it regularly, so that if something like heartbleed occurs again, you know your router, home automation gateway, connected washing machine, or robot will be soon patched automatically.

Snappy Ubuntu Core Logo

Snappy Ubuntu Core Logo

Let’s go through the hardware requirements first:

  • Processor – 600 MHz processor (ARMv7 or greater, or x86)
  • System Memory – 128 MB RAM or greater (The system itself uses 40 MB RAM)
  • Storage – 4GB flash / storage for factory reset and system rollback

So the hardware requirements are not quite as low as something as OpenWRT, but still lower than what you’d expect from Ubuntu, so you could use an old laptop or PC as a development platform, and Canonical also recommends BeagleBone Black or ODROID-C1 ARM based development boards. The Raspberry Pi board won’t work with Snappy, because Broadcom BCM2835 processor is using an older architecture (ARMv6) not supported by Ubuntu.

Snappy Architecture

Snappy Architecture

Twenty one companies and organization have partnered with Canonical on Snappy Ubuntu Core:

  • Home automation – Ninjablocks (Ninjasphere), Openhab (smarthub framework), Trasibot
  • Robotic – OSRF – ROS robots, , Erle Robotics with Erle-Copter
  • Development Boards – Hardkernel ODROID-C1, Beagleboarg community’s Beaglebone Black, Lemaker (Banana Pro), Udoo, LinkSprite (PCDuino), and Parallella
  • Silicon Vendors – Allwinner
  • IoT frameworks – Kaa, DeviceHive, IoTSys, Resin.io, OpenSensors.io
  • Misc- Riot-OS, Nwave, Fairwaves,  Docker with Weave

As mentioned in the introduction, apt-get is no where to be found in Snappy, as the distribution is using snappy instead, but the command line options remain familiar in some aspects:

$ sudo snappy install docker
docker      4 MB    [=====================================================]   OK
Part          Tag         Installed        Available        Fingerprint       Active
docker        edge        1.3.2.004        -                788b0787b18b1c    *

with various new/different options like info, search, versions and more:

$ snappy versions -a
PART               TAG      INSTALLED           AVAILABLE   FINGERPRINT   ACTIVE
ubuntu-core        edge     14.11.1-20141130    -           4e8c32456ab10
ubuntu-core        edge     14.12.1-20141201    -           7611de9a73923 *
docker             edge     1.1.21              -           34b32c359a08e *
hello-world        edge     1.0                 -           27e98ab23492c *

You can see in the list above two version of ubuntu-core, with one ACTIVE and the previous available for roll-back with the command:

$ sudo snappy rollback ubuntu-core
rolling back ubuntu-core -> (edge 14.11.1-20141130 8337ce7b64821)
Reboot to use the new ubuntu-core.

You can find more example in Ubuntu Developer’s snappy page, and find out snappy can also be used to build software packages from source.

There’s also a work-in-progress web interface called WebDM (Web Device Manager) used to configure the device and install packages. It can be installed with sudo snappy install webdm, but Canonical warns it should not be enabled in production devices for now, as access control is not implemented yet.

WebDM

WebDM

If you want to try it, you don’t even need extra hardware, as a Snappy Ubuntu Core instances can be launched from Azure, GCE or Amazon EC2  cloud services, or run in a Virtual Machine with KVM, OVA (VMWare, VirtualBox,…) or Vagrant. All you have to do is follow the instructions provided here. Complete instructions and a preview image are also available for the BeagleBone Black. There does not seem to be pre-built images yet for the other ARM boards mentioned in this article.

Via LinuxGizmos

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So This is How Allwinner A80 Cheats at Antutu Benchmark…

January 11th, 2015 9 comments

Ever since Allwinner A80 was released, the Antutu scores did not add up with some devices getting around 30,000 points, while other devices scoring close to 50,000 or even higher. But what about 143,430 points? Now that would be impressive, and that’s exactly what Byron got in his Tronsmart Draco AW80 box, after changing a single parameter.

Draco_AW80_Antutu_Score

Draco AW80 Antutu Score (Click to Enlarge)

The screenshot above reports a Nexus 10 because he must be using one of Freatab ROM, where they often change the device name for better Google Play compatibility. Nevertheless what kind of sorcery is that? How could he achieve this?

It turns out build.prop, as a key called ro.sys.hiritsu. It’s set to 30 in the stock firmware, but if you change this to 95, some magic happens, and you get the very high score above. Byron reported his box got pretty hot with this setting, so it’s probably better not to try a high value… Hiritsu (ひりつ) is a Japanese word meaning “ratio, proportion, percentage”, and in this case It looks like it just set the Antutu cheating ratio… Manufacturers may decide to adjust it just a bit to show a very good score, but not too high or it’d look suspicious.

What happens if you remove ro.sys.hiritsu from build.prop? Freaktab member fess tried it, and the score falls down to 36,185, which should be closer to reality, and similar to the score (36,903) I got using Antutu X. Another member try to adjust the setting to 30 and 35 and run both Antutu and GFXBench. Antutu score goes up from one setting to the other, but GFXBench stays put at 476. GFXBench is a graphics intensive score, and maybe a CPU intensive benchmark, might have a slightly higher score, but certainly in the order of magnitude shown in Antutu.

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AllWinner A64 is a $5 Quad Core 64-bit ARM Cortex A53 SoC for Tablets

January 8th, 2015 8 comments

Allwinner already announced H64 octa-core Cortex A53 processor for OTT boxes together with Nobel64 development board in the last quarter of last year, and the Chinese silicon manufacturer has now introduced Allwinner A64 quad core Cortex A53 processor for entry-level tablets, as the processor will only cost $5 per unit in large quantities.

Allwinner_A64As usual, Allwinner only provided a subset of information for their first announcement, and some technical details like the GPU are unknown.

Key features listed for Allwinner A64:

  • 64-bit Cortex-A53 architecture
  • Supports H.265/H.264 video decoding in hardware, and supports HDMI 4K display
  • Supports various DDR memory types, making the BOM cost more competitive
  • Supports eMMC 5.0 for better IO performance and enhanced data throughput capacity
  • Allwinner SmartColor display technology for more vivid and eye-pleasing visual experience
  • Supports Trusted Firmware security architecture from ARM

The company is finally moving to a device tree enabled kernel with Linux 3.10, and Allwinner 64-bit ARM tablets will also run Android 5.0 Lollipop. Hopefully, this processor implements proper H.265 hardware decoding, not GPU accelerated decoding as in Allwinner A80 processor. Interestingly neither Allwinner A64, nor Rockchip RK3368 announced recently, support VP9, despite it being the codec of choice for YouTube 2160p content.

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Easily Create an Android Bootable SD Card for Allwinner A80 Devices with PhoenixCard Tool

January 6th, 2015 1 comment

We’ve already seen how it was possible to boot Linux or Android on Rockchip RK3288 devices from an SD card, which involved getting the stock firmware and running some scripts in Linux. Today, Freaktab member no_spam_for_me found out how to create a bootable SD card for Tronsmart Draco AW80 Meta, and other Allwinner A80 devices using PhoenixCard 3.09 tools for Windows (The latest version should be available @ http://dl.cubieboard.org/model/cc-a80/Tools/Flash-firmware-tools/). There may also be a way to use LiveSuit tools for Linux, but this have not been tested.

PhoenixCard_3.09_SD_Card

Once you have installed the tools, start it, and  load the firmware by clicking on “Img File” button (Here Draco AW80 Finless 1.1 firmware was used). Then press DiskCheck to scan for storage devices, and select your SD card in the drop-down menu “disk” (not sure why it’s blank in the screenshot above), select “Startup !” write mode, and click on the “Burn” button.

Once it’s done, just insert the SD card into your Allwinner A80 device, power it your device and it should boot from SD card. The first boot is quite slow, allegedly because the system converts the FAT32 file system to EXT-3, but subsequent boots are relatively fast (one minute or so) depending on the SD card.

Draco_AW80_Meta_32_GB_SD_CardThe screenshot above have been taken in Draco AW80 Meta (with 16GB eMMC) booted from a 32GB SD card.  So booting from SD card is nice to get more storage, and trying out firmware before flashing a new one as it does not affect your current installation. Just make sure you use a fast SD card (Class 10 or greater) or the system may feel very slow.

This method should also work for other Allwinner processors (A31, A20, etc…). It looks like it might only work for Android firmware, and not Linux based distributions like Ubuntu/Lubuntu (TBC).

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3D Graphics Acceleration in Linux on Allwinner A80 based Cubieboard4

January 2nd, 2015 11 comments

Allwinner A80 is a powerful octa-core processor found in development boards and TV boxes such as Cubieboard4 or Tronsmart Draco AW80. Some early Ubuntu images and instructions had already been released for A80 Optimusboard and Draco AW80, but none of these featured GPU drivers for 3D acceleration, which to be honest, has limited advantages in Linux desktop distributions since desktop environments and most apps require full OpenGL support, i.e. not only OpenGL ES, and the only ARM SoC that can provide OpenGL support without external graphics card is Nvidia Tegra K1 SoC. Having said that GPU drivers would pave the way for smooth OpenELEC / Kodi user interface support in Allwinner A80 Linux distributions. That’s only one part of the puzzle, since the GPU normally handles the user interface, while the VPU takes care of video decoding.

Cubieboar4_Linux_GPU_DriversThe good news is that CubieTech release updates images for their Cubieboard4 (CC-A80) development with PowerVR GC6200 GPU support, which you can download on Baidu:

  • linaro-cb4-emmc-vga-v0.3.img.7z is the eMMC flash image with VGA output
  • linaro-cb4-emmc-hdmi-v0.3.img.7z.md5 is the eMMC flash image with HDMI output

The company also provided instructions they followed to create the image, using two files they got from Allwinner rogue_km.tar.gz , and discimage-release-1.4-fix_buffer_ideas_20141216_no_gl.tar.gz, available on Cubieboard server.

The steps below have been completed in an Ubuntu 14.04 computer’s terminal window, and may need some corrections, since I’ve mostly edited them from an email but not tried myself:

  1. Build drivers
    tar -zxpf rogue_km.tar.gz
    cp -rf rogue_km linux-3.4/modules
    cd rogue_km/build/linux/sunxi_linux && make -j4

    The two drivers files dc_drmfbdev.ko and pvrsrvkm.ko can be found in linux-3.4/modules/rogue_km/binary_sunxi_linux_xorg_release/target_armhf directory

  2. Copy drivers to SD card
    You’ll need to download and extract Linaro Ubuntu 14.04 rootfs, and copy the drivers to a bootable sdcard in the rootfs partition

    mkdir -p <path_to_rootfs>/lib/modules/3.4.3/extra
    cp dc_drmfbdev.ko pvrsrvkm.ko <path_to_rootfs>/lib/modules/3.4.39/extra/
    sync 
  3. Copy libraries to rootfs
    sudo tar -zxpf discimage-release-1.4-fix_buffer_ideas_20141216_no_gl.tar.gz
    cd <path_to_rootfs>/usr/local/pvr
    cp -rf etc/ <path_to_rootfs>/
    cp -rfd include share <path_to_rootfs>/usr
    cp -rfd lib/xorg <path_to_rootfs>/usr/lib
    cp -rfd lib/* <path_to_rootfs>/usr/lib/arm-linux-gnueabihf
    cp -rf ssl <path_to_rootfs>/etc
    cp -rf ssl/misc/ <path_to_rootfs>/usr/lib/ssl
    cd discimage/usr/
    cp -rfd lib/* <path_to_rootfs>/usr/lib/arm-linux-gnueabihf
    cp -rf local/bin <path_to_rootfs>/usr/local
    sync
  4. Insert the SD card into Cubieboard4 board, boot, and complete the steps as follows:
    mkdir -pv /usr/local/pvr/lib/dri/
     cd /usr/local/pvr/lib/dri/
    ln -s /usr/lib/arm-linux-gnueabihf/dri/pvr_dri.so
    ln -s /usr/lib/arm-linux-gnueabihcdf/dri/swrast_dri.so
    rm /usr/lib/arm-linux-gnueabihf/mesa-egl -rf
    cd /usr/lib/arm-linux-gnueabihf
    ln -s libGLESv2.so.1.4.3064661 libGLESv2.so.2
    

    Edit  /etc/modules to add the two lines:

    dc_drmfbdev
    pvrsrvkm

    Insert the modules, run depmod, and reboot to complete the installation:

    insmod /lib/modules/3.4.39/extra/dc_drmfbdev.ko
    insmod /lib/modules/3.4.39/extra/
    depmod
    reboot

    Done!

Now you can test 3D graphics acceleration works with glmark2-es2 or es2gears:

sudo apt-get install glmark2-es2
sudo glmark2-es2 

Thanks to Ovidiu for the info.

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Top 10 Posts of 2014 and Stats on CNX Software

December 31st, 2014 15 comments

Wow! After a slow start of the year, 2014 has been a busy year as new devices based on newer processor from Amlogic started to flood the market in Q2, soon followed by even more Rockchip RK3288 based media players, and then some more Amlogic S805 and Allwinner A80 boards and devices. It’s now the last day of the year, so just like in 2013, it’s time to look back on the main trends of the year, and based on the list of the top 10 most visited posts below, the new generation of ARM Android media players were the most important story of the year on CNX Software, but we also saw more IoT devices and board like Vidonn X5 or LinkIT One, lots of new Wi-Fi modules, and by the end of the year ESP8266 seemed to have won that fight, but being found in $3 Wi-Fi modules. Low cost Intel based mini PCs generated a lot of buzz in the last quarter, although they’ve just started shipping in the last few days.

I’ve compiled the list using data from Google Analytics, filtered posts from 2014, and sorted them by decreasing number of page views. Here are the top 10 posts of 2014:

    1. Review of M8 Android Kitkat TV Box Powered by Amlogic S802 SoC (April 2014) – Shenzhen Tomato M8 was one of the first new generation Android TV boxes available on the market, featuring the new Amlogic S802 quad core Cortex A9 processor with a Mali-450MP6 GPU. Despite stability issues, and poor Wi-Fi performance at with earlier firmware, the device became popular, and is by far the most popular post of 2014, getting three times more pageviews than the post in second position.
    2. Rockchip RK3288 vs RK3188 Performance Comparison (January 2014) – Rockchip RK3188 was the king of 2013 in TV boxes and HDMI TV sticks, so it was natural people were eager to find out more about the performance of its more powerful successor, Rockchip RK3288.
    3. Review of Tronsmart Vega S89 Elite Amlogic S802 TV Box (April 2014) – Tronsmart Vega S89 was another Amlogic S802 Android media player released in April, and my very first review for an Amlogic S802 device, so people certainly wanted to find out more about the performance and video capabilities of the latest Amlogic processor.
    4. How to Upgrade Firmware in Amlogic S802 Devices (April 2014) – With all these Amlogic S802 mini PCs in the market requiring firmware updates, and user friendly working OTA firmware updates a rarity rather than the norm, people had to find out how they could upgrade their device with the latest firmware.
    5. MEEGO-T01 HDMI TV Stick Supports Android, Windows 8.1, and Ubuntu/Linux (October 2014) – By Q4 2014, several low cost Intel Atom Z3735 mini PC started to be announced, and Meego-T01, now better known as MeegoPad T01, got popular as a Windows 8.1 / Android HDMI TV Stick.
    6. ARM Cortex A15/A17 SoCs Comparison – Nvidia Tegra K1 vs Samsung Exynos 5422 vs Rockchip RK3288 vs AllWinner A80 (May 2014) – Several Cortex A15 and A17 based processors have hit the market this year, so I’ve drawn a comparison table with features, interfaces, and interfaces of the most popular ones by Nvidia, Samsung, Rockchip, and Allwinner.
    7. List of Rockchip RK3288 Android TV Boxes So Far (May 2014) – Chinese manufacturers were announcing Rockchip RK3288 devices at a tremendous pace, and many months before Rockchip RK3288 became available, at times announcing their products by showing early PCBA while the enclosure was not finalized. This was all confusing, so I started to make a non-exhaustive list to try to navigate the flood of devices.
    8. M8 Android TV Box Powered by AMLogic S802 (Unboxing) (April 2014) – As people checkout M8 review, the top post of 2014, they also clicked on the unboxing post to checkout pictures and specs of the device.
    9. Raspberry Pi Model A+ Board Features a 40-pin GPIO Connector, a micro SD slot, and Improved Power Management (November 2014) – What happens when you are the first to post a leak of a widely anticipated product? It goes viral. It’s what happens with Raspberry Pi Model A+, as I found a page on Element14 a couple of days before the official release. Posted on November 8, this is the most recent post of this list.
    10. SolidRun HummingBoard is a Raspberry Pi Compatible Board Powered by Freescale i.MX6 (April 2014) – You often read people asking for a more powerful Raspberry Pi, but although the Foundation only released variations of their Broadcom BCM2835 based boards this year with A+ and B+, some R-Pi inspired dual and quad board got released this year with Banana Pi, Orange Pi, and SolidRun HummingBoard.

Several posts from 2013, and even 2012 would have made it to the top 10 list, including my now-somewhat-outdated comparison table of GPU in ARM SoCs, a simplified method to install Rockchip drivers in Windows, a rooting method for WM8800 tablets, or the 84 MB minimal image for the Raspberry Pi.

Let’s now check out some traffic stats for CNX Software blog in 2014.

CNX_Software_Pageviews_2014The year started just like the end of 2013 with traffic around 350,000 pageviews per month, with a slow growth for the first 9 months, but then around mid-October, Google pushed a new search algorithm update, and traffic nearly doubled to 600,000 pageviews in November and December. Google Analytics reports a total of 2,999,462 sessions, 1,757,172 users, and 4,834,676 pageviews for the year, or about a 35% increase in traffic mostly thanks to the last three months.

Nearly 70% of traffic comes from search engines, mainly Google, with the remaining coming from nearly 5,000 other websites. The top 10 search terms clicked (excluding “cnxsoft”, “cnx software” and similar keywords) for the last 3 months listed in Google Webmasters, and referrals for the full year listed in Google Analytics (GA) are shown in the table below. Keywords for the year are listed in GA too, but for the vast majority of request the keywords are “not provided”, which is why I use Google Webmasters data instead.

Top 10 Keywords Top 10 Referrals
m8 android tv box plus.url.google.com
esp8266 scoop.it
meegopad t01 freaktab.com
xtreamer wonder facebook.com
tronsmart draco aw80 reddit.com
rk3288 t.co
meego-t01 raspbian.org
amlogic s812 forum.xbmc.org
amlogic s805 liliputing.com
odroid-c1 4pda.ru

Google Plus, that some “pundits” refers as the “ghost town”, went to the top of referral traffic for the year, barely overtaking scoop.it website curating service. Freaktab and Reddit are new entrants to the referral list. Most keywords are related to Android mini PC articles found the top 10 post, but ESP8266, the ultra low cost Wi-Fi SoC, and ODROID-C1 development board are also part of the list.

Let’s find a bit more about you, my readers / visitors.

CNX_Software_Traffic_2014_Country_CityThe top four countries are still the United States, Germany, the United Kingdom, and France, with the USA and the UK totalling about 22%, just like last year. London still has the top city, with Seoul moving to second position, and moving Moscow down to third.

CNX_Software_Traffic_2014_OS_BrowserWindows is still the most widely use operating systems of CNX visitors, but its market share has gone down from 61.9% to 57.39%. Linux is still in second position, but has gone down from 17.30% to 15.30%, and the rising OS are the mobile OS such as Android and iOS, so we should expect Android to overtake Linux distributions next year, unless something drastic happens. If we add up all Linux based OS (Linux + Android + Chrome OS), Linux market share goes up to 28.55% vs 25.5% last year. Chrome Browser has extended its lead from 43.94% to 48.05%, while Firefox went down to 27.20% from 30.61%, and the others did not change that much. That means despite the rise of Android OS, people are not using the Android Browser that much and prefer to use alternative browsers such as Chromium, Opera, or Firefox.

I’ll conclude this post and 2014 by joining some of this year’s media player, boards, and tools (pictured below) to wish you a very happy, healthy and prosperous new year 2015, which should see the rise of 64-bit ARM platform, an interesting ARM vs Intel mini PCs war, more products finally getting out with alternative OS such as Tizen, Firefos OS, and Ubuntu, as well as low cost IoT products and wearables featuring ESP8266 or Mediatek Aster SoCs.

Happy_New_Year_2015_CNX

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